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Full text of "Annual report"

The Children's Hospital 



BOSTON, MASS. 



1869 



67th ANNUAL REPORT 
1936 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Form of Bequest 

I give, devise, and bequeath to 
The Children's Hospital, in the 
City of Boston, and Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, incorpo- 
rated in the year 1869, the sum 
of 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Boston, Mass. 

1869 

#> 
ANNUAL REPORT 

Part IT 

MEDICAL STATISTICS 

1936 

♦ 

Officers of the Children's Hospital 

1937 

Honorary President 
George P. Gardner 

President 
Samuel H. Wolcott 

Vice-President 
F. Murray Forbes 

Treasurer 
Edward L. Bigelow 

State Street Trust Co., Boston 

Secretary and Counsel for the Corporation 
James Garfield 

of 
Choate, Hall & Stewart 
30 State Street, Boston 

Assistant Secretary 
F. Murray Forbes, Jr. 

Executive Committee 
J. A. Lowell Blake, Chairman Arthur G. Rotch 

Edward L. Bigelow Samuel H. Wolcott 

F. Murray Forbes Mrs. William C. Cox 

Committee on Investments 
Edward L. Bigelow (Ex-Officio) Harvey H. Bundy 

J. A. Lowell Blake Wm. Arthur Dupee 

Samuel H. Wolcott 



Board of Managers 
1937 



George P. Gardner 188.5 

J. A. Lowell Blake 1011 

Alexander Whiteside 1014 

Samuel H. Wolcott (Ex-Officio) 1915 

George von L. Meyer 11)1.5 

F. Murray Forbes (Ex-Officio) 1018 

Mrs. George H. Monks 1021 

Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 1921 

Louis E. Kikstein 1021 

G. Peabody Gardner, Jk 1021 

"William Arthur Dl t pee 1022 

Pliny Jewell 1022 

Henry W. Palmer 1023 

Arthur G. Rotch 1023 

Mrs. H. Parker Whittincton 1027 

Harvey H. Bundy 1027 

Mrs. Sutton Russell 1028 , 

Louis F. S. Bader 1030 

James Garfield (Ex-Officio) 1031 

Gordon Abbott, Jr 1032 

F. Murray Forbes, Jr 1032 

Lawrence Foster 1032 

Edward L. Bigelow (Ex-Officio) 1033 

Miss Ida C. Smith 1033 

Louis A. Shaw 103-1 

Alexander "Wheeler 1034 

Frank D. Comerford 103.5 

Mrs. "William C. Cox (Ex-Officio) 1036 

Mrs. Nelson S. Bartlett 1036 

John C. Kiley 1036 

Lawrence Coolidge 1036 

Samuel H. "Wolcott, Jr 1036 



Medical Officers 



ACTIVE STAFF 



Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D 
William E. Ladd, M.D. 
Frank R.'Ober, M.D. . 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. 
Hallowell Davis, M.D. 
Reid Hunt, M.D. 
Hans Zinsser, M.D. 



Chief Medical Service 
Chief Surgical Service 
Chief Orthopedic Service 
Chief Pathological Service 
Vis iting Physiologist 
Visit ing Phar m acologist 
Visiting Bacteriologist 



CONSULTING STAFF 



Fred R. Blumenthal, D.M.D. 
J. Lewis Bremer, M.D. 
F. B. Mallory, M.D. 



Charles G. Mixter, M.D. 
John L. Morse, M.D. 
Robert B. Osgood, M.D. 



L. M. S. Miner, M.D. 



ASSOCIATE STAFF 
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Visiting Physicians 



Bronson Crothers, M.D. 
James L. Gamble, M.D. 
Charles F. McKhann, M.D. 



Richard M. Smith, M.D. 
James L. Wilson, M.D. 
Edwin T. Wyman. M.D. 



Associate Visiting Physicians 



Allan M. Butler, M.D. 
Randolph K. Byers, M.D. 
Benjamin W. Carey, Jr. M.D. 
Louis K. Diamond, M.D. 
R. Cannon Eley, M.D. 
LeRoy D. Fothergill, M.D. 



Paul W. Emerson, M.D. 
Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 
Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 
Philip H. Sylvester, M.D. 



Associate Physicians 



Stewapt H. Clifford, M.D. 

Henry E. Gallup, M.D. 

Stanton Garfield, M.D. 

Nathan Gorin, M.D. 
*Hyman Green, M.D. 
*Gerald N. Hoeffel, M.D. 

Eliot Hubbard, Jr., M.D. 



Wilfred L. McKenzie, M.D. 
Dorothea M. Moore, M.D. 
David W. Sherwood, M.D. 
Abraham S. Small, M.D. 
Clement A. Smith, M.D. 
Harvey Spencer, M.D. 
"Sidney H. Weiner, M.D. 



Assistant Physicians 



John A. V. Da vies, M.D. 
Mark I. Makler, M.D. 
Rose C Munro, M.D. 



Henry N. Pratt, M.D. 
William J. Turtle, M.D. 
Lendon Snedeker, M.D. 



Lucille Williamson, M.D. 



"Special Clinics 



MEDICAL OFFICERS 

I 'nl a nicer . Isnistants 
Mm rice T. Briggs, M.I). Wallace J. Nichols, M.D. 

I'm i. R. Withington, M.I). Rachel L. Hardwick, M.D. 

Helen Semenenko, M.D. 

SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Visiting Surgeons Visiting Otolaryngologist 

Thomas II. L-ANMAN, M.D. HAROLD ('•. TOBEY, M.D. 

I'u \ \c. I). I NCR Ml AM, M.D. 

(, Neurosurgery) Research Associate in Otolaryngology 

Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 



Associate Visiting Surgeons 
George D. Cutler, M.D. 



A ssociate S u rgeo n s 
Henry W. Hudson, Jr., M.D. 
Patrick J. Mahoney, M.D. 
Augustus Thorxdike, Jr., M.D. 



Assistant Visiting Surgeons 
John W. Chamberlain, M.D. 

Orthodontist 
Harry W. Perkins, D.M.D. 

Surgeons 
Arthur T. Legg, M.D. 
James W. Sever, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons 
A. H. Brewster, M.D. 
Seth M. Fitchet, M.D. 
William T. Green, M.D. 
Robert H. Morris, M.D. 

SPECIAL 

Dermatologist 
E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 

Assistant Dermatologist 
Austin W. Cheever, M.D. 

Opthalmologist 
J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 

Assistant Ophthalmologists 
Pall A. Chandler, M.D. 
Edwin B. Dunphy, M.D. 
E. B. Goodall, M.D. 



Associate Otolaryngologists 
Charles Allman, M.D. 
Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 
Philip Mysel, M.D. 
Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 

Assistant Otolaryngologists 
Walter J. Carroll, M.D. 
John Frazee, M.D. 
Edgar M. Holmes M.D. 

Associate in Dental Research 
Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 

Assistant Associate in Dental Research 
Paul K. Losch, D. M. D. 
Stanley B. VirklerJ D.M.D. 
David Weesberger, D.M.D. 

Assistant Orthodontists 
Edward L. Silver, D. M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 
John G. Kuhns, M.D. 
Robert J. Joplin, M.D. 
Miriam G. Katzeef, M.D. 
Paul W. Hugenberger, M.D. 
Meir G. Karp, M.D. 

DEPARTMENTS 

Bacteriologist 
LeRoy D. Fothergil, M.D. 

Assistant Bacteriologist 
Benjamin W. Carey, Jr., M.D 

Pathologists 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 
Cecil A. Krakower, M.D. 

Roentgenologist 
Edward C. Vogt, M.D. 
Associate Roentgenologist 
M. C. Sosman, M.D. 
Hugh F. Hare, M.D. 
6 



RESIDENT STAFF 

Director 
George von L. Meyer 

Assistant.'} to the Director 
Miss Madeline S. Gibbs, R.N. Miss Fanny C. Knapp, R.N. 



Admitting Officers 
Mrs. Elsa K. Cosner, R. N. Mrs. Eleanor Carey, R.N. 

Miss Anna Kendall, R.N. 



Director of Physical Therapeutics 
Miss Janet B. Merrill 



Research Associate in Psychology 
Elizabeth Lord, Ph.D. 



Director of Social Service 
Miss Amy W. Greene 

Assistant Chemist 

Miss Elsie A. MacLachlan, B.S. 

Admitting Officer, O.P.D. 
Miss Priscilla E. Hedley 



Director of Clinic for Paralytic 
Cases 

Miss Mary E. Trainor, R.N. 



A ssistant Bacteriologist 

Miss Marian Sweet, A.B..M.S 

Occupational Therapist 
Miss Jessie A. Ness 



Abatement Adjuster 
Miss Ethel E. Preble 



Photographer 
Ferdinand R. Harding 



Superintendent of Nurses and Principal of the School of Nursing 
Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 



Assistant Principal 
School of Nursing 
Miss Mary E. Norcross, R.N. 

Supervisor of Medical Wards 
Miss Dorothy C. Grant, R.N. 

Supervisor of Orthopedic Wards 
Miss Kathryn Cheney, R.N. 

Supervisor Infants' Hospital 
Miss Harriet B. Russel, R.N. 

Supervisor of Operating Room 
Miss Edith C. Jenkins, R.N. 

Supervisor Private Ward 
Miss Anne Baillie, R.N. 



Assistant Superintendent 
of Nurses 
Miss Isabelle M. Jordan, R.N. 

Supervisor of Surgical Wards 
Miss Edith Rinell, R.N. 

Supervisor of Neurological Ward 
Miss Esther Read, R.N. 

Supervisor of Isolation Department 
Miss Eleanor Dill, R.N. 

Anesthetist 
Miss Betty E. Lank, R.N. 

Supervisor Private Ward 

Operating Room 
Miss Helen Richardson, R.N 



MEDICAL OFFICERS 



RESIDENT PHYSICIANS AND HOUSE OFFICERS 

Resident Surgeons 

Merkitt B. Low, M.D. Charles F. Ferguson, M.D., 1935-38 

Henry H. Norton, M.D., 1935-'36 Carlyle G. Flake, M.D., 1936-38 



Surgical House Officers 

Donald Hight, M.D. Harry L. Mueller, M.D. 

Grey C. Hughes, M.D. Paul D. Giddings, M.D. 

John C. Wilcox, M.D. Thomas W. Botsford, M.D. 

Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. Frederick W. Rutherford, M.D. 

James B. Campbell, M.D. 



Resident Physicians 

William J. Turtle, M.D. Warren E. Wheeler, M.D. 

Arthur H. Hurd, M.D. Frederick W. Barnes, Jr., M.D. 

Harry F. Dietrich, M.D. Robert T. Moulton, M.D. 



Medical House Officers 

Robert T. Moulton, M.D. Jerome S. Harris, M.D. 

Frank C. O'Neil, M.D. Harry E. Wachter, M.D. 

George B. Logan, M.D. Paul V. Wooley, Jr., M.D. 

Charles D. May, M.D. Percy H. Jennings, Jr., M.D. 

Warren E. Wheeler, M.D. Don W. Freeman, M.D. 

Robert B. Hightower, M.D. Edward C. Curnen, Jr., M.D. 

James T. Stanton, M.D. 



Resident Orthopaedic Surgeons 
Meir G. Karp, M.D. Pinckney Harral, M.D. 



Orthopaedic House Officers 

Harvey F. Billig, Jr., M.D. Storer P. Humphreys, M.D. 

Carl C. Corson, M.D. Edward T. Smith, M.D. 

Robert F. Legge, M.D. Harry C. Hughes, M.D. 

Frederic W. Ilfeld, M.D. Lewis L. Huston, M.D. 

Clyde W. Dawson, M.D. 



Resident Pathologists 
G. Darrell Ayer, M.D. (Substitute) Harald N. Johnson, M.D. 

8 



MEDICAL OFFICERS 



House Officers Pathology 



Surgical 



Thomas W. Botsford, M.D. 
Frederick W. Rutherford, M.D. 
James B. Campbell, M.D. 
Frank L. Marting, M.D. 



Orthopaedic 



Clyde W. Dawson, M.D. 
Edward G. Ewer, M.D. 
F. Bert Brown, M.D. 
Otto E. Aufranc, M.D. 



Medical 

Paul V. Wooley Jr., M.D. 
Richard G. Hodges, M.D. 



Pathology 
Smith 0. Dexter, M.D. 



Volunteer Assistants 
O. George Bates Jr., M.D. William Elliston, M.D. 

Resident Bacteriologists 
Edward C. Curnen, Jr., M.D. John W. Regan, M.D. 

House Officers, Bacteriology 
Richard G. Hodges, M.D. Nathan B. Talbot, M.D. 



Dentist 
Ellis B. Jump, D.M.D. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Report of the Board of Managers 

WITHOUT going into particulars, the records show that during 
1936 the medical and surgical staffs together looked after 4,034 
individual cases in the wards and 17,276 in the Out-patient Department. 
In the operating rooms 2,681 operations were performed. In the X-Ray 
rooms, 28,858 films were used. In the bacteriological laboratories 4,264 
laboratory tests were made, and 4,490 chemical examinations for diag- 
nostic purposes. 

This is an impressive enough showing, but it is only the dry statistical 
statement of the work. It gives us an idea only of volume but it gives us 
no conception of the exacting qualities required for its accomplishment 
— skill, courage, knowledge, imagination, patience and all the other 
qualities which have given the Hospital its high standing and which our 
Staff does its best to conceal. From distinguished visitors we learn of 
our Staff's achievements but not from our own people. Once in a while 
enthusiasm breaks through and we hear of a particularly happy cure, 
or a surprising reduction in mortality in certain operative or medical 
cases. We know children freed from the lives of cripples, of others trans- 
formed from humiliating facial disfigurements. We know that the search 
for more knowledge is ceaseless and mysterious and we are aware of a 
force driving on to still greater things. 

The modesty of the Staff does not go so far as to cramp its aspira- 
tions. Its vision and its objectives are made quite clear and only the 
restrictions of our financial limitations stand in their way. 

On the side of the administration, it appears that we can publish 
our praise of our Director without violating a code and we take great 
pleasure in doing so. The particular difficulty of his task is that he never 
knows in advance what the income is going to be. The expenses he can 
pretty well count on. 

He must keep up to the exacting Hospital standard the $2,954,000 
worth of physical property. He must feed 641 people a day including 
the patients. He must see to the efficiency and the contentment of 427 
employees, and maintain with a light hand the most exacting discipline. 

Last year with all possible economics the total cost of running the 
Hospital was $553,000.00. 

Towards this the income from the Endowment Fund contributed 
$192,000.00 and the rest had to be covered by the two uncertain factors 
of our Community Federation quota and of the parent's ability to pay. 
This last factor has improved very slowly so that during 1936 while it 
cost $6.33 to look after a child for one day in a ward bed, the average 

10 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

return towards this was only $1.84. In no case is more than $3.50 ever 
charged. 

In the same way the cost of a visit to the Out-patient Department 
was $1.32, towards which the average collection was sixty-one cents. 

As there were 55,650 hospital days in the wards and 62,346 visits 
made to the Out-patient Department this particular problem can be 
easily understood. 

The fact that the year 1936 was closed with a deficit of only $1,600 
is an outstanding tribute to the Director and to the President and 
Treasurer who have so effectively advised him. 

Since the President and the Treasurer have had nothing to do with 
writing this report, we would like to pay tribute to them here for the 
work they did in the Community Federation this year. They did a 
tremendous amount of work at great sacrifice to themselves and the fact 
that they were such conspicuous figures undoubtedly contributed many 
designations to the Hospital. 

The Welfare Committee, under the able leadership of Mrs. Cox, 
continues its invaluable work of making known the aims and the needs 
of the Hospital besides making an important contribution of money. 
For what they do for the Hospital, we most sincerely thank the ladies 
of this committee. BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



Director's Report 

1936 

IT WOULD seem if the interest of the Managers and of the friends of 
the Hospital, and the public at large was no longer centered on bare 
statistics, on the number of patients treated, the number of out-patient 
cases seen; but they are more interested in the far-reaching results which 
are being accomplished within and outside the walls of the institution. 
As has been stated in previous reports, it is not the intention to 
enlarge the capacity of the Hospital. The next building program will 
inevitably have to be a modern building to replace our existing wards. 
Many features of these buildings are ideal, but they are expensive to 
operate and to staff, and there is considerable inconvenience to patients 
and personnel when it comes to transporting children to and from the 
operating room, X-Ray and for other treatments. 

The aim of each and every department is not to try and treat more 
children then in the previous period. By and large, there has not been 
much variance in the number of hospital days in 1936 over that of 1935. 
The aim is, on the contrary, more and more to discharge the child with 
the feeling that he has received a more thorough diagnosis, therefore, 

11 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

better treatment than the same child with the same condition might have 
received a year ago. This is not in any sense criticism of methods em- 
ployed in the past. They in turn were improvements over corresponding 
periods previous to that time. In other words, one must strive all the 
time for constant improvement. It is this constant urge in a hospital of 
this kind that brings about gradual but steady improvement in the field 
of medicine. 

All of this requires more and more brain power, more and more 
man power, more and more money. 

A more thorough diagnosis of a patient requires the cooperation of 
many departments of the hospital. The patient may be admitted for a 
very definite reason, but that is not allowed to prejudice the diagnosis. 
X-Rays are taken and many laboratory tests are made. Specialists in 
various branches are consulted to determine the possible cause of the 
ailment which may be deep rooted. This "work-up" may fail to disclose 
what is causing the trouble, but on the other hand, it may reveal some 
other incipient trouble which can be treated and save the child from 
some future disorder. 

People are giving their money to hospitals, doctors and nurses 
are giving their lives — not merely to care for a given number of patients 
during the course of a year. Their donation is far greater than this. 
They are giving a large percentage to the betterment of posterity. 

So in formulating the policies of this institution, the Managers 
have always looked to the future. From its foundation in the 'sixties, 
the aim was an institution equipped to handle any known ailment. This 
aim was fulfilled in 1931. Henceforth the goal must be greater perfection 
of methods, the utmost utilization of the knowledge acquired, and the 
dissemination of this knowledge so that it will benefit the greatest pos- 
sible number of people. 

There is no question but what this hospital, like other institutions 
of a similar nature, is becoming more and more a laboratory, and as 
such is going to fulfill to the greatest possible degree, the aims and ob- 
jectives of the founders and their successors. 

Not many years ago, it might have been rash to use the word 
"laboratory." There is still a certain amount of dynamite in the word 
"research," but by and large it would seem as if the public were begin- 
ning to see that therapy is the outcome of research in laboratory work. 

Typhoid fever and small pox used to be devastating diseases. These 
diseases are now a comparative rarity. Immunization has proven its 
effectiveness. 

The Anti-Vivisection Campaign no doubt did a lot of good, but it 
also did a great deal of harm in that it led a lot of people to think of 
research in the terms of vivisection and experimentation at the possible 

12 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

expense of the living being. Now, fortunately, the mental picture that 
the individual is prone to have when he hears the words "laboratory" 
and "research" is that of a "man in white" studying over a microscope 
or a test tube, so that it would seem that we should no longer fear the 
truth. On the contrary, we should not hide our light under a bushel, but 
be proud of the fact that in addition to caring for patients we are simul- 
taneously conducting research which will lead to continual progress and 
advancement in the field of medicine. 

How far shall we go in this field of research and laboratory work? 
But for the lack of funds, there should be no limit whatever other than 
the careful selection of the people to conduct the research and subjects 
to be studied. 

We would be very seriously handicapped were it not that much 
work that is being done within these walls is due to the grants of various 
foundations. The amount involved is substantial, and if withdrawn 
would seriously impair, not only the efficiency but the prestige of the 
institution. Should we not bestir ourselves to make sure that our rela- 
tionship with these foundations is continued, and that the contacts are 
through the Managers as well as through the Staff? 

It is hoped that the giving public will always respond to the im- 
mediate needs of this hospital. Sick children needing care will never 
be allowed to go wanting, but we must look elsewhere for the proper 
resources with which to give further study to the welfare of the children 
of tomorrow. Our duty to that child is as important as our duty to the 
child on the ward. G. von L. MEYER 



13 



Statistical Report - In-Patient 

For the year ended December 31, 1936 





Pri. 


Pub. 


T 














Remain. Dec. 31, 1935 


23 


160 


183 














Admitted 


1426 


3874 


5300 














Treated 


1449 


4034 


5483* 














Discharged 


1428 


3899 


5327 














Remain. Dec. 31, 1936 


21 


135 


156 










Daily 






i 


Idmissions 


Bed 


Capacity 


Bed 


Occupancy 




Pri. 


Pub. 


T 


Pri. 


Pub. 


r 


Pri. 


Pub. 


T 


Medical 


372 


823 


1195 


10 


44 


54 


8 


34 


42 


Surgical 


276 


1324 


1600 


10 


66 


76 


6 


54 


60 


Orthopedic 


46 


348 


394 


10 


47 


57 


2 


36 


38 


Throat 


676 


1059 


1735 


12 


31 


43 


8 


14 


22 


Neurological 


12 


224 


236 


-0- 


*15 


15 


-0- 


9 


9 


Isolation 


44 


96 


140 


-0- 


*38 


38 


2 
26 


5 
152 


7 




1426 


3874 


5300 


42 


241 


283 


178 




Hospital L 


'«i/s 


Operations 




Deaths 






Pri. 


Pub. 


T 


Pri. 


Pub. 


T 


Pri. 


Pub. 


T 


Medical 


2917 


12637 


15554 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


16 


50 


66 


Surgical 


2081 


19839 


21920 


287 


1281 


1568 


-0- 


50 


50 


Orthopedic 


848 


13048 


13896 


37 


329 


366 


-0- 


1 


1 


Throat 


2731 


5261 


7992 


692 


1071 


1763 


3 


4 


7 


Neurological 


78 


3150 


3228 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


3 


3 


Isolation 


720 
9375 


1715 
55650 


2435 
65025 


-0- 
1016 


-0- 

2681 


-0- 
3697 


-0- 


4 


4 




19 


112 


131 










Autop 


sies 




4 


' 58 


62 



Percent of Autopsies, 21% 52% 47% 



The Infants' Hospital 



Boston, Massachusetts 



For the year ended December 31, 1936 



Remain. Dec. 31, 1935 
Admitted 


33 

708 


Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Throat 

Deaths 
Autopsies 
Percent of 


Operations 
Autopsies 




Treated 

Discharged 

Remain. Dec. 31, 1936 


741 

701 

40 


10 

1 
18 




60 

36 

13144 


29 


Capacity 

Daily Occupancy 

Hospital Days 


124 
100 

81% 



♦Interchangeable— Public SOCIAL SERVICE DEPT.— BOTH HOSPITALS 

and Private 
Isolation Wards closed May 15 to Group I Group II Group III Group IV Total 

Dec. 1st 
Bader Wards closed June 30th to 176 440 2139 114 2869 

Sept. 8 

14 



Statistical Report - Out-Patient 

For the year ended December 31, 1936 



Clinic 

Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral, Curvature 

Infantile Paralysis 

Throat 

Muscle Training 

Lamp 

Dental 



Free Part Rate Full Rate Total 









Visits 


7573 


2248 


15742 


25563 


3325 


949 


6776 


11050 


2403 


605 


4710 


7718 


633 


183 


1252 


2068 


7657 


-0- 


-0- 


7657 


1170 


347 


2574 


4091 


1946 


288 


1384 


3618 


24 


8 


81 


113 


162 


2 


304 


468 



24893 



4630 



32823 



62346 



New Cases Transfers Old Cases Total 



Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature 

Infantile Paralysis 

Throat 

Muscle, Training 

Lamp 

Dental 









Visits 


4859 


817 


19887 


25563 


1882 


657 


8511 


11050 


781 


448 


6489 


7718 


24 


80 


1964 


2068 


126 


-0- 


7531 


7657 


776 


857 


2458 


4091 


13 


44 


3581 


3618 


-0- 


1 


112 


113 


-Q- 


10 


458 


468 



8461 



2914 



50971 



62346 



Emergencies 




Medical 


72 


Surgical 


737 


Orthopedic 


56 


Throat 


153 



Total number of individuals 
Daily average number of new cases 
Daily average number of total visits 
Minor operations 



17276 

28 

206 

741 



1018 



15 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Report of the Treasurer 

Balance Sheet as of December 31, 1936 

ASSETS 



Current Assets: 



Cash in bank and on hand $ 62,893. 54 

Accounts receivable 10,080. 33 

Infants' Hospital, balance on share of operating 

costs 11,223.92 

Accrued interest and dividends 38,011. 63 

Materials and supplies on hand 19,841. 79 

Prepaid expenses 2,464. 90 

$144,516.11 

Investment Securities: 

General fund investments $2,233,137.69 

Restricted fund investments 1,336,655. 45 

$3,569,793. 14 

Other Investment Property: 

Real estate $458,750. 00 

Mortgages receivable 63,000. 00 

Notes receivable 5,000. 00 , 

$526,750.00 

Plant and Equipment: 

Land $211,128. 03 

Hospital buildings 1,813,332. 35 

Dormitory property 878,222. 61 

Furniture, equipment and improvements 

(depreciated value) 51,847.50 

$2,954,530.49 

Total Assets $7,195,589. 74 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Liabilities: 

Accounts payable (current bills) $ 17,212. 78 

Credit balances, accounts receivable 1,930. 05 

Taxes payable (investment property) 4,476. 00 

Training School tuitions unearned 3,384. 24 

$27,003.07 

16 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Capital: 



General fund $5,837,853. 89 

Restricted investments funds 1,328,001. 66 

Donations paid in advance and temporary funds 

for special purposes 2,731 . 12 

7,168,586.67 



Total Liabilities and Capital $7,195,589. 74 

Statement of Income and Expense 



Income: 



Hospital revenue $244,693. 47 

Income from investments 191,955. 10 

Donations and subscriptions 87,515. 98 

Subscriptions through Welfare Committee (net).. 10,569.40 

Income from trust funds 15,559. 51 

Total Income $550,293. 46 



Expense: 



Operation of Hospital $541,555. 64 

Taxes 437. 00 

Publicity 1,625. 32 

Treasurer's office (financial matters) 5,170. 38 

Miscellaneous 3,138. 97 

Total Expense $551,927. 31 

Operating Deficit . . . 1,633. 85 



17 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Report of the Medical Service 

TIIK Medical Service is aware of the changing state of medical 
practice and is endeavoring to keep apace with the many new 
general policies so important in maintaining the position of prominence 
which the Children's Hospital holds, not only in this community hut 
outside in the large and broad field of child health and disease. 

In the last report a rather complete review was made of the various 
research and teaching activities which are being carried on through the 
esprit de corps of the active members of the Staff, and together with the 
effective assistance of nurses, social service workers and the administra- 
tive personnel. It does not seem necessary to review these activities this 
year, yet it should be mentioned that newer methods of investigation 
concerning children's diseases are constantly being added to our pro- 



gram. 



At this time it is particularly interesting to call attention to certain 
new therapeutic measures. Prontylin, a widely publicized new remedy 
is a chemical substance which is regarded as being a specific means of 
controlling a very dangerous germ, the hemolytic streptococcus. It is 
neither a vaccine nor a serum, but is a chemical drug and was discovered 
and first used in Germany about three years ago. Experience so far with 
prontylin is limited to a few patients but we feel that some children with 
severe hemolytic streptococcus infections have been benefitted and pos- 
sibly life has been saved in a few instances. However, definite conclu- 
sions as to its place in our armamentarium can not be drawn at the pres- 
ent time and possibly it will prove effective against other organisms. 

Probably one of the most common diseases from which little chil- 
dren suffer, aside from diseases of the respiratory tract, is an infection of 
the genito-urinary tract, in other words pyelitis. Rapid advances in its 
treatment ha\ T e been made by the use of mandelic acid, an acid-produc- 
ing salt. It renders the urine so acid that the organisms are killed. 
The results obtained with this form of treatment are most gratifying and 
it seems as if it will prove to be simpler, more dependable and more 
efficacious than any other form of therapy we have used. 

Statistics are always illuminating and it should be of interest to 
know that whereas in 1916, 616 admissions were made to the public 
wards of the Medical Service, in 1931 there were 1052 and in 1936 these 
admissions totalled 1143. The total number of visits in the Medical 
Outpatient Department during 1916 was reported to be 15,676, in 1931 
it was 22,126, while in 1936, the number of such visits totalled 25,563. 

It is becoming increasingly apparent that it will be difficult to in- 
crease the number of ambulatory patients in the Medical Outpatient 

is 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Department with our present staff of doctors, without either lowering 
our standard of work or turning patients away. The first is of course 
unthinkable. The second policy we have been forced already to adopt 
to a certain extent. Twenty years ago one doctor could see twenty to 
forty patients in a forenoon and listen to their first complaints and dis- 
pense appropriate prescriptions. Today an average of about one half an 
hour of a doctor's time is spent per patient in order to render appropriate 
advice, and we often regret that more time is not available. 

The demand for admittance to the Out-patient Department has 
steadily increased. However, especially in the last three years private 
physicians have been unable to spend as much time as in previous years 
in giving free work to the Clinic. The practice of Pediatrics is now less 
a function of a few specialists answering consultations with plenty of 
leisure and more a competitive practice of general medicine in the age 
group of children. First we found it necessary to provide the Out-patient 
physicians with one month free from duty in four months. Even with 
this arrangement they contributed far more time than is customary in 
most free clinics. Lately several physicians have found it necessary to 
resign because of the pressure of their private practice. We regret the 
loss of their assistance especially as with the increasing demand it is 
difficult often times to carry the peak load of our responsibility. In order 
to continue our present volume of work there seem to be two alterna- 
tives: to remunerate the doctors in practice on whom we depend for a 
large part of the Out-patient Department work by a small but reasonable 
fee, or to gradually increase our staff of full-time men by the addition of 
more interns or residents. Young physicians in considerable numbers 
are anxious to increase their training by working in our clinic and in 
many ways, under supervision, the men in training make most desirable 
out-patient physicians. 

One important change in the physical structure of the Out-patient 
Department has been completed and it is proving to be of great benefit. 
Previously corridors have been filled with workers at tables where piles 
of records are kept before the doctor sees the patient. Now we are able 
to have the administrative details cared for in a small room opening 
through a window into the corridor. In this way privacy is afforded to 
the clerks working on the records, etcetera. Thus a great deal of noise 
and confusion in the corridors is avoided. To this centralization of the 
administrative work we hope sometime a departmental communication 
system may be added, so that the doctor in each room can be reached by 
a telephone when he is ready to care for a new patient. As it is, each doc- 
tor needs to wait on himself, which means he is continually leaving his 
room to interview the nurse, or the social worker, or to get records or 
X-Rays for his patient. 

19 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

It should be noted that the physical equipment of the Out-patient 
Department is used rather inefficiently in that the great proportion of 
patients is admitted and attended to in two and a half hours in the fore- 
noons. To a certain extent this inefficiency has been lessened by the 
organization of afternoon clinics. One recent very necessary change has 
been the increase in number of doctors working in the field of allergy, or 
so-called asthma clinic, so that on Tuesdays in the afternoon, as well as 
Friday, a large number of patients can be seen. On Monday there is a 
Luetic Clinic as well as the Child Welfare and Diabetic Clinic. On 
Wednesday afternoons a very desirable feature has been developed by 
having patients who have been discharged from the wards return for a 
general review as to the progress which has been made and recommenda- 
tions for further care and treatment. This Discharge Clinic plays a very 
important part in the service which is rendered by the Hospital. It is 
hoped that arrangements can be made to introduce other special clinics 
in the afternoons. 

A proper diagnosis and the outline of a proper treatment do not 
conclude the task of medical care. We must unfortunately assume the 
responsibility of seeing that the orders given are carried out. This is 
the problem of the "follow-up" work of a public medical clinic. There 
is no way of determining mathematically the amount of wasted medical 
effort that results from inadequate "follow-up" work. Expensive labora- 
tory studies, X-Rays, consultations arranged for and carried out with 
considerable expenditure of time, are made futile if, because of some 
trivial family problem, or confusion about dates, or lack of cooperation 
of parents falsely interpreting a temporary improvement as a permanent 
one, a child is not brought back to the hospital at proper intervals, and 
to the proper physician. W e see all too frequently such a situation as a 
child brought to us after an interval of years with a fatally high blood 
pressure on whom we had initiated a treatment long since interrupted. 
As it is now, with our present personnel, this very important task is 
done a little here by a record stenographer, a little there by a social 
service worker, and the next time by another, or sometimes by a doctor 
so that the duty often falls between the many hands involved. We need 
to consider this aspect of our service in order to systematize and co-ordin- 
ate this function. If our interest in the results of our work is sincere and 
intelligent we must be prepared to assume a paternalistic responsibility 
in many cases, for proper follow-up work clinches, as it were, the medical 
services of the entire hospital. 

Mrs. Prouty's ward has been rearranged and completely redecorated. 
The soft green walls and bright yellow furniture combine to make the 
ward cheerful and sunny no matter what the weather. The green and 
yellow motif is carried out in most attractive curtains and the windows 

20 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

are completed with Venetian blinds. An attractively colored floor has 
been laid thus making the whole ward fresh and new. We are most grate- 
ful to Mrs. Prouty for making so pleasant an atmosphere for the sick 
children. 

The work in the Neurological Ward has gone along smoothly. In 
general about one-half of the children are classified in the rough, but 
suggestive category of "behavior problems!" Almost all of them present 
problems that require careful consideration of the family situation, of 
the educational setting and of the inherent physiological and psycho- 
logical make-up of the child. On the whole matters have been arranged 
so that the house officers and students can see that the study of physical 
disease and the management of children are closely related. Fortunately 
we are frequently faced by critical physical illness so that the younger 
men are not allowed to think of mental disorders as matters to be con- 
sidered until physical disease is ruled out. The psychologist, the teachers 
and the social worker are all involved with the medical staff in the super- 
vision of these children, and it is possible to demonstrate the shifts of 
emphasis that must be considered as the child goes along the road from 
acute illness to recovery and re-entry to home and school. Many in- 
formal conferences with representatives from schools, social agencies 
and other medical organizations give the staff some valid idea of the 
way in which serious prolonged or uncertain diseases can effect the hap- 
piness or the efficiency of the children in the homes or the schools to 
which most of them must return. 

In the season beginning December 2, 1935, and ending May 15, 
1936, there were 136 patients admitted to the Isolation Unit as compared 
with 105 in the preceding year. Of the 136, 36 were private patients as 
compared with 23 private patients in the previous year. The increase 
each year in the use of the facilities of the Isolation Unit for the care of 
private patients has been gratifying. The operation of the Isolation 
Unit requires proportionately a somewhat larger staff of nurses than the 
medical wards because of the large number of babies cared for, as well 
as the more careful technique in preventing the spread of cross infection. 
In the year 1936, of the patients admitted to the Isolation Ward twenty- 
six were infants under two years of age; eleven patients were adults, 
mostly students from Harvard University. 

The social service department continues to be of invaluable help 
in the treatment of patients both on the Ward and in the Out-patient 
Department. In many instances, one cannot recommend a plan for 
treatment with any assurance that it will be carried out unless the co- 
operation of the social worker is secured. The economy of the hospital 
is increased by the fact that discharges can be arranged more promptly, 
that provision is made for sick children not in need of hospital care but 

21 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

For whom home conditions make adequate care impossible. The arrange- 
ment for transportation alone guarantees continued medical supervision 
instead of utter waste of highly specialized care when a patient does not 
carry out treatment to the point of complete recovery. Consultation 
with the social worker who knows the patient's problems may often 
assist in making a diagnosis and frequently affects the recommendations 
for treatment. We need more service from this department than it is at 
present equipped to give, and an increase in the present staff is very 
desirable. 

The report would not be complete without referring to the Con- 
valescent Home of the Children's Hospital. Through the cooperation 
of the President and Managers with the Superintendent at the Home, 
efforts are constantly being made to bring into closer union the facilities 
of the two institutions by making the Convalescent Home more useful 
in caring for the children who would otherwise have to stay at the Hospi- 
tal a longer period of time. In the last year, the Medical Staff has been 
altered to include a resident physician in immediate charge of patients 
and a visiting physician who is subject to call besides making regular 
visits. This plan provides more time on the part of the doctors in at- 
tendance and is working out advantageously. A full time social worker 
has been added to the Staff and is proving to be of great assistance in 
many ways; intimate knowledge of home conditions is obtained, dis- 
charge of patients frequently expedited, recommendations for home 
care are closely supervised and follow-up work more carefully carried out. 
The system of admitting patients to the Convalescent Home is being 
made more flexible to allow more than one weekly admitting day, thus 
permitting a quicker turn over of Hospital patients and saving of Hospi- 
tal time. 

It has been emphasized repeatedly that "in passing the Children's 
Hospital, few realize the great force of the organization behind it, its 
many activities and its many minds working for a common purpose. 
But within the Hospital what makes its work outstanding? Is it not 
the skill and imagination of its staff, the quality of its nursing the out- 
flow of informative information from its laboratories and the diffusion 
of knowledge which it spreads in this community as well as abroad?" 

Special acknowledgment should be given to the Director, his 
Associates, the members of the Medical and Nursing Staff and the 
Social Service workers, for their untiring and conscientious devotion to 
the best interests of the children and the Hospital. Appreciation is 
expressed to the members of the Medical Staff who have aided so materi- 
ally in the compilation of this report. 

KENNETH D. BLACKFAN, M.D 

22 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

Congenital Malformations 

Anomaly of chest 2 

Anomaly of ear 2 

. Anomaly of eye . 1 

Anomaly of hand 1 

Anomaly of labia minora 1 

Anomaly of larynx 2 

Anomalies, multiple 1 

Anomaly of neck . 1 

Anomaly of skull 2 

Anomaly of sternum 1 

Anomaly of tongue 1 

Anomaly of umbilicus 1 

Anomaly of urogenital tract 1 

Arachnodactylia 1 

Arthrogryposis 1 

Atresia, pulmonary 1 

Cartilaginous arrest of branchial cleft 1 

Cleft palate 1 

Cleft palate and harelip 2 

Club foot 2 

Club hand 1 

Dislocation of hip 2 

Hermaphrodism 1 

Hypertelorism 1 

Hypospadias. 2 

Imperforate anus 1 

Klippel Fiel Syndrome ■ 1 

Meningocele ■ 2 

Micrognathia 4 

. Nasal obstruction 1 

Obliteration of bile ducts 1 

Pilonidal sinus 2 

Polydactylism 4 

Spina bifida 2 

Supernumerary nipple 1 

Syndactylism 2 

Talipes valgus 1 

Thyroglossal cyst 1 

Tongue-tie 5 

Torticollis 5 

Undescended testicle 24 



91 



Diseases of the Newborn 

Cephalhematoma 



Hemorrhagic disease of newborn . 



23 



4 
2 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Newborn — Continued 

Omphalitis 4 

Ophthalmia neonatorum 1 

Prematurity 35 

Diseases of Nutrition 

Acidosis 1 

Aerophagy 8 

Coeliac disease 2 

Hypoglycemia 1 

Ketosis 8 

Malnutrition 203 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 155 

Pica 3 

Regulation of feeding 675 

Rickets 112 

Rumination 1 

Scurvy 41 

Tetany 6 

Respiratory System 

Deviated septum 13 

Epistaxis 30 

Foreign body in nose 6 

Hay fever '31 

Nasal obstruction 8 

Sinusitis 117 

Asthma 184 

Bronchial fistula 2 

Bronchiectasis 9 

Bronchitis 324 

Foreign body in bronchus 2 

Tracheitis 8 

Laryngeal obstruction 2 

Laryngeal stridor, congenital 14 

Laryngitis 38 

Abscess of lung 1 

Atelectasis 1 

Emphysema of lungs 1 

Pneumonia 78 

(bronchial 20) 

(lobar 3) 

(unclassified 55) 

Pleurisy 4 

(fibrinous 2) 

(purulent 2) 

Pneumothorax 1 



46 



1216 



874 






MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Alimentary System 

Hypoplasia of mandible 2 

Alveolar abscess 1 

Carious teeth 149 

Difficult dentition 16 

Malocclusion of teeth 14 

Parotitis 1 

Geographical tongue 2 

Gingivitis 14 

Pyorrhea 3 

Stomatitis 39 

Thrush ........ 16 

Vincent's angina 21 

Ulceration of hard palate 1 

Abscess, retropharyngeal . . . . . 2 

Tonsillitis 306 

Upper respiratory infection 1285 

Tonsillitis 306 

Esophageal stricture 2 

Anorexia 29 

Esophageal stricture 2 

Anorexia 29 

Gastritis 1 

Pyloric stenosis 6 

Pylorospasm 9 

Appendicitis 9 

Colitis 4 

Constipation 219 

Diarrhoea 22 

Impacted feces 4 

Incontinence of feces 5 

Megacolon 1 

Visceroptosis of colon . ■. . 2 

Enteritis . . . 19 

Intestinal grippe 1 

Intestinal obstruction, partial 1 

Intestinal parasites 90 

Hepatitis 1 

Hepatomegaly 2 

Jaundice 18 

(catarrhal 17 ) 

(physiological 1 ) 

Pancreatitis, post infectious 1 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 51 

Diastasis recti 5 

Relaxed abdominal muscles 1 

Hernia 87 

(diaphragmatic 1 ) 

(epigastric 1 ) 

(inguinal 24) 

(umbilical 59) 

(ventral 2) 

25 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Alime n t a ry — Co n tin u ed 

Fissure of anus 6 

Fistula in ano 1 

Stricture of anus 4 

Tight anal sphincter 2 

Hemorrhoids 3 

Proctitis 1 

Prolapse of rectum 2 



2-181 



Genito-Urinary System 

Nephritis 10 

Nephrolithiasis 1 

Nephrosis 1 

Pyelitis 31 

Pyelonephritis 13 

Calculus, vesical 1 

Cystitis 2 

Diuresis 1 

Dysuria 1 

Enuresis 185 

Albuminuria 33 

(orthostatic 31 ) 

(post infectious 2) 

Bacilluria 1 

Glycosuria 1 

Hematuria, etiology unknown - 2 

Pyuria 31 

Inflammation of urinary meatus 1 

Urethritis 2 

Atresia of labia minora 1 

Adhesions about clitoris 2 

Dysmenorrhea 1 

Fissure in vulva 1 

Hydrocele 7 

Phimosis 130 

Vulvitis 1 

Vulvo-vaginitis, non-specific 53 

Abscess of breast ._. 1 

Mastitis 4 

— 518 



Circulatory System 

Aneurysm of aorta 1 

Arhythmia 1 

Cardiac neurosis 1 

Congenital heart disease 73 

Rheumatic heart disease 76 

— 152 

26 






MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Diseases of the Blood and Blood-forming 
Organs and Lymphatic System 

Anemia 184 

Erythroblastosis 6 

Leukemia 4 

Lymphoblastoma 1 

Purpura 6 

Splenomegaly 3 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 242 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Diabetes 3 

Eunuchoidism 1 

Frolich's syndrome 7 

Goitre, colloid 1 

Hyperthyroidism 4 

Obesity 45 

Pitutiary disfunction 1 

Thyroid deficiency 1 

Neuro-Muscular System 

Amyotonia congenita 2 

Behavior problem 156 

Birth injury 20 

Atrophy, cerebral 3 

Chorea 43 

Concussion, cerebral 1 

Convulsions, etiology unknown 79 

Defective speech 37 

Deficiency, mental . 144 

Encephalitis, unclassified 4 

Habit spasm 55 

Hemorrhage 5 

(cerebral 1 ) 

(intracranial 4) 

Hydrocephalus, unclassified 10 

Hysteria 1 

Idiocy 58 

(microcephalic 14) 

(mongolian 44) 

Masturbation 11 

Meningismus 2 

Meningitis 1 

Migraine 9 

Mutism 2 

Narcolepsy 1 

Nervous instability 19 

Neuralgia 9 

Night terror 5 

27 



446 



63 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Neuro-Muscular System — Continued 

( )xycephaly 1 

Paralysis 44 

(facial 8 ) 

(obstetrical 7) 

(spastic 29 ) 

Poliomyelitis 2 

(anterior, acute 1 ) 

(anterior, old 1 ) 

Psychoneurosis 2 

Somnambulism 1 

Specific Infectious Diseases 

Dysentery 6 

Erysipelas 3 

Influenza 4 

Rheumatic fever 54 

Syphilis, congenital 23 

Chicken pox 42 

Diphtheria 2 

Diphtheria carrier 1 

Exanthema subitum 2 

Measles 42 

Mumps 31 

Pertussis 125 

Roseloa infantum 6 

Scarlet fever 5 

Typhoid fever '2 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis, glandular 11 

Tuberculosis, hilum 7 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 19 

Tuberculosis, skin 1 

Tuberculosis, spine 2 



727 



348 



40 



Skeletal System 

Achondroplasia 2 

Anomaly of ribs, developmental 1 

Arthritis 7 

Bursitis, popliteal 1 

Dyschondroplasia 1 

Dystrophy, muscular 2 

Faulty posture 60 

Foot strain 6 

Ganglion, popliteal space 1 

Hydrarthrosis 1 

Osgood-Schlatter's disease 2 

Pronated feet 78 

Synovitis of knee, luetic ^ 1 

— 163 
28 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Skin 

Acne 4 

Alopecia areata 4 

Bites 26 

(dog 1) 

(insect 25) 

Cellulitis 3 

Dermatitis, unclassified 213 

Dermatographia 2 

Dystrophia unguium 1 

Ecthyma 1 

Eczema 407 

Epidermophytosis '. . 18 

Erythema, etiology unknown 9 

Folliculitis 1 

Fungus infection of skin 6 

Furunculosis 66 

Herpes 4 

Hyperidrosis 1 

Ichthyosis 9 

Impetigo contagiosa 188 

Intertrigo 10 

Keratosis 5 

Miliaria 25 

Molluscum contagiosum 1 

Morphea . , 1 

Onychorrhexis 1 

Paronychia 4 

Pediculosis 8 

Pemphigus 1 

Pityriasis rosea 7 

Prurigo 2 

Psoriasis 6 

Pyodermia 1 

Ringworm 25 

Scabies . 55 

Scleroderma 1 

Seborrhea 37 

Sudamina 1 

Urticaria 67 

Verruca vulgaris . . 19 

Vitiligo 2 

— 1242 

Diseases of the Eye 

Amblyopia 1 

Blepharitis 7 

Blindness 2 

Cataract, congenital 1 

Chalazion 1 

Chorioretinitis 1 

Coloboma, congenital 1 

29 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Eye — Continued 

Conjunctivitis 39 

Dacrocystitis 2 

Eye strain 3 

Hemorrhage, subconjunctival 1 

Hordeolum 8 

Keratitis 2 

(interstitial 1 ) 

(ulcerative 1 ) 

Nystagmus, etiology unknown 2 

Strabismus 25 

Ulcer, corneal 2 

— 98 

Diseases of the Ear 

Cerumen 3 

Deaf mutism, congenital 2 

Deafness 12 

Foreign body in ear 1 

Mastoiditis 7 

Otitis media 374 

399 

Tumors 

Brain tumor, unclassified 1 

Hemangiomata and naevi 34 

Hematoma, subdural 1 

Keloid, elbow 1 

Papilloma, anus 1 

Polyp 8 

(rectal 7 ) 

(umbilical 1 ) 

Cyst, breast 1 

Cyst, gxjm 1 

Cyst, prepuce ■. . 1 

Cyst, tonsil, anterior pillar 1 

Cyst, vaginal 1 

— 51 

Unclassified 

Abrasions 4 

Abscesses 5 

Acrodynia 3 

Allergic state, unclassified 20 

Carotinemia 1 

Contusions 3 

Dislocations 2 

(coccyx 1 ) 

(epiphysis of wrist 1 ) 

Ecchymosis of thigh, traumatic 1 

Edema, angioneurotic 7 

30 






MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Unclassified — Continued 

Fatigue 11 

Fracture 5 

(clavicle 1 ) 

(fibula 1) 

(nose 1 ) 

(skull 1) 

(tibia 1 ) 

Lacerations 4 

Lipodystrophy 2 

Malingerer 1 

Poisoning 26 

(lead 25) 

(neosilvol-ephedrine 1 ) 

Pyrexia, etiology unknown 4 

Reading difficulty . . . , • 2 

Regulation of habits 222 

Septicemia, unclassified 1 

Serum sickness 3 

Diagnosis deferred 212 

Left before seen 15 

No disease 435 

Referred to other departments or hospitals 433 

Dead on admission 7 

— 1429 

New cases 4859 

Secondary diagnosis 5525 

Total 10,384 



MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

Congenital Malformations New Old 

Absent kidney 2 — 

Absent uterus 

Absent vagina 

Anomaly of esophagus 

Anomaly of gastro-intestinal tract 

Anomaly of hand 

Anomaly of thorax 

Anomaly of urethra 

Asymmetry, cranial 

Bifid renal pelvis 

Branchiogenetic sinus 

Cervical rib 2 

Cleft palate 2 1 

Cystic disease of the lungs 2 2 

Double renal pelvis — 1 

Double ureter 2 2 

Dwarfism 1 — 

31 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Fused kidney 1 

Harelip and cleft palate 3 

Hermaphrodism 1 

Hypertrophy of leg I 

Hypospadias 2 

Imperforate anus 2 

Pilonidal sinus 2 

Retinal defects 1 

Septate vagina 1 

Spina bifida occulta 2 

Spina bifida with meningocele 1 

Syndactylism 2 

Talipes equinovarus 1 

Undescended testicle 3 

46 
Di. eases of the Newborn 

Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn 1 

Prematurity 1 



Diseases of Nutrition 

Acidosis 6 — 

Aerophagy 1 — 

Avitaminosis 2 — 

Coeliac disease 9 7 

Hypoglycemia 1 — 

Ketosis 9 — 

Malnutrition 11 1 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 38 7 

Regulation of feeding 17 — 

Rickets 8 5 

Scurvy 2 — 

Xerophthalmia 1 — 

105 20 
Respiratory System 

Hay fever 1 — 

Sinusitis 42 6 

Asthma 38 7 

Bronchiectasis 10 10 

Bronchitis 48 10 

Foreign body in bronchus 5 1 

Septic sore throat 1 — 

Abscess, peritracheal 1 — 

Obstruction, tracheal 1 — 

Tracheitis 1 — 

Laryngitis 9 — 

Abscess of lung 5 — 

Atelectasis 6 3 



MEDTCAL DEPARTMENT 



Respiratory System — Continued 

Emphysema of lungs, secondary to asthma 2 

Emphysema of lungs, secondary to foreign body in bronchus 3 

Pneumonia, primary 129 

Pneumonia, secondary 39 

Pneumonia, unclassified 31 

Pneumonitis 3 

Pleurisy, fibrinous 7 

Pleurisy, purulent 18 

Pleurisy, streptococcus 1 

Pneumothorax 2 

Pyopneumothorax . 2 



405 



Alimentary System 

Alveolar abscess 2 

Carious teeth 36 

Parotitis 1 

Gingivitis 1 

Stomatitis 4 

Thrush 6 

Vincent's angina 2 

Abscess, retropharyngeal 6 

Abscess, tonsillar 3 

Tonsillitis 131 

Upper respiratory infection 192 

Esophageal stricture 1 

Foreign body in esophagus : 2 

Abscess, subdiaphragmatic 1 

Hematemesis, etiology unknown 1 

Pyloric stenosis 3 

Appendicitis •. 10 

Colitis, cause unknown 1 

Colitis, mucus 1 

Colitis, ulcerative 7 

Constipation 10 

Diarrhoea 7 

Impacted feces 1 

Incontinence of feces 2 

Megacolon 2 

Gastro-enteritis 5 

Incomplete rotation of cecum , 4 

Intestinal obstruction, extrinsic 1 

Intestinal parasites 12 

Ulcer, duodenal 1 

Cholecystitis 1 

Cirrhosis of liver 2 

Jaundice, catarrhal 1 

Jaundice, obstructive, due to adhesions 1 

Jaundice, obstructive, due to lymph node 1 

Jaundice, obstructive, etiology unknown 1 

33 



1 

4 
1 



1 
1 

48 



5 
9 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Alimentary System — Continued 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 23 

Traumatic injury to abdominal viscera ] 

Abscess, retroperitoneal 1 

Peritonitis 5 

Hernia, unclassified (5 

Fissure of anus 1 

Abscess, ischiorectal 1 

Prolapse of rectum 1 

Rectal bleeding, etiology unknown 1 

Genito-Urinary System 

Hydronephrosis 

Nephritis 

Nephrosis 

Pyelitis 22 

Pyelonephritis 24 

Uremia, etiology unknown 1 

Calculus, renal 1 

Infantile kidney 1 

Ptosis of kidney 2 

Renal colic 1 

Ruptured kidney, traumatic 1 

Calculus, ureteral 2 

Megaloureter 4 

Calculus, vesical 1 

Enuresis ' 4 

Incontinence of urine, etiology unknown 1 

Retention of urine, etiology unknown 1 

Albuminuria, orthostatic . 3 

Anuria, etiology unknown 1 

Bacilluria, etiology unknown 3 

Glycosuria, etiology unknown 1 

Glycosuria, etiology unknown 1 

Glycosuria with traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage 1 

Hematuria, etiology unknown 3 

Levulosuria, etiology unknown 1 

Pyuria 15 

Caruncle, urethral 1 

Stricture, urethral 1 

Urethral valve 1 

Abscess, pelvic 1 

Hydrocele 2 

Hypertrophy of clitoris 1 

Menorrhagia 1 

Orchitis 1 

Phimosis 8 

Vulvo-vaginitis, non-specific 6 



504 


30 


3 


1 


17 


10 


6 


8 



143 



32 



34 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



New 


Old 


17 


3 


1 


— 


5 


1 


2 


— 


3 


1 


9 


— 


1 


— 


46 


11 


84 


16 


2 


11 


3 


3 


39 


4 


— 


1 


2 


1 



Circulatory System 

Congenital heart disease 
Endocarditis, bacterial . . 
Hypertension, essential . 
Myocardial insufficiency 

Myocarditis, toxic 

Pericarditis 

Phlebitis 

Rheumatic heart disease 



Diseases of the Blood, Blood-forming Organs, 
and Lymphatic System 

Anemia, aplastic 

Anemia, erythroblastic 

Anemia, secondary 

Anemia, sickle cell 

Eosinophilia, etiology unknown 

Erythroblastosis 1 — 

Hemophilia 10 14 

Jaundice, congenital hemolytic 3 — 

Leukemia 

Purpura 

Reticuloendotheliosis : 

Splenomegaly with gastric hemorrhage 

Splenomegaly, etiology unknown 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 



Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Diabetes insipidus 

Diabetes mellitus 

Frolich's syndrome 

Gland disfunction 

Goitre, exophthalmic 

Hyperthyroidism 

Obesity 

Thyrotoxicosis 

25 40 
Neuro-Muscular System 

Abscess of brain 1 — - 

Acrocephaly 1 — 

Amyotonia congenita 2 — 

Ataxia, Friedreich's 1 — 

Atrophy, cerebral 21 2 

Behavior problem 38 4 

Calcification, cerebral 1 — 

Chorea 14 1 

Concussion, cerebral 4 1 

Convulsions, etiology unknown 86 19 

Cord injury 2 — 

35 



12 


8 


16 


7 


1 


— 


1 


2 


1 


— 


68 


4 


159 


55 


1 


1 


15 


35 


1 


1 


1 


— 


1 


— 


3 


1 


2 


2 


1 


— 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Neuro-Muscular System — Continued 

Deficiency, cerebral, unclassified 

Deficiency, mental 

Degeneration, cerebral, etiology unknown 

Degeneration, cerebral, post encephalitic 

Degeneration, familial lenticular 

Dementia praecox 

Encephalitis, unclassified 

Habit spasm 

Headache, etiology unknown 

Hemorrhage, cerebral 

Hemorrhage, intracranial 

Hemorrhage, subarachnoid 

Horner's syndrome 

Hydrocephalus, unclassified 

Idiocy, microcephalic 

Idiocy, mongolian 

Intracranial lesion 

Masturbation 

Meningismus 

Meningitis, influenzal 

Meningitis, meningococcus 

Meningitis, mumps 

Meningitis, organism unknown 

Meningitis, pneumococcus 

Meningitis, sterile 

Meningitis, streptococcus 

Meningitis, tuberculous 

Myelitis, infectious 

Myelitis, toxic 

Myositis 

Narcolepsy 

Neuritis, peripheral 

Neuronitis, infectious 

Paralysis, brachial 

Paralysis, cranial and somatic, post encephalitic 

Paralysis of extremities, due to meningocele 

Paralysis of extremities, etiology unknown 

Paralysis of extremities, post-operative 

Paralysis, facial 

Paralysis, post diphtheritic 

Paralysis, spastic 

Poliomyelitis, acute anterior 

Poliomyelitis, old 

Porencephaly 

Psychoneurosis 

Speech defect 

Thrombosis, cerebral 

Thrombosis, sinus 



34 


3 


105 


«J 


2 
1 
1 


— 





1 


— 


40 


1 


1 


— 


4 


3 


2 


— 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


— 


8 


8 


3 


— 


4 


— 


5 


1 


1 


— 


13 


2 


9 


2 


7 


— 


5 


— 


1 


— 


13 


— 


7 


— 


2 


— 


3 


— 


1 


— 


2 


— 


1 


— 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


— 


5 


1 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


2 


— 


1 


— 


46 


6 


5 


3 


5 


2 


2 


— 


8 


1 


2 


— 


1 


— 


2 


— 



539 73 



36 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Specific Infectious Diseases New 

Bacteremia, intermittent 1 

C. Xerosis infection 1 

Dysentery 4 

Erysipelas 5 

Influenza 4 

Ktala-azar ..... 1 

Meningococcemia 1 

Rheumatic fever 26 

Syphilis, congenital 3 

Tetanus . . 2 

Vaccinia 3 

Chicken pox 10 

Diphtheria 1 

Measles 19 

Mumps 23 

Pertussis 13 

Roseola infantum 1 

Scarlet fever 43 

Typhoid fever 9 



Old 



5 

2 



170 



10 



Tuberculosis New Old 

Tuberculides 1 — 

Tuberculosis of ear 1 — 

Tuberculosis, generalized glandular 1 — ■ 

Tuberculosis, hilum 2 — 

Tuberculosis of kidney 1 1 

Tuberculosis of lymph nodes, unclassified 4 2 

Tuberculosis, miliary 4 — 

Tuberculosis peritonitis 1 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 7 5 

Tuberculosis of spleen 1 1 



23 



Skeletal System New 

Arthritis, infectious 5 

Arthritis, proliferative 1 

Arthritis, toxic 3 

Contracture of elbow, secondary to arthritis 1 

Dislocation of hip, pathological 1 

Dystrophy, muscular 1 

Dystrophy, osseous — 

Exostoses, multiple 1 

Hemarthrosis 1 

Osteoarthropathy ■. 3 

Osteogenesis imperfecta 1 

Osteomyelitis 6 

37 



Old 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Skeletal System — Continued 

Periostitis of scapula, etiology unknown 1 — ■ 

Pronated feet 2 — 

Pyogenic infection of hip 1 

Retarded osseous development 2 — 

Scoliosis, functional 3 — 

Septic elbow 2 

Septic knee 1 — 



36 8 

Diseases of the Skin New Old 

Burns 2 — 

Cellulitis 

Dermatitis, unclassified 

Dermatographia 

Dog bite 

Eczema 

Epidermophytosis 

Erythema, unclassified 

Furunculosis 

Ichthyosis 

Impetigo contagiosa 

Lupus erythematous 

Paronychia 

Pemphigus 

Scabies 

Scleroderma 

Seborrhea 

Ulcer of elbow, healing 

Urticaria 

82 4 

Diseases of the Eye New Old 

Atrophy, optic 4 — 

Cataract, congenital 1 — 

Coloboma, retinal 1 — 

Conjunctivitis 4 1 

Dacrocystitis 1 — 

Error of refraction 2 — 

Keratitis, interstitial 1 — 

Neuritis, retrobulbar 1 — 

Obliteration of tear duct 1 — 

Pan-ophthalmitis 2 — 

Retinitis, etiology unknown 1 — 

Staphyloma, anterior 1 — 

Strabismus 11 2 

31 3 

38 



3 


— 


10 


1 


1 


— 


2 


— 


28 


3 


1 


— 


5 


— 


6 


— ■ 


1 


— 


9 


— 


2 


— 


4 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


3 


— 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Ear New 

Condylarthrosis 1 

Deafness, congenital 3 

Deafness, post-infectious 2 

Mastoiditis 

Otitis media 



Tumors 

Brain tumor, unclassified 

Cord tumor, unclassified 

Hemangioma, abdominal wall 

Hemangioma, forehead 

Hematoma, neck . 

Hematoma, scalp. . . 

Lipoma, thigh 

Neuroblastoma, kidney 

Neuroblastoma, multiple 

Neuroblastoma, retroperitoneal 

Neurofibromatosis — Recklinghausen's disease . 

Papilloma, larynx 

Papilloma, tongue 

Polyp, rectal 

Bone cyst, femur 

Bone cyst, multiple 

Enteric cyst, stomach 



Old 



47 


6 


161 


7 


214 


13 


Neiv 


Old 


20 


3 



— 1 
1 



36 



Unclassified New Old 

Abscesses 7 — 

Acrodynia . . . 4 — 

Allergic state, unclassified 7 — 

Anascara 1 — 

Aphagia, etiology unknown 1 1 

Carotinemia 1 — 

Contusions 2 — 

Draining facial sinus 1 — 

Edema, angioneurotic 2 — 

Fracture of femur 2 — 

Fracture of skull 3 1 

Fracture of spine 1 — 

Lacerations 5 — 

Poisoning, lead 13 4 

Poisoning, methyl salicylate 1 — 

Poisoning, nitroglycerin 1 — 

Poisoning, phenolphthalein 1 — 

Pyrexia, etiology unknown 9 — 

Pyrexia, post operative 2 — 

Reading difficulty 2 — 

39 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Unclassified — Continued 

Regulation of habits 1 

Retarded development, developmental 2 

Septicemia, organism unknown 1 

Septicemia, pneumococcus 4 

Septicemia, staphylococcus 7 

Septicemia, streptococcus 3 

Serum sickness 4 

Shock, allergic 2 

Shock, secondary to Smith-Howard disease 1 

Shock, surgical 1 

Wound, bullet 1 

Deferred 13 

No disease 17 

123 

Number of cases admitted to the Medical Ward 1143 

Number of cases admitted to the Private Ward 428 

Total 1571 

New diagnoses 2727 

Old diagnoses 380 

Total 3107 



Report of the Surgical Service 

THIS last year has evidenced many changes in the surgical depart- 
ment that have long been planned and have now been finally exe- 
cuted in part. Principal of these changes has been the establishment in 
the Bader Building, of a surgical floor which houses both the private 
offices of four of the staff, and the administrative offices of the depart- 
ment. Dr. W. E. Ladd has moved bis private office from 66 Common- 
wealth Avenue to this division and Dr. D. W. MacCollum has also 
established his office here. The offices of Drs. T. H. Lanman and F. D. 
Ingraham complete this group. The administration office houses a 
small surgical library, the discharge summary files, and is used for a 
study room and by the surgical resident, and the surgical secretary. 
This centralization has taken time to complete but it has already proved 
to be beneficial to the surgeon, the hospital, and the patient. Much 
closer contact has been established between the members of the surgical 
staff and those of the medical, orthopedic, and hospital personnel, who 
have been in residence at the hospital for many years. It is felt that this 

40 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

move of the surgical service will do mucb to advance the solidarity of the 
surgical unit. 

There have been a few changes in the personnel. Dr. M. B. Low, 
who served as resident from September 1935 to September 1936, has left 
to practice in Deerfield, Mass. Dr. Charles F. Ferguson has assumed 
the duties of this vacated position. Dr. D. W. MacCollum, (Mosely 
Travelling Fellow of Harvard University), returned from a year in 
London where he worked in plastic surgery with Sir Harold Gillies and 
Sir Launcelot Barrington Ward. Dr. Carlyle G. Flake, former Ear, 
Nose and Throat resident at John Hopkins for several years, has become 
the resident of the Otolaryngological service at the Children's Hospital. 
Dr. John F. Pohl, former surgical interne and assistant resident at the 
Children's Hospital has been the first to fill the new position of Neuro- 
surgical resident. 

A long contemplated plan of extending the surgical interneship so 
as to provide, in addition to the training in Children's surgery, a com- 
prehensive training in adult surgery has now been accomplished by an 
amalgamation of our service with the surgical service at the Peter Bent 
Brigham. This combined service is now in effect and affords each in- 
terne a thirty-five months service. This includes the general surgery of 
infants, children, and adults, also the specialties of surgical pathology, 
laboratory service, traumatic surgery, ear, nose and throat surgery, 
orthopedic surgery, genito-urinary surgery, gynecological surgery, plastic 
surgery and neurosurgery, in all age groups. As in previous years, 
alternating exchange rounds between the surgical services of the two 
hospitals were held every Thursday throughout the year. These rounds 
kept the various members of the now large services acquainted with 
the surgical problems of each division. 

Six appointments to this new interne staff are to be made each year. 
From the numerous applications (65) received this year, it would seem 
that this combined service may rapidly become one of the most desired 
interne posts in the East. 

One of the primary functions of the surgical division, in addition to 
the care of the patient, is to offer instruction to medical students, in- 
ternes and nurses. The education of the interne, we believe, will be 
benefited by this amalgamation. The education of the medical student 
is continually a problem to us. In the report of last year mention was 
made of a reorganization of some of the surgical teaching. This has been 
attempted for members of the junior class of the Harvard Medical 
School during part of this year. It has resulted in what is believed to 
be a marked improvement of method. The principal change has been 
to extend the time given over to bedside teaching, and to abolish all but 
a few whole class key lectures. The subjects formally covered in these 

41 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

lectures have been written, mimeographed and given to each student to 
read. In order to successfully teach in this fashion, a sub-division of the 
class into many small groups has been necessary. In this way the student 
becomes intimately acquainted through the media of his own eyes and 
hands with the many surgical problems on our wards, rather than being 
obliged to rely on information given to him by some one else in a formal 
lecture. In addition, operating room teaching has also been instituted 
and according to a student vote is well liked and is of benefit to them. 
Very little change has been made in the teaching of the second and fourth 
year students, as these courses had recently been reorganized. A con- 
templated course in clinical embryology has been outlined for students 
of the first year and will be put in effect in September in 1937. When 
this becomes effective, the surgical department will then have extended 
its teaching to every class in the medical school. It is hoped that by this 
repetition through four years of training, the student at graduation will 
be w T ell acquainted with the problems of surgery in infancy and child- 
hood. As ours is the only hospital and the only school in the country in 
which this has been accomplished, we feel quite proud of our achievement. 

We are exceedingly glad to report that for the fourth consecutive 
year we have again bettered our previous statistics. During 1936 the 
surgical department has taken care of more patients and with fewer 
deaths than ever before in the history of the service. 

Study the following table: 

Admissions 

Operations 

Deaths 

O. P. D. Visits 10,630 10,952 11,067 11,050 

The members of the staff have continued their activities in various 
medical societies. During October 1936 the American Association of 
Plastic Surgeons met in Boston. The Children's Hospital and the surgical 
service were hosts to this gathering for one of their two days here. Opera- 
tions were performed, and clinics were given by Drs. Ladd, Lanman, 
and MacCollum, demonstrating various plastic procedures as applied 
to children. Dr. Ladd was elected president of the organization for the 
ensuing year. Various other meetings have been attended by our staff 
at which papers were read or discussed. Following is list of those pub- 
lished or read during the past year. 

Dr. Ladd Congenital Absence of the Pericardium. New 

England Journal of Medicine. Vol. 214, Jan- 
uary 30, 1936. 

42 



1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1257 


1277 


1270 


1302 


1161 


1183 


1254 


1282 


64 


71 


58 


51 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Dr. Ladd Surgical Diseases of the Alimentary Tract in 

Infants. New England Journal of Medicine. 
Vol. 215, October 15, 1936. 

Dr. Ladd Duplications of the Alimentary Tract. Read at 

the Southern Medical Meeting. November 12, 
1936. 

Dr. Ladd and Dr. Fothergill Idiopathic Ulcerative Colitis in Children. Medi- 
cal Clinics of North America. 1936. 

Dr. Lanman Extrophy of the Bladder. Read at the Meeting 

of the New England Surgical Society at Bridge- 
port. September, 1936. 

Dr. Mahoney Congenital Patent Urachus. New England 

Journal of Medicine. July 30, 1936. 

Dr. Chamberlain Omphalitis in the New-Born. The Journal of 

Pediatrics. August, 1936. 

Dr. Hudson Acute Appendicitis and Measles. New England 

Journal of Medicine. July 9, 1936. 

Dr. Thorndike Fractures in the New-Born. New England Jour- 
nal of Medicine. Vol. 215, November, 1936. 

WILLIAM E. LADD, M.D. 



SURGICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE OUT-PATIENT 

DEPARTMENT— INCLUDING POST-OPERATIVE CASES 

DISCHARGED FROM HOUSE 

Diseases of Nutrition 

Malnutrition . . . _. : 1 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 9 

Rickets 4 

Scurvy 1 



15 



Respiratory System 

Cyst, nose 1 

Deviated septum 1 

Epistaxis 1 

Sinusitis 1 

Tonsillitis 29 

Upper respiratory infection 41 

Bronchitis 4 

Pneumonia 4 

Empyema 12 

Pneumothorax 1 

95 
43 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Alimentary System 

Abscess, alveolar 4 

Carious teeth 5 

Eoreign body in mouth 2 

Stomatitis 1 

Cyst, sublingual 4 

Fibroma, tongue 1 

Tongue-tie 37 

Thyroglossal cyst 9 

Tumor, thyroid 1 

Branchiogenetic sinus 7 

Cleft palate 29 

Cyst, lip 3 

Deformity of lip, acquired 1 

Granuloma, lip 1 

Harelip 5 

Harelip and cleft palate 4 

Hypertrophy of frenum of lip 1 

Sinus of lip 1 

Parotitis 4 

Tumor, parotid 2 

Esophageal stricture 1 

Pyloric stenosis 20 

Appendicitis, unclassified 33 

Colitis, ulcerative 2 

Constipation 11 

Enteritis 6 

Enteric cyst, duodenum - 1 

Foreign body in intestines 33 

Incomplete rotation of cecum 1 

Obstruction, intestinal 2 

Parasites, intestinal 3 

Intussusception 8 

Cirrhosis of liver 1 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 10 

Foreign body in abdomen 1 

Peritonitis 3 

Anomaly of anus 1 

Condyloma, anus 1 

Fissure of anus 3 

Fistula in ano 5 

Imperforate anus 2 

Stricture of anus 1 

Abscess of rectum 6 

Foreign body in rectum 1 

Hemorrhoids 2 

Polyp, rectal 10 

Prolapse of rectum 11 

Rectal bleeding 1 

— 302 

44 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Genito-Urinary System 

Hydronephrosis 2 

Pyelonephritis 1 

Pyuria 2 

Enuresis 3 

Exstrophy of the bladder 3 

Inflammation of urethral meatus 1 

Stenosis of urethral meatus 2 

Urethritis 4 

Adhesions, vulva 1 

Anomaly of vulva . 1 

Atrophy of testicle 1 

Granulosa cell tumor of ovary 1 

Hydrocele 57 

Hypertrophied clitoris 1 

Hypospadias 19 

Masturbation 1 

Orchitis 2 

Phimosis 300 

Pruritus of glans 1 

Torsion of appendix testis 1 

Undescended testicle 31 

Undeveloped scrotum 1 

Varicocele 1 

Vulvo-vaginitis, non-specific 2 

— 439 

Cardio-Vascular Diseases 

Anemia 1 

Heart disease, congenital 1 

Hemangiomata and naevi 241 

Jaundice, hemolytic : 1 

Lymphoblastoma '. 1 

Pericarditis, purulent 1 

Telangiectasis 4 

Varicose veins 1 

— 251 

Lymphatic System 

Abscess of breast 1 

Hypertrophy of breast 5 

Mastitis 6 

Lymphadenitis, auricular 3 

Lymphadenitis, axillary 10 

Lymphadenitis, cervical 167 

Lymphadenitis, cervical, tuberculous 2 

Lymphadenitis, epitrochlear 4 

Lymphadenitis, femoral ■'.-.-. 13 

Lymphadenitis, iliac 2 

Lymphadenitis, inguinal 10 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric ■ ■ ■ ? 3 

45 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Lymphatic System — Continued 

Lymphadenitis, submaxillary 

Lymphadenitis, submental 

Lymphadenitis, suboccipital 

Lymphangiectasis of leg 

Lymphangiectasis of toe 

Lymphangioma, axilla 

Lymphangitis, arm 



— 243 



Nervous System 

Abscess of brain 1 

Concussion 7 

Encephalocele 1 

Epilepsy 1 

Hydrocephalus 11 

Intracranial injury, traumatic 1 

Meningocele 15 

Oxycephaly 2 

Paralysis of extremities, due to meningocele 7 

Paralysis, obstetrical 2 

Paralysis, spastic 2 

Paralysis of sphincters, due to meningocele 1 

Paralysis of ulnar nerve, traumatic 1 

Spina bifida 1 

— 53 



Diseases of the Skin and Cellular Tissue 

Abscesses 37 

Abrasions 67 

Blister . 11 

Bites, cat 1 

Bites, dog 57 

Bites, frost 4 

Bites, horse 1 

Bites, insect 16 

Bites, snake 1 

Burns 45 

Burn contractures 6 

Carbuncle 1 

Cellulitis 12 

Cephalhematoma 7 

Cicatrix 1 

Contusions 83 

Cyst, abdominal wall 1 

Cyst, cheek 1 

Cyst, eyebrow 6 

Cyst, eyelid 4 

Cyst, finger 1 

Cyst, forehead 1 

46 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Skin and Cellular Tissue — Continued 

Cyst, neck 1 

Cyst, scalp 1 

Cyst, sebaceous 10 

Cyst, submental 1 

Cyst, supraorbital 1 

Dermatitis, unclassified 49 

Eczema 6 

Edema, unclassified 5 

Epidermolysis bullosa 1 

Epidermophytosis 3 

Fibroma, arm 1 

Fibroma, neck 1 

Fibroma, toe 1 

Folliculitis 1 

Foreign body 35 

Fungus infection of skin 1 

Furunculosis 71 

Hematoma, unclassified 9 

Impetigo 11 

Ingrown toe-nail 9 

Keloid, unclassified 9 

Lacerations 275 

Lipoma, forehead 1 

Miliaria 2 

Omphalitis 22 

Papilloma, forehead 1 

Paronychia 48 

Pediculosis 2 

Pilonidal sinus 4 

Pimple 1 

Scabies ■ 1 

Septic wound 25 

Serum sickness 1 

Tumor, neck 1 

Tumor, leg 1 

Ulcer, unclassified 4 

Verruca vulgaris 34 

Wound, puncture 19 

Wringer injury 1 

— 1035 



Diseases of the Bones and Joints 

Anomaly of chest 1 

Anomaly of sacrum 2 

Anomaly of upper extremity 3 

Arthritis of hip 1 

Arthritis of knee 1 

Assemetry of head 3 

Cyst, humerus 1 

47 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Diseases of the Bones and Joints — Continued 

Dislocation of radius 1 

Dislocation of thumb 1 

Exostosis, femur 1 

Fracture of ankle 1 

Fracture of clavicle 25 

Fracture of elbow 7 

Fracture of femur 3 

Fracture of humerus 19 

Fracture of ilium 1 

Fracture of mandible 1 

Fracture of metacarpal 4 

Fracture of metatarsal 3 

Fracture of nose 2 

Fracture of phalanx 7 

Fracture of radius 16 

Fracture of radius and ulna 23 

Fracture of rib 1 

Fracture of skull 14 

Fracture of tibia 5 

Fracture of ulna 5 

Fracture of wrist 1 

Hammer toe 1 

Osteochondroma, long bones 1 

Osteomyelitis of femur 2 

Osteomyelitis of ischium 1 

Osteomyelitis of metacarpus 1 

Polydactylism ' 6 

Pseudarthrosis, temporo-mandibular joint 1 

Scoliosis 2 

Slipped radial epiphysis 2 

Synostosis, radius and ulna 1 

Talipes equino-varus 1 

Traumatic amputation of finger 2 

Tumor, spine 1 



175 



Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Camptodactylism 1 

Diastasis recti 4 

Ganglion, popliteal space 1 

Ganglion, wrist 2 

Hernia, epigastric 4 

Hernia, femoral 1 

Hernia, inguinal 194 

Hernia, scrotal 2 

Hernia, umbilical 101 

Pronated feet 3 

Sprains 14 

Strains '. 8 

Syndactylism 4 

— 339 

48 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Eye 

Chalazion 3 

Conjugate deviation of eyes 1 

Conjunctivitis 4 

Foreign body in eye . . . . 9 

Hordeolum 7 

Injury to eye 2 

Ptosis of eyelid 1 

— 27 

Diseases of the Ear 

Anomaly of ear . 5 

Foreign body in ear 1 

Mastoiditis 1 

Otitis media 11 

— 18 

• ■ 

Specific Infectious Diseases 

Chicken pox 2 

Mumps 4 

Roseola infantum 1 

Vaccinia 1 



Unclassified 

Adolescence 1 

Poisoning, ammonia 1 

Poisoning, "exlax" 1 

Poisoning, kerosene 1 

Poisoning, lead ■ 1 

Poisoning, stove polish 1 

Regulation of habits 3 

Traumatic shock 1 

Dead on arrival 1 

Deferred 51 

Eloped 5 

No disease 41 

Transferred to other departments or hospitals 10 



118 



New cases 1882 

Secondary diagnosis 1236 

Total 3118 



49 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS 

WITH ANAESTHESIA 

Aspiration of hematoma 1 

Aspiration of cysts 2 

Bronchoscopy 1 

Circumcisions 102 

Dilatation of urethra 17 

Dilatation of meatus 3 

Dilatation of anus 3 

Endothermy for hemangioma 59 

Elevation of nasal bones — ] 

Fractures, reduction of 21 

Freeing frenum for tongue tie 5 

Incision and drainage of abscesses and septic wounds 121 

Lysis of adhesions 2 

Laryngoscopy I 

Paracentesis 188 

Proctoscopy — 2 

Paraphimosis, reduction of 1 

Removal of nail 55 

Removal of cysts 14 

Removal of hemangioma 10 

Removal of fibroma of neck 2 

Removal of keloid 3 

Removal of papilloma of forehead 1 

Removal of wen 4 

Wound sutures 121 

Winograd operation for ingrowing toenail 1 

Total . . 741 



WITHOUT ANAESTHESIA 

Carbon-dioxide snow treatments 669 



50 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

SURGICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

Diseases of Nutrition New Old 

Acidosis 2 

Malnutrition . . 7 l 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 19 — 

Rickets 9 — 

Scurvy 2 — 

Tetany 1 — 

Vomiting, recurrent 5 — 

45 1 
Respiratory System 

Bifid nose 1 2 

Deviated nasal septum 1 — 

Nasal obstruction . . . 1 — 

Sinusitis 8 — 

Tonsilitis 78 4 

Upper respiratory infection 193 — 

Laryngeal obstruction 1 — 

Laryngitis 2 

Abscess, peritracheal 1 — 

Abscess, retropharyngeal 3 — 

Bronchiectasis 8 2 

Bronchitis 4 — 

Fistula, pleuro-bronchial 1 1 

Abscess of lung 3 2 

Atelectasis 3 — 

Pneumonia 46 1 

Pulmonary suppuration 3 8 

Pulmonary tuberculosis 1 — 

Empyema 47 6 

Pneumothorax .._._.,...".". 2 — 

Pyopneumothorax 2 — 

409 27 
Alimentary System 

Hypoplasia of mandible 1 — 

Alveolar abscess 1 — 

Dental caries 37 4 

Unerupted teeth 1 1 

Gingivitis 2 — 

Stomatitis 1 — 

Sublingual cyst 5 1 

Tongue-tie , . . . 1 — 

Thyroglossal cyst 6 — 

Sinus of neck 1 — 

Branchiogenetic sinus 5 1 

Cleft palate 23 14 

Harelip 17 5 

Harelip and cleft palate 33 89 

Sinus of lip 2 5 

51 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Alimentary System — Continued 

Fistula, parotid 

Fistula, salivary 

Obstruction of submaxillary duct 

Foreign body in esophagus 

Shortened esophagus 

Stricture of esophagus 

Tracheo-esophageal fistula 

Abscess, subdiaphragmatic 

Cardiospasm 

Enteric cyst, stomach 

Foreign body in stomach 

Pyloric stenosis 

Pylorospasm 

Abscess, pelvic 

Appendicitis, acute 

Appendicitis, chronic 

Appendicitis with peritonitis 

Hemoperitoneum 

Peritonitis 

Constipation 

Enteritis 

Colitis, chronic ulcerative 

Megacolon 

Redundant colon 

Impacted feces 

Incontinence of feces 

Adhesions between duodenum and liver . . 

Enteric cyst, duodenum 

Enteric cyst, ileum 

Enterocele, cecum 

Gastro-intestinal allergy 

Hypertrophied Peyer's patch 

Incomplete rotation of cecum 

Intestinal hemorrhage, etiology unknown 

Intestinal obstruction, extrinsic 

Intestinal obstruction, intrinsic 

Intestinal parasites 

Intestinal perforation 

Intussusception 

Meckel's diverticulum 

Mesenteric cyst 

Volvulus 

Biliary obstruction 

Biliary stasis 

Cholecystitis 

Cholelithiasis 

Cirrhosis of liver 

Jaundice, obstructive 

Obliteration of bile ducts 

Rudimentary gall bladder 

52 



1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


4 


53 


5 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


3 


— 


36 


1 


2 


— 


1 


— 


34 


1 


23 


— 


29 


— 


1 


— 


11 


— 


9 


— 


6 


— 


3 


10 


2 


2 


1 


— 


4 


— 


2 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— ■ 


1 


— 


1 


— 


3 


2 


1 


— 


2 


— 


2 


— 


11 


4 


7 


— 


6 


— 


1 


— 


15 


1 


5 


— 


1 


— 


6 


— 




1 


1 


— 


1 


— 


2 


— 




2 


3 


— 


2 


— 


1 


— 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

iUimentary System — Continued 

Tumor of liver, unclassified 1 — 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 27 — 

Abscess, ischio-rectal — 1 

Abscess, perianal 1 — 

Anomaly of anus 1 — 

Fissure of anus 1 — 

Fistula in ano 5 — 

Imperforate anus 11 14 

Stricture of anus 1 1 

Atresia of rectum 2 — 

Fistula, recto-perineal 1 — - 

Fistula, recto-vaginal 6 5 

Fistula, recto-vesical 2 6 

Hemorrhoids : 1 1 

Polyp, rectal 10 3 

Prolapse of rectum 3 — 

Rectal bleeding, etiology unknown 7 — 

474 228 
Genito-Urinary System 

Hydronephrosis 12 10 

Nephritis, glomerular 1 — 

Pyelitis 4 2 

Pyrlonephritis 6 8 

Aberrant renal vessel 4 — 

Abscess, perinephric 1 — 

Absence of kidney 1 — 

Anomaly of genito-urinary tract 1 — 

Bifid renal pelvis 1 

Calculus, renal 2 1 

Double renal pelvis 3 — 

Embryoma, kidney ' 4 1 

Fistula, urinary '. 2 1 

Horse-shoe kidney 1 — 

Infantile kidney 1 — 

Ptosis of kidney 1 1 

Ruptured kidney, traumatic 2 1 

Tuberculosis of kidney 3 — 

Calculus, ureteral 1 — 

Double ureter 3 1 

Kinked ureter 2 — - 

Megaloureter 1 3 

Ureterocele 1 1 

Calculus, vesical 1 — 

Cystitis 1 — 

Enuresis , 1 — 

Exstrophy of the bladder 3 17 

Incontinence of urine 2 — 

Leukoplakia of bladder 1 — 

Micturition, frequent, etiology unknown 2 — 

Patent urachus 1 — 

53 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Genito-Urinary System — Continued 

Ulceration of bladder mucosa 1 — 

Bacilluria, etiology unknown 1 — 

Hematuria, etiology unknown 4 — 

Hematuria, secondary to contusion of kidney 1 — 

Phosphaturia, etiology unknown 1 — 

Pyuria, etiology unknown 8 — 

Stricture of urethra 4 1 

Urethritis 2 1 

Absence of testicle 1 — 

Adhesions about clitoris 1 — 

Adhesions, preputial 3 — 

Atrophy of testicle 2 — 

Calculus, prostatic 1 1 

Cyst of Morgagni 1 — 

Dermoid cyst, ovary 2 — 

Double testicle 1 — 

Embryoma, ovary 1 — 

Epispadias 2 9 

Fistula, vesico-vaginal, traumatic — 2 

Gangrene of testicle 2 1 

Hermaphrodism 1 — 

Hydrocele 43 2 

Hypospadias 11 6 

Leucorrhea, non-specific 1 — 

Menarche 1 — 

Phimosis 42 - — ■ 

Torsion of appendix testis • 1 — 

Torsion of Hydatid of Morgagni 1 — 

Torsion of testicle 1 — 

Undescended testicle 31 16 

Vulvo-vaginitis, non-specific , 5 — 

248 86 
Cardio-Vascular Diseases 

Anemia 15 3 

Congenital heart disease 5 4 

Hemangioendothelioma, neck 1 — 

Hemangioma, arterio- venous fistula 2 2 

Hemangiomata and aevi 50 43 

Icterus neonatorum 1 — 

Jaundice, congenital hemolytic 3 — 

Leukopenia 1 — 

Lymphoblastoma, Hodgkin's type 1 — 

Myocarditis 1 — 

Pericarditis, influenzal bacillus 1 — 

Phlebitis 2 

Rheumatic heart disease 3 — 

Splenomegaly with gastric hemorrhage 1 — 

87 52 
54 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Lymphatic System New Old 

Lymphangiectasis 2 2 

Lymphangioma, axilla 1 — 

Lymphangioma, cheek 1 8 

Lymphangioma, lip — 1 

Lymphangioma, thumb 1 — 

Lymphangitis 1 — 

Lymphedema, familial . 1 — 

Lymphadenitis, auricular 2 

Lymphadenitis, axillary 1 — 

Lymphadenitis, cervical 24 3 

Lymphadenitis, cervical, tuberculous 5 — 

Lymphadenitis, femoral 4 — 

Lymphadenitis, iliac 1 — 

Lymphadenitis, inguinal 3 — 

Lymphadenitis, inguinal 3 — 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric 10 — 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric, tuberculous 4 — 

Lymphadenitis, perirectal 1 — 

Lymphadenitis, submaxillary 2 — 

Mastitis, chronic 1 — 

65 14 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands New Old 

Endocrine imbalance 1 — 

Obesity 4 1 

Pubertas precox 1 — 

6 1 

Nervous System New Old 

Abscess of brain — 2 

Absence of cerebellum 1 — 

Acrodynia 1 — 

Agenesis, cerebral 1 — 

Arachnoiditis 1 — ■ 

Atrophy, cortical 3 — 

Behavior problem 2 — 

Brain tumor, unclassified 12 7 

Concussion, cerebral 22 — 

Convulsions 1 — 

Cord tumor, unclassified 3 1 

Deficiency, mental 13 8 

Edema, cerebral 2 — 

Encephalitis 4 — 

Epilepsy 2 1 

Ganglioneuroma, chest 1 — 

Hemiplegia, post-operative 1 — 

Hemorrhage, post-operative 3 — 

Hemorrhage, intercranial 3 — 

55 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Nervous System — Continued 

Hemorrhage, interventricular 1 — 

Hemorrhage, subarachnoid 2 — 

Hydrocephalus 19 — 

Idocy, microcephalic 1 2 

ldocy, mongolian 5 i 

Mcningismus 1 — 

Meningitis, influenzal 1 — 

Meningitis, streptococcus 1 — 

Meningocele without spina bifida 2 — 

Meningoencephalocele 1 — 

Migraine, secondary to head trauma 1 — 

Myelitis, transverse 1 — 

Neuroblastoma, retroperitoneal 2 — 

Neurofibroma, finger 1 — 

Neurofibroma, multiple 2 — 

Oxycephaly 1 — 

Paralysis, brachial 3 — 

Paralysis of extremities, due to spina bifida 5 — 

Paralysis, spastic 7 3 

Paralysis of sphincters, due to spina bifida 5 — 

Paralysis of sphincters, due to anomaly of sacrum 1 — 

Paralysis, Volkmann's 1 — 

Poliomyelitis, acute anterior 1 — 

Poliomyelitis, old 4 — 

Scaphocephaly 1 — 

Spina bifida with meningocele 17 3 

Spina bifida occulta ' 2 3 



165 31 

Diseases of the Skin and Cellular Tissue New Old 

Abrasions 16 — 

Abscess of head, face, and neck 5 — 

Abscess of lower extremities 10 — 

Abscesses, multiple 6 — 

Abscess of trunk 7 — ■ 

Abscess of upper extremities 4 

Burns 18 3 

Cellulitis 26 1 

Cephalhematoma 1 — 

Constricting band of arm 1 — 

Contusions 21 — 

Contractures following burns 11 19 

Contractures — other than burns 7 — 

Dermatitis, unclassified 2 — 

Dermoid cyst, leg 2 — 

Dermoid cyst, sternocleidomastoid muscle 1 — 

Dermoid cyst, temporal region 1 — 

Dermoid cyst, umbilicus 1 — 

Dog bite 2 — 

56 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Diseases of the Skin and Cellular Tissue — Continued 

Eczema 1 

Erysipelas 5 

Fibro-lipoma, arm 1 

Fibroma, abdominal wall 1 

Foreign body in buttock 1 

Foreign body in wrist 1 

Furunculosis 7 

Granuloma of umbilicus 2 

Hematoma, unclassified 6 

Herpes 3 

Impetigo contagiosa 5 

Keloid, face . . . 1 

Lacerations 25 

Lipoma, back 1 

Lipoma, lumbar region 1 

Lipoma, neck 1 

Omphalitis 3 

Paronychia 4 

Pediculosis capitis 1 

Pilonidal sinus 1 

Pressure sore 3 

Scabies 1 

Scar, post-operative 2 

Sebaceous cyst, face 2 

Septic finger 2 

- Septic wound 29 

Serum sickness 4 

Tumor of back, unclassified 1 

Tumor of neck, unclassified 1 

Ulcer of skin 6 

Urticaria, papular , 2 

Verruca vulgaris 6 

Wound, bullet 2 

Wound, puncture 1 

Wringer injury, unspecified 4 



4 
1 



279 



28 



Diseases of the Bones and Joints New 

Absence of femur — 

Absence of fibula — 

Ankylosis of hip, old osteomyelitis of femur — 

Ankylosis of knee, old osteomyelitis of femur — 

Anomaly of coccyx 1 

Anomaly of frontal bone 1 

Anomaly of lower extremity 2 

Anomaly of sacrum 2 

Anomaly of spine 1 

Anomaly of upper extremity 5 

Arthritis of hip and knee, purulent - — 

57 



Old 

1 
1 

2 
2 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Bones and Joints — Continued 

Asymmetry of face 3 — 

Hone cyst of humerus — 2 

Causal appendage 1 — 

Cervical rib 1 — 

Claw hand 1 — 

Coccygodynia 1 — 

Claw hand 1 — 

Coccygodynia 1 — 

Dislocation of phalanx 3 — 

Dislocation of spine 1 

Dystrophy, osseous — Morquio's disease 1 1 

Fracture of clavicle 5 — 

Fracture of femur 7 — 

Fractur of humerus 11 ] 

Fracture of mandible 1 — 

Fracture of metacarpus 3 — 

Fracture of pelvis 1 — 

Fracture of phalanx 4 — 

Fracture of radius 5 — 

Fracture of radius and ulna 11 

Fracture-dislocation of radius and ulna 1 — ■ 

Fracture of rib 1 — 

Fracture of scapula 1 — 

Fracture of skull 25 3 

Fracture of tibia 5 — 

Fracture of tibia and fibula 1 — 

Fracture of ulna ' 3 — 

Hemivertebra 1 — 

Hypertelorism 1 — 

Malunion of old fracture of humerus 1 — 

Malunion of old fracture of radius and ulna 3 — 

Malunion of old fracture of tibia 1 1 

Osteoarthropathy — club fingers and toes 4 1 

Osteochondroma, femur — 1 

Osteochondroma, humerus 1 — 

Osteomyelitis of femur 3 7 

Osteomyelitis of fibula . 1 — 

Osteomyelitis of ischium — 2 

Osteomyelitis of mandible 1 2 

Osteomyelitis of phalanx 1 — - 

Osteomyelitis of radius 2 — 

Osteomyelitis of rib 2 — 

Osteomyelitis of tibia 1 4 

Polydactylism 6 — 

Sarcoma of ilium, ostogenic 1 4 

Scoliosis, structural 1 1 

Separation of epiphysis of innominate bone 1 — - 

Septic elbow 2 

Septic hip 1 3 

Septic knee 3 — 

58 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Bones and Joints — Continued 

Subluxation of knee, old septic 1 — 

Synostosis, radius and ulna 1 — 

Synovitis of knee 1 — 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus 1 — 

Talipes equino-valgus — 1 

Talipes equino- varus 3 6 

Xanthomatosis 2 5 

146 53 
Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Avulsion of tendon . — 2 

Camptodactylism 1 — 

Diastasis recti 1 — 

Ganglion 6 — 

Gangrene of forearm and hand, traumatic 1 — 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 2 — 

Hernia, femoral 1 — 

Hernia, incisional 2 — 

Hernia, inguinal 219 16 

Hernia, umbilical 31 5 

Pronated feet 2 1 

Severed tendon 2 — 

Syndactylism 3 - — 

Torticollis 1 1 

272 25 
Diseases of the Eye 

Aberrant tear duct 1 2 

Anomaly of nose and eye — 2 

Atrophy, optic 3 — 

Blindness, post meningitis 1 — 

Cataract, congenital . .. 1 2 

Coloboma 4 3 

Conjunctivitis 6 1 

Corneal tumor, unclassified 1 2 

Hordeolum 7 — 

Leucoma 1 1 

Obliteration of tear duct 1 — 

Papilledema, post encephalitic 1 — 

Ptosis of eyelid 1 — 

Strabismus 8 1 

36 14 
Diseases of the Ear 

Anomaly of ear 7 4 

Deafness 1 — 

Mastoiditis 3 — 

Otitis media 38 2 

Supernumerary auricles 1 — 



59 



50 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Specific Infectious Diseases New Old 

Bacteremia 2 — 

Dysentery, Sonne 1 — 

Septicemia 10 — 

Syphilis 1 — 

Vaccinia 1 — 

Vulvo-vaginitis, gonorrheal 2 — 

Chicken pox G — 

Measles 5 1 

Mumps ,5 1 

Scarlet fever 3 — 

36 2 

Unclassified New Old 

Poisoning 3 — 

Prematurity 3 — 

Pyrexia, etiology unknown 2 ■ — 

Shock, surgical 2 — 

Shock, traumatic 1 — 

Toxemia 1 — 

Deferred 3 — 

No disease 3 — 

18 — 

Number of cases admitted to the Surgical Ward 1324 

Number of cases admitted to the Private Ward ,276 

Total 1600 

New diagnoses 2336 

Old diagnoses 568 

Total 2904 



SURGICAL OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

Operations on Respiratory Tract 

Bifid nose 

Plastic 1 

Peritracheal abscess 

Incision and drainage 1 

Tonsillitis 

Tonsillectomy 4 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 43 

Abscess of lung 

Artificial pneumothorax 4 

Incision and drainage 2 

Rib resection 2 

60 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations on Respiratory Tract — Continued 

Bronchiectasis 

Artificial pneumothorax 2 

Injection of lipiodol 1 

Lobectomy 1 

Pneumonectomy 1 

Bullet wound 

Exploratory laparotomy and exploratory thoracotomy 1 

Empyema 

Aspiration , 1 

Decortication 3 

Exploration 2 

Exploration and rib resection ./.... 2 

Intercostal drainage '. 17 

Intercostal drainage and irrigation 1 

Rib resection 36 

Thoracentesis 1 

Pyopneumothorax 

Intercostal drainage 1 

Rib resection 2 

Suppuration of lung 

Exploration of thoracotomy wound 1 

Exploratory thoracotomy 1 

Injection of lipiodol 3 

Lobectomy 1 

Pneumonectomy 2 

Rib resection 1 

— 137 



Gastro-Enteric Operations 

Unerupted teeth 

Exposure of teeth 1 

Exposure of teeth and alveolectomy 1 

Cyst, sublingual 

Excision 2 

Excision and marsupialization 3 

Cleft palate — only 

Plastic 26 

Harelip — only 

Plastic 17 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Plastic to jaw ,. ■ • • 1 

Plastic to lip 45 

Plastic to lip and nose 1 

Plastic to nose 4 

Plastic to palate 41 

Plastic to palate and nose 1 

Anomaly of lip 

Excision of hypertrophied mucosa 1 

61 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Gastro-Enteric Operations — Continued 

Sinus of lip 

Endothermy 1 

Plastic 2 

Removal 1 

Branchiogenetic sinus 

Irrigation of sinus 1 

Removal 5 

Fistula, parotid 

Removal of scar 1 

Thyroglossal cyst 

Removal 6 

Esophageal stricture 

Dilatation 89 

Gastrostomy 3 

Fistula, tracheo-esophageal 

Anastomosis 6 

Gastrostomy 

Foreign body in esophagus 

Removal 

Abscess, subdiaphragmatic 

Incision and drainage 

Enteric cyst, stomach 

Exploratory laparotomy, biopsy, and marsupialization 

Foreign body in stomach 

Gastrostomy and removal of foreign body 

Pyloric stenosis 

Pyloromyotomy 38 

Re-suture of wound 

Vomiting, etiology unknown 

Dilatation of esophagus 

Appendicitis, acute 

Appendectomy 37 

Appendectomy and drainage 5 

Appendectomy and exploratory laparotomy 2 

Appendectomy and lysis of adhesions 1 

Appendicitis, chronic 

Appendectomy , . . . 19 

Appendectomy and exploratory laparotomy 4 

Appendicitis with peritonitis 

Appendectomy 3 

Appendectomy and drainage 23 

Appendectomy and drainage and exploratory laparotomy 1 

. Incision and drainage 2 

Peritonitis 

Exploratory laparotomy and freeing of adhesions 1 

Incision and drainage 4 

Proctoscopy 1 

Adhesions between duodenum and liver 

Appendectomy, exploratory laparotomy, and freeing of adhesions. . . 1 

62 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Gastro-Enteric Operations — Continued 

Enteric cyst, intestinal 

Appendectomy, resection of cyst, anastomosis, and enterostomy .... 

Resection of cyst and upper end of duodenum and lower end of py- 
lorus, and gastrojejunostomy 

Re-suture of wound 

Enterocele of cecum 

Resection and enterocolostomy 

Hypertrophied Peyer's patch 

Enterostomy 

Intestinal hemorrhage, etiology unknown 

Cystoscopy 

Intestinal obstruction 

Anastomosis and closure of enterostomy 

Anastomosis, closure of enterostomy, and resection of ileum 

Closure of ileostomy 

Colostomy and exploratory laparotomy 

Duodenojejunostomy 

Ileostomy and exploratory laparotomy 

Ileostomy and ileosigmoidostomy 

Ileostomy and re-suture of wound 

Jejunostomy 

Lysis of adhesions 

Lysis of adhesions and exploratory laparotomy 

Lysis of adhesions, exploratory laparotomy, and enterostomy 

Lysis of adhesions and constricting bands, and exploratory laparotomy 

Re-suture of wound 

Intussusception 

Application of clamp 

Closure of enterostomy 

Proctoscopy 

Reduction ■ 

Reduction and appendectomy. 

Reduction, appendectomy, and biopsy 

Reduction, resection of ileum, and enterostomy 

Resection of enterostomy and anastomosis 

Meckel's diverticulum 

Resection 

Resection and ileostomy 

Mesenteric cyst 

Anastomosis and resection of cyst and portion of ileum 

Volvulus 

Reduction 

Reduction and appendectomy 

Colitis, chronic ulcerative 

Application of clamp 2 

Closure of ileostomy 3 

Ileostomy 4 

Ilesotomy and appendectomy 1 

Proctoscopy 19 

Proctoscopy and application of clamp 1 

63 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Gastro-Enteric Operations — ( 'ontinued 

Partial resection of ileostomy 

Partial resection of ileostomy and application of clamp 

Dilatation of colon 

Exploratory laparotomy and biopsy 

Sympathectomy 

Redundant colon 

Proctoscopy 

Biliary obstruction 

Exploration of gall bladder and dilatation of anastomosis 

Cholelithiasis 

Cholecystostomy and removal of gall stones 

Cholecystectomy and exploration of bile ducts 

Jaundice, obstructive 

Exploratory laparotomy, removal of lymph node, freeing of adhesions, 

and appendectomy 

Obliteration of bile ducts 

Exploratory laparotomy 

Tumor of liver, unclassified 

Biopsy 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy 

Anomaly of anus 

Plastic 

Fissure of anus 

Proctoscopy 

Fistula in ano 

Proctoscopy and plastic 

Removal 

Imperforate anus 

Dilatation 

Plastic 

Plastic and exploratory laparotomy 

Sigmoidostomy 

Stricture of anus 

Dilatation 

Atresia of rectun . 

Plastic 

Fistula, recto-perineal 

Plastic ■ 

Fistula, recto-vaginal 

Closure of fistula 

Cystoscopy and vaginal examination 

Cystotomy and excision of fistula 

Dilatation 

Excision of fistula 

Plastic 

Hemorrhoids 

Proctoscopy with injection of sodium morrhuate 

Rectal bleeding, etiology unknown 

Proctoscopy 

64 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Gastro-Enteric Operations — Continued 

Proctoscopy and removal of tab 

Rectal polyp 

Proctoscopy 

Proctoscopy and removal 

Removal 

Rectal prolapse 

Cauterization of rectum 

Proctoscopy 

Deferred 

Appendectomy and biopsy of lymph gland 

Operations on the Genito-Urinary System 

Hydronephrosis 

Cystoscopy 

Cystotomy 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy 

Exploratory laparotomy and nephrectomy 

Exploratory laparotomy, nephrectomy, and ureterectomy . 

Heminephrectomy 

Nephrectomy 

Nephrectomy and ureterectomy 

Nephrostomy 

Pyelitis 

Cystoscopy 

Pyelonephritis 

Cystoscopy 

Cystotomy 

Nephrectomy 

Nephrostomy 

Aberrant renal vessel 

Ligation of aberrant vessel . . . I 

Ligation of aberrant vessel and nephropexy 

Abscess, perinephric 

Nephrectomy 

Absence of kidney 

Cystoscopy 

Calculus, renal 

Cystoscopy 

Removal 

Ureterolithotomy. ...'..' 

Embryoma of kidney 

Cystoscopy 

Nephrectomy 

Nephrectomy and excision of tumor 

P'istula, urinary 

Excision 

Infantile kidney 

Cystoscopy ■ ■ • • 

Exploration of kidney 

65 



2 
4 
5 



12 



2 
2 



1 
1 

2 
1 



2 
1 
1 

1 
1 
2 



560 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations on the Genito-Urinary System — Continued 

Tuberculosis of kidney 

Cystoscopy 

Calculus, ureteral 

Cystoscopy 

Nephrectomy and ureterolithotomy 

Double ureter 

Cystoscopy 

Megaloureter 

Cystoscopy 

Cystotomy 

Calculus, vesical 

Cystotomy and removal 

Exstrophy of the bladder 

Cystectomy 

Cystoscopy 

Plastic 

Ureterosigmoidostomy 

Micturition, frequent, etiology unknown 

Cystoscopy 

Patent urachus 

Removal 

Hematuria, etiology unknown 

Cystoscopy 

Stricture of uretha 

Cystoscopy and dilatation 

Cystotomy and excision of stricture 

Cystotomy and plastic 

Dilatation 

Dilatation and urethrotomy 

Urethritis 

Cystoscopy 

Dilatation 

Dilatation and cystotomy 

Adhesions, preputial 

Freeing of adhesions 

Cyst of Morgagni 

Removal 

Cyst of ovary 

Oophorectomy, partial 

Puncturing of cysts 

Removal, salpingectomy, and oophorectomy 

Embryoma of ovary 

Oophorectomy and removal of tumor 

Gangrene of testicle 

Orchideetomy 

Hermaphrodism 

Exploratory laparotomy and plastic to vagina 

Vaginal examination 

66 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Gastro-Enteric Operations — Continued 

Hydrocele 

Exploration of inguinal region 1 

Removal 40 

Hypospadias. . 

Dilatation 3 

Plastic 6 

Plastic and urethrotomy 3 

Phimosis 

Circumcision 33 

Torsion of Hydadid of Morgagni 

Appendectomy and removal of cysts 1 

Torsion of testicle 

Orchidectomy 1 

Undescended testicle 

Exploratory of inguinal region 1 

Orchidopexy 18 

Cardio-Vascular Operations 

Anemia 

Biopsy 3 

Biopsy and splenectomy 1 

Eosinophilia 

Biopsy 1 

Hemangiomata and naevi 

Arterial puncture 1 

Biopsy 2 

Diathermy and probing of duct 1 

Endothermy 21 

Endothermy and removal 1 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy 1 

Exploratory laparotomy, appendectomy, and removal 1 

Incision and drainage 1 

Removal 18 

Removal of dilated veins 1 

Removal and plastic 3 

Jaundice, hemolytic congenital 

Splenectomy 3 

Leukemia 

Biopsy 5 

Lymphoblastoma — Hodgkin's type . 

Biopsy 1 

Removal of cervical glands 1 

Pericarditis 

Pericardostomy 2 

Pericardostomy and drainage 1 

Reticuloendotheliosis 

Biopsy 2 

Splenomegaly with gastric hemorrhage 

Splenectomy 1 

67 



226 



71 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations on the Lymphatic System 

Lymphadenitis, cervical 

Exploration and curettage of sinuses 1 

Incision and drainage 11 

Lymphadenitis, cervical tuberculous 

Incision and drainage 1 

Removal of glands 3 

Lymphadenitis, femoral 

Incision and drainage 2 

Lymphadenitis, inguinal 

Biopsy 1 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric 

Appendectomy 1 

Biopsy 3 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric tuberculous 

Removal of glands 2 

Lymphadenitis, peri-rectal 

Proctoscopy 1 

Lymphadenitis, submaxillary 

Incision and drainage 2 

Lymphadenitis, submental 

Incision and drainage 1 

Lymphangiectasis 

Amputation of toe 1 

Endothermy 1 

Lymphangioma 

Biopsy 2 

Endothermy 8 

Removal 3 

43 



Operations of the Skin and Cellular System 

Abscesses 

Biopsy, exploration, and curettage of abscess . 1 

Incision and drainage 21 

Burns 

Amputation 1 

Curettage of granulations 2 

Debridement 7 

Plastic •> 12 

Burn contractures 

Plastic 37 

Caudal appendage 

Removal 1 

Cellulitis 

Incision and drainage 1 

Cephalhematoma 

Evacuation '.'. . 1 

Contractures — other than burns 

Plastic . . . 5 

68 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Skin and Cellular System — Continued 

Dermoid cyst, leg- 
Removal 2 

Dermoid cyst, sternocleidomastoid muscle 

Removal l 

Dermoid cyst, umbilicus 

Removal . . : 1 

Fibro-lipoma, arm 

Removal 1 

Fibroma, abdominal wall 

Removal 1 

Foreign body in extremities 

Removal 2 

Hematoma of leg 

Incision and drainage 1 

Keloid of face 

Removal 1 

Lacerations 

Debridement 1 

Debridement, irrigation, and suturing 7 

Irrigation and suturing 3 

Plastic . 4 

Suturing 11 

Suturing and plastic 1 

Suturing and removal of nail 1 

Lipoma 

Removal 4 

Paronychia 

Removal of nail 3 

Scars 

Plastic . 2 

Sebaceous cyst 

Removal , 2 

Septic wound 

Exploration and drainage . . .■ 1 

Incision and drainage 3 

Tetanus 

Excision of wound 1 

Tumor of neck, unclassified 

Removal 1 

Wringer injury 

Plastic 2 

146 

Operations on the Bones and Joints 

Anomaly of hand 

Osteotomy of phalanx 1 

Anomaly of sacrum 

Cystoscopy 1 

69 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Operations on the Bones and Joints — Continued 

Arthritis 

Incision and drainage 2 

Removal of rheumatic nodule 1 

Bone cyst, humerus 

Curettage of cyst 1 

Claw hand 

Plastic 1 

Dislocation of phalanx 

Reduction, closed 1 

Reduction, open 1 

Fracture of femur 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 5 

Fracture of humerus 

Reduction, closed 8 

Reduction, open 1 

Fracture of pelvis 

Reduction, open 1 

Fracture of radius 

Reduction, closed 3 

Fracture of radius and ulna 

Reduction, closed 8 

Reduction, open 1 

Fracture — dislocation of radius and ulna 

Reduction, closed 1 

Fracture of skull 

Bone flap 1 

Burr holes - 1 

Decompression and removal of fragments 1 

Elevation 1 

Fracture of ulna 

Reduction, closed 2 

Malunion of old fracture of radius and ulna 

Osteoclasis 1 

Reduction, closed 4 

Reduction, open , 2 

Removal of w r ire 1 

Malunion of old fracture of tibia 

Reduction, closed 2 

Osteochondroma of humerus 

Removal 1 

Osteomyelitis of femur 

Incision and drainage G 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy . 6 

Removal of Kirschner wire 1 

Removal of scar 1 

Sequestrectomy and aspiration 1 

Sequestrectomy and exploration 1 

Sequestrectomy and insertion of Kirschner wire 1 

Osteomyelitis of fibula 

Incision and drainage 1 

70 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations on the Bones and Joints — Continued 

Osteomyelitis of humerus 

Incision and drainage 2 

Osteomyelitis of mandible 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy 2 

Osteomyelitis of radius 

Incision and drainage 1 

Osteomyelitis of tibia 

Sequestrectomy and curettage 1 

Polydactylism 

Removal .5 

Sarcoma of ilium, osteogenic . . 

Biopsy 1 

Septic joints 

Incision and drainage 2 

Incision and drainage and irrigation 1 

Incision and drainage and marsupialization 1 

Incision and drainage and removal of nail 1 



Operations on the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Avulsion o tendon 

Exploration 1 

Tenoplasty 1 

Camptodactylism 

Plastic 1 

Ganglion 

Removal 6 

Gangrene of forearm and hand 

Amputation of forearm 1 

Incision and drainage .\ 1 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 

Laparotomy 1 

Phrenisectomy 1 

Repair ,_. . , 1 

Hernia, femoral 

Herniorrhaphy 1 

Hernia, incisional 

Herniorrhaphy 2 

Hernia, inguinal 

Herniorrhaphy 240 

Herniorrhaphy and exploration of inguinal canal 5 

Hernia, umbilical 

Herniorrhaphy 30 

Severed tendon 

Suturing i 2 

Syndactylism 

Plastic 5 



71 



80 



263 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations on the Nervous System 

Abscess of the brain 

Incision and drainage 

Atrophy, cortical 

Subdural tap and biopsy 

Brain tumor 

Biopsy 

Bone flap 

Bone flap and ligation of vessels 

Bone flap and partial removal of tumor 

Burr holes and ventricular tap 

Craniotomy and drainage of cyst 

Craniotomy and injection of air 

Craniotomy and ventriculogram 

Decompression, bone flap, and biopsy 

Excision of sac 

Exploration 

Exploration and partial removal of tumor 

Exploration and re-elevation of bone flap 

Laminectomy, cervical 

Osteoplastic bone flap and evacuation of cyst 

Re-elevation of bone flap 

Re-elevation of bone flap and evacuation of cyst 

Trephine 

Ventriculogram 

Ventriculogram and ventricular tap 

Contusion of brain 

Lumbar puncture • 

Convulsions 

Burr holes 

Cord tumor 

Exploration , 

Exploration and biopsy 

Laminectomy and evacuation of cyst 

Laminectomy, evacuation of cyst, and partial removal of tumor. . . . 

Ventriculogram and lumbar puncture 

Deficiency, cerebral 

Cistern puncture, trephine, and ventriculogram 1 

Ventriculogram 3 

Encephalitis .... 

Burr holes and ventriculogram 4 

Craniotomy, exploration of sinus, and injection of air 1 

Craniotomy and ventriculogram 1 

Decompression 1 

Ventricular and lumbar tap 1 

Epilepsy 

Bone flap and removal of epileptic area 1 

Burr holes 1 

Re-elevation of bone flap and evacuation of clot . 1 

Ventricular tap ...-.:•. r 1 

Ventriculogram '.' 2 

72 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Operations on the Nervous System— Continued 

Ganglioneuroma of chest 

Exploratory thoracotomy and biopsy , 

Thoracoplasty with partial removal of tumor 

Hemorrhage, subarachnoid 

Trephine and ventricular tap 

Trephine and ventriculogram 

Hydrocephalus 

Exploration 

Exploration, craniotomy, ventriculogram and lumbar puncture .... 

Exploration and freeing of adhesions 

Exploration and lysis of septum 

Ventricular and spinal tap 

Ventricular and spinal tap and ventriculogram 

Ventriculogram . . 

Intracranial lesion 

Burr holes and ventriculogram , 

Craniotomy 

Meningitis, influenzal 

Trephine 

Trephine, ventricular tap, and injection of serum 

Meningocele 

Removal 

Meningocele with spina bifida 

Fascial sling to rectum 

Removal of meningocele 

Removal of meningocele and laminectomy 

Rotation of rectum 

Myelitis, transverse 

Exploration and laminectomy 

Neuroblastoma 

Biopsy 

Exploration 

Exploratory laparotomy and biopsy 

Neurofibroma 

Biopsy 

Removal 

Paralysis, brachial 

Exploration of brachial plexus 

Paralysis, spastic 

Shortening of tendon 

Psychosis, post-traumatic 

Trephine and ventriculogram '. 

Operations on the Eye and Ear 

Aberrant tear duct 

Catheterization and injection of lipiodol 

Transplant of tear duct into nose 

Anomaly of ear 

Plastic 

73 



99 



1 
1 

15 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations on the Eye and Ear — Continued 

Anomaly of eye and nose 

Plastic 1 

Staphyloma 

Evisceration of eye 1 

Strabismus 

Resection and advancement of external rectus and tenotomy of in- 
ternal rectus and inferior oblique 2 

Tenotomy of external rectus 1 



22 



Anaesthesias for dressing and plaster 23 

Total number of operations 1679 

Total number of Anaesthesias in Surgical Ward 1281 

Total number of Anaesthesias in Private Ward 287 



Total Anaesthesias 1568 



T 



Report of the Orthopedic Department 

HE Orthopedic Department of the Children's Hospital has been 
very active during the past year. 



House Staff. 

This continues to be made up of men who come from all parts of 
the country in order to avail themselves of the excellent opportunities 
to be obtained from this department of the hospital. The hospital may 
well be proud of these men who receive the Diploma which is awarded 
at the end of their service. 

Chief Resident. 

Dr. Pickney Harral, succeeded Dr. Paul Hugenberger as resident 
September 1, 1936. Dr. Harral's successor has been chosen for the next 
year. 

During the past year members of the Visiting Staff have given for- 
mal instruction to the House Staff at an evening session lasting two hours 
every week or two. Occasionally there have been talks by others than 
the Staff. 

The House Officers are working up end result problems from out- 
patients' cases and their records. 

Pathology. 

The internes who are working in the pathology laboratory in antici- 
pation of their clinical months have fitted in well and the system is 

74 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

already showing its worth to the department in the better coordination 
of the two departments. We hope to increase the usefulness to us of the 
Pathological Department in the near future. Dr. William Green is 
making use of the department in pursuing studies on bone growth and 
is also going ahead with our research in Pseudomuscular Dystrophy. 
Money for research is needed very much. 

Teaching. 

The teaching of third and fourth year medical students continues 
as last year. Doctors appear from time to time for graduate instruction 
throughout the year. 

The Report of the special clinics appears elsewhere. The Arthritic 
clinic is a success and has resulted in better care of these badly crippled 
children, which makes a decrease in readmissions to the wards. 

The follow-up clinics which are held throughout the school year 
have been well attended and are instructive. 

FRANK R. OBER, M.D. 



ORTHOPEDIC DISEASES TREATED IN THE 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

Congenital Malformations 

Head, Neck, and Trunk 

Klippel-Feil Syndrome 2 

Torticollis 57 

Anomaly of thorax, unclassified 1 

Anomaly of rib, unclassified 2 

Spine 

Anomaly of spine, unclassified 8 

Meningocele 1 

Pilonidal sinus 1 

Spina bifida 3 

Upper Extremity 

Sprengel's deformity 2 

Anomaly of arm, unclassified 3 

Anomaly of hand, unclassified 2 

Anomaly of finger, unclassified 1 

Club fingers 1 

Syndactylism 1 

Lower Extremity 

Dislocation of hip 11 

Anomaly of leg, unclassified 2 

Anomaly of foot, unclassified 5 

75 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Atrophy of fool 

Pes planus 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus 

Talipes equino-varus 

Talipes valgus 

Accessory scaphoids 

Anomaly of toe, unclassified 

Hypertrophy of toe 

Miscellaneous 

Achondroplasia 

Anomalies, multiple congenital 



2 
3 
49 
26 
5 
4 
1 



2 
1 



197 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 

Head, Neck, and Trunk 

Torticollis, acquired 5 

Spine 

Fracture of spine 2 

Scoliosis 61 

Upper Extremity 

Fracture of clavicle 23 

Fracture of humerus 19 

Dislocation of elbow 2 

Fracture of elbow 2 

Fracture of radius and ulna . . 16 

Fracture of radius 16 

Fracture of carpus 2 

Sprain of wrist 4 

Fracture of metacarpal 1 

Fracture of phalanx 7 

Sprain of thumb 1 

Lower Extremity 

Fracture of femur 3 

Slipped femoral epiphysis 1 

Flexion contracture of knee 1 

Internal derangement of knee 2 

Strain of knee 2 

Short leg, acquired 2 

Fracture of tibia 12 

Spur of tibia 2 

Fracture of tibia and fibula . 3 

Fracture of fibula 4 

Severed peroneal tendon 1 

76 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injuries or Disease — Continued 



Strain of foot 

Pronated feet 

Pes cavus 

Talipes calcaneus, acquired. . . . 
Talipes equino- varus, acquired 

Fracture of malleolus 

Fracture of metatarsal 

Sprain of ankle 

Fracture of os calcis 

Flexion contracture of toe . . . . 
Hammer toe 



3 

513 

6 

1 

9 
2 
2 
13 
1 
1 
1 



Miscellaneous 

Fractures, multiple .... 
Osteogenesis imperfecta. 



Non-Tuberculous Arthritis 

Arthritis of knee, etiology unknown . . 
Arthritis, proliferative — Still's disease . 

Arthritis of hip, toxic 

Arthritis of knee, toxic 

Arthritis of knee, traumatic 

Polyarthritis, etiology unknown 

Polyarthritis, rheumatoid 

Septic elbow 

Septic hip . . . : 

Toxic hip 



Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System 

Brodie's abscess of femur 

Brodie's abscess of tibia 

Osteomyelitis of humerus 

Osteomyelitis of phalanx 

Osteomyelitis of os calcis 

Osteomyelitis of tibia 

Osteomyelitis of ulna 



Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Dystrophy, pseudohypertrophic 

Myositis 

Neuritis, peripheral 

Paralysis of extremities, due to meningeocle . . . 

Paralysis, obstetrical 

Paralysis, peroneal 

Paralysis, spastic 

Paralysis, ulnar nerve 

Poliomyelitis, new 

Poliomyelitis, old 



5 
3 
2 
5 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 



4 

2 

1 

1 

14 

1 
23 

1 

1 
44 



748 



25 



92 



77 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Rickets and Its Deformities 

Rickets with bow legs 

Rickets with knock knees 

Rickets with multiple deformities. 

Tumors 

Baker's cyst of knee 

Ganglion of ankle 

Ganglion of wrist 

Osteochondroma of humerus 

Osteochondroma of tibia 



65 
.56 

22 



3 
1 
1 

1 
1 



Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, Muscles, 
Tendons, and Fascia 

Apophysitis 4 

Bursitis, os calcis 1 

Bursitis, patella 2 

Coxa plana 9 

Coxa vara 

Exostosis, metatarsal 

Exostosis, multiple 

Kohler's disease 

Ollier's disease 

Osgood-Schlatter's disease 

Snapping hip 

Synovitis of extensor tendons of hand, traumatic 

Synovitis of flexor tendons of hand, traumatic 

Synovitis of knee, traumatic 

Tenosynovitis of ankle 

Unclassified 

Abscess of leg 

Anemia, secondary 

Birth injury, unspecified 

Blister 

Bronchitis . . 

Carious teeth 

Cellulitis of ankle 

Clavus 

Coccygodynia 

Constipation 

Contusions 32 

Convulsions , 

Cystitis 

Deafness 

Dietary rash 

Enuresis 

Epidermophytosis 2 

Feebleminded 3 

78 



34 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Unclassified — Continued 

Hemophilia 1 

Hydrocele 1 

Hydrocephalus 1 

Ligamentous relaxation, generalized 2 

Keloid of. lip and nose 1 

Lacerations 2 

Obesity 7 

Otitis media 1 

Rheumatic fever 1 

Ringworm 1 

Scabies 1 

Scurvy 1 

Strabismus ■ 2 

Syphilis 3 

Tonsillitis 1 

Umbilical hernia 1 

Undescended testicle 1 

Upper respiratory infection 3 

Deferred 32 

Eloped 4 

No disease 35 

Transferred to other services 4 



New Cases 781 

Secondary diagnosis 632 



106 



1413 



ORTHOPEDIC DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

Congenital Malformations 

Head, Neck, and Trunk New Old 

Skull defect 1 

Torticollis 25 7 

Anomaly of thorax, unclassified — 1 

Cervical rib 1 1 

Spine 

Anomaly of spine, unclassified 1 3 

Hemivertebrae 1 1 

Scoliosis, structural 1 2 

Spina bifida with meningocele — 3 

Spina bifida occulta 4 1 

Upper Extremity 

Sprengel's deformity 3 — 

Anomaly of upper extremity, unclassified : — 1 

Extension contracture of elbow — 1 

79 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Flexion contracture of wrist 

Anomaly of hand, unclassified 

Lower Extremity 

Absence of femur 

Dislocation of hip 

Dislocation of knee 

Anomaly of leg, unclassified 

Hypertrophy of lower extremity 

Accessory cuneiform 

Accessory scaphoid 

Hypertrophy of foot 

Pronated feet 

Pes cavus 

Talipes equino-cavo- varus 

Talipes equino-varus 

Talipes valgus 

Cock-up deformity of toe 

Talipes equino-cavo- varus 

Talipes valgus 

Cock-up deformity of toe 

Miscellaneous 

Anomalies, multiple 

Arthrogryposis 

Dysostoses, multiple 

Multiple epithelial overgrowth 

84 76 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 

Spine 

Dislocation of spine 2 — 

Fracture of spine 2 — 

Scoliosis, functional 14 3 

Scoliosis, structural 22 6 

Upper Extremity 

Fracture of humerus 11 2 

Ankylosis of elbow, old septic — 1 

Malunion of old fracture of elbow 1 — 

Fracture of ulna 1 — 

Dislocation of radius, pathological 1 — 

Fracture of radius 1 — 

Malunion of old fracture of radius 1 — 

Fracture of radius and ulna 5 — 

Fracture-dislocation of radius and ulna 1 — 

Deformity of finger, old laceration 1 — 

Fracture of phalanx 1 — 

Severed flexor tendor of finger 3 — 

Trigger finger 1 — 

80 



— 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


14 


11 
1 
3 


— 


1 
2 


2 


— 


1 


— 


2 


— 


1 


1 


1 


— 


16 


26 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 
1 


— 


2 


4 


1 


4 


1 


— 


1 


— ■ 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease- 
Lower Extremity 

Adductor spasm of hip, etiology unknown 

Aseptic necrosis of femur 

Dislocation of hip, pathological 

Flexion contracture of hip 

Fracture of femur 

» 

Slipped femoral epiphysis 

Ankylosis of knee 

Flexion congracture of knee 

Genu recurvatum, old osteomyelitis of femur 

Genu valgum, etiology unknown 

Genu valgum, old fracture of femur 

Internal derangement of knee joint 

Fracture of fibula 

Fracture of tibia 

Fracture of tibia and fibula 

Pronated feet 

Talipes equino- varus, due to spina bifida 

Malunion of old fracture of metatarsal 

Severed peroneus longus and brevis tendons 

Hallux valgus, post-operative polydactylism 



-Continued 



1 
1 
1 

9 
1 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



3 

2 
1 

2 



Miscellaneous 

Contractures, post-infectious myelitis, multiple 

Dyschondroplasia — Ollier's disease 

Osteogenesis imperfecta 



Tubercolosis 

Tuberculosis of hip 

Tuberculosis mesenteric lymphadenitis . 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 

Tuberculosis of spine 



Non-Tubercolosis Arthritis 



Arthrit 

Arthrit 

Arthrit 

Arrhrit 

Arthrit 

Arthrit 

Arthrit 

Arthrit 

Arthrit 

Arthrit 

Septic elbow 

Septic hip . . 

Toxic hip . . 



s of ankle, etiology unknown . 
s of elbow, etiology unknown . 
s of knee, etiology unknown . . 
s of wrist, etiology unknown . . 

s of knee, luetic 

s, proliferative — Still's disease . 

s of hip, toxic 

s of knee, toxic 

s of ankle, traumatic 

s of elbow, traumatic 



110 


22 


1 


— 


1 
1 
1 


— 


4 





2 


— 


1 


— 


7 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


— 


4 


3 


1 


2 


— 


1 


— 


1 


— 


1 


1 


4 


2 


1 


- — 



25 



81 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Infections, Non-Tubercolosis, of Osseous System 

Brodie's abscess of tibia 

Brodie's abscess of femur 

Osteomyelitis of femur 

Osteomyelitis of fibula 

Osteomyelitis of humerus 

Osteomyelitis of ilium 

Osteomyelitis of ischium 

Osteomyelitis of metatarsal 

Osteomyelitis of socalcis 

Osteomyelitis of pelvis 2 

Osteomyelitis of phalanx 1 — 

Osteomyelitis of rib — 1 

Osteomyelitis of scapula 2 — 

Osteomyelitis of tarsus 1 — 

Osteomyelitis of tibia , 3 — 

Osteomyelitis of ulna 1 



1 

1 


— 


3 


6 


2 


— 


2 


1 




2 


- 


1 


2 


— 


1 


— 



20 13 
Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Anaesthesia of extremities, due to meningocele — 1 

Birth injury, transection of spinal cord 1 — 

Brachial plexus injury with paralysis of arm 1 — 

Dystrophy, progressive muscular — 3 

Hemiatrophy, facial 1 — 

Myelitis, post-infectious 1 — 

Paralysis, brachial 4 2 

Paralysis of extremities, due to meningocele * — 1 

Paralysis, facial 1 — 

Paralysis of radial nerve, post-traumatic 2 — 

Paralysis, spastic 7 4 

Paralysis, Volkmann's 1 

Poliomyelitis, new 3 — 

Poliomyelitis, old 62 54 

84 65 
Rickets and Its Deformities 

Rickets with bow legs 3 — 

Rickets with knock knees 1 — 

Tumors 

Granuloma of leg, unclassified 1 — 

Neurofibromatosis — von Recklinghausen's disease — 2 

Osteochondroma of humerus 1 — 

Osteochondroma of tibia 1 — 

Sarcoma of ilium, osteogenic 1 — 

Tumor of spine, unclassified 1 — 

Baker's cyst of knee 3 — 

Bone cyst of femur 1 — 

Bone cyst, multiple 1 — 

10 2 

82 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, Muscles, 
Tendons and Fascia 

Coxa plana 

Coxa vara 

Epiphyseal lesions, etiology unknown 

Osteitis, multiple rarefying fibrous 

Synovitis of hip, etiology unknown 

Synovitis of knee, etiology unknown 

Synovitis of knee, traumatic 



New 



Old 

3 
1 



Unclassified 

Abrasions 

Abscesses 

Allergy 

Aneurism, arterio- venous 

Asthma 

Blindness, post-meningitis 

Bronchitis 

Burns 

Cellulitis of knee 

Coccygodynia. 

Convulsions 

Cystitis 

Deaf mutism 

Deficiency, mental 

Dermatitis 

Empyema 

Empyema 

Endocrine disturbance 

Epidermophytosis 

Foreign body in Hoke wound 

Foreign body in knee 

Frolich's syndrome 

Furunculosis 

Heart disease, congenital 

Hematoma 

Hematuria 

Hernia, umbilical 

Hordeolum 

Hydrocele 

Hypertension, essential 

Hypertrichosis 

Hypertrophied tonsils and adenoids 

Idiocy, unclassified 

Incontinence of feces 

Incontinence of urine 

Laceration 

Leukemia, aleukemic lymphatic ....... 

83 



3 
3 

2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Unclassified — Continued 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 3 

Nevus, multiple pigmented 1 

M nmps 1 

Otitis media ] 1 

Paronychia 1 

Phimosis 1 

Pneumonia 2 

Pressure sore, external malleolus 1 

Pterygium of eye 1 — 

Pyrexia, etiology unknown 1 — 

Rheumatic fever 1 

Septicemia, staphylococcus 1 — 

Sexual precocity 1 — 

Strabismus 7 1 

Tonsillitis 1 — 

Ulcer, metatarsal region, old perforating — 1 

Ulcer, amputation stump 1 

Undescended testicle 3 — 

Upper respiratory infection 5 — 

"Whooping cough 1 — 

Xanthomatosis 1 — 

Deferred 4 — 

No disease 1 — 

101 12 

Number of cases admitted to the Orthopedic Ward ' 348 

Number of cases admitted to the Private Ward 46 

Total 

394 

394 

New diagnoses 451 

Old diagnoses -. 202 

Total 653 



ORTHOPEDIC OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

Congenital Malformations 

Head, Neck, and Trunk 
Torticollis 

Myotomy of sternocleidomastoid muscle 29 

Myotomy and tenotomy of sternocleidomastoid muscle 1 

Upper Extremity 
Elevation of scapula 

Lysis of scapula — first stage 3 

Erector spinae transplant — second stage 1 

Removal of wires 2 

84 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Lower Extremity 

Dislocation of hip 

Injection of air into hip 1 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 2 

Reduction, closed 14 

Reduction, open 2 

Reduction, open and shelf operation 1 

Hypertrophy of lower extremity 

Biopsy and exploration of foot 1 

Accessory cuneiform 

Removal 1 

Accessory scaphoid 

Removal . . . . 2 

Pronated foot 

Arthrodesis and tightening of tendon 2 

Arthrodesis, tightening of tendon, and lengthening of tendon 1 

' Talipes equino-varus 

Arthrodesis, Hoke 13 

Fasciotomy, plantar 1 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 10 

Lengthening of tendo Achillis 3 

Ligamentous procedure, Ober 4 

Manipulation 27 

Osteotomy, calcaneus and cuboid 2 

Tendon and muscle transplants, miscellaneous 4 

Miscellaneous 

Arthrogryposis 

Osteotomy, radius 1 

Tendon and muscle transplant 2 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 

Upper Extremity 

Fracture of humerus 

Biopsy of cortex 1 

Reduction, closed 9 

Reduction, open 3 

Fracture of radius 

Reduction, closed 1 

Malunion of old fracture of radius 

Reduction, closed 1 

Reduction, open and insertion of ivory lamina 1 

Fracture of ulna 

Reduction, closed 1 

Fracture of radius and ulna 

Reduction, closed 4 

Reduction, open 2 

Malunion of old fracture of radius and ulna 

Plastic 1 

Deformity of finger, old laceration 

Osteotomy of phalanx and insertion of pin 1 

85 



130 



THE CHILD HENS HOSPITAL 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease — Continued 
Fracture of phalanx 

Debridement and closed reduction 

Severed flexor digitorum profundus tendon 

Suturing of tendon 

Tenoplasty 

Trigger finger . . 

Manipulation and plastic to finger 

Lower Extremity 

Dislocation of hip, pathological 

Arthrodesis of hip, Albie type 

Biopsy from adductor muscle 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 

Myotomy, rectus and tensor fascia femoris 

Flexion contracture of hip, post-operative cord tumor 

Fasciotomy, tensor 

Flexion contracture of hip and knee, old spina bifida . 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 

Fracture of femur 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 

Reduction, closed 

Genu valgum, etiology unknown 

Osteotomy, Macewen 

Fracture of tibia 

Plastic — Thiersch graft to leg 

Reduction, closed 

Fracture of tibia and fibula 

Debridement and insertion of Kirschner wire ' 

Talipes equino-varus, due to spina bifida 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 

Severed peroneus longus and brevis tendon 

Tenoplasty 

Hallux valgus, post-operative polydactylism 

Lengthening of extensor hallucis longus tendon. . : 

Osteotomy, phalanx of first toe 

Plastic to skin 

Miscellaneous 

Dyschondroplasia — Oilier 's disease 

Manipulation, leg and foot 

Osteotomy and biopsy, femur 



— 53 



Non-Tuberculous Arthritis 

Arthritis of hip, toxic 

Incision and drainage 

Arthritis of knee, etiology unknown 

Aspiration and irrigation 

Septic elbow 

Incision and drainage 

Septic hip, healed 

Adductor myotomy and tensor fasciotomy. 



86 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Infections, Non-Tuberculous of Osseous System 

Brodie's abscess of tibia 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis of femur 

Curettage of sinus 

Excision of scar and incision and drainage 

Incision and drainage 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy 

Osteotomy, supracondylar 

Osteomyelitis of fibula 

Incision and drainage 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy 

Osteomyelitis of humerus 

Incision and drainage .-. *.' 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy 

Osteomyelitis of ilium 

Incision and drainage . '. ' 

Osteomyelitis of metatarsal 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis of os calcis 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis of phalanx 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis of scapula 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis of spine 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis of tarsus 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis of tibia 

Incision and drainage 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy 

Osteomyelitis of ulna 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy 

Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Brachial plexus injury with paralysis of arm 

Tendon and muscle transplant 

Dystrophy, progressive muscular 

Arthrodesis, Hoke 

Biopsy, gastrocnemius muscle 

Tendon and muscle transplant 

Myelitis with contractures, post-infectious 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 

Paralysis, brachial 

Division of subscapularis and pectoralis major insertion. 

Myotomy, subscapularis 

Paralysis of radial nerve, old fracture of humerus 

Exploration of radial nerve 

Paralysis, spastic 

Adductor myotomy and obturator neurectomy 

87 



25 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Paralysis and Other N euro-Muscular Diseases — Continued 

Adductor myotomy, obturator neurectomy, and lengthening of tendo 

Achillis 

Art hrodesis, Hoke 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, and plantar fasciotomy 

Lengthening of tendo Achillis 

Neurectomy, (Stoeffel), and tenodesis of wrist extensors 

Shortening of flexor hallucis longus tendon 

Tendon and muscle transplant 

Tenotomy of hamstrings and lengthening of tendo Achillis 

Paralysis, Volkmann's 

Fasciotomy and freeing of flexors from medial condyle 

Poliomyelitis, old 

Arthrodesis, astragalo-scaphoid 

Arthrodesis, Hoke 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, counter sinking, and tendon and muscle trans- 
plant 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, and osteotomy of os calcis 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, and posterior bone block 

Arthrodesis, astragalo-scaphoid, and tendon and muscle transplant. . . 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, and tendon and muscle transplant 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, and tenotomy of plantar fascia 

Astragalectomy 

Bone block, posterior 

Counter sinking of astragalus 

Fascial sling and tendon and muscle transplant 

Fasciotomy 

Fasciotomy and insertion of Kirschner wire i 

Fasciotomy and manipulation 

Fasciotomy and osteotomy of femur 

Fasciotomy and tendon and muscle transplant 

Fusion of astragalo-scaphoid joint 

Fusion of spine and osteo-periosteal graft 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 

Lengthening of tibia and fibula and tendo Achillis 

Lengthening of tendo Achillis , 

Manipulation 

Manipulation and tendon and muscle transplant 

Osteotomy of os calcis 

Plastic to foot and tendon and muscle transplant 

Reconstruction of carpal arch 

Tendon and muscle transplant 

Tenodesis of extensor carpi ulnaris and radialis longus 

Tenodesis, exploration of old tenodesis, and tendon and muscle trans- 
plant : : 

Tenotomy of extensor communis tendon and tendon and muscle trans- 
plant 

Rickets and its Deformities 

Rickets with bow legs 

Osteoclasis of tibiae 



1 

2 
1 
3 

2 
1 
1 

1 



1 
16 

2 
1 
1 
1 

28 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
9 
1 
1 
1 
1 

26 
1 

1 

1 



139 



88 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Tumors 

Baker's cyst of knee 

Removal 

Bone tumor, multiple 

Biopsy, skin and bone of femur 

Granuloma of leg, unclassified 

Removal 

Hematoma of thigh. 

Incision and drainage . . . 

Neurofibromatosis, von Recklinghausen's disease 

Biopsy, thigh 

Osteochondroma 

Removal 

Tumor of spine, unclassified 

Biopsy, lumbar spine 



Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 
Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Coxa plana 

Biopsy and exploration of hip 

Coxa vara 

Intertrochanteric osteotomy, adductor myotomy, and insertion of 

Kirschner wire 

Synovitis of knee, etiology unknown 

Aspiration 

Xanthomatosis 

Biopsy, humerus 

Biopsy, ilium 



3 
1 

1 
1 

1 



10 



Unclassified 

Abscesses 

Incision and drainage 

Deferred 

Manipulation 

Draining sinus — hip 

Incision and curettage of sinus tract . . 
Draining sinus — ilium 

Incision and curettage of sinus tract . . 
Foreign body in Hoke wound 

Removal 

Foreign body in knee 

Removal 

Lacerations 

Debridement 

Debridement, irrigation, and suturing. 
Ulcer, amputation stump 

Re-amputation and excision of ulcer . . 



Anaesthesias for dressing and plaster 8 

Total number of operations 390 

Total number of Anaesthesias in Orthopedic Ward 329 

Total number of Anaesthesias in Private Ward 37 

Total 

89 



14 



364 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Report of the Muscle Training Clinic 

The following new cases were admitted to the Clinic: 

Brachial Palsy 11 

Cerebral Palsy 36 

Spinal Cord Injury 1 

Miscellaneous Diagnoses 7 

Deferred Diagnoses . 4 

3581 treatments were given at the Clinic. 

Community Health Nurses are still giving treatments for us in 
the homes of patients who cannot be brought to the Clinic, either be- 
cause of their own infirmities or because their mothers are unable to 
bring them. 

It. K. BYERS, M.D. 



Report of the Bacteriology Laboratory 

J\ TOTAL of 13,639 examinations were performed in the laboratory 
•n* during the year past. This again represents an increase above the 
figure of the previous year. Of this total, 9,375 bacteriological specimens 
were examined. 4,264 clinical-pathological examinations were per- 
formed, representing a greater increase than of the bacteriological 
specimens. Part of the increase in the clinical-pathological examina- 
tions is due to the fact that during the past year the personnel of the 
hospital has been subjected to complete physical examinations. The 
laboratory has participated in certain parts of these examinations. 
These examinations are desirable as a means of excluding disease which 
might be harmful to the patients in the hospital. The care of patients 
in the private ward also in reflected is these figures and it is believed that 
this increase represents the growing necessity of the laboratory as an 
aid for the complete and thorough care of sick children. With advancing 
knowledge in the diagnosis and treatment of disease in children there 
are several procedures which might be established as standard methods 
in the laboratory. For example, a rapid blood test for the diagnosis of 
syphilis now is available. It would be desirable to use this test on all 
persons chosen to serve as blood donors for patients in the hospital. 
In order that the laboratory may continue to advance in knowledge 
and to function properly it is necessary to conduct problems in research 
and to be receptive of new ideas in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, 
besides performing its routine duties. During the past year the staff of 

90 



BACTERIOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

the laboratory has attempted to perfect a method for determining the 
exact type of pneumococcus, the bacterium causing pneumonia. This 
has required special study because such methods as were previously 
available for this procedure in adult patients could not be adopted for 
use in infants and children. It is believed that considerable success has 
attained; this is born out by the fact that a number of patients have been 
successfully treated with pneumonia serum, which shortened the dura- 
tion of their illness and probably saved life. The state department of 
health has recognized these attempts and has designated the laboratory 
as a depot where serum is always available for patients in the hospital 
or if occasion demands, for patients outside the hospital. The laboratory 
has been conducting studies relevant to the use of the new drugs "Pron- 
tosil" and "Prontylin" which have been so widely publicised for the 
treatment of streptococcus infections. 

Miss Marian Sweet has continued in her position as assistant 
bacteriologist. Drs. Edward Curnen, Richard Hodges, John Regan and 
Nathan Talbot have served as house officers in the laboratory during 
the past year. Dr. LeRoy D. Fothergill has continued to serve as bac- 
teriologist, and has given invaluable aid and advice even though his 
laboratory has been removed to the Harvard Medical School. Dr. 
Benjamin W. Carey, Jr., has continued as assistant bacteriologist. 

BENJAMIN W. CAREY, JR. M.D. 

Bacteriological Examinations 

Cultures from: 

Nose and throat for diphtheria bacilli 4,689 

Blood 724 

Spinal fluid 881 

Surgical specimens and miscellaneous cultures 1,442 

Feces 900 

Urine 507 

Guinea pig inoculation for diphtheria 26 

Guinea pig inoculation for Tubercle bacilli 81 

Agglutination tests 107 

Vaccinis prepared 18 

Total 9,375 

Clinical Pathology 

Routine urine examinations 1,874 

Blood 

Hemoglobin estimations 449 

Red cell counts 451 

White cell counts 733 

Differential cell counts 489 

Bleeding time estimations 35 

91 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Clotting time estimations 38 

Groupings 99 

Spinal fluid examinations 63 

Stool examinations 14 

Miscellaneous 19 

4,264 

Bacteriological examinations 9,375 

Total 13,639 



Report of Physical Therapeutics 

A SURVEY of the diseases which have been referred to the Depart- 
ment for treatment during the past year shows that some form of 
physiotherapy is being found useful in a wide variety of conditions. 

While the unusually small number of fresh polio cases was reflected 
in a corresponding decrease in the number of general and pool treat- 
ments given to House patients, there were no slack periods, for other 
phases of the work were active. Even in August when some of the 
Out-patient clinics were closed, the figures showed a busy month on the 
wards. While the Neurological Muscle Training Clinic was closed, a 
number of its patients were taken into the Orthopedic Physiotherapy 
Clinic in order not to interrupt their treatment. 

Two special studies were carried on during the year. Special meas- 
urements and tracings were taken of a large group of patients in the 
Scoliosis Clinic to assist Dr. Corson in his study of the effect of different 
types of posture on the center of gravity of the body. On the orthopedic 
ward, a study was made of a group of children with limitation of knee 
joint motion resulting from the splints used in the early treatment of 
polio. Intensive treatment was given and charts and measurements 
made to record progress. 

The clinic for the treatment of lateral curvature and faulty posture 
has been obliged to alter its routine to meet present conditions. General 
preventive measures seem to have been effective in reducing the number 
of severe structural cases in the community. The majority of cases which 
now come to us for treatment come from a distance, and are economically 
unable to follow the regular exercise and corrective jacket routine with 
frequent attendance at the clinic, as was formerly the case. Temporary 
inexpensive jackets and instruction for home exercises have had to be 
substituted. Patients with faulty posture also attend at less frequent 
intervals, and emphasis has to be put on obtaining the co-operation of 
the mother with home exercises. Results are necessarily slower, but in 

92 



PHYSICAL THERAPEUTICS DEPARTMENT 

general the photographic record of these children shows improvement. 

The therapeutic exercise pool was in constant use, except for six 
weeks during the summer. When plans were being drawn for Bader 
Building, there was some discussion as to the advisability of a pool and 
its usefulness. Six years has proved its usefulness here, and every in- 
stitution now built for the care of crippled children includes at least one 
pool in its equipment. 

The research which has been done with irradiated substances and 
vitamins has made it unnecessary to carry on the general O. P. D. 
Light Therapy Clinic which was much used a few years ago. There is 
still need for this treatment on patients who have been hospitalized for 
some time, and it is useful in hastening the healing of some sluggish 
wounds. The greatest number of requests for light therapy came from 
the Surgical Service. 

The training of graduate students from Harvard Medical School 
is a very important part of the work of the Department. The nine 
months course is on the list approved by the American Medical Associa- 
tion and the American Physiotherapy Association. Affiliation with the 
Massachusetts General Hospital, Robert Brigham Hospital, Peter Brig- 
ham Hospital, Cambridge Hospital, Industrial School for Crippled Chil- 
dren, Wellesley Convalescent Home and other institutions gives these 
students a broad general experience. However, they are known over the 
country for the success of their work with children, especially in the 
infantile paralysis field. Their usefulness is of much value to this Hospi- 
tal while they are obtaining their training. Without them it would be 
quite impossible to care for the number of children for whom some form 
of physiotherapy treatment is advised. However, since they are inex- 
perienced in this field, constant supervision and regular instruction are 
necessary to insure the welfare of the patients. Of the sixteen women 
trained in 1936, six are now working in hospitals, four with public health 
nursing organizations, three with crippled children in schools and three 
with doctors in private practice. 

The seven weeks summer course included a number of nurses who 
were preparing to take positions in different states under the Social 
Security program for the care of crippled children. Dr. Legg and Dr. 
Sever have done much to further the spread of intelligent physiotherapy 
throughout the country, by their work in these courses. 

A most interesting three day reunion of former physiotherapy 
students was held in June. It was attended by more than a hundred, 
some of whom came from as far away as the Pacific Coast. Members 
of the Children's Hospital and Medical School Staff joined in making 
the program such a success that it has been widely commented upon. 

93 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Several of the papers were published in the American Physiotherapy 
Review. 

Special students from the Bouve-Boston School of Physical Educa- 
tion, and student nurses, were also given periods of instruction during 
the year. 

Miss Merrill was given four months leave of absence which was 
spent taking special work at New York University. 

In summing up the work of the Department, it should be remem- 
bered that while the responsibility for carrying out the various forms of 
physiotherapy treatment rests with the director, the prescriptions for 
treatment are made by the members of the Staff who follow the pro- 
gress of the patients on the different services and change the prescrip- 
tion accordingly. Many of them also assist with the training of the stu- 
dents. Whatever success the Department has attained is due in a large 
extent to the interest and helpfulness of the Staff. 

Publications 

View of Muscle Training" — Physiotherapy Review 



"A Broader 
November 1936. 



JANET B. MERRILL, 

Director of Physical Therapeutics 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY 
STATISTICS 



General 
P. T. 

Hospital Wards Cases 

Orthopedic 93 

Surgical 6 

Medical 7 

Throat 

Neurological 1 

Private 3 

Infants' Hospital 2 

Isolation 

Private 

Hospital Staff. 9 

School of Nursing 8 

Hospital Employees. . . 2 

131 
68 





Light 


Light 






P. T. 


Therapy 


Treat- 


Mt;scle 




Treatments Cases 


ments 


Exams 


Total 


3505 


5 


67 


26 


3598 


47 


43 


549 


4 


600 


137 


2 


26 


12 


175 





2 


50 





50 


3 








5 


8 


34 


6 


67 





101 


22 








1 


23 





2 


14 


1 


15 





1 


9 





9 


33 


3 


■ 27 





60 


28 


4 


48 





76 


13 











13 



3822 



68 



857 



49 



4728 



199 



94 



PHYSICAL THERAPEUTICS DEPARTMENT 



House Pool 

Orthopedic . . 
Medical .... 
Surgical . . . . 
Neurological 
Private .-...'. 



1 
4 



1474 

65 

10 

35 

139 



35 



1723 



O. P. D. Pool 
H. I. P. C. 

Private . . . . 



56 
5 

61 



2599 
121 

2720 



O. P. D. 

Orthopedic . 
Surgical . . . 
Private . . . 
Medical . . . 
Arthritic . . 
Scoliosis. . . 

Light 

Private . . . . 
H. I. P. C. 



159 
4 
1 
1 

23 

369 

9 

1 
1192 (IS 



new 



Neurological 204 



Total. 



1963 

2258 



Congenital Malformations 

Anomalies 

Arthrogryposis 

Club Feet 

Congenital Dislocation of Hip 

Coxa Vara 

Scoliosis 

Spina Bifida 

Sprengel's Deformity 

Torticollis 









10 








7 








11 








60 








2120 








78 








10 








5058 








3641 




12,374 








21,545 


'OTAL 


0. P. D. 


House 


Adults 


8. 


5 


3 




2 


1 


1 


- 


3 


3 






38 


30 


8 




1 


1 






39 


39 






12 


10 


2 




2 


1 


1 




20 


12 


8 





125 



102 



II. Deformities and Disabilities following Injury or Disease 

Faulty Posture 238 238 

Fractures 17 8 

Injuries 23 14 

Knock Knee 1 1 

Scoliosis (structural) 95 95 



374 



355 



7. 
3 



10 



2 
6 

1 

9 



95 



THK f IIILDRKX'S HOSPITAL 



III. Non-Tuberculous Infections Total 

Arthritis 42 

Osteomyelitis 10 

Septic Joints 7 

Septicemia 1 

60 

IV. Paralysis and Other Neuro Muscular Conditions 

Amyotonia Congenita 1 

Dystrophy 16 

Myalgia 1 

Neuronitis 1 

Paralysis 

Brachial 18 

post-operative 9 

Poliomyelitis 26 

post-operative 16 

Other Central Nervous System Lesions 15 

Volkmann's Paralysis 2 

105 

Tumors 

Cord 3 

Hemangiomata 11 

Osteochondroma 1 

Xanthoma 1 

Miscellaneous 

Abscess 2 

Adenitis 1 

Asthma 1 

Burns 2 

Coxaplana 3 

Deferred 8 

Empyema 13 

Erysipelas 2 

Gun Shot Wound 1 

Lead Poisoning 2 

Malignant Hypertension 1 

Malnutrition 1 

Mastoiditis 3 

Post-Operative Wounds 8 

Pneumonia 4 

Scurvy 1 

Sinusitis 4 

Skin Lesions 8 

Ulcers 1 

Muscle Examinations 53 

135 

Total 799 

96 



O. 



P. D. 


Housb 


Adults 


28 


8 


6 


3 


7 




3 


2 
1 


2 



34 



51 

1 
11 

1 



18 



14 


2 




1 


18 




5 


4 


4 


22 




16 


9 


6 




2 



53 



2 
1 
1 
2 
3 
7 
13 





1 






1 






3 






8 






3 


1 




1 






2 


2 




4 


4 




1 




9 


44 




25 


103 


7 


567 


207 


25 



HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 

The Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission 

TURNING back the pages of medical history to the great infantile 
epidemic of 1916, we find the appointment of the Harvard Infantile 
Paralysis Commission. This Commission has just completed its twentieth 
year of service in the after-care of Infantile, with nearly a quarter of a 
million treatments to its credit. These have been twenty years of in- 
tensive study and research on the nearly 6,000 individual cases that 
have come to the Clinic for treatments, exercises and apparatus. Many 
cases each year are sent into the Children's Hospital for operation and 
later return to the Infantile Clinic for post-operative care. 

The Chart below shows quite vividly the number of pieces of 
apparatus fitted to children in each year from 1917. The lower Chart, 
showing the total number of treatments given by years, starts at the 
beginning of 1921 because the records of Field Workers prior to that 
time have not been preserved. 

The regular Hospital Clinics were held Tuesday, Thursday and 
Friday mornings together with outside Treatment Clinics in Arlington, 
Cambridge, Dedham, East Boston, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, 
Maiden, North Adams, Quincy, Somerville and Waltham. There were 
also seven Doctor Clinics held in outside cities. 

During the year the State Department of Health reported 59 cases 
of Infantile, although the Commission cared for 143 cases new to its 
clinics and gave 21,517 treatments in the Hospital clinics, pool, respirator 
and outside clinics. 

A survey made during the year of nearly 500 cases in which the 
onset of paralysis occurred in 1927, shows that by January 1934, seven 
years later, 33.6% had been discharged or left practically normal. 
33% are still under treatment. These figures are mentioned to emphasize 
two things: the relatively large percentage of recoveries and the exten- 
sive period of time required, in many cases, to accomplish this end. 

The Clinic continues to serve as a teaching clinic for House Officers 
of the Children's Hospital, Medical School Students and Physiotherapy 
Students. 

The fine cooperation of the Children's Hospital and Community 
Health Association has been a great factor in making possible the Com- 
mission's fine record during these twenty years. 

The Commission is most grateful to the Red Cross and Volunteer 
motor drivers for transporting patients to and from the clinics; to the 
Noemi, U. O. T. S. No. 11, the Kiwanians and the host of other organiza- 
tions for their unfailing support during the year. 

ARTHUR T. LEGG, M.D. 

97 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
THE HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 

Number of regular clinics held at the Children's Hospital 154 

Number of Doctor clinics held in outside cities and towns 7 

Total 161 

Number of visits made to the Children's Hospital clinics 7,531 

Number of old cases seen at Doctor clinics in outside cities and 

towns 310 

Number of visits made in the field by Commission workers 6,359 

Number of visits made in the field by the Community Health 

Association 7,174 

Total 21,374 21,374 

Number of new cases seen at the Children's Hospital clinic 126 

Number of new cases seen at Doctor clinics held in outside cities 

and towns 17 

Total 143 

Total visits at all Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission 

clinics 21,517 

Total number of individual cases seen 1,314 

Number of H. I. P. C. cases operated on in the Children's 

Hospital 79 



Report of the Otolaryngological Department 

THE Department of Otolaryngology has been functioning smoothly 
and efficiently during the past year, due to the installation of a 
resident surgeon on September first. On that date, Dr. C. G. Flake, 
after a long preliminary training at Baltimore, assumed the duties of 
resident surgeon. The result of having a competent resident on full 
time duty has exceeded our expectations and is in no small part due 
to Dr. Flake's interest and skill. 

The resident is able to assume a large part of the routine work and 
together with the Staff assures prompt attention to all emergencies. 
There have also been assigned to him part duties in instruction. Another 
advantage is the more thorough training of the house officers in otolaryn- 
gology through more constant association with the resident than is 
possible with the members of the Staff. It is to be sincerely hoped that 
the policy can be continued. 

The technique of the tonsils and adenoid operation has been re- 
vised, in that, the upright position has been abandoned in favor of the 
prone position. While the exact figures are not at hand, we are sure that 

98 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

the statistics in regard to post-operative hemorrhages will be much more 
favorable. 

The department is conscious that during the changes which have 
taken place in the last year, original contributions and papers have 
not been as numerous as they might otherwise have been. 

The following papers have been presented: 

A Study in Transillumination. Dr. Lyman Richards. Trans. Am. Laryngological 
Assoc, 1936, P. 91-110. 

Foreign Bodies in the Air and Food Passages. Drs. C. I. Johnson and C. F. Ferguson. 
N. E. Jour, of Medicine, Vol. 215, No. 23, pp. 1054-1060, Dec. 3, 1936. 

HAROLD G. TOBEY, M.D. 



REPORT OF NUMBER OF OPERATIONS FOR 
THROAT DEPARTMENT 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy — Out-Patient Department 719 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy — Ward 35 

Adenoidectomy — Out-Patient Department 39 

Adenoidectomy — Ward 11 

Mastoidectomy, simple 91 

Mastoidectomy, secondary 9 

Mastoidedtomy, radical 4 

Incision and drainage of post aural abscess 2 

Opening of lateral sinus and removal of clot 1 

Ligation of jugular and exploration of lateral sinus 1 

Skin graft to middle ear 3 

Exploration of mastoid and uncovering of lateral sinus . .' 2 

Laryngoscopy 18 

Laryngoscopy with excision of papilloma 8 

Laryngoscopy with removal of foreign body 2 

Laryngoscopy with incision and drainage of abscess 2 

Laryngoscopy with excision of tracheal fistula 2 

Bronchoscopy 11 

Bronchoscopy with injection of lipiodol and X-ray 29 

Bronchoscopy and adenoidectomy 1 

Bronchoscopy with removal of foreign body 11 

Bronchoscopy with removal of papilloma 2 

Esophagoscopy 4 

Esophageal dilatation 8 

Esophagoscopy with removal of foreign body 13 

Esophagoscopy under Fluoroscope 1 

Antrotomy 6 

Antrotomy with irrigation 3 

Antrotomy with injection of lipiodol and adenoidectomy 1 

Antrotomy and adenoidectomy 2 

Antrotomy with turbinectomy, tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 1 

99 



TI1K CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Antrolomy with resection of hypertrophied turbinates 

Radical antrotomy with removal of polyp 

Radical antrotomy and intranasal ethmoidectomy 

Antrotomy with irrigation and removal of both turbinates 

Tracheotomy 

Ionization 

Attempted removal of epiglottal cyst 

External ethmoidectomy with incision and drainage of left hand, 

Reduction of nose 

Incision and drainage of septal abscess 

Incision and drainage of retropharyngeal abscess 

Incision and drainage of eye 

Submucous resection 

Examination of nose and pharynx 

Repair of palate . 

Bic 



13 



nopsy 



Removal of foreign body from ear canal 

Excision of tumor of nasopharynx 

Exploration of left face and removal of zygoma 

Adenoid pack for post-operative bleeding 

Urethral dilatation, tonsillectomy, and adenoidectomy. 

Total number of ward operations 

Total number of Out-Patient operations 



4 

1 

313 

758 



Total number of operations. 



1071 



THROAT CASES IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 



Abscess, peritonsillar. . . . 
Abscess, retropharyngeal 

Abscess, post aural 

Adenitis, cervical 

Adenitis, post auricular. . 
Adenoids 



Asthma 

Carious teeth 
Ce 



.erumen 



Contusions ..... 

Deafness 

Deviated septum . 
Epistaxis 



Ethmoiditis 

Foreign body in auditory canal 

Foreign body in bronchus 

Foreign body in nose 

Foreign body in esophagus 

Foreign body in throat 

Fracture of nasal bones 

Hay fever 

Hypertrophy of phraynx 

Hypertrophy of septum (traumatic) 



1 

2 
1 

24 
5 

51 
1 
2 

19 
8 
6 

19 

33 
1 
4 
1 
3 
2 
3 

14 
3 



100 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Hypertrophy of tonsils and adenoids 635 

Laryngeal obstruction 1 

Laryngitis 5 

Mastoiditis 52 

Nasal deformity 2 

Nasal polyp 2 

Nasopharyngitis 30 

Otitis externa 1 

Otitis media 445 

Pharyngeal polyp 1 

Polyp of vocal cords 1 

Rathke's pouch extension. 1 

Rhinitis : '. 33 

Stricture of .esophagus . , 2 

Tonsillitis 96 

Ulcer of septum 1 

Ulcer of nose 1 

Upper respiratory infection 52 

No disease 82 

Left before seen 21 

Diagnosis deferred 21 

Transferred to other departments 8 

Total 

New cases in Throat Department 1633 

Secondary diagnosis 67 

Total 



1700 



1700 



PRIVATE WARD THROAT CASES— 1936 



Mastoidectomy, right 18 

Mastoidectomy, left 27 

Mastoidectomy, bilateral 16 

Mastoidectomy, left simple and right secondary 1 

Mastoidectomy, right secondary 4 

Mastoidectomy, left secondary 3 

Tonsillectomy 2 

Adenoidectomy 23 

Tonsillectomy, and adenoidectomy 529 

Tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, and branchiogenetic cyet dilation 

Tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, antrotomy, and ethmoidectomy 

Tonstillecomy and posterior turbinectomy 

Tonsillectomy and antrum puncture and adenoidectomy 

Tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, and incision and drainage of cervical 

glands 

Adenoidectomy and extraction of two teeth 

Antrum puncture and wash. 3 

Antrum puncture and posterior turbinectomy 2 

Incision and drainage of retropharyngeal abscess 2 

Incision and drainage of cervical adenitis 2 

Incision and drainage of post aural abscess 1 

101 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Incision and drainage of peritonsillar abscess 1 

External ethmoidectomy 1 

Submucous resection 2 

Suturing of mastoid 2 

Esophagoscopy 1 

Ligation of jugular, left 1 

Eustachian dilatation 1 

Suturing of palate 1 

Drainage of petrous tip, left 1 

Drainage of petrous tip, right 1 

Bronchoscopy 2 

Tracheotomy 1 

Total Private Ward throat operations 655 



Report of the Roentgenological Department 

IF THIS annual report, the eleventh by the present writer, like its pre- 
ceding ones of former years, has any claim to distinction, it is for its 
brevity and lack of wit. 

Our activities are like an open book, w T ell known to those who are 
interested and concerned with the activities of all the other departments 
and services of the hospital. 

Although treated somewhat as a separate entity, we on our part 
would like to be considered not only an adjunct but a part of the other 
clinical services. 

The object of our existence is to be able to give as much aid in the 
diagnosis and treatment of sick children as possible. 

If the amount of work we do is a reflection of the value of our efforts, 
the following statistical data tells the story. 

EDWARD C. VOGT, M.D. 

TABULATION OF PATIENTS 

Out-Patient Department 1936 

Medical 1956 

Surgical 922 

Orthopedic 1140 

Throat 255 

Total. 4,273 

Ward 

Medical 1089 

Surgical 939 

Orthopedic 635 

Throat 294 

Total 2,957 

102 



ROENTGENOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Infants. 

Private 

Bader Building. . . . 

Isolation 

Miscellaneous 

Doctors 

Nurses . .' 

Employees 

Total 

Total cases examined . . 
Total cases treated .... 

Total exposures (films). 



910 
799 
273 

80 
104 

29 
183 
217 



9825 
156 



2,595 



9,981 
27,705 



X-RAY REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 1936 



Radiographic Cases 

X-Ray Films Old Cases 

January 2542 524 

February . 2423 456 

March 2666 486 

April 2499 528 

May 2408 488 

June 2355 432 

July 2192 410 

August 1883 338 

September 1986 371 

October 2233 452 

November 2162 375 

December 2356 435 



27,705 



5295 



New Cases 


Treatments 1 


rOTALS 


384 


17 


925 


316 


13 


785 


417 


9 


912 


357 


8 


893 


412 


10 


910 


417 


21 


870 


412 


11 


833 


321 


5 


664 


344 


21 


736 


410 


9 


871 


360 


17 


752 


380 


15 


830 



4530 



156 



9981 



Private Cases 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 







Bader 


Iso - 




Infants 


Building 


lation 


96 


97 


23 


23 


57 


75 


24 


11 


75 


66 


38 


15 


42 


83 


25 


14 


69 


98 


42 


8 


73 


91 


37 




40 


67 






40 


56 






67 


65 


18 




86 


82 


21 




70 


53 


17 




84 


77 


28 


9 



799 



910 



273 



80 



103 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



House 

Medical 

.January 120 

February Ill 

March 120 

April 123 

May 84 

June 85 

July 72 

August 63 

September 64 

October 82 

November 72 

December 93 



1089 



Surgical 


Orthopedic 


Throat 


Total 


86 


76 


25 


307 


98 


35 


20 


264 


109 


40 


16 


285 


95 


58 


35 


311 


82 


26 


62 


254 


73 


77 


16 


251 


78 


71 


13 


234 


74 


59 


15 


211 


40 


58 


15 


177 


72 


53 


34 


241 


67 


35 


24 


198 


65 


47 


19 


224 



93» 



635 



294 



2957 



O. P. D. 

Medical 

January 166 

February 125 

March 171 

April 155 

May 190 

June 157 

July 180 

August 153 

September 147 

October 177 

November 164 

December - 171 



1956 



iSrRGICAL 


Orthopedic 


Throat 


Total 


44 


112 


20 


342 


64 


91 


24 


304 


71 


91 


21 


354 


98 


109 


20 


382 


107 


79 


17 


393 


112 


69 


23 


361 


104 


94 


24 


402 


69 


72 


19 


313 


80 


90 


22 


339 


79 


105 


19 


380 


49 


115 


18 


346 


45 


113 


28 


357 



922 



1140 



255 



4273 



Extras 

Doctop.s 

January 

February 4 

March 2 

April , 2 

May 4 

June 1 

July 8 

August 

September 2 

October . . 2 

November 1 

December 3 







Mis- 






cella- 


Nurses 


Employees 


neous 


4 


5 


11 


15 


11 


7 


40 


23 


5 


9 


13 


4 


9 


12 


11 


6 


24 


5 


5 


45 


21 


11 


20 


8 


14 


17 


16 


21 


22 


7 


30 


17 


3 


19 


8 


6 



29 



183 



217 



104 



104 



PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

Report of the Department of Pathology 

THE routine work of the laboratory has continued during 1936 with 
constant emphasis on thorough and carefully prepared records. 
Procedures that but a few years ago might have suggested special re- 
search efforts are now regarded as part of a complete routine study of 
problems presented by a surgical specimen or a postmortem examina- 
tion. It is evident that there is no sharp dividing line between the main- 
tenance of a proper routine, which answers the immediate requirements 
imposed upon the laboratory in a given case, and future study which 
is dignified by the term research. The reasons for maintaining what 
once might have been called an elaborate routine have been discussed 
in previous reports. It is sufficient to state that the routine efforts of 
the laboratory have been accepted by the clinical staff and have been 
incorporated in the factors responsible for the steady progress of the 
hospital as a whole. 

Because it is believed that one of the important functions of the 
laboratory is to carry on investigative work, special emphasis will be 
placed on that phase of our activities in this report. When the new 
quarters of the department of Pathology were built, provision was 
made for experimental work. Although no special equipment was in- 
stalled, the rooms were built to permit simple rearrangement for any 
of the research activities within the scope of pathology. With the collabo- 
ration of Dr. Wilson, experiments concerned with the general problem 
of respiration of the new born have been continued, following a line of 
work which has been going on for several years. The Department 
played host during 1936 to the full or part-time research activities of 
ten doctors not directly associated with the Pathology Department, 
and supported that work in various ways. Representatives of the sur- 
gical, orthopedic, medical and neurosurgical services of the hospital 
are included in that group. Stimulated and supported to an appreciable 
extent by the Pathology Department, the orthopedic, surgical and 
dental services have concentrated their recently undertaken experimental 
activities in our laboratories. Our animal room houses all the experi- 
mental animals used by Dr. McKhann and the members of his depart- 
ment. Under the direction of Dr. Wolbach and Dr. Blackfan, Dr. Ingalls 
is completing a two year study of certain phases of the vitamin C problem. 
Under their direction also, Dr. May has carried out studies on the vita- 
min A problem. Professor Conel of Boston University, and recently 
appointed Research Fellow in the Department of Pathology of Harvard 
Medical School, has submitted for publication the result of six years' 
work: the first volume of his basic study on the postnatal development 
of the brain, "The Cerebral Cortex of the New Born." 

105 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Dr. Farber returned in June to resume his duties as Pathologist. 
His year abroad as a Moseley Traveling Fellow from Harvard University 
was spent largely with Professor C. Heymans at Ghent. He has very 
modestly refrained from entering as publications from this department, 
the numerous publications which came out of the year's work. Of more 
importance to the hospital, however, is the fact that Dr. Farber brings 
back to the institution many new ideas and new methods of experimental 
approach to the solution of problems frequently presented in the clinic 
and in the postmortem room. Happily, the present quarters have per- 
mitted the establishment of a modestly equipped laboratory where, 
among other problems, Dr. Farber is actively studying the problem of 
pulmonary edema. An explanation has already been obtained for the 
occurrence of one type of acute pulmonary edema — that associated with 
lesions of the central nervous system. Dr. Farber 's experimental results 
may now be correlated with postmortem facts and they have cleared 
up the pathogenesis of a hitherto perplexing and not infrequent factor in 
immediate causation of death. 

Dr. Harris has completed a long and difficult study of one phase of 
congenital heart disease. The Department is collaborating with various 
members of the clinical staff in the study of several problems of interest. 
These will be mentioned in the next report. 

The collection of microscopic preparations of bone has reached a 
considerable size. This has been prepared by a part-time technician 
subsized through the efforts of Dr. Ober. Special studies on tumors of 
early life conducted for the past seven years, and aided by valuable end- 
result information gathered by Dr. MacCollum of the Surgical Service, 
have resulted in the accumulation of data of considerable importance. 

The educational activities of the department continue as in previous 
years. The official and unofficial instruction of students in the second, 
third, and fourth years constitutes a good portion of the work of the 
department. Five internes, representing all three clinical services, serve 
for from six to eight months in the laboratory before entering on ward 
duties. The weekly clinical-pathological conference, which helps the 
hospital meet one of the requirements for A. M. A. approval, acts as an 
important clearing-house for problems in diagnosis and treatment. It 
serves, also, as an important exercise in both post and undergraduate 
teaching. 

The above brief account of the activities of the Department of 
Pathology indicates that more and more the department is engaging in 
activities beyond those of most hospital departments of pathology. 
The development has been a wholly logical one, brought about through 
collaboration with the clinical staff and the realization that the pathology 
of early life is a very different field from adult pathology. Whereas in 

106 



PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

adults the important non-infectious causes of death are largely the out- 
come of the deterioration of tissues that we associate with the aging pro- 
cess, in early life we deal with tissues and organs unaffected by age and 
presumably amenable to recovery* provided pathogenesis can be dis- 
covered. Dr. Farber's year abroad was in realization that the pathologist 
must acquire techniques with instruments other than the scalpel and the 
microscope. More and more the pathologist is compelled to supplement 
his training in the morphologic aspects of disease by knowledge of 
physiology and biochemistry. It is to be hoped that gradually the de- 
partment may be permitted to expand in the experimental approach to 
causes of disease and mechanisms of death suggested, though not amen- 
able to solution, by analyses of gross and microscopic observations. 
The department has been fortunate in the intelligent and devoted 
assistance offered by its permanent force. Mention should be made of 
the excellence of the photographic work of Mr. Harding, whose efforts 
have enriched our permanent records. 

TABLE I 

Deaths 

Infants' Hospital 124 

Children's Medical Service: 

Isolation 4 

Neurological 3 

Children's Wards 49 

Medical Out-Patient 

Surgical Service: 

Surgical Wards 50 

Throat Service 4 

Orthopedic Service 1 

Private Ward 16 

Total 251 

Outside Cases* 

Total autopsies — 1936 

*Examinations usually performed here. 

TABLE II 

Infants' Hospital 

Medical Service (Children's) 

Surgical Service 

Orthopedic Service 

Private Ward 

251 166 66.1 

TABLE III 
Surgical Specimens 

1935 591 

1936 520 

107 



;opsies 


Percentage 


100 


80.6 


2 


50.0 


2 


66.6 


26 


53.0 


3 




27 


54.0 


1 


25.0 


1 


100.0 


4 


25.0 


166 


66.1 


14 




180 





124 


100 


80.6 


56 


33 


58.0 


54 


28 


51.8 


1 


1 


100.0 


16 


4 


25.0 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

The following men served in the Department of Pathology during 
1936. All except two of those, who had regular services, continued in the 
hospital in one of the clinical departments after leaving the Department 
of Pathology. 

Dr. Smith 0. Dexter, November 1, 1935 to May 1, 1936 (House 
Officer in Pathology). 

Dr. Thomas W. Botsford, October 1, 1935 to April 1, 1936 (Surgical 
Service). 

Dr. O. George Bates, July 1, 1935 to J9ly 1, 1936 (Voluntary 
Assistant and Substitute House Officer). 

Dr. Edward G. Ewer, September 1, 1935 to March 1, 1936. (Ortho- 
pedic Service). 

Dr. Paul V. Wooley, January 1, 1936 to February 15, 1936 (Medical 
Service). 

Dr. Frederick W. Rutherford, January 15, 1936 to June 15, 1936. 
(Surgical Service). 

Dr. Guy Darrell Ayer, March 15, 1936 to June 15, 1936, (Acting 
Resident). 

Dr. F. Bert Brown, March 1, 1936 to September 1, 1936, (Ortho- 
pedic Service). 

Dr. J. B. Campbell, April 1, 1936, to October 1, 1936, (Surgical 
Service). 

Dr. Richard G. Hodges, July 1, 1936 to January 1, 1937, (Medical 
Service). 

Dr. F. L. Marting, July 1, 1936 to January 1, 1937, (Surgical 
Service ) . 

Dr. Harold N. Johnson, August 1, 1936 to July 1, 1937, (Resident 
in Pathology). 

Dr. William Elliston (England), January 1, 1936 to June 1, 1936, 
(Voluntary Assistant in Pathology). 

Dr. Cecil Krakower, who took over the duties of Pathologist on 
July 1, 1935, served until July 1, 1936 when Dr. Sidney Farber, who 
had been on leave of absence during that year, returned. Dr. Krakower 
is now an Associate in Pathology in The School of Tropical Medicine, 
Puerto Rico. 

108 



PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

Publications of the Department of Pathology 

1936 

Dehydration and Acidosis with Calcification at Renal Tubules. Sidney Farber, 
A. M. Butler, and J. L. Wilson. J. of Ped., 8:489, 1936. 

Pulmonary Embolus Containing Cerebral Tissue. Cecil Krakower. Atch. of Path., 
July, 1936, vol. 22, pp. 113-115. 

The Pathogenic Significance of "Late Lactose-Fermenting" Coli-like Bacilli. Cecil 
Krakower. J. of Ped., vol. 9, No. 1, p. 23, July 1936. 

Acute Appendicitis and Measles. Henry W. Hudson, and Krakower Cecil. N. E. J. 
of Med., vol. 215, No. 2, pp. 59-64, July, 1936. 

The Lipoid Factor in Glycogen Storage Disease. Cecil Krakower. J. of Ped., Decem- 
ber, 1936. 

The Role of Scurvy in the Etiology of Chronic Subdural Hematoma. Theodore Hunt 
Ingalls. N. E. J. of Med., vol. 215, No. 27, pp. 1279-1281, December 31, 1936. 

S. B. WOLBACH, M.D. 



Annual Report of the Orthodontia 

Department 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING NOVEMBER 1936 

THE Dental Department of the hospital for the year 1935-1936 
shows a further healthy growth. In fact, it developed to such pro- 
portions it seemed advisable to divide the Dental Group into two depart- 
ments. The Orthodontia Clinic, devoted to the correction of the Maloc- 
clusions which occur in the mouths of all children with a cleft palate or 
harelip. The Dental Clinic, with four men (Dr. Boyle, Dr. Losch, Dr. 
Jump and Dr. Virkler) interested, who have assumed responsibility 
for all dental lesions which occur in, what is known as, General Dentis- 
try. This change is a division of authority and not of interests. 

The dental equipment at the Hospital is now inadequate and funds 
are needed to provide more space and additional equipment — chairs, 
instruments, etc. The writer hopes to accomplish this improvement 
during the coming year and thus expand the Dental Service at the 
Hospital. 

For the past five years, an average of six children a month, more than 
seventy per year have been operated upon for a cleft palate at the 
Hospital. 

The Orthodontia Department has been able to accept for treat- 
ment only two new cases during the past year. Further, during the past 
seven years it has been possible to accept only sixty-four children for 

109 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

treatment, of this number, forty-two are receiving active treatment. 
These figures show how necessary it is to expand the Orthodontia De- 
partment. The Hospital needs as many more Orthodontists as it can 
interest in the work. 

Detail of the Orthodontia Department for the year ending Novem- 
ber 1, 1936. 

Number of children receiving regular treatment. . 42 

Number of visits to Hospital 579 

Number of Broken Appointments 124 

In addition, a number of children report to the Department once or twice 
a year for examination and advice. All of these children suffer a speech 
defect which is a great handicap in all their social contacts. 

We were fortunate last fall in securing the services of Miss Segal, 
to give instruction in speech Correction and Training, and a large num- 
ber of the children have taken advantage of this service the past winter. 
An instrument for recording the speech of these children is very much 
needed in connection with this work by Miss Segal. 

HARRY W. PERKINS, D.M.D. 



Photographic Department Report 

' I A HE permanent exhibit of clinical photography mentioned in the 

report of last year is now on display at the Hospital. It was shown 
to three different groups during the "Come and See" week, late in the 
year. It is on permanent exhibition in the "V\ elf are Library. 

A much needed addition to the Department, a water jacketed 
developing, fixing and washing tank, was purchased in June. This has 
materially speeded up work in the processing room. 

Early in the year a start was made on a series of photographs of 
muscles and tendons of the human body. When finished, they will form 
a valuable collection for teaching surface anatomy. A considerable 
amount of time is required to make such photographs as each patient 
is an individual lighting problem. It will be several years before the set 
is complete. 

It is hoped that in the near future it will be possible to entirely 
eliminate troublesome high lights on fresh gross pathological specimens 
by photographing them under polarized light. 

A new two-inch lens for the motion picture camera was presented 
to the Department by the Children's Hospital Alumni Association, and 
has been of great aid in close-up work. The time is not far away when a 
new motion picture camera must be procured. The machine now in use 

110 



PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT 

has been in operation since 1929 and is not adequate for the technical 
demands made upon it. 

Improvement in the lighting of clinical subjects is constantly going 
on. Photographs made five years ago bear little resemblance to similar 
subjects photographed at this time. This is due to improved lighting 
apparatus, better sensitized material, and constant research into new 
methods of lighting the subjects. 

A Western Photonic Meter was added to the equipment of the 
Department and has been found very useful for determining correct 
exposure of many technical subjects. 

Papers published during the year included the following: 

Additional Notes on Radiographic Reproduction. Journal Biological Photographic 
Association. Volume 4, No. 3. 

Use of the Extension Bed and Sliding Tripod Block. Journal Biological Photographic 
Association. Volume 4, No. 3. 

T Binders. Journal Biological Photographic Association. Volume 4, No. 4. 

Tray Development of Cut Films. Journal Biological Photographic Association. Vol- 
ume 4, No. 4. 

Final Preparation of Prints: Spotting. Journal Biological Photographic Association. 
Volume 5, No. 2. 

Photography in the Posture Clinic. Physiotherapy Review. Volume 16, No. 3. 

F. R. HARDING 



PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT REPORT 

STATISTICS 
1936 

Service 

Cases Views 

Orthopedic 424 1014 

Surgical 375 814 

Medical 105 243 

Scoliosis Clinic 128 470 

Pathology — Infants' Hospital 69 111 

Pathology— Children's Hospital 88 168 

Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission 59 147 

Infants' Hospital 56 124 

Follow-up Clinic (Orthopedic) 25 54 

Publicity " 14 34 

Ward 9 „ 12 32 

Private Ward 8 18 

Throat Ward (6) 5 14 

Isolation (Ward 11 ) 5 9 

111 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Muscle Training Clinic 2 4 

Dental Clinic 1 3 

Operating Room 1 6 

Total 1377 3265 

Miscellaneous negatives 714 

Miscellaneous prints 1362 

Lantern slides 421 

Color Plates 24 

Motion Pictures 52 

Motion Picture footage 1800 ft. 

For Scoliosis Clinic 

Film packs developed 53 

Prints from above 531 

Cost of supplies $790. 77 

Charge slips 541. 79 

Inventory, unbroken packages, Dec. 31 59. 07 

Grand Total — Negatives for all purposes 3949 

Prints for all purposes 5158 



Occupational Therapy Report 

ONE thousand, one hundred and eighty-nine children received occu- 
pational therapy during 1936. This does not include patients who 
were visited in the home after leaving the Hospital. The number of 
projects finished — 1075. 

Exclusive of salary, the cost of maintaining the Occupational 
Therapy Department was $297.13. Ot this amount which includes cost 
of light, heat, cleaning, etc., approximately $90.00 was spent for sup- 
plies. The maximum per capita cost for the year has been about twenty- 
five cents. Cost of supplies less than eight cents per child per year. 

Seven students affiliating from the Boston School of Occupational 
Therapy have assisted over a period of ten months. 

Fifty-seven volunteers, an increase of twenty-five since 193-5, have 
given 2101 hours of service in 1936. These volunteers are members of 
the Junior League, students from Garland School, Bennington, Regis, 
Smith, and Radcliffe College; Conservatory of Music, Boston Museum 
of Fine Arts, and other friends who are interested in volunteer work. 

This year as in 1935 each affiliate group of nurses received one hour 
lecture on occupational therapy and its relation to the normal child. 
The second year Children's Hospital nurses (two groups) ten hours each 
of occupational therapy, consisting of one hour lecture, six hours craft 
and three hours ward assignment. 

112 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 

The Children's Library is more popular than ever. The books have 
been moved from the Occupational Therapy Department to the Wel- 
fare Room. Two volunteers assist the children in their selection of books. 
During the year there was a circulation of 1300 books. 

The Zonta Club of Boston continues to support and finance the 
Home Extension project of occupational therapy for convalescent 
children from the Children's Hospital. The work while under the direc- 
tion of the Occupational Therapy Department is supervised by Mrs. 
C. A. Hinkle. A grand Christmas party given by her for the children 
brought to a close this phase of the year's work. 

The Occupational Therapy Department as it brings this year of 
1936 to a close wishes to express its thanks and sincere appreciation for 
the friendly interest and hearty co-operation of the Welfare Committee 
and Hospital Staff. 



Report of the Social Service Department 

w I ^HE continuing pressure from the medical staff to cooperate in 
medical social treatment has kept us very busy all through the year. 
No two problems ever present the same contributing factors and there- 
fore the work is always fascinating. 

This year, one of our most interesting problems on the Medical 
Service was a child who came down from Canada. She was actually a 
walking skeleton and when her mother went back to care for her four 
other children she hardly expected to see Dorothy again. The doctors 
were able to diagnose her trouble at once and started her on a diet which 
very soon brought increasing improvement but because it would be 
impossible for her to come to the Out-patient Department if she went 
home, arrangements were made with one of the children's agencies to 
keep her in Boston. After several months, when they felt it would be 
safe, her mother came for her. Her friends and relatives considered her 
as one risen from the dead and would have liked to have published 
"before" and "after" pictures in the local paper. Ripe bananas were a 
large part of her diet and because it is so difficult for the family to pro- 
cure them, we have arranged to have banana powder sent to her when 
necessary. Her progress has been followed, and treatment changed 
through correspondence and so far all goes well. Since the reputation of 
the Hospital brings to us many patients from a distance, this is only one 
of many other cases where geography must be considered. Dorothy 
also happens to be one of a group of children for whom a very restricted, 
special diet over a period of years is a pre-requisite to eventual recovery. 
The medical social worker has found that it pays many times over to see 

113 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

that such children adhere to the diet, and if the families are unable to 
afford it to see that it is provided. 

Some of the most perplexing problems presented by the Orthopedic 
Service relate to the need for post-operative physiotherapy and clinic 
visits from one to three times a week over a period of months. Children 
living within a five-mile radius can usually be taken care of by arranging 
for transportation through the Red Cross, by issuing car tickets, or 
arranging with friends or relatives to drive the patient. For children 
living outside this area, we are again dependent on friends and relatives 
and often ask the Community Nurse, the Board of Health, the Police 
Department, the Fire Department, or local clubs to help out. Some- 
times it is necessary to send our patients to the convalescent home at 
W ellesley or place them in homes provided by one of the child-placement 
agencies until they are past this very important period of treatment. 
It almost seems as if Greenfield, Amesbury, and New Bedford have more 
than an average number of such children to be provided for. 

The Surgical Service, for the most part, has many patients who 
come in for operation and are discharged as cured almost before we know 
they are here. But there is one group of patients who often are referred 
to us. These are the unfortunate babies born with deformities which 
can never be corrected. Sometimes the mother has not seen her child, 
and friends who brought the patient to us a few hours after birth, believe 
she should never see it. The emotional difficulties involved in helping 
the family to come to some decision requires the utmost understanding 
and skill. At other times, because of the mother's death or a large family 
of children who will need all her strength, placement may be advisable 
but because such plans are extremely limited, the difficulties involved 
need the knowledge of one trained to know the resources and how T to 
use them. 

Again, this year we have been granted money from the Committee 
of the Permanent Charity Fund Incorporated for use in securing essen- 
tials of medical care not provided by the Hospital. Much of this money 
has had to go for club foot shoes which seems to be the biggest item we 
are asked to furnish. The Allocating Committee of the Unemployment 
Relief Fund has continued its allowance of previous years so that we are 
able to supply medical appliances for the patients who are receiving aid 
from the public welfare. We are indeed grateful for these gifts in times 
when the need is so insistent. Also, w T e wish to thank the Zonta Club for 
continuing their very generous service project which makes it possible 
to send an occupational therapist into some of the homes where children 
are recovering slowly from weeks of illness. 

AMY W. GREENE, 
Director. 

114 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Report of the School of Nursing and 
Nursing Service 

THERE has always been some vagueness about the date of the 
founding of this School of Nursing, since like many early schools 
of nursing young women were taken into the Hospital for training with- 
out much organization of a school. Several dates have been used. In 
order that we might have the matter settled the old records were gone 
through very carefully. The first diplomas were granted in May 1891 
to six young women who had been in the school at least two years, and 
in the organization of the school two years was established as the length 
of the course. By vote of the Executive Committee of the Board of 
Managers, after reviewing the evidence, the date 1889 has been estab- 
lished as the date for the founding of the school. It was one of the first 
forty schools in the United States. 

On the closing day of its forty-eighth year, there are ninety-eight 
students enrolled in the Children's Hospital School of Nursing. Of these, 
30 are away on affiliation, 27 in the preliminary course at Simmons 
College, 2 are completing their fifth year at Simmons, leaving 39 for 
assignment to the general wards and special departments of The Chil- 
dren's and Infants' Hospitals. This is 5 less than at this time last year. 
We also have 69 affiliating students representing 13 schools, and 8 gradu- 
ates having supplementary experience in pediatrics. During 1936 41 
students graduated from this school, including 6 five-year students; 
257 completed the affiliating course, and 17 the supplementary course. 
In addition, six students from Simmons College had field practice in 
ward administration. 

We hope to increase the number of our own students somewhat 
during the coming year. We decreased the number several years ago 
when the unemployment situation was acute; we need now to come back 
to our normal number. We have reached what we believe is the satura- 
tion point with affiliating students. 

For the first time in the history of the school the graduation exer- 
cises were held in the residence for nurses. The living room at Gardner 
House proved to be exceedingly satisfactory and made a charming setting 
for the exercises. A stimulating address on present day trends in nursing 
education was given by Dean Burwell of the Harvard Medical School. 

Our housing problem is getting quite serious, and we shall have need 
to find some means of providing a minimum of twelve to fifteen extra 
rooms. 

We continue to have a high rate of illness among our student nurses. 
In 1936, 2,104.5 days were lost by Children's Hospital and affiliating 

115 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

students in residence (this excludes our own students on affiliation) due 
to illness and leave of absence for or following illness. This represents a 
heavy daily loss, an average of 5.76 students off daily for illness or leave 
of absence for or following illness. The average number of days of illness 
and leave of absence per Children's Hospital student in residence for 
the year was 17.4. The comparative figure for affiliating students was 11.4. 
Comparing the graduate illness with student, we find that the average 
for all graduate nurses on the nursing staff was 1.2 L 2 graduates off for 
illness daily, including leave of absence for or following illness. If we 
take the group of graduate nurses who are in intimate contact with the 
patients, as are the student nurses, that is the general duty nurses, we 
find that the average off for illness was .23 daily — as against 5.76 for 
students. 

One wonders if the hours of work have some relation to the amount 
of illness. At the present time Children's Hospital students, after the 
first eight months, work 49 hours a week on the wards, exclusive of classes 
and study, in the daytime, and 56 hours at night, exclusive of classes 
and study. When you add to the student's ward schedule four to six 
hours of class and a like amount of study it exceeds the working hours 
of the graduate nurses. The schedule for affiliating students is not quite 
as heavy as for Children's Hospital student nurses, since in the case of 
our own students we are responsible for teaching the basic curriculum 
rather than the one branch of pediatric nursing. A 49-hour week, exclu- 
sive of classes and study, for day duty and a 56-hour week, exclusive of 
classes and study, for night duty is a heavy schedule for an eighteen 
to twenty year old young woman. 

The National League of Nursing Education is just about to publish 
its new Curriculum. This Curriculum is not compulsory for anybody. 
The League has no legal authority, such as a State Board of Nurse 
Examiners, but it is rather a pace-setter for the good schools of nursing. 
Among the recommendations is one with reference to a reduction in 
hours of service for student nurses. This school was one of the very early 
schools some twenty-five years ago to install an eight-hour day for its 
students and to put recommended educational practices into effect. 
During the ten-year tenure of the present Principal of this school the 
hours of service for student nurses on the wards have not been lessened. 
We believe that it is a problem which should now receive our attention 
if we are to keep pace with good current practice in good schools of nurs- 
ing. 

During the last year we have kept very accurate figures as to the 
number of bedside nursing hours on each of our services. The old method 
of measuring bedside nursing service was by means of ratio of nurses to 
patients. It was never a very satisfactory measuring rod. The Division 

116 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

on Nursing of the Council of the American Hospital Association and a 
Committee of the National League of Nursing Education have recently 
published a pamphlet on "Essentials of a Good Nursing Service" in 
which recommendations are made as to the number of bedside nursing 
hours which should be provided for certain types of patients. Our own 
figures for the individual wards for the past year show averages which 
closely approximate these standards. There are one or two places where 
we need more nursing service. The expansion of our services, not neces- 
sarily in numbers but in complicated treatments, research, and teaching 
of medical students, constantly keeps before us the need — in the interest 
of both patients and student nurses — of increasing the graduate bedside 
nursing staff. 

We are grateful for the continued co-operation of the medical staff, 
and the kindly interest of the Welfare Committee and the Ladies' Aid 
Committee of the Infants' Hospital in the nursing staff as evidenced by 
the teas held during the winter months. 

STELLA GOOSTRAY, 
Principal, School of Nursing 



C.,H. Students enrolled, January 1, 1936 102 

C. H. students enrolled, January 1, 1936 

in five year course at Simmons College 6 

Admissions — C. H. students 40 

Re-admissions — C. H. students 

148 

Completed course during year — 3 year students 35 

Completed course during year — 5 year students 6 

Resignations — ill health: 

Preliminary students 1 

Junior students 

First-year students 1 

Second-year students 

Third-year students 

2 

Resignations — miscellaneous reasons : 

Preliminary students 2 

Junior students 2 

First-year students 

Second-year students . . 1 

Third-year students 

5 

Dismissals: 

Preliminary students 

Junior students 1 

First-year students 

Second-year students 1 

117 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Third-year students (t 



2 50 



('. II. students enrolled, December 31, 1936 96 

C. H. students enrolled, December 31, 1936 

in five-year course at Simmons 2 

— 98 
('. H. students enrolled, December 31, 1936 96 

Affliliating students enrolled 69 

Graduate students enrolled S 

— 173 
C. II. students on affiliation not in residence 30 

C. H. students in residence but attending Simmons College. ... 27 57 

Total number of students assigned to wards and 

special departments 116 

Children's Hospital 93 

Infants' Hospital 23 

Affiliating students completing course during year 257 

Graduate students receiving additional experience in 

pediatrics during the year 17 



Report of the Welfare Committee 

AS WE LOOK back over 1936, the Welfare Committee has accom- 
plished quite a few things. 

The Avery Lectures again proved to be of great interest to the 
community with a record-breaking attendance and a large waiting list 
for next year. Not only were we able to carry on our support of the 
Occupational Therapy Department, but also purchased a portable X-Ray 
machine and equipment that was needed in the Hospital. Three cheers 
to Mrs. Stewart, Mrs. Warren and their committee. 

The Birthday Bed fund now has 551 members. This record is not 
quite as good as last year, but Mrs. Theopold is in the process of reorgan- 
izing the committee and hopes to reach a new high in 1937. 

The Holiday Committee had a most successful year. On each of the 
fifteen holidays every child in the hospital received an appropriate favor 
and ice cream. For Christmas, it is this committee's custom to contri- 
bute funds for anv last minute necessities. This vear it was tree decora- 
tions. 

Donation Day was held on Thursday, September twenty-fourth. 
Ruby Newman gave the services of his orchestra and both he and "his 
men" seemed to enjoy this annual event as much as the children. As 
usual ice cream and cookies were served and the afternoon was thoroughly 
enjoyed by all. 

118 



WELFARE COMMITTEE 

We voted in April to appropriate an annual fund of $50.00 for the 
Knitting Committee. This will give Mrs. Black the privilege of buying 
yarn whenever she runs out of donations, as we have many faithful 
knitters throughout the state, and we like to keep them interested in this 
work and in the hospital. 

The Girl Scouts, under Mrs. Clapp's stimulating influence, continue 
to supply us with scrapbooks, soft animals and toys, which mean so 
much to the children in the hospital. 

Mrs. Harwood has had a most successful year with the Nurses' 
Teas. She again had the big tea in April for the Managers, Staff Doctors 
and their wives, House Officers and Nurses which purposes to create a 
friendly feeling throughout the hospital. Special attention was given to 
a Christmas tea for the nurses. Gardner House was transformed into 
the most delightful Christmas atmosphere, and an added innovation 
was a three-piece orchestra which made a big hit. 

The teas given at the hospital for various groups of women's organ- 
izations contacted new people thus furthering our educational program 
and spreading a feeling of goodwill all over greater Boston. 

For three days in May we attended the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs' convention at the New Ocean House in Swamps- 
cott. We had a very attractive display of Occupational Therapy pro- 
jects made by the children, knitting articles, the doll's house and the 
merry-go-round model. This is a remarkable way to interest many thous- 
ands of women in the hospital. 

The Speakers' Bureau has continued to find new groups of women 
who have never heard of the wonderful work the hospital is doing. The 
film also is shown at these meetings. 

The C. H. Clubs are continuing their good work and have interested 
new summer resorts, thus increasing the fund. There are many new 
ideas which we hope will materialize for the coming year. 

The Thrift Shop continues to be a source of income for the hospital 
and several new members have been added to our committee. 

This year we added an Occupational Therapy Committee whose 
chief concern is to keep in touch with this department and report activi- 
ties, needs and progress each month at our meetings. 

We would like to thank the Director, members of the Hospital 
Staff, and the Board of Managers for their kindness and assistance at all 
times throughout the year. We hope as the years go on we may be of 
more service to the hospital. 

MRS. WILLIAM C. COX, 

Chairman 

119 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



WELFARE COMMITTEE OF THE CHILDREN'S 
HOSPITAL 1936 



Chairman 

Mrs. William C. Cox 

Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. John G. Palfrey 

Mrs. Gordon Abbott 
Mrs. Arthur W. Allen 

(New member December 1930.) 
Mrs. Joel M. Barnes 

(New member August 1936.) 
Miss Betty Bartlett 
Mrs. Lawrence Black 
Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 
Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 
Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 
Mrs. Albert Bradley Carter 
Mrs. Edwin F. Cave 
Mrs. George A. Clapp 
Miss Louise Coburn 
Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 
Mrs. Channing H. Cox 
Mrs. Maurice J. Curran 
Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 

(Resigned October 1936; voted hon- 
orary member.) 
Mrs. Charles Devens 
Mrs. Ralph H. Doane 
Mrs. Edward C. Donnelly 
Mrs. Samuel Eliot 
Mrs. H. Wendell Endicott 

(New member March 1936.) 
Mrs. Carl II. Ernlund 
Mrs. Donald Falvey 
Mrs. John W. Hallowell 
Miss Lucile A. Harrington 
Mrs. Bartlett Harwood 
Mrs. John II. Johnson 

(New member June 1936 as President 
of the Massachusetts State Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs.) 
Mrs. Gelston T. King 
Mrs. Louis E. Kirstein 



Vice Chairman 
Mrs. William DeFord Beal 

Treasurer 
Mrs. M. G. Russell 

Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Mrs. Thomas H. Lanman 
Miss Constance B. Learned 
Miss Elizabeth C. Leland 
Mrs. Francis B. Lothrop 
Miss Mary Meehan 
Mrs. George H. Monks 
Airs. John W. Myers 
Mrs. William Brace Pratt 
Miss Margery Richardson 

(Resigned June 1936.) 
Mrs. Frank A. Royce 
Mrs. William L. Shearer, Jr. 
Miss Mary L. Spaulding 

(New member December 1936.) 
Mrs. Frank H. Stewart 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. William Sutton 
Mrs. Robert C. Terry 
Mrs. Philip H. Theopold ' 
Mrs. Richard K. Thorndike, Jr. 
Mrs. Thomas J. W'alker 

(Automatically dropped June 1936 
as Past President of Massachusetts 
State Federation of Women's Clubs.) 
Miss Anne Warren 

(Resigned December 1936.) 
Airs. Samuel D. Warren 
Mrs. Richard P. Waters 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster 
Mrs. Nehemiah H. Whitman 
Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 
Mrs. L. A. Winchester 
Mrs. Samuel II. Wolcott 
Mrs. M. C. Young 

(Resigned November 1936.) 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE WELFARE COMMITTEE 1936 



Receipts 

Welfare Committee. 
Avery Lectures . . . . 



B8,293.29 
3,000.00 



120 



WELFARE COMMITTEE 



Campaign proceeds through Welfare Committee. 

Gross Receipts 

Deduct Special Donations: 

Holiday Committee 

Solby Taxi Fund 

Expenses 

Balance towards current expenses 



1,075.00 

$12,368.29 

$ 119.50 

50.00 

1,629.39 

10,569.40 



February 3, 1937. 



$12,368.29 
Mrs. Sutton Russell, 

Treasurer 



Former House Officers and Residents 



Abbott, F. B 1915 

* Adams, John D 1902 

Adams, Wm. B 1920 

Adelman, Maurice 1922 

Allison, Nathaniel 1901 

Ames, Frederick D 1934 

Amiral, Hiram H 1916 

Anderson, Arthur 1923 

Anderson, Randolph L 1926 

Anderson, Samuel A., Jr 1925 

Andrews, Edward A 1896 

Andrews, Sumner C 1916 

Atsatt, Rodney F 1927 

Ayer, J. B., Jr 1907 

Bailey, Orville T 1935 

Bailey, Walter C 1898 

Baker, Frederick H 1892 

Baker, Horace M 1917 

Baldwin, Herman T 1895 

Ball, John D 1923 

Barber, Carol Glenn 1921 

Barnes, Frederick W., Jr 1937 

Barr, Jo seph S 1928 

Barrett' M. F. 1903 

Bartlett, Daniel E 1905 

Bartlett, Fred A 1908 

Baty, James M 1929 

Beekel, Fred 1907 

Bell, Donald 1921 

Bender, Norman 1921 

Benjamin, James D., U. S. N..1914 
Bennett, Charles B 1923 



*Deceased 



20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

224 Thayer St., Providence, R. I. 

950 East 59th St., Chicago, 111. 

1204 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

9 Walnut St., Worcester, Mass. 

122 East 76th St., New York, N. Y. 

202 Professional Building, Richmond, Va. 

2326 W. Grace St., Richmond, Va. 

1298 Center St., Newton Center, Mass. 

1374 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

1421 State St., Santa Barbara, Cal. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Peter Jient Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

87 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 

29 Whitman Rd., Worcester, Mass. 

Lumberton, N. C. 

96 Middlesex Rd., Newton, Mass. 

2308 Oakmart Ave., Santa Ana, Cal. 

14805 Detroit Ave., Hand Bldg., Cleveland, O. 

Convalescent Home, Wellesley, Mass. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

231 Main St., Brockton, Mass 

308 Beale St., Wollaston, Mass. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

7039 Superior Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

115 Saranac Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. 

1122 University Ave., Berkeley, Cal. 



121 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Berkley, Hugh K 1916 

Binns, J. Erazier 1929 

Biorkinan, Gustav 1918 

Billig, Harvey F., Jr 1936 

Blair, Montgomery 1929 

Bolowtovv, Nathan A 1917 

Bost, Frederick C 1929 

Botsford, Thomas W 1937 

*Bowditch, Henry 1 1902 

Bowditch, Horace K 1905 

Bressler-Pettis, Chas. W 1917 

Briggs, Maurice T 1917 

Bromer, Ralph 1915 

Brostrom, Frank 1929 

Brown, Charles L 1923 

♦Brown, David R 1918 

Brown, John E., Jr 1933 

Brown, Lloyd T 1908 

Brown, Percy 1900 

Browne, Trevor S 1924 

Bryant, Charles S 1899 

Bryant, Clarence E 1906 

Burpee, Benjamin P 1916 

Byers, Randolph K 1924 

Byrne, Harry V 1929 

Calder, Harold G 1908 

Canada, Charles C 1934 

Canaday, John W 1934 

Carey, Benjamin W 1935 

Carpenter, George 1920 

Carson, Paul C 1921 

Carter, Marshall A 1935 

Catterson, L. F 1926 

Cave, Edwin 1927 

Chamberlain, John W 1935 

Chapin, William E 1926 

Churney, Otto 1929 

Clarke, George W 1904 

Clarke, M. Melvin 1927 

Clifford, Stewart 1929 

Cochrane, J. Joseph 1925 

Coe, Herbert E 1907 

Coggswell, William Jr 1892 

Cole, Walter F 1920 

Cook, Robert J 1916 

Coonse, G. Kenneth 1927 

Corson, Carl C 1936 

Crandall, Arthur R 1896 

Cravener, Edward K 1929 



1136 West 6th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

414 Doctor's Bldg., Nashville, Tenn. 

34 East 32d St., New York, N. Y. 

226 Linion Oil Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 

1155 16th St., N. W., Washington, D.C. 

224 Thayer St., Providence, R. I. 

157 16th Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 



(Not in practice) Grant City, Mo. 

Lynn Shore Drive, Lynn, Mass. 

Episcopal & Ortho. Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa. 

3411 Prytania St., New Orleans, La. 

2011 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

14 North State St., Concord, N. H. 

270 E. Town St., Columbus, Ohio 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

95 Pinckney St., Boston, Mass. 

Death Valley, Cal. 

Millinocket, Mass. 

15 Fairmount Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

814 Elm St., Manchester, N. H. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

371 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

224 Thayer St., Providence, R. I. 

Staunton, Va. 

Glenns Falls, N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Behnie Dillon Bldg., Nashville, Tenn. 

401 North Emporia, Wichita, Kans. 

Los Altos, Cal. 

New Sharon, Iowa 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

22 North 9th St., Richmond, Va. 

Babies Hosp. of Alameda Co., Oakland, Cal. 

85 Seneca St., Dundee, N. Y. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

198 Union Ave., Framingham, Mass. 

Medical & Dental Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

Capitol Bldg., Helena, Mont. 

Jefferson Bldg., Greensboro, N. C. 

97 Grove St., New Haven, Conn. 

370 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

90 Myrtle St., Boston, Mass. 

48 Church Green, Taunton, Mass. 

Home Savings Loan Bldg., Youngstown, O. 



"Deceased 



122 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Crawford, Henry B 1930 

*Creesy, Everett L 1900 

Crothers, Bronson 1912 

Cudney, Ethan B 1925 

Cunningham, Allen 1915 

Daniels, George F 1923 

Darrah, Rufus . . 1887 

Davidson, William D 1933 

David, S. D 1923 

Davis, Arthur G 1922 

Dawson, Clyde W 1937 

Deering, Charles F.. 1911 

Derby, Joseph C 1924 

Dexter, Smith O 1936 

Diamond, Louis K : . . . . 1929 

Dietrich, Harry F 1936 

Dillon, Victor M 1931 

Divers, Douglas 1924 

Dodd, J. E 1912 

Domser, Benjamin M 1911 

Doolittle, Leroy 1917 

Dresel, Rudolph L 1919 

Drissen, Edward 1931 

Dubois, Robert O.. . . 1923 

*Dunn, C. H 1902 

Dwan, Paul F 1931 

Dye, Paul J 1926 

Duckett, J. Warner . . 1929 

Eastman, Alexander 1900 

Eaton, Percival J 1885 

Eckles, Lucius E 1935 

Eley, R. C 1929 

Ellis, Richard W. B 1929 

Ely, T. W 1910 

Emerson, George E 1905 

Emerson, Paul 1915 

Emidy, Herman L 1926 

Eveleth, Charles W 1904 

Ewer, Edward G 1937 

Farber, Sidney 1928 

Fay, William E 1887 

Ferguson, Chrales F 1937 

Fisher, James T 1895 

Fisher, William H 1929 

Fiske, Eben W 1912 

Fiske, William B 1885 

Fitch, Ralph R 1904 



263 Hazelwood Ter., Rochester, N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

527 W. Iroquois Rd., Pontiac, Mich. 

76 Church St., Winchester, Mass. 

129 E. 69th St., New York, N. Y. 

810 E. Powell Ave., Evansville, Ind. 

911 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Danvers, Mass. 

20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

36 Follen St., Cambridge, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

559 So. Ardmore Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

566 10th Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

Pulaski, Va. 

121 Franklin St., Framingham, Mass. 

5-6 Prospect Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

908 Fidelity Bldg., Duluth, Minn. 

490 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Port Washington, Wis. 

125 East 72d St., New York, N. Y. 

825 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Sewall Rd., Wolfeboro, N. H. 

4105 Live Oak St., Dallas, Texas 

44 Chestnut St., Springfield, Mass. 
627 Commercial St., Provincetown, Mass. 

Eskridge, Kan. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Rearsby, Leicestershire, Eng. 

Bedford, Mass. 

South Weymouth, Mass. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

162 Main St., Woonsocket, R. I. 

1 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

181 Brookside Drive, Berkley, Cal. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Melrose, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Ill N. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

801 Salem St., Maiden, Mass. 

Westinghouse Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

315 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 



*Deceased 



123 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Fitts, John B 1916 

*FitzSimmons, H. J 1910 

♦Fletcher, A. S 1909 

Fletcher, F. L 1928 

Flint, Carlton P 1898 

Floyd, Cleveland 1905 

Fort, F. L 1923 

Fortune, Clayton W 1930 

Foshee, Clyde H 1931 

Foster, Joseph B 1929 

Foster, Thomas 1919 

Fothergill, Leroy 1930 

Fowler, Charles B 1929 

Frawley, W. T 1910 

Frazee, John W 1930 

*Fregeau, Wheaton 1933 

Freiburg, Joseph A 1927 

Friedman, Eli 1918 

Fitz, George W 1890 

Gage, Homer 1885 

Gallo, James F 1925 

Gallup, Henry E 1928 

Gamble, James L 1912 

Ganz, Robert N 1927 

Gates, R. F 1908 

(Not in practice) 

Gear, Patrick 1919 

George, F. W 1904 

Giddings, Paul D 1937 

Gill, MacLean 1935 

Gillespie, Elmer H 1930 

Gillespie, Norman 1917 

Glover, Donald M 1921 

Goldloom, Alton 1917 

Goldman, Ahbrum 1918 

Goldthwaite, Joel E 1888 

Goodale, Robert L 1924 

Goodwin, Edward S 1928 

Gordon, John K 1921 

Graham, W. T 1910 

Green, Hyman 1916 

Green, William T 1931 

Greene, D. Crosby, Jr 1898 

Griffin, Charles H 1923 

Griffith, Jesse B 1919 

Gross, Harold G 1890 

Gross, Herman W 1896 

Gross, Robert 1932 

Grover, Joseph 1 1913 



318 W. Franklin St., Richmond, Va- 
520 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Milford, N. H. 

246 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

1022 Park St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 

Louisville City Hospital, Louisville, Ky. 

1028 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

131 State St., Portland, Me. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

411 30th St., Oakland, Cal. 

184 North St., Pittsfield, Mass, 

311 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

3577 Alaska Ave., Cincinnati, O. 

311 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Peconic, L. I., N. Y 

8 Chestnut St., Worcester, Mass. 

317 Bellinger St., Herkima, N. Y. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass, 

19 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

144 Walnut St., East Dedham, Mass. 

127 Lincoln St., Holyoke, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

14 North State St., Concord, N. H. 

101 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

632 Columbia Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, O. 

1543 Crescent St., Montreal, Que. 

121 East 60th St., New York, N. Y. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

258 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

304 State St., Albany, N. Y. 

1538 Sherbrooke St., W. Montreal, Que. 

401 Medical Arts Bldg., Richmond, Va. 

483 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

85 Dudley Rd., Newton Center, Mass. 

404 County St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Willinsburg, Pa. 

Eureka, Cal. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
281 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 



* Deceased 



124 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Guest, George M 1926 

Guy, P. F 1926 

Haig, Ray T 1924 

Haight, Harry W 1911 

*Hall, Herbert J 1894 

Hall, Robert G 1910 

Hand, Delbert W 1935 

Hanflig, Samuel 1931 

Hansell, W. Whitfield 1917 

Harbin, Maxwell 1923 

Harper, Edwin A 1934 

Harris, Albert H 1931 

Harris, Herbert E 1936 

Harris, Jerome S 1936 

Harral, Pinckney . . 1935 

Hartman, Frederick B 1935 

• Harvey, Campbell 1921 

Hass, George 1931 

Hassman, David M 1915 

Haven, George 1882 

Helmick, Arthur G 1913 

Henry, Myron 1922 

Herrick, Theodore P 1920 

Hertig, A. T 1932 

Heyl, Henry L 1935 

Hibben, F. H 1914 

Higgins, Frank A 1891 

Hight, Donald. . 1935 

Hightower, Robert A 1936 

Hill, A. Morgan 1928 

Hill, Lewis W , . 1915 

Hitchcock, Harold H 1922 

Hockwalt, Wm. Richard 1929 

Hodgen, John T 1915 

*Hogarth, Walter P 1921 

Hopkins, Frank Read 1930 

Horner, Albert A 1913 

Hosley, Walter A 1906 

Howard, A. A 1910 

Howard, Philip 1927 

Howe, Walter C 1897 

Howell, William W 1899 

Hubbard, Elliot, Jr 1918 

Hubbard, John P 1931 

Huddleston, John 1899 

Hudson, Henry W., Jr 1927 

Hugenberger, Paul W 1934 

Hughes, Grey C 1936 

Hughes, Harry C 1937 



Cincinnati Children's Hosp., Cincinnati, O. 
782 South 49th St., Tacoma, Wash. 



Highland Park, J. J. 

801 Stevens Bldg., Portland, Ore. 

Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio 

371 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

519 So. Surety Bldg., Des Moines, la. 

Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland, O. 

Bedford, Va. 

219 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 

270 West End Ave., New York City 

5920 Julian Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Orchard Lake, Mich. 

Winthrop House, Cambridge, Mass. 

1728 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

78 South Fifth St., Columbus, Ohio 

4866 W. Lake Harriet Blvd., Minneapolis, Minn 

12429 Cedar Rd., Cleveland Hts., Ohio 

Carnegie Institute, Washington, D. C. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Newton, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

314 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1810 Wealthy S. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1624 Franklin St., Oakland, Cal. 

518 Almeda Place, Dayton, Ohio 

Grand Rapids Clinic, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

1112 Church St., Lynchburg, Va. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

46 Waban Ave., Waban, Mass. 

Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 

279 Clarendon St., Boston, Mass. 

29 Highland St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Hinckley Rd., Milton, Mass. 

1101 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

234 Marlboro St., Boston, Mass. 

Shackleford Hospital, Martinsville, Va. 

Route 1, Box 310, Englewood, Col. 



*Deceased 



125 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Humphreys, Storer P 193G 

Hunt, Fred C 1925 

Hunt, George P 1919 

Hunting, Nathaniel S 1886 

Huntington, Frederick 1926 

Hurd, Arthur H 1936 

Huston, Lewis L 1937 

Hyatt, Gilbert T 1933 

Ilfeld, Frederic W 1936 

Jackson, George H 1918 

Jacobus, Lawrence 1928 

Jeans, Philip 1910 

Jenks, Harrison D 1893 

Jennings, Robert E 1934 

Jennings, Percy H., Jr 1937 

Johann, A. E 1910 

Johnson, Erick St. John 1904 

Johnson, Harold N 1937 

Jones, Frank S 1932 

Jones, Harold W 1901 

Jones, J. Lawrence 1921 

Joplin, Robert J 1934 

Judy, J. A 1926 

Karp, Meir G 1935 

Keane, Clarence 1905 

Keever, Henry F 1909 

Kendrick, James 1 1932 

Key, John A .1920 

Key, William A 1928 

King, Donald 1917 

King, Edward 1917 

King, James M 1926 

Knowles, W. F 1882 

Koplik, Louis 1931 

Kuhns, John G 1927 

Kyle, Bernard. 1921 

Lanman, Thomas H 1920 

Larned, F. J 1914 

Legg, Arthur T 1900 

Legge, Robert F. . 1936 

Levine, S. Z 1923 

Linde, Frederick G 1925 

Lindemann, E. E 1911 

Logan, George B 1937 

Lonergan, Robert C 1925 

Lord, Robert M 1920 



Mass. General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

161 West 61st St., New York, N. Y. 

34 Fenn St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

1136 Hancock St., Quincy, Mass. 

Medical Arts Bldg., Scranton, Pa. 

1432 North Hayworth Ave., Los Angeles 

117 12th St., N. E. Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Truesdale Hospital, Fall River, Mass. 

1007 8th St., Las Vegas, New Mexico 

310 S. Michigan Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 

242 Moss Ave., Redlands, Cal. 

Children's Hospital, Iowa City, Iowa 

143 Park St., E. Orange, N. J. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York 

Liberty Bldg., Des Moines, Iowa 

32 Chestnut St., Boston, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

179 Allyn St., Hartford, Conn. 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

401 Argyle Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Barney Community Center, Dayton, Ohio 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Silverton, Ore. 

69 Maple Rd., Auburndale, Mass. 

2201 Wellborn St., Dallas, Texas 

Wash. Univ. Medical School, St. Louis, Mo. 

Shriner's Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 

205 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Hayward Bldg., Ashville, N. C. 

Wellsville, Ohio 

Lenox, Mass. 

311 East 72d St., New York, N. Y. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

1011 Church St., Lynchburg, Va. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

6 Roble Rd., Berkley, Calif. 

525 East 68th St., New York, N. Y. 

384 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

503 Ninth Ave., S. W. Rochester, Minn. 

636 Church St., Evanston, 111. 

122 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 



"Deceased 



126 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Low, Harry C 1896 

Low, Merritt B 1934 

Lucas, William P 1906 

Luther, Elliott H 1926 



139 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Eagle Brook School, Deerfield, Mass. 

490 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

State Sanatorium, Westfield, Mass. 



MacCollum, Donald W 1932 

McDonald, Francis Chas 1930 

McElroy, William D 1933 

McGoverney, Richard B 1930 

McGuire, Joseph H 1917 

McKeever, Francis M 1930 

McKhann, Charles F 1923 

McLaughlin, William 1931 

McNeil, Donald 1930 

Mahoney, P. J . . 1930 

Manning, J. B 1908 

Maraldi, Carl F 1927 

Marion, J. W. J 1911 

Marr, Myron W 1908 

Martin, James W 1924 

Matchet, Foster 1935 

McDermot, Leo J 1935 

Mathews, Samuel 1928 

Maxwell, Cyrus 1928 

Meade, T. Stanley. . 1934 

Merriam, Joseph C 1925 

Metzer, Butler 1897 

Mewburn, F. H. H 1922 

Miller, H. L 1918 

Her, Harold F 1929 

Her, J. Fleek 1934 

Miller, Ralph T 1927 

Milleken, Ralph A 1926 

Miner, Henry R 1920 

Moore, Beveridge H 1918 

Moore, Chester B 1912 

Moore, George C 1905 

Morrissey, E. James 1935 

Morse, William R 1916 

Moulton, Robert T 1937 

Mueller, Harry L 1937 

Mumford, Eugene B 1905 

Muro, Felipe 1920 

Murphy, John P 1933 

Myers, A. E 1913 

Myers, Ernest E 1932 

Myers, Samuel W 1902 

Naive, Jesse B 1921 

Nathan, Louis 1930 



*M 
M 



*Deceased 



81 Wimpole St., London, Eng. 

370 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Industrial Hospital, Youngstown, Ohio 

515 State St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Medical Arts Bldg., Dallas, Texas 

1136 W. 6th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

116 Melrose Ave., N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Medico Dental Bldg., Sacramento, Calif. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1515 State St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 

276 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Pinehurst, N. C. 

1418 Medical Arts Bldg., Omaha, Neb. 

Shriners' Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Worcester City Hospital, Worcester, Mass. 

1718 Wellington Rd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Auburn, N. Y. 

913 Sloyd Ave., Richmond, Va. 

198 Union Ave., Framingham, Mass. 

41 Ocean St., Lynn, Mass. 

416 McLeod Bldg., Edmonton, Alberta, Can. 

163 High St., Taunton, Mass. 

413 Hudson Ave., Newark, Ohio 

45 Main St., Ware, Mass. 

404 Hume-Mansur Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Falls City, Neb. 

30 North Michigan Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

384 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

475 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

329 So. Front St., Milton, Pa. 

Chengtu, China 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Detroit Children's Hosp., Detroit, Mich. 

Chamber of Com Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Farmington, Mich. 
2815 Park Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 



84 Hutchins St., Roxbury, Mass. 

Davidson Co. T. B. Hosp., Nashville, Tenn. 
69 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 



127 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Nelson, Richard L 1932 

Newsam, A. Roland 1922 

Nichols, Wallace J 19.33 

♦Nichols, E. H 1889 

Norton, Paul L 1934 

Norton, Rupert 1891 

Nutter, John A 1906 

Ober, Frank R 1914 

O'Connor, Dennis 1926 

O'Meara, John W 1919 

O'Neil, Frank C 1937 

Osgood, Rudolph 1930 

Otis, Henry S 1882 

Overlander, Charles L 1906 

Packard, Robert G 1915 

Page, Calvin G 1893 

Painter, Charles F 1893 

Palfrey, F. W 1903 

Parker, Willard S 1912 

Parnall, Edward 1932 

Patchen, Paul J 1931 

Patrick, William F 1917 

Patterson, Robert L 1934 

Peckham, Frank E 1888 

Pelkan, Karl F 1925 

*Pegram, John C, Jr 1896 

Percy, Karlton G 1913 

Perkins, John W 1884 

Perry, Sherman 1909 

Peters, William C 1904 

Phelps, Winthrop 1924 

Pierce, F. Richard 1935 

Pike, Maurice 1928 

Pinckny, F. H 1914 

Pinkerton, Henry. : 1926 

Pitkin, Horace C 1927 

Pohl, John F. . . 1933 

Pokorny, Norman A 1933 

Pollitzer, Richard M 1926 

Porter, Donald W 1914 

Porter, Robert B 1901 

Pratt, Henry 1933 

Prescott, H. D 1903 

(Retired) 
Pyle, Henry D 1929 

Radcliffe, Ernest J 1925 

Ramsay, Robert E 1918 



♦Deceased 



5442 Merrimac Ave., Dallas, Texas 

453 Angell St., Providence, R. I. 

102 Forest St., Medford, Mass. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

48 Chesterfield Ave., Westmount, P. E. I. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

789 Howard Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

390 Main St., Worcester, Mass. 

Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio 

33 Clarendon St., Boston, Mass. 

443 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

1707 East 18th Ave., Denver, Col. 

128 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

52 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

311 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

277 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 

8254 South Buffalo Ave., Chicago, 111. 

410 Taylor St., Portland, Ore. 

1143 Prince Ave., Athens, Ga. 

215 Saint Clair Bldg., San Jose, Calif. 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

22 Walnut St., Winchester, Mass. 

45 State St., Bangor, Me. 

New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn. 

Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 

179 Allyn St., Hartford, Conn. 

Morristown, N. J. 

Bryantville, Mass. 

Mill Valley, Calif. 

1945 Medical Arts Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

105 E. North St., Greenville, S. C. 

58 Grumbull St., New Haven, Conn. 

North Easton, Mass 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

26 Grove St., New Bedford, Mass. 

518 Sherland Bldg., South Bend, Ind. 

62 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 
65 N. Madison Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 



128 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Ramsey, W. S 1914 

Rawlings, Junius Mott 1929 

Rector, John M 1933 

Reed, Carson R 1935 

Reese, C. A. 1907 

Regan, John W 1937 

Register, John F 1935 

Rew, Willard B . 1934 

*Robb, William A 1931 

Roberts, Madison Hines 1921 

Roberts, Sumner 1929 

Roberts, Wyatt 1916 

Robertson, L. B. . . 1913 

Rogers, William 1923 

Ross, Alan S 1931 

Ross, Fred E 1912 

Rowland, Russell S 1904 

Rowley, Howard F 1923 

Rubin, Gabriel J 1926 

Rue, Homer A 1920 

Rutherford, Frederick H 1937 

Ryerson, Edwin W 1897 

*Sadler, Roy A 1909 

Saeger, Ernest T.. . . : 1919 

Sander, John F 1926 

Sanford, Charles H 1913 

Schlesinger, W. F 1927 

Schott, Harry J 1921 

Schultz, Robert V 1931 

Schultz, Reuben 1929 

Schwartz, Eugene 1934 

Scudder, Cuarles 1886 

Seabold, William W 1935 

Seelye, Walter B 1929 

Segar, Louis 1914 

Selleseth, Iver F 1920 

*Selva, Julio 1892 

Sever, James W 1901 

Shannon, James 

Shannon, Paul W 1934 

Sherwood, David W 1929 

Shortell, Joseph 1918 

Simon, Royal 1931 

Skinner, Marcus 1913 

Smith, Clement A 1931 

Smith, Edward T 1936 

Smith, F. R 1921 

Smith, L. D . 1924 

Smith, Richard M 1909 



407 E. Kingsley St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

4700 Hastings St., El Paso, Texas 

2000 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 

Natchitoches, La. 

Beaumont du Perigord, Dordogne, France 

Charleston, So. Carolina 

Greeleyville, So. Carolina 

Yakima, Wash. 

104 Ponce de Leon Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

1920 S. 10th St., Birmingham, Ala. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

345 Bronson Ave., Ottawa, Can. 

134^ W. Ninth St., Erie, Pa. 

5140 Second Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

278 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 

483 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

626 S. Lorena St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

122 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

32 Townsend St., Lansing, Mich. 

923 Walton Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

1216 Roosevelt Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

375 Walnut St., Wellesley, Mass. 

.610 E. Main St., Paola, Kans. 

144 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

502 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, M 

603 Cobb Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

266 Hume-Mansur Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

701 W. Lake St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

321 Dartmouth St., Boston, Mass. 
Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Can. 

Tiffin, Ohio 

66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

466 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Shriner's Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 

Box 682, Selma, Ala. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

Houston, Texas 

107 East 67th St., New York, N. Y. 

272 Ogden Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 

66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 



"Deceased 



129 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Smyth, Francis Scott 1923 3d St. and Parnassus Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 

Snedeker, Lendon 1932 66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Soule, Herbert C, Jr 1922 122 Rutgers St., Rochester, N. Y. 

*Soutter, Robert 1898 

Spalding, Roger 1903 Duxbury, Mass. 

Spaulding, Charles L 1899 

Spencer, Harvey 1928 572 Washington St., Wellesley, Mass. 

Spencer, J, B 1908 

Spicer, Charles M 191.5 1106 Republic Bldg., Denver, Colo. 

Spring, C. W 1883 

Steinberg, Alfred 1920 1623 R St., N. W., Washington, C. D. 

Stetson, Frank E 1897 South Dartmouth, Mass. 

Stevenson, Edward 1927 West 23d St., Lawrence, Kans. 

Stewart, Steele F 1920 2007 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Stickney, Edwin P 1891 .58 Pleasant St., Arlington, Mass. 

Stickney, William 1906 

Stiefel, D. M 1924 541 David Whitney Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

Stoeffler, Walter 1928 420 N. Arsenal Dr., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Storey, Carroll L 1916 

Storey, Thomas A 1905 Stanford University, San Francisco, Calif. 

Stratford, Eldredge W 1931 1723 Hobart St., Washington, C. D. 

c-o J. Osmond Hyd 

Sweet, Lewis K 1931 Pekin Union Medical School, Pekin, China 

Sylvester, Philip H 1907 25 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

Talbot Fritz B 1905 270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Teft, Richard C 1922 475 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Thiery, R. 1924 

Thompson, Milton S., Jr 1935 264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Thompson, Vernon P 1926 319 No. Windsor Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Thurber, D. Packard 1918 417 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Thomkies, James S . 1910 5831 Margerita St., Dallas, Texas 

Treanor, John P., Jr 1925 520 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Tso, Ernst 1919 c-o American Mission, Ichann, China 

Tucker, James 1929 401 Medical Arts Bldg., Richmond, Va. 

Tucker, J. F 1883 

Turner, Arthur R 1929 8122 Drexel Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Turtle, William J 1936 66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Ulrich, Joseph M 1920 193 W. Market St., Akron, Ohio 

Van Meter, Agram L 1915 427 Bank of America Bldg., Stockton, Calif. 

Van Ornum, Earl N . 1928 1709 W. 8th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Vincent, Beth 1903 925 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

Virkler, Stanley, D.M.D 1935 372 Washington St., Wellesley, Mass. 

Vogel, Harold T 1926 3536 80th St., Jackson Hts., L. I., N. Y. 

Wachter, Harry E 1936 920 E. 59th St., Chicago, 111. 

Walthal, Damon 1916 906 Grand Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Walker, John H 1933 Hampton, Conn. 



*Deceased 



130 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



* Warren, Henry S 1889 

Washburh, Alfred 1924 

. Washburn, Frederic A. ...... . 1894 

Watson, Richard G 1924 

Webster, Fred P 1903 

Weigel, Edgar W 1927 

Weigele, Carl E 1923 

Weir, Dwight 1932 

Weiler, Howard G 1930 

Wheeler, Warren E 1937 

Whitford, Warren 1930 

Whittemore, Frank S 1890 

Wilcox, John C 1936 

Wilens, Gustav 1926 

Wilson, Edward H ■. 1923 

Wilson, Franklin D : . . . 1919 

Wilson, James L 1929 

• Wilson, James 1920 

*Wilson, Louis T 1902 

Woo, Lan Sing 1919 

Wood, Benjamin E 1907 

Woodberry, H. S 1914 

Woodbury, William P 1906 

Wormelle, Charles B 1901 

Wylie, Eugene C 1894 

Wyman, Edwin T 1912 

Wysen, Frank L 1916 

*Young, Ernest B 1895 

Young, W. H 1909 



1950 Forest Parkway, Denver, Colo. 

190 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

1624 Franklin St., Oakland, Calif. 

156 Free St., Portland, Me. 

970 Park Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 

147 Garrison Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

36 Mulberry St., Mansfield, Ohio 

2314 Morningside Ave., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

2208 Ridgewood Ave., Alliance, Ohio 

Windsor Locks, Conn. 

2349 W. 21st St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

258 Geneses St., Utica, N. Y. 

395 E. Broad St., Columbus, Ohio 

5352 Studeley Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Nursery & Child's Hosp., New York, N. Y. 

St. Luke's Hospital, Shanghai, China 
475 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 



75 Gardner St., Allston, Mass. 

556 Washington St., Dorchester, Mass. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Clifton Forge, Va. 



66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 



*Deceased 



131 



The Children's Hospital 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE, BOSTON 
Telephone Aspinwall 5930 



THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT CLINICS 



NOT OPEN TO PERSONS ABLE TO PAY A DOCTOR'S FEE 
AGE LIMIT — 12 YEARS 

Medical (By Appointment) — Every morning. Tel. Aspinwall 5930. 

Medical Clinic Branches. (By Appointment from Medical Clinic Only.) 

Heart Wednesday a.m. 

Eczema Thursday a.m. 

Luetic Monday p.m. 

Diabetic Monday, 2.00 p.m. 

Boston Lying-in Discharged Baby Clinic Wednesday, 2,00 p.m. 

Children's Hospital Medical Discharge Clinic Wednesday, 2.00 p.m. 

Infants' Hospital Discharge Clinic Wednesday, 2.00 p.m. 

Anaphylaxis Clinic Tuesday — Friday, X cm. 

Muscle Training Clinic ( Bader Bldg.) Mon., Wed., Fri., 2.00 p.m. 

New cases, Friday 2.00 p.m. 

Surgical — Every morning, 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Carbon Dioxide Treatment Wednesday, 10.45 a.m. 

Surgical-Neurological Wednesday, 8.30 a.m. 

Ear, Nose and Throat — Tuesday and Thursday, 8.30-10.00 a.m. (By Appointment) 

Orthopedic — Every morning, 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Arthritis Clinic — Alternate Thursdays at 2.00 p.m. (By Appointment.) 

Infantile Paralysis (Bader Bldg.) Tues., Thurs., Fri., 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Physiotherapy — (Bader Bldg.) 

Scoliosis-Posture — Tues. and Thurs., 2.00 to 3.30 p.m. — Sat. 8.30 a.m. 
Med. Surg. Orth. Physiotherapy— Mon., Wed., Fri., 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 
Light Therapy — Mon., Wed., Fri. By appointment from clinics only. 

New cases — Monday 9.00 a.m. 
Exercises — Pool — By appointment only. 

Orthodontia — Tuesday and Wednesday 9.00 a.m. For children who have been operated 
on for Hare Lip or Cleft Palate. By appointment only. 

Dental Clinic — Thursday 10.00 a.m. By appointment from Orthodontia. 

No Clinics on Sundays or Holidays 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Form of Bequest 

I give, devise, and bequeath to 
The Children's Hospital, in the 
City of Boston, and Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, incorpo- 
rated in the year 1869, the sum 
of 




The Children's Hospital 



BOSTON, MASS. 



1869 



68th ANNUAL REPORT 
1937 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Form of Bequest 

I give, devise, and bequeath to 
The Children's Hospital, in the 
City of Boston, and Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, incorpo- 
rated in the year 1869, the sum 
of 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Boston, Mass. 

1869 

#> 
ANNUAL REPORT 

Part II 
MEDICAL STATISTICS 

1937 

♦ 

Officers of the Children's Hospital 

1938 

Honorary President 
George P. Gardner 

President 
Samuel H. Wolcott 

Vice-President 
F. Murray Forbes 

Treasurer 
Edward L. Bigelow 

State Street Trust Co., Boston 

Secretary and Counsel for the Corporation 
James Garfield 

of 
Choate, Hall & Stewart 
30 State Street, Boston 

Assistant Secretary 
F. Murray Forbes, Jr. 

Executive Committee 
Alexander Wheeler, Chairman Arthur G. Rotch 

Edward L. Bigelow Samuel H. Wolcott 

F. Murray Forbes Mrs. William C. Cox 

Committee on Investments 
Edward L. Bigelow (Ex-Officio) William Arthur Dupee 

Harvey H. Bundy Samuel H. Wolcott 



Board of Managers 
1938 



George P. Gardner 1885 

Alexander Whiteside 1914 

Samuel H. Wolcott (Ex-Officio) 1915 

George von L. Meyer 1915 

F. Murray Forbes (Ex-Officio) 1918 

Mrs. George H. Monks 1921 

Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 1921 

Louis E. Kirstein 1921 

G. Peabody Gardner, Jr 1921 

William Arthur Dupee 1922 

Pliny Jewell 1922 

Henry W. Palmer 1 923 

Arthur G. Rotch 1923 

Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 1927 

Harvey H. Bundy 1927 

Mrs. Dudley P. Rogers 1928 

Louis F. S. Bader 1930 

James Garfield (Ex-Officio) 1931 

Gordon Abbott, Jr 1932 

F. Murray Forbes, Jr 1932 

Lawrence Foster 1932 

Edward L. Bigelow (Ex-Officio) 1933 

Miss Ida C. Smith 1933 

I-ouis A. Shaw 1934 

Alexander Wheeler 1934 

Frank D. Comerford 1935 

Mrs. William C. Cox (Ex-Officio) 1936 

Mrs. Nelson S. Bartlett 1936 

John C. Kiley 1936 

Lawrence Coolidge 1936 

Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr 1936 

John S. Ames, Jr 1937 

Charles Stockton 1937 



Medical Officers 



ACTIVE STAFF 



Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D 
William E. Ladd, M.D. . 
Frank R. Ober, M.D. . 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. 
Hallowell Davis, M.D. 
Reid Hunt, M.D. . 
Hans Zinsser, M.D. 



Chief Medical Service 
Chief Surgical Service 
Chief Orthopedic Service 
Chief Pathological Service 
Visiting Physiologist 
Visiting Pharmacologist 
Visiting Bacteriologist 



CONSULTING STAFF 



Fred R. Blumenthal, D.M.D. 
J. Lewis Bremer, M.D. 
F. B. Mallory, M.D. 



Charles G. Mixter, M.D. 
John L. Morse, M.D. 
Robert B. Osgood, M.D. 



L. M. S. Miner, M.D. 

ASSOCIATE STAFF 

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Visit in g Physicians 
Bronson Crothers, M.D. Richard M. Smith, M.D. 

James L. Gamble, M.D. Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 

Charles F. McKhann, M.D. 

Associate Visiting Physicians 

Allan M. Butler, M.D. Paul W. Emerson, M.D. 

Randolph K. Byers, M.D. Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 

Benjamin W. Carey, Jr., M.D. Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 

Louis K. Diamond, M.D. Philip H. Sylvester, M.D. 
R. Cannon Eley, M.D. 
LeRoy D. Fothergill, M.D. 



Associate Physicians 



Stewart H. Clifford, M.D. 

John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Henry E. Gallup, M.D. 

Stanton Garfield, M.D. 

Nathan Gorin, M.D. 
*Hyman Green, M.D. 
*Gerald . X. Hoeffel, M.D. 



Eliot Hubbard, Jr., M.D. 
Wilfred L. McKenzie, M.D. 
Dorothea M. Moore, M.D. 
Abraham S. Small, M.D. 
Clement A. Smith, M.D. 
Harvey Spencer, M.D. 
*Sidney H. Weiner, M.D. 



Assistant Physicians 

John P. Hubbard, M.D. Henry X. Pratt, M.D. 

Mark I. Makler, M.D. Lendon Snedeker, M.D. 

Robert T. Moulton, M.D. William J. Turtle, M.D. 

Rose C. Munro, M.D. Lucille Williamson, M.D. 

Paul V. Woolley, Jr., M.D. 
''Special Clinics 



MEDICAL OFFICERS 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Visiting Surgeons 
Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 
Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. 

(Neurosurgery) 

Associate Visiting Surgeons 
George D. Cutler, M.D. 
Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. 



Associate Surgeons 
Henry W. Hudson, Jr., M.D. 
Patrick J. Mahoney, M.D. 
Augustus Thorndike, Jr., M.D. 

Assistant Surgeon 
John W. Chamberlain, M.D. 

Fellow in Neurosurgery 
Henry L. Heyl, M.D. 

Orthodontist 
Harry W. Perkins, D.M.D. 



Visiting Otolaryngologist 
Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 

Research Associate in Otolaryngology 
Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 

Associate Otolaryngologists 
Charles Allman, M.D. 
Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 
Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 
Philip Mysel, M.D. 

Assistant Otola ryngologists 
Walter J. Carroll, M.D. 
John Frazee, M.D. 
Edgar M. Holmes, M.D. 

Associate in Stomatology 
Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 

Assistant Associate Stomatologists 

Paul K. Losch, D.M.D. 

David Weisberger, M.D., D.M.D. 

Assistant Orthodontists 
Edward L. Silver, D.M.D. 
Stanley B. Virkler, D.M.D. 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Surgeons 
Arthur T. Legg, M.D. 
James W. Sever, M.D. 



Visiting Surgeons 
A. H. Brewster, M.D. 
Seth M. Fitchet, M.D. 
William T. Green, M.D. 
Robert H. Morris, M.D. 



Assistant Visiting Surgeons, O.P.D. 
Paul W. Hugenberger, M D. 
Meir G. Karp, M.D. 
John G. Kuhns, M.D. 
Robert J. Joplin, M.D. 
Miriam G. Katzeff, M.D. 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 



Dermatologist 
E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 



Bacteriologis 
LeRoy D. Fothergill, M.D. 

Assistant Bacteriologist 
Benjamin W. Carey, Jr., M.D. 



MEDICAL OFFICERS 



Assistant Dermatologist 
Austin W. Cheever, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist 
J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 

Assistant Ophthalmologists 

Paul A. Chandler, M.D. 
Edwin B. Dunphy, M.D. 
E. B. Goodall, M.D. 

Pharmacologist 
Otto Krayer, M.D. 



Pathologist 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

Roentgenologist 
Edward C. Vogt, M.D. 

Assistant Roentgenologist 
George M. Wyatt, M.D. 
Associate Roentgenologist 
M. C. Sosman, M.D. 
Hugh F. Hare, M.D. 

Visiting Biological Chemist 
A. Baird Hastings, M.D. 



RESIDENT STAFF 

Director 
George von L. Meyer , . 

Assistants to the Director 
Miss Madeline S. Gibbs, R.N. Miss Fanny C. Knapp, R.N. 

Admitting Officers 
Mrs. Elsa K. Ferguson, R.N. Mrs. Eleanor Carey, R.N. 

Miss Anna Kendall, R.N. 



Director of Physical Therapeutics 
Miss Janet B. Merrill 

Director of Social Service 

Miss Amy W. Greene 

Assistant Chemist 

Miss Elsie A. MacLachlan, B.S. 

Admitting Officer, O.P.D. 
Miss Friscilla E. Hedley 

Abatement Adjuster 
Miss Ethel E. Preble 



Research Associate in Psychology 
Elizabeth Lord, Ph.D. 
Director of Clinic for Paralytic Cases 
Miss Mary E. Trainor, R.N. 

Assistant Bacteriologist 

Miss Marian Sweet, A.B., M.S. 

Occupational Therapist 
Miss Jessie A. Ness 
Photographer 



Ferdinand R. Harding 
Superintendent of Nurses and Principal of the School of Nursing 
Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 
Assistant in Supervision and Instruction Assistant in Administration School 



School of Nursing 
Miss Mary E. Norcross, R.N. 
Supervisor of Medical Wards 
Miss Dorothy C. Grant, R.N. 

Supervisor of Orthopedic Wards 
Miss Kathryn Cheeney, R.N. 

Supervisor Infants' Hospital 
Miss Harriet B. Russel, R.N. 
Supervisor Operating Room 
Miss Edith C. Jenkins, R.N. 

Supervisor Private Ward 
Miss Anne Baillie, R.N. 



of Nursing 
Miss Isabel M. Jordan, R.N. 

Supervisor of Surgical Wards 
Miss Frances Leary, R.N. 
Supervisor of Neurological Ward 
Miss Esther Read, R.N. 
Supervisor of Isolation Department 
Miss Margaret Spellmeyer, R.N. 

Anesthetist 

Miss Betty E. Lank, R.N. 

Supervisor Private Ward Operating 

Rooms 
Miss Helen Richardson, R.N. 



MEDICAL OFFICERS 

RESIDENT PHYSICIANS AND HOUSE OFFICERS 

Resident Surgeons 

Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. Robert E. Gross, M.D. 

Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeon 
John M. Moore, M.D. 



Surgical House Officers 



Paul D. Giddings, M.D. 
Thomas W. Botsford, M.D. 
Frederick W. Rutherford, M.D. 
James B. Campbell, M.D. 
Dean W. Tanner, M.D. 
John A. Sandmeyer, M.D. 
Robert S. Meyers, M.D. 



Frank L. Marting, M.D. 
C. Fred Goeringer, M.D. 
George Austen, Jr., M.D. 
John H. Kennard, M.D. 
McChord Williams, M.D. 
Robert R. White, M.D. 
Rutledge W. Howard, M.D. 



Resident Physicians 



Warren E. Wheeler, M.D. 
Robert T. Moulton, M.D. 

Charles D. May, M.D. 
Ralph A. Ross, M.D. 



Frederick W. Barnes, M.D. 

Don W. Freeman, M.D. 
Paul V. Wooley, M.D. 
Edward C. Curnen, M.D. 



Medical House Officers 



Percy H. Jennings, Jr., M.D. 
Paul V. Wooley, M.D. 
James T. Stanton, M.D. 
Charles D. May, M.D. 
George B. Logan, M.D. 
Don W. Freeman, M.D. 
Richard G. Hodges, M.D. 
S. Halcuit Moore, M.D. 



David H. Clement, M.D. 
Nathan B. Talbot, M.D. 
Harry Shwachman, M.D. 
John K. Brines, M.D. 
Allen M. Hill, M.D. 
Charles H. Cutler, M.D. 
Wilson Wing, M.D. 
Glidden S. Brooks, M.D. 



Resident Orthopedic Surgeons 
Pinckney Harral, M.D. Clyde W. Dawson, M.D. 



Orthopedic House Officers 



Harry C. Hughes, M.D. 
Lewis L. Huston, M.D. 
Clyde W. Dawson, M.D. 
Edward G. Ewer, M.D. 
Harry D. Morris, M.D. 
Carol B. Larson, M.D. 



Lewis Cozen, M.D. 
John A. Reid, Jr., M.D. 
Carter R. Rowe, M.D. 
Otto E. AuFranc, M.D. 
Sherwin 0. Staples, M.D. 
Leo J. McDermott, M.D. 



F. Bert Brown, M.D. 



8 



MEDICAL OFFICERS 

Resident Pathologists 
Harald N. Johnson, M.D. Lewis E. Rector, M.D. 

House Officers, Pathology 
Surgical Medical 

Dean W. Tanner, M.D. Nathan B. Talbot, M.D. 

George Austen, Jr., M.D. Allen M. Hill, M.D. 

McChord Williams, M.D. Glidden S. Brooks, M.D. 

Robert R. White, M.D. Wilson C. Shugarman, M.D. 

Marion L. Connerley, M.D. 

Richard S. Neff, M.D. Orthopedic 

O. Swenson, M.D. Pierre E. LaCroix, M.D. 

Otto E. AuFranc, M.D. 

Leo J. McDermott, M.D. 

Samuel E. Floor, M.D. 

Luther M. Strayer, Jr., M.D 

Pathology 

Wolfgang W. Zuelzer, M.D. 
Charles H. Cutler, M.D. 

Volunteer Assistant 
Herman T. Tyler, M.D. 

Resident Racteriologists 
John W. Regan, Jr., M.D. 
Henry H. Work, M.D. 

House Officers, Bacteriology 
Allen M. Hill, M.D. Wilson C. Shugarman, M.D. 

Glidden S. Brooks, M.D. Winthrop I. Franke, M.D. 

Dental House Officers 
Ellis B. Jump, D.M.D. John C. Brown, D.M.D. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Report of the Board of Managers 

1937 

THE story of The Children's Hospital for the past year fully measures 
up to the standards we have come to expect. 5,435 patients were 
admitted to the wards and 61,419 visits were made in the Out-Patient 
Department resulting in an excess of expense over income of $6,045.67 
which is an impressive record when it is realized that $563,792.78 was 
required to run the Hospital. But the figures alone give little idea of the 
steady advance in the standard of care which the Hospital was able to 
give. To the Director the Board expresses its complete confidence and 
to the Chiefs of Staff its gratitude for their skill and devotion to their 
patients. To all those working for the Hospital and its aims, the Manag- 
ers express their obligation and appreciative recognition. 

Outstanding in the mind of every Member of the Board is the loss of 
Gordon x\bbott, who for so many years gave so much of his energy, 
thought and financial support to the Hospital. His enthusiasm and 
initiative saw the Hospital through its formative years. He has left a 
tradition for future Managers to look up to. 

By taking a Participating Hospital Membership in the Associated 
Hospital Service Corporation of Massachusetts, the Hospital has sup- 
ported a movement which is increasing in importance, whereby group 
insurance provides semi-private care in designated hospitals. 

The requirements of modern medical and surgical technique, 
which become each year more exacting, have been fully met. Up to 
date methods have required diagnosis based on knowledge gained through 
increased laboratory analysis of each patient. A corresponding increase 
in hours of nursing care has been necessary with a result of higher operat- 
ing costs. The Hospital has met these increased demands and aspires to 
maintain its position of a children's hospital second to none. 

It must be recognized that whereas the plant, as it has existed until 
today, has been adequate to enable our efficient staff to accomplish 
their work, it will, nevertheless, become less suited to effective and 
economic operation as the years go on. Foreseeing this, the President 
has appointed a Special Committee to make a study of all the related 
requirements of the Hospital in order to plan for the future. This Com- 
mittee is consulting with the Chiefs of Staff to obtain their conception 
of the future of the Hospital, in order that concerted policy may be 
planned. Any such policy is to carefully take into account the close 
alliance with the Harvard Medical School, and the outstanding research 
which the Hospital is now enabled to carry on. 

10 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

The definition of the future policy has a very close bearing on the 
gifts and bequests which the Hospital may hope to attract. In the last 
few years this form of individual support has made a tremendous differ- 
ence in what the Hospital has been able to accomplish. While the Hospi- 
tal, because of its work in behalf of ch ildren, has secured gifts unrestricted 
as to purpose which are far the most useful, it has been made clear that 
many benefactors would be glad to make contribution or bequests toward 
specific ends which appeal to their imagination. With this in view, on 
the suggestion of the Treasurer, the Special Committee is making a 
study for the purpose of naming specific needs which may bring home to 
some parent, through association with an experience of his own, a desire 
to help others. 

With these thoughts in mind, the Board of Managers is firm in its 
purpose that The Children's Hospital shall continue to be more and 
more useful to the children and parents it is its purpose to serve. 

BOARD OF MANAGERS 



Director's Report 

1937 

REVIEWING the year 1937 as a whole it might be defined as satis- 
• factory, not that other years have been unsatisfactory, but various 
plans and projects have materialized and vindicated themselves in these 
twelve months. 

Cooperation and coordination between the various services and de- 
partments in an institution of this size is always expected, but working 
under more or less constant stress and strain, not always obtained. It is 
gratifying indeed to look back over 1937 and record unusual cooperation 
and coordination. 

Grants made by the Board of Managers to the Surgical Service have 
materially strengthened this department, and the fact that Dr. Ladd 
now has his office in the hospital, and can give nearly all his time to the 
activities of the various branches of this service is readily reflected in 
the results. 

We regret that Dr. James L. Wilson of the Medical Service has left 
to take up a very interesting piece of work in the W r ayne Medical School, 
Detroit, Michigan. 

A change has occurred in the X-Ray Department. Dr. Vogt requested 
that he be relieved from full duty to half-time duty in order that he might 
go into private practice. We welcome Dr. George M. Wyatt as full-time 
Resident Roentgenologist. 

11 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

We welcome Miss Isabel Jordan as Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses, though previously as supervisor of Infants' Hospital she has 
been a member of the official family for some years. 

The Nursing Service should be congratulated for carrying on so 
efficiently throughout a year which was wrought with many difficulties. 
An unusual amount of resignations among the supervisors necessitated 
changes all along the line. Graduates were promoted to head nurses, 
head nurses to supervisors, and it should be a matter of real satisfaction 
to Miss Goostray to see how smoothly the many adjustments took place. 

The saturation point has been reached as regards housing for house 
officers and nurses- — in fact for all personnel. In the Nursing Depart- 
ment, as a matter of fact, the situation became so acute that we were 
obliged to vacate the Infirmary at Gardner House to release those beds 
for nurses, and transfer the Infirmary, temporarily, to the heretofore 
unoccupied floor of the Isolation Unit. Obviously, this does not solve 
this problem, and the housing facilities for maids and attendants is 
mediocre at best. 

The demands upon all services are steadily increasing. Under con- 
stantly improving therapeutic methods, the number of hours of nursing 
service per patient is on a constant crescendo. Procedures which a few 
years ago were only used in emergencies have now become routine. 
Requisitions on the Chemical Laboratory have doubled in the last two 
years. The increased demands on the X-Ray Department are staggering. 
Photography is swamped with work. Much of this extra load has been 
absorbed either by increased efficiency in the various departments, or 
by the extraordinary willingness of the personnel, or both. All this is 
very satisfactory in retrospect, but as the saturation point is being 
reached, it turns from a pleasing picture to a matter of grave concern. 

What are we to do? Obviously, it is desirable that the patients have 
the best diagnosis available, and likewise it is true that the doctors, 
nurses and others in training here at the institution be given an oppor- 
tunity to make use of all the facilities which we have. Obviously, if a 
child is desperately sick, it should have, whether it be on public or 
private ward, the best of nursing service even though it might require 
special duty nursing at hospital expense. 

We are all in accord with these general principles, and if facilities 
and money were limitless, there would be no worry, no problems. 

It is my personal belief that we can continue to function efficiently 
and smoothly without expansion, provided only essential demands are 
made upon various departments. The main difficulty is to determine 
that very fine line which divides the essentials from non-essentials. 

Are we going to continue to accept any and all requisitions made 
upon the X-Ray, the Bacteriological and Chemical Laboratories, the 

12 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Nursing Service, etc., and increase our personnel to adequately carry the 
load that is being put upon them, or we are going to somehow in one 
way or another put on some reasonable restrictions? 

The very nature of our institution demands ample provisions for 
laboratory and research work in order to maintain leadership in our 
branch of medicine. 

The administration takes this opportunity to thank the staff, em- 
ployees, welfare committee, and everyone who gives generously of their 
time and efforts towards the success and best interests of the institution. 
Their whole-hearted cooperation makes the darker moments seem brighter 
and is a constant source of inspiration. 

G. v. L. MEYER, Director 



Statistical Report - In-Patient 

For the year ended December 31, 1937 







Pri. 


Pub. 


T 














Remain Dec. 31, 


1936 


21 


135 


156 














Admitted 




1618 


3817 


5435 














Treated 




1639 


3952 


5591 














Discharged 




1618 


3790 


5408 














Remain Dec. 31, 


1937 


21 


162 


183 






























Daily 








Admissions 


Bed Capacity 


Bed Occupancy 






Pri. 


Pub. 


T 


Pri. 


Pub. T 


Pr\ 


!. 


Pub. 


T 


Medical 




429 


887 


1316 


10 


44 54 


10 




32 


42 


Surgical 




288 


1237 


3525 


10 


66 76 


5 




58 


63 


Orthopedic 




42 


374 


416 


10 


47 57 


1 




38 


39 


Throat 




823 


992 


1815 


12 


31 43 


8 




15 


23 


Neurological 




24 


222 


246 


— 


*15 15 


1 




8 


9 


Isolation 




12 


105 


117 


— 


*38 38 


1 




5 


6 




1618 


3817 


5435 


42 


241 283 


26 




156 


182 
















Deaths and 








Hospital Days 


Operations 




A utopsies 
















D A 


D 


A 


D 


A 




Pri. 


Pub. 


T 


Pri. 


Pub. 


T Pri. 


P, 


ub. 


T 




Medical 


3618 


11640 


15258 






11 ™ 


36 


16 


47 


18 






11 4. 


Surgical 


2066 


21107 


23173 


327 


1215 


1542 2 2 


47 


34 


z49 


36 


Orthopedic 


490 


13699 


14189 


37 


310 


347 — - 


1 








Throat 


2991 


5372 


8363 


845 


986 


1831 2 1 


4 


1 


6 


2 


Neurological 


193 


3003 


3196 








— 


— 















Isolation 


214 


1832 


2046 











5 


7 


5 









9572 56653 6625 1209 2511 3720 15 5 95 56 110 61 
fe"Z5 Percentage of Autopsies 33% 59% 



The Infants' Hospital 



Boston, Massachusetts 



For the year ended December 31, 1937 



Remain Dec. 31, 1936 


40 


Operations 


Admitted 


799 


Surgical 


Treated 







Treated 


839 


Orthopedic 


Discharged 


812 


Throat 



Remain Dec.31, 1937 



17 



28 



47 



Capacity 


60 


Deaths . . 


113 


Daily Occupancy 


33 


Autopsies 


86 


Hospital Days 


12139 


Percentage of Autopsies 


76% 



14 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

interchangeable— Public SOCIAL SERVICE DEPT.— BOTH HOSPITALS 

and Private 
Isolation Wards closed May 15 Group I Group II Group III Group IV Total 

to Dec. 2, 1937 
Bader Ward Closed June 30 to 

Sept. 7, 1937 141 455 1793 60 2449 



Statistical Report - Out-Patient 



For the year ended December 31, 1937 



Clinic 

Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature 

Infantile Paralysis 

Throat 

Muscle Training 

Lamp 

Dental 



Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature 

Infantile Paralysis 

Throat 

Muscle Training 

Lamp 

Dental 









Total 


Free Part Rate 


Full Rate 


Visits 


7181 


2082 


17372 


26635 


3479 


656 


7035 


11170 


2521 


552 


5685 


8758 


750 


228 


1110 


2088 


4818 


-0- 


-0- 


4818 


1134 


311 


2571 


4016 


1933 


293 


1360 


3586 


10 




25 


42 


100 


113 


93 


306 


21926 


4242 


35351 


61419 

Total 


New Cases 


Transfi 


ers Old Cases Visits 


4803 


925 


20907 


26635 


1922 


697 


8569 


11170 


851 


530 


7377 


8758 


27 


108 


1953 


2088 


ii9 


-0- 


4699 


4818 


637 


851 


- 2528 


4016 


12 


31 


3543 


3586 


-0- 


4 


38 


42 


-0- 


6 


300 


304 



8371 



3134 



49914 



61419 



Emergencies 




Medical 


105 


Surgical 


676 


Orthopedic 


63 


Throat 


196 



Total number of individuals 
Daily average number of new cases 
Daily average number of total visits 
Minor Operations 



17449 

28 
203 
850 



1040 



15 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Report of the Treasurer 

Balance Sheet as of December 31, 1937 



ASSETS 

Current Assets: 

Cash in bank and on hand 71$,260. 28 

Accounts Receivable 14,320. 14 

Infants' Hospital, balance on share of operating 

costs 10,804.47 

Accrued interest and dividends 39,875. 45 

Materials and supplies on hand 21,113. 22 

Prepaid expenses 1,864. 14 

$159,237.70 

Investment Securities: 

General fund investments $2,439,655. 87 

Restricted fund investments 1,442,850. 81 

$3,882,506. 68 



Other Investment Property: 

Real estate $458,750. 00 

Mortgages receivable 63,000. 00 

$521,750.00 



Plant and Equipment: 

Land $211,128. 03 

Hospital buildings 1,813,332. 35 

Dormitory property 878,222. 61 

Furniture, equipment and improvements 

(depreciated value) 45,189.61 

$2,947,872.60 

Total Assets $7,511,366. 98 



LIABILITIES AXD CAPITAL 

Liabilities: 

Accounts payable (current bills) 20,815. 05 

Training School tuitions unearned 3,327. 60 

$24,142.65 

16 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Capital: 



General fund $6,030,252. 96 

Restricted investment funds 1,440,648. 27 

Donations paid in advance and temporary funds 

for special purposes 16,323. 10 

$7,487,224.33 

Total Liabilities and Capital $7,511,366. 98 

Statement of Income and Expense 

Income: 

Hospital revenue j $263,163. 68 

Income from investments 195,909. 90 

Donations and subscriptions 78,831. 21 

Subscriptions through Welfare Committee (net).. 11,360.80 

Income from trust funds 17,358. 88 

Total Income $566,624. 47 

Expense: 

Operation of Hospital $563,792. 78 

Treasurer's Office expense 4,417. 30 

Publicity . . 982. 79 

Taxes 445 . 05 

Miscellaneous 3,032. 22 

Total Expenses. 572,670. 14 



Operating Deficit „ *s $6,045.67 



17 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Report of the Medical Service 

IN THIS REPORT a few facts relative to what has been accomplished 
during 1937 may prove interesting to the friends of the Children's 
Hospital. On their loyal support in the future, as in the past, depends 
to a large extent the care of the sick, the training of doctors and nurses, 
and the research investigation in diseases of infants and children carried 
on within its walls. This year progress has continued in the accomplish- 
ment of this threefold purpose. 

Statistics show that twelve hundred and fourteen children were 
admitted to the public medical wards and twenty-six hundred and thirty- 
five visits were made by patients to the Medical Out-Patient Depart- 
ment. These figures, which closely approximate those for 1936, convey 
an idea of the large burden of responsibility which falls upon all who 
take part in the work of the Medical division. 

Time will not permit a complete review of all the activities which 
are going on in the Medical division of the Children's Hospital but 
among other things a few of the modernized forms of treatment em- 
ployed in the care of children may be mentioned. A considerable amount 
of progress has been made with the newer therapeutic procedures for 
certain diseases. For instance the w T idely publicized remedy, sulfanila- 
mide or "prontylin" has fulfilled its promise in the treatment of" strepto- 
coccal as well as other diseases. It is a truly remarkable substance, for 
whereas in the past a child with a streptococcus meningitis was doomed 
to die — at present this very wonderful chemical drug effects an amazingly 
quick favorable response in the patient with this disease. Not only 
meningitis but also streptococcus septicemia has been cured by this 
means in many patients during the past year. In addition to being an 
effective agent against the streptococcus, we have learned that sul- 
fanilamide can kill the colon bacillus, the gonococcus and the menin- 
gococcus. 

The efficacy of this drug against the meningococcus has definitely 
changed the entire procedure which we were accustomed to use in the 
treatment of meningococcus meningitis. No longer is it necessary to 
subject children to repeated and painful lumbar puncture and to the 
injection of a foreign serum. Sulfanilamide given by mouth when the 
disease is recognized early — that is, within two or three days — has 
reduced the mortality equally as successfully as did the former method 
of treatment. 

Likewise in pyelitis, when this drug is given by mouth in amounts 
varying according to the nature of the underlying type of bacteria, the 

18 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

course of the disease is halted much more effectively than had been 
possible by any means employed previously. 

Attention should be called to the newer procedures now available in 
the treatment of certain types of pneumonia. Anti-pneumococcus sera 
have been developed against several strains of the thirty-two types of 
pneumococcus which can be differentiated. Provided serum therapy 
is begun soon after the onset of the disease, its use is often followed by 
an abrupt reduction of temperature from 105°F. or more, to normal in 
twelve to twenty-four hours — that is, a true crisis. 

It would be remiss to fail to stress the fact that new drugs and new 
sera, and the procedures involved in their use require a knowledge of 
the correct time for giving the therapy, the dosage to be used in each 
case, the unusual or untoward reactions to be looked for in the patient, 
and other information, without which the desired beneficial effect may 
not be achieved. Likewise precision in using these drugs has increased 
the need for new laboratory methods as adjuncts to clinical experience. 
The added time and effort and the constant supervision by trained and 
experienced nurses and doctors which is required in carrying out these 
new procedures is more than justified by the great lessening of human 
suffering and the more exact control of disease which has resulted. 

In 1936, mention was made of rearrangements which were needed 
to improve the efficiency of the Medical Out-Patient Department. 
It was pointed out that the physical equipment in this Department was 
not being used to its fullest capacity and that the existing space could 
be employed to greater advantage by the organization of special clinics 
in the afternoons. The suggested changes in the schedule were made 
and now the service in the Medical Out-Patient Department is almost 
continuous throughout every day in the week. 

Among the other activities there, a health conference for infants and 
pre-school children is conducted each Monday afternoon by the Health 
Department of Boston. Third year medical students, students in the 
School of Public Health, members of the house staff of the Children's 
Hospital and other groups of students attend this conference. The house 
officers and more experienced students are given an opportunity to 
participate actively in the provision of these services. In this way, knowl- 
edge of normal child development and health needs during the early 
years has been fostered, and interest in preventing disease and promoting 
child health has been increased. 

The Syphilis Clinic has continued its work along the same lines as 
the preceding year. The experience accumulated seems to point to a 
more accurate evaluation of the effectiveness of certain of the specific 
remedies in the treatment of this disease. There were a total of one 
hundred and ninety-one visits by patients to the Syphilis Clinic and 

19 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

forty-two visits by patients under suspicion but proved not to be syphi- 
litic. The Social Service Department deserves commendation for its 
careful and effective follow-up work in this connection. 

In the Cardiac Clinic during the past year a series of patients with 
congenital malformations of the heart has been reviewed against a back- 
ground of experience which began in 1923. One hundred and thirty-five 
case reports have been examined preliminary to a careful comparison 
from which helpful conclusions may be drawn. An authoritative account 
of the anatomical findings of some of the cases, together with an exposi- 
tion of the complicated theory of Spitzer concerning the manner in which 
malformations come about, has nearly been completed. iVn intensive 
study of the contour by X-Ray of abnormal hearts is now being carried 
on by the X-Ray Department. At present this study seems to be of 
value chiefly from the point of view of prognosis, but as a result we are 
gradually developing a clearer understanding in the diagnosis of con- 
genital heart disease. 

A separate afternoon clinic was started in October 1937, for children 
with rheumatic fever with or without heart damage, chorea, etc. It has 
been the purpose of this clinic to afford an opportunity for thorough 
investigation of each case and continuity of care for those patients who, 
by virtue of the chronic and recurrent nature of the disease, deserve 
supervision throughout the childhood years at least. An important 
element in the handling of the rheumatic fever problem is personal con- 
tact with the families and a well-organized follow-up service. We have 
been fortunate in having a full-time social service worker without whom 
the successful conduct of a clinic of this nature would be impossible. 

Two changes in the Social Service Department have contributed 
much toward the more adequate care of sick children. A full-time 
medical social worker on the medical wards makes it possible to have 
available the social information on each case at the time it is most useful. 
The increasing requests for this information, by the physicians, indicates 
how essential the need of close cooperation of the social component has 
become. In the second place, the appointment of a full-time medical 
social worker at the Wellesley Convalescent Home makes it possible to 
establish more continuity in the care of the patients going there from 
our wards and Out-Patient Department. The problems of convalescent 
care present as much need for thoughtful consideration of their social 
aspects as do those of acute illness and it is a great satisfaction to feel 
that these children may now receive their just due in this respect. 

The Mental Hygiene aspects of the hospital work have centered 
more and more around the work in the Bader Building. Here methods 
have been developed for dealing with some of the difficult cases where 
psychological and social difficulties complicate the management of sick 

20 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

children. Many of these children require medical, surgical or orthopedic 
treatment, as well as study of their intellectual and emotional difficulties. 
It is entirely possible to arrange matters so that many aspects of these 
problems are cared for during the stay in the Hospital. This arrange- 
ment makes it possible to discover difficulties which were formerly 
ignored and to help many parents by provision of advice based on ade- 
quate observation. This newer responsibility which the Children's 
Hospital has assumed in the desire to render full and complete service to 
the community, needs support. For its beginning and present continu- 
ing support we owe a debt of gratitude to that philanthropic foundation 
— the Commonwealth Fund. 

Once again the chemical analyses made byt he Chemistry Laboratory 
at the request of physicians caring for patients within the Hospital have 
shown an increase over the figures for the previous years. Not including 
the analyses made for study purposes by the laboratory staff, 5176 
determinations were made this year. Once again the increase in the work 
of the laboratory is a direct reflection of the increase in the information 
that the hospital can supply to the physician; and again this increase in 
utility has resulted in an increase in labor which has been met through 
the ready cooperation of the members of the Pediatric Department of 
the Harvard Medical School with the Hospital. That the routine infor- 
mation required should be acknowledged as a Hospital obligation is 
clearly indicated by the number of determinations requested by the 
surgical, orthopedic and nose and throat wards as well as the medical 
division of the Hospital. One hundred and ninety-five such determina- 
tions were requested for private ward patients. 

In the season beginning December 1936 and ending May 15, 1937, 
one hundred and thirty-two patients were admitted to the Isolation 
Division as contrasted with one hundred and thirty-six the preceding year 
Twenty-two were private patients. Of these admissions, pertussis 
accounted for forty-nine as contrasted with two in the year previous, 
while scarlet fever accounted for twenty-five as opposed to fifty-six the 
year before. Thus it is seen that the admissions to the Isolation Unit 
vary from year to year both in total numbers and in the numbers of 
individual diseases admitted — depending upon the prevailing epidemics. 
While a careful study of cross infections was being carried out in the 
Infants' Hospital, attempts to solve the problem of cross infections were 
being made in the Isolation Unit of the Children's Hospital. Among the 
additions to the technique for prevention of cross infections two were 
under investigation: (1) The masking of all the personnel with a new 
type of bacteria filtering mask, and (2) The installation in the corridor 
of an ultra-violet light barrier separating the patients with measles and 
chicken pox from the patients on the rest of the ward. In studies carried 

21 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

out by the Harvard School of Public Health, ultra-violet light has 
been shown to have bactericidal and virucidal properties. The barrier 
installation in the Isolation Unit represents one of the early attempts 
to apply this knowledge in the problem of hospital control of epidemic 
diseases. The record of cross infections was the best that it has been in 
several years. There was only one cross infection throughout the year, 
and that directly traceable to transfer of contagion by a nurse who her- 
self contracted the disease. 

In the fall of 1937, Dr. James L. Wilson left Boston to accept an 
appointment as Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Wayne Medical 
School, Detroit, in association with the Children's Hospital of Michigan. 
His loss has been felt keenly by the members of the medical and nursing 
staffs, the students and innumerable small patients. 

The teaching of undergraduate and post-graduate students has con- 
tinued as in the past. As the actual necessity of post-graduate teaching 
has become more and more recognized in the training of experts in differ- 
ent fields of medicine, this is a problem which we must keep constantly 
before us, in order to maintain a high standard for the physicians who 
in large numbers constantly are seeking instruction here. 

Space does not permit enlargement here on the progress which has 
been made in the various research activities of the Medical Department. 
It might be mentioned in passing however that during 1937, over forty 
contributions dealing with many different clinical and laboratory aspects 
of investigation were published by members of this division of the 
Children's Hospital. This is one of the ways of maintaining the promi- 
nence of the Children's Hospital in the medical community both in this 
country and abroad. 

Special acknowledgment should be given to the Director, his Asso- 
ciates, the members of the Medical and Nursing Staff and the Social 
Service workers, for their untiring and conscientious devotion to the 
best interests of the children and the Hospital. Appreciation is ex- 
pressed to the members of the Medical Staff who have aided so materi- 
ally in the compilation of this report. 

KENNETH D. BLACKFAN, M.D. 



9.-2 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 



Congenital Malformations 

Absence of lateral incisors , 1 

Anomaly of finger . 2 

Anomaly of finger nails. 1 

Anomaly of finger nails and toe nails 1 

Anomaly of hand 1 

Anomalies, multiple 2 

Anomaly of rib. 2 

Anomaly of spine '. . 2 

Anomaly of toe 1 

Anomaly of urinary tract. 1 

Anomaly of vessels of feet 1 

Asymmetry of skull 1 

Bifid uvula 2 

Cleft palate. 3 

Club foot 7 

Cystic disease of the lung 1 

Dwarfism 1 

Fistula, auricular 1 

Hemihypertrophy 1 

Hypertelorism 2 

Hypoplasia of mandible 1 

Hypospadias 7 

Imperforate hymen 1 

Meningocele 1 

Patent urachus 1 

Pilonidal sinus . 4 

Polydactylism 1 

Preauricular appendage ■ ■ ... . : ....... ; .. . 1 

Ptosis of eyelid : 1 

Small larynx 1 

Spina bifida 4 

Tongue-tie 2 

Torticollis 8 

Transposition of viscera 1 

Undescended testicle 17 

Diseases of the Newborn 

Cephalohematoma 4 

Granuloma of umbilicus 3 

Hemorrhagic disease of newborn 2 

Mastitis of newborn 1 

Omphalitis 2 

Ophthalmia neonatorum, gonorrheal 1 

Prematurity 22 



23 



85 



35 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of Nutrition 

Acidosis 2 

Aerophagy 7 

Avitaminosis, multiple 1 

Coeliac disease 1 

Hypoglycemia 1 

Ketosis 4 

Malnutrition 194 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 187 

Pica 4 

Regulation of feeding 638 

Rickets 85 

Rumination 3 

Scurvy 34 

Spasmophilia 1 

Tetany 3 



Respiratory System 

Deviated septum 24 

Epistaxis 24 

Foreign body in nose 2 

Hay fever 34 

Nasal obstruction 4 

Sinusitis Ill 

Asthma 220 

Bronchial obstruction . 1 

Bronchiectasis 7 

Bronchitis 262 

Foreign body in bronchus 1 

Tracheitis 9 

Laryngeal stridor, congenital 10 

Laryngitis '24 

Abscess of lung 1 

Atelectasis of lung 3 

Emphysema of lung 3 

Penumonia, unclassified 65 

Pleurisy 4 

(fibrinous 2) 

(purulent 2) 



Alimentary System 

Alveolar abscess 10 

Carious teeth 101 

Difficult dentition 10 

Malocclusion of teeth 2 

Geographical tongue 2 

Sublingual ulcer 1 

Gingivitis 29 

24 



1165 



809 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Alimentary — Continued 

Stomatitis 57 

Thrush 12 

Ulceration of buccal mucous membrane 1 

Vincent's angina 9 

Bednar's aphthae 1 

Abscess, retropharyngeal ] 

Abscess, peritonsillar 1 

Tonsillitis 222 

Upper respiratory infection 1053 

Stricture of esophagus 1 

Pyloric stenosis 5 

Pylorospasm . . 3 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 42 

Appendicitis 6 

Enteritis 10 

Intestinal colic 1 

Peritonitis 1 

Colitis 2 

Constipation 176 

Diarrhoea 21 

Fecal impaction , 3 

Redundant colon 1 

Hepatitis 1 

Jaundice 12 

Diastasis recti 2 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 1 

Hernia, inguinal 14 

Hernia, umbilical 61 

Fissure of anus 5 

Hemorrhoids 2 

Prolapse of rectum. . . . 1 

Rectal hemorrhage ....... :~ : 1 



Genito-Urinary System 

Nephritis 9 

Nephrosis 1 

Pyelitis 18 

Pyelonephritis 11 

Cystitis 2 

Dysuria, cause unknown 2 

Enuresis 182 

Frequency, emotional 1 

Albuminuria, orthostatic 19 

Hematuria, etiology unknown 1 

Hemoglobinuria, etiology unknown 1 

Polyuria, etiology unknown 1 

Pyuria 19 

Urethritis 1 

25 



1884 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Genito-Urinary System — Continued 

Genilal adhesions 1 

Hydrocele 15 

Phimosis 100 

Torsion of appendix testis 1 

Foreign body in vagina 1 

Precocious menstruation 1 

Pruritus vulvae 5 

Traumatic injury to genitalia 1 

Vulvo-vaginitis, non-specific 42 

Circulatory System 

Angioneurotic edema 7 

Congenital heart disease 71 

Rheumatic heart disease 67 

Telangiectasis 1 



435 



146 



Diseases of the Blood, Blood-forming Organs, 
and Lymphatic System 

Anemia, unclassified 133 

Erythroblastosis 1 

Hemophilia 1 

Leukemia 1 

Purpura 5 

Splenomegaly ' 3 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 220 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Diabetes 1 

Frolichs syndrome 3 

Hyperthyroidism 3 

Obesity 57 

Physical and mental precocity 1 

Pituitary disorder 1 

Neuro-Muscular System 

Acrodynia 2 

Amyotonia congenita 1 

Behavior problem 157 

Birth injury 8 

Cerebral atrophy 5 

Cerebral deficiency 113 

Chorea 30 

Convulsions, etiology unknown 86 

Defective speech 43 

26 



364 



66 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

N euro-Muscular System — Cont inued 

Encephalitis 2 

(lead 1 ) 

(Schilder's 1 ) 

Habit spasm 45 

Hematoma, sternocleido muscle 1 

Hemorrhage 5 

(cerebral 2) 

(intracranial 3) 

Hydrocephalus 7 

Hysteria. 1 

Instability, nervous 1 

Idiocy 43 

(familial amaurotic 1) 

(microcephalic 4) 

(mongolian 38) 

Masturbation 14 

Meningismus 1 

Meningitis 2 

Migraine 8 

Mutism 1 

Night terror 6 

Paralysis 40 

(external rectus 1 ) 

(facial 5 ) 

(obstetrical 7) 

(spastic 27) 

Physical and mental retardation 4 

Poliomyelitis, anterior 14 

(acute 8 ) 

(old 6) 



Specific Infectious Diseases 

Dysentery 3 

Influenza 11 

Pleurodynia 1 

Rheumatic fever 33 

Syphilis 6 

Tetanus 1 

' Vaccinia 2 

Vaginitis, gonorrheal 1 

Chicken pox 24 

Diphtheria 1 

Malaria 1 

Measles 25 

Mumps 10 

Pertussis 163 

Roseola infantum 6 

Scarlet fever 7 



27 



640 



295 



THE CHILD REN'S HOSPITAL 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis, hilum 1 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 8 

Tuberculosis, tonsillar 1 

Tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis 2 

Tuberculous mesenteric lymphadenitis .5 



Skeletal System 

Achondroplasia 1 

Arthritis 3 

Calcinosis 1 

Displaced ligament of shoulder 1 

Exostosis, femur 1 

Fracture of skull 2 

Ganglion 3 

(finger 1) 

(popliteal space 2) 

Myositis 1 

Osteochondrodystrophy 1 

Periostitis 2 

(tibia 1) 

(ulna 1 ) 

Pronated feet 100 

Scoliosis 37 

Strains 4 

(back 1) 

(foot 3) 



17 



157 



Diseases of the Skin 

Acne • 3 

Alopecia areata 3 

Burns 3 

Cellulitis 7 

Comedo 1 

Dermatitis, unclassified 197 

Dermatographia 2 

Ecthyma 3 

Eczema 383 

Epidermolysis bullosa 1 

Epidermophytosis 30 

Erythema, unclassified 11 

Fungus infection of skin 3 

Furunculosis 52 

Herpes 5 

Ichthyosis 10 

Impetigo contagiosa 288 

Insect bites 19 

28 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Skin — Continued 

Intertrigo 12 

Keratosis 2 

Leukoplakia 1 

Lupus erythematous 1 

Miliaria 17 

Paronychia 7 

Pediculosis 10 

Pityriasis rosea 3 

Prurigo 1 

Psoriasis. 3 

Pyodermia 4 

Ringworm 30 

Scabies 34 

Seborrhea 13 

Urticaria 68 

Verruca vulgaris 15 

Vitiligo 2 



Diseases of the Eye 

Blepharitis 6 

Blindness 1 

Cataract, congenital 1 

Coloboma 1 

Conjunctivitis 27 

Cacrocystitis 6 

Defective vision 2 

Edema of eyelids 3 

Exophthalmos 1 

Eye strain 1 

Heterochromia 1 

Hordeolum -....." 7 

Keratitis, ulcerative 1 

Nystagmus 3 

Obliteration of tear duct 3 

Obstruction of tear duct 2 

Ophthalmitis 1 

Strabismus 24 



Diseases of the Ear 

Abscess, auricular 1 

Cerumen 9 

Deafness 20 

Deaf mutism 1 

Foreign body in ear 2 

Hemorrhage, ear 1 

Mastoiditis 5 

Otitis media 295 



29 



1244 



91 



334 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Tumors 

Hemangiomata and naevi 34 

Neurofibromatosis — von Recklinghausen's disease 1 

Polyp, nasal 2 

Dermoid cyst, eyelid 1 

Sebaceous cyst, multiple 1 

39 

Unclassified 

Abrasions 5 

Abscesses 4 

Allergic state, unclassified 20 

Contusions , 2 

Fatigue 7 

Lacerations 1 

Poisoning 26 

(drug 2) 

(food 1 ) 

(kerosene 4) 

(lead 18) 

(silver 1 ) 

Pyrexia, etiology unknown 1 

Regulation of habits 179 

Serum sickness 1 

Diagnosis deferred 120 

No disease 489 

Dead on admission 13 

^— 868 

New cases 4803 

Secondary diagnosis 3871 

Total 8674 



MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

New Old 
Congenital Malformations 

Absence of cuspids 

Absence of eye 1 2 

Absence of kidney 2 

Absence of upper extremity 1 1 

Anomaly of hips : 

Anomaly of kidney 

Anomaly of larynx 

Anomaly of lower extremity 

Anomaly, multiple 1 

Anomaly of rib 1 1 

Anomaly of spine 2 1 

Anomaly of thorax 

30 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

C ongenital Malformations — Continued 

Asymmetry of head I 

Bifid thumb 1 

Cervical ribs 1 

Club fingers 2 1 

Club foot 3 

Cystic disease of the lungs 1 2 

Double kidney 1 1 

Double ureter 4 2 

Double ureter and pelvis 2 

Dwarfism. 1 1 

Fistula, recto vaginal 3 

Fused kidney ." . 1 1 

Harelip 1 

Harelip and cleft palate 3 

Hermaphrodism . . . 1 

Hypospadias 4 

Imperforate anus 3 2 

Meningoencephalocele 1 

Micrognathia 1 

Pilonidal sinus 2 

Polycystic kidney 1 

Scoliosis, structural 1 1 

Septate vagina 2 

Syndactylism . : . . 2 

Talipes equino valgus 1 

Torticollis 1 

Undescended testicle 10 

66 24 

Diseases of the Newborn 

Congenital laryngeal stridor 2 2 

Diseases of Nutrition 

Acidosis , 

Aerophagy 

Alkalosis 

Coeliac disease 

Dehydration 

Gastro enteric disturbance 

Ketosis 

Lipodystrophy 

Malnutrition : 

Rickets 

Rumination 

Scurvy 

Spasmophilia 

Tetany 

Vomiting, recurrent 

Xerophthalmia 

124 15 

31 



15 




1 




1 




4 


3 


9 


1 


38 


3 


3 




1 




21 


1 


4 


3 


2 




4 




1 




3 




16 


2 


1 





THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Respiratory System 

Anosmia 1 

Deviated nasal septum 2 

Epistaxis 3 

Erosion of nasal septum 1 

Ethmoiditis 7 

Hypertrophied turbinates 5 

Infected antrum 2 

Rhinitis 1 

Sinusitis 43 

Agenesis of bronchial tree and lung 1 

Asthma 42 

Bronchiectasis 14 

Bronchitis 53 

Foreign body in bronchus 1 

Laryngitis 3 

Laryngitis, diphtheritic 1 

Abscess of lung 3 

Atelectasis 4 

Emphysema of lungs 5 

Pneumonia, primary 144 

Pneumonia, secondary 37 

Pneumonia, unclassified 31 

Pulmonary suppuration 

Empyema 26 

Mediastinitis 1 

Pleurisy, fibrinous 2 

Pleurisy, serofibrinous - 4 

Pneumothorax 1 



8 
3 

5 



1 

4 

1 

i 



438 



30 



Alimentary System 

Alveolar abscess 5 

Carious teeth 41 5 

Gingivitis 3 

Lymphoid hypertrophy of pharynx 2 

Nasopharyngitis 99 5 

Parotitis 2 1 

Stomatitis 6 

Adenoiditis 3 

Tonsillitis 127 8 

Tonsillitis, diphtheritic 1 

Hemorrhage, post-operative incision and drainage 

Peri-tonsillar abscess 1 

Vincent's angina 2 

Upper respiratory infection 126 9 

Ulcer of tongue 1 

Esophageal stricture 2 1 

Esophageal varices 1 

Anorexia 3 

32 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Alimentary System — Continued 

Gastritis 1 

Hyperemesis 1 

Pyloric stenosis 5 

Pylorospasm 2 

Appendicitis 14 4 

Colitis 6 

Constipation 10 

Diarrhoea 2 2 

Enteritis 5 

Entercolitis 1 

Foreign body in gastro-intestinal tract 1 

Gastro-enteritis 9 

Hemorrhage, intestinal 2 

Impacted feces . . . . 1 

Incomplete rotation of cecum 2 1 

Intestinal obstruction, extrinsic 2 1 

Intestinal obstruction, intrinsic 1 

Intestinal perforation 1 

Sprue 1 1 

Partial ileus 1 

Stasis, colonic 1 

Ulcer, duodenal ; . . 1 

Abscess of liber 1 

Calcification of liver 1 

Cirrhosis of liver 1 

Hepatitis 1 

Hepatomegaly 2 

Jaundice, infectious, catarrhal 9 

Obstruction, common bile duct 1 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 18 1 

Abdominal pain, psychogenic origin 1 

Adhesions, abdominal ....... 1 

Diastasis recti 2 

Peritonitis 6 

Hernia 6 1 

Fistulo in ano 1 

Incontinence of feces 2 

Stricture of rectum 1 



>46 42 



Genito-Urinary System 

Aberrant renal vessel 

Abscess of kidney 1 

Calculi, renal 

Calcification, adrenal 1 

Cystic kidney 1 

Hypdronephrosis 7 

Hydroureter 1 

Infantile kidney 1 

33 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Genito-Urinary System — Continued 

Megaloureter 2 2 

Nephritis 41 1C 

Ptosis, renal 1 

Pyelitis 26 1 

Pyelonephritis 30 4 

Renal insufficiency 1 

L«remia 2 

Albuminuria, orthostatic 2 

Bacilluria 5 

Glycosuria 1 

Hematuria 4 

Hemoglobinuria 1 

Pyuria 16 

Cystitis 5 

Enuresis, functional 7 1 

Retention of urine 2 

Caruncle, urethral 1 

Urethral valves 1 

Balanitis 1 

Menorrhagia 1 

Phimosis 6 

Prostatis 1 

Vulvo vaginitis, non specific 2 



169 



31 



Circulatory System 

Angioneurotic edema 1 

Cardiac arrhythmia 1 

Congenital heart disease 20 6 

Endarteritis, obliterative 1 1 

Endocarditis, bacterial 2 

Endocarditis, rheumatic 3 1 

Hypertension 1 

Hypertensive cardiovascular disease 1 

Myocardial insufficiency 3 

Myocarditis 11 2 

Neurocirculatory asthenia 1 

Pancarditis, rheumatic 2 

Pericarditis 3 

Pericarditis with effusion 3 

Phlebitis 1 1 

Rheumatic heart disease 29 5 

Tachycardia . 2 



34 



85 



16 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Blood, and Blood Forming Organs, 
and Lymphatic System 

Acetonemia 1 

Anemia, aplastic 1 1 

Anemia, hemolytic 1 

Anemia, erythroblastic 1 1 

Anemia, hyperchromic 6 

Anemia, hypoplastic . . 12 2 

Anemia, secondary 31 3 

Anemia, sickle cell 1 

Anemia, etiology unknown 1 

Anemia of the newborn 1 

Anoxemia 1 

Hemoglobinuria, paroxysmal 1 

Hemophilia J 1 10 

Hepatosplenomegaly 1 

Hypoglycemia 1 1 

Jaundice, congenital hemolytic 1 

Leukemia 7 2 

Leukopenia 1 

Lymphoblastoma, Hodgkin's type 1 

Lymphoma 1 

Meningococcemia 4 

Menonucleosis 1 

Purpura 9 5 

Septicaemia, organism unknown 2 

Septicaemia, pneumococcus '. 4 

Septicaemia, staphylococcus 2 

Septicaemia, streptococcus 5 

Septicaemia, B. Suipestifer 1 

Splenomegaly '. 5 

Splenomegaly with gastric hemorrhage 2 

Sulphemoglobinemia . 1 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 82 3 

187 31 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Coma, diabetic 3 

Cretinism 2 

Diabetes mellitus 6 11 

Diabetes, maternal 1 

Endocrine disturbance 1 

Goitre, adolescent 1 

Growth precocity 1 

Hypertrophy of thyroid 2 

Hypothyroidism 3 1 

Insulin reaction 1 

Myxedema 1 

Polyglandular dysfunction 1 

Pubertas praecox 1 



35 



24 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Neuromuscular System 

Abscess of brain 2 

Agenesis, cerebral 1 

Amaurosis 1 

Amyotonia congenita 1 l 

Arachnoiditis 1 l 

Atrophy, cerebral 14 1 

Behavior problem 42 2 

Birth injury, unspecified ,5 

Catatonia ] 

Cerebral calcification 1 

Cerebral injury — traumatic 1 1 

Cerebral maldevelopment 1 

Cerebral lesion 1 

Chorea 13 1 

Concussion, cerebral 6 

Convulsions 51 12 

Cord injury .5 

Deficiency, cerebral 134 11 

Degeneration, cerebral 2 

Degeneration, lenticular 1 

Encephalitis 34 2 

Epilepsy 37 2 

Habit spasm 2 

Headache 2 

Hemiatrophy . 1 

Hemorrhage, cerebral 1 1 

Hemorrhage, intracranial 1 

Hemorrhage, subarachnoid 2 

Horner's syndrome 1 

Hydrocephalus 8 1 

Hypoplasia 1 

Idiocy, amaurotic, familiar 1 

Idiocy, microcephalic 5 2 

Idiocy, mongolian 1 1 

Intracranial hemorrhage , 2 

Masturbation 3 

Meningismus 5 

Meningitis, influenzal 3 

Meningitis, mumps 1 

Meningitis, pneumococcus 2 

Meningitis, meningococcus 8 1 

Meningitis, staphylococcus 1 

Meningitis, sterile 2 

Meningitis, streptococcus 3 

Microcephalus 3 

Migraine 1 

Mirror writing 1 

Myalgia 2 

Myelitis 1 

Myositis 1 

36 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Neuro-Muscular System — Continued 

Neuritis, toxic 1 

Neuromyositis 1 

Paralysis agitans 1 

Paralysis cerebral 25 3 

Paralysis, brachial 5 1 

Paralysis, facial 3 1 

Paralysis, spastic 16 3 

Personality problem 1 

Personality change 1 

Polioencephalitis 1 1 

Poliomyelitis, acute anterior 35 1 

Poliomyelitis, old 3 

Porencephaly 2 1 

Psychoneurosis. 6 1 

Scaphocephaly 1 

Social maladjustment 1 

Somnambulism 1 

Speech defect 8 

Sturge-Weber's disease 1 

Thrombosis, sinus 2 

531 56 

Specific Infectious Diseases 

Acrodynia 2 

Amebiasis 1 

Chicken pox 16 

Diphtheria 1 

Dysentery 14 

Erysipelas 3 1 

Furunculosis 3 

Infection, acute 2 

Intestinal parasites 15 4 

Kala-Azar 1 

Measles 11 1 

Malaria 1 

Mumps 4 

Pertussis 42 7 

Rheumatic fever 28 2 

Roseolo infantum 6 

Scarlet fever 23 1 

Streptococcus carrier 1 

Streptococcus infection of respiratory tract 2 

Syphilis 8 4 

Tetanus 2 

Thrush 2 

Tinea 1 

Typhoid fever 6 1 

Undulant fever 1 

Vulvo vaginitis, specific, gonococcal 4 

199 22 

37 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Tuberculosis 

Lymphadenitis, cervical .... 
Lymphadenitis, mesenteric. . 

Tuberculin reactor 

Tuberculosis of kidney 

Tuberculosis, miliary 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary. . . , 
Tuberculosis, sacroiliac joint . 

Tuberculosis of skin 

Tuberculosis of spine 

Tuberculosis of ulna 

Tuberculous dactylitis 

Tuberculous meningitis 



3 

3 

30 

3 
10 



Skeletal System 

Abscess of lower extremities 

Arthritis, infectious 

Arthritis, proliferative 

Arthritis, toxic 

Atrophy of arm 

Contractures (hip flexion from cord tumor). 

Dislocation of spine 

Dupuytren's contracture 

Dysostosis multiplex 

Dwarfism 

Faulty union 

Fracture of skull 

Fracture of tibia 

Hemarthrosis 

Osteoarthropathy 

Osteomyelitis 

Pes cavus 

Pronated feet 

Retarded development, physical.. 

Scoliosis, functional 

Scoliosis, structural 

Septic finger 

Septic hip 

Talipes equinus 

Talipes equino varus 



58 



6 



Diseases of the Skin 

Acne vulgaris 

Burns. 

Cellulitis 

Dermatitis, unclassified. 

Ecthyma 

Eczema 



40 

2 

2 

5 

17 

1 
22 



38 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Skin — Continued 

Epidermolysis bullosa 2 1 

Erythema, unclassified 7 1 

Hematoma, traumatic, forehead 1 

Herpex simplex 4 

Hydroa Aestivale 1 

Hyperhidrosis 1 

Impetigo contagiosa 8 

Lupus erythematous 1 

Paronychia 5 

Psoriasis 2 

Pyodermia! 3 

Scabies . 2 

Urticaria 6 

92 4 

Diseases of the Eye 

Atrophy, optic 7 

Blindness 3 

Conjunctivitis 3 

Edema of eyelid 1 

Error of refraction 1 

Keratitis, luetic 1 

Keratitis, phlyctenular 1 

Myopia 2 

Ptosis of eyelid 2 

Strabismus 14 3 

35 3 

Diseases of the Ear 

Mastoiditis 30 

Otitis media • 156 11 

Deafness 4 

Hemorrhage from ear, etiology unknown. . 1 

191 11 

Tumors 

Brain tumor, unclassified 11 

Cord tumor 1 

Embryoma of kidney 1 

Hemangioma 3 1 

Neuroblastoma 2 

Polyp, intestinal 2 

Polyp, rectal : . . . 1 

Neurofibromatosis — Recklinghausen's disease 1 

Brain cyst, multiple 1 

Cyst of kidney 1 

Mediastinal cyst 1 

24 2 



39 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Unclassified 

Abscesses, multiple 1 

Allergic state, unclassified C 2 

Coma, cause unknown 2 

Deferred 14 

Draining facial sinus 1 

Lacerations 4 

No diagnosis 17 1 

Pediculosis 5 

Poisoning, food 3 

Poisoning, kerosene 1 

Poisoning, lead 5 2 

Poisoning, luminal 1 

Positive Hinton reaction 1 

Pyrexia, etiology unknown 12 

Regulation of habits 3 

Serum sickness 2 

Serum reaction 1 

Shock 1 

Wound, punctured 1 

81 5 

Number cases treated in Medical Ward 1214 

Number cases treated in Private Ward 465 

Total 1679 

New cases 2855 

Secondary diagnosis 315 

Total , 

3170 



Report of the Surgical Service 

\ S HAS BEEN pointed out in previous reports, the Surgical Depart - 
-^ *■ ment of The Children's Hospital has three main functions: The 
care of sick children requiring surgical treatment; the teaching of medical 
students; and the effort to keep the medical profession informed of the 
advances being made in the surgical treatment of children. It is false 
modesty not to speak of the tremendous advances that have been made 
by this Service in the last ten years along all of these three lines. 

On the Surgical Service there has been each year an increase in the 
number of operations, and with it an operative mortality which is pro- 
gressively becoming lower. Mere figures mean very little and in con- 
sidering these figures it is well to point out that not only has the number 
of operations increased each year, but the type of operations performed 
are in greater and greater number on patients who a few years ago would 
have been considered beyond surgical help. That our mortality in these 

40 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

difficult and seemingly hopeless cases is low is a reason for just pride. 
The Surgical Service at The Children's Hospital continues in a great 
measure to be the court of last appeal for New England and the pro- 
vinces, and in the last few years we have been receiving more and more 
cases from outside of New England. 

Members of the Surgical Staff now give teaching to first, second, third, 
and fourth year medical students. The elective course for the fourth 
year students has become one of the most popular courses in the School. 
This is evidenced by the fact that we have in the past two years had 
about sixty applications for the twenty-four places that the course pro- 
vides. The combined surgical internship with the Peter Bent Brigham 
Hospital is very popular and we received eighty applications, not only 
from some of the best men in the Harvard Medical School but from men 
all over the country as well. The applications for the positions of Assist- 
ant Surgical Resident and Surgical Resident keep coming in greater and 
greater numbers and they, too, come from every section of the United 
States. This year we received seventy applications for these two positions. 

Of particular significance this year as regards dissemination of the 
knowledge obtained on our Service is the fact that the Chief of the Surgi- 
cal Service was asked to be the guest editor for one of the issues of the 
American Journal of Surgery; this issue being entirely devoted to sur- 
gical problems in children. In addition to seven articles coming from 
the Staff of The Children's Hospital in Boston, there were numerous 
other articles by authors recognized as authoritative in their field and 
who live in various parts of the United States, Canada, and England. 
Although the issue did not appear in print until early in 1938, there have 
been very many favorable comments received upon it. A complete list 
of the contributions to the literature from the Surgical Service is ap- 
pended at the end of this report. 

Such increase in work and such progress and improvement in the 
treatment of surgical diseases brings with it an increased cost. One 
has only to cite one typical example. Fifteen to twenty years ago the 
giving of intravenous fluids and transfusions was considered a measure 
to be used only in desperate cases, and they were rarely used. During 
the month of March there were given on the Surgical Service 361 intra- 
venous injections and 39 transfusions. These forms of treatment re- 
quire much added work on the part of the house staff and particularly 
it involves greater expense because of increased nursing care. The Staff 
feels that these procedures are essential, and the benefit resulting from 
them is reflected in our low mortality rates. This must be considered 
as an essential increased financial burden. 

Although our wards are crowded to capacity throughout the year, 
we do not feel that we are justified in asking for greater bed capacity 

41 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

until the financial state of the country is improved. We do feel, however, 
that if we must cut down on expense it must be done by curtailing the 
amount of work and not the quality of the work. 

The surgery of children in the average community is comparable 
to what general surgery was twenty-five years ago. The Children's 
Hospital is showing the way to improve the treatment of surgical con- 
ditions of this age group, and to reduce the surgical mortality. Difficult 
as the financial times are, we must continue to progress, for to stand still 
is to go backward. 

Dr. Perkins who for a number of years has conducted a special clinic 
for the correction of the dental deformities associated with hare-lip 
and cleft palate has now been given more adequate quarters in the 
Bader Building. The work of this clinic has been outstanding and the 
results have been most gratifying. His clinic fills a long felt need in the 
care of these distressing deformities of the lip and mouth. In addition 
he has started this year what we hope will be an appreciable aid to the 
speech training of these patients. No matter how good a surgical repair 
is made of the cleft palate, there is likely to be some residual impairment 
of speech. This is especially true in cases that are operated on late, and 
also in cases where home conditions are not conducive to good, clear 
enunciation. Under Dr. Perkins guidance Miss Segal has started a 
clinic for defective speech. As a part of her w r ork she makes phonographic 
records of the patients' speech when she receives them and follows the 
progress of her speech training by further phonographic records. This 
enables those in charge of the clinic to have a very accurate record of 
the patient's progress. It is also very helpful for the child to actually 
hear the improvement he is making. 

In the past year Dr. Donald W. MacCollum has been promoted to 
Associate Visiting Surgeon; Dr. Patrick J. Mahoney has been made 
Associate Surgeon; Dr. John W. Chamberlain has been made Assistant 
Surgeon; Dr. Robert E. Gross has been made Resident Surgeon; and 
Dr. John M. Moore has been made Assistant Resident Surgeon. In the 
Throat Department Dr. Carlisle Flake has been made Associate Visiting 
Otolaryngologist; Dr. John Frazee and Dr. Edgar M. Holmes have 
been made Associate Otolaryngologists; and Dr. Charles F. Ferguson 
has been made Resident in Otolaryngology. 

WILLIAM E. LADD, M.D. 



List of Contributions to the Literature from the Surgical Service, 
The Children's Hospital in Boston 

Para-aminobenzenesulfonamide and Its Derivatives in the Treatment of Beta Hemo- 
lytic Streptococcus Injections of the Middle Ear and Mastoid. Report of Six Cases in 

42 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Children, Carlyle G. Flake, M.D., (with Benjamin Carey, Jr.). Reprinted from the 
New England Journal of Medicine. Vol. 217, pp. 1033-1038, Dec. 23, 1937. 

Renal Function in Exercise. H. T. Edwards, M. I. Cohen, D. B. Dill, A. Thorndike 
Jr. Pub. Arbeitsphysiologie. Vol. 9, No. 6, pp. 610, 1937. 

Duplications of the Alimentary Tract. William E. Ladd, M.D. Pub. The Southern 
Med. Jr. Vol. 30, pp. 363-371, April, 1937. 

Congenital Duodenal Obstruction. William E. Ladd, M.D. Pub. Surgery. Vol. 1, 
pp. 878, June, 1937. 

Extrophy of the Bladder. William E. Ladd, M.D., and Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 
Pub. New England Journal of Medicine. 216:637-644, April, 1937. 

The Surgical Significance of Melena in Childhood. William E. Ladd, M.D. Pub. 
New England Journal of Medicine. Vol. 217, pp. 649-653, October, 1937. 

Recurring Myxomatous, Cutaneous Cysts of the Fingers and Toes. Robert E. Gross, 
M.D. Pub. Gynec. and Obstetrics, 65:289-302, 1937. 

Acute Intestinal Obstruction Following Hernia into Ascending Mesocolon. John W. 
Chamberlain, M.D. Reprinted from the New England Journal of Medicine, 216, pp. 
299-301, February 18, 1937. 

Vitamin C Deficiency and Wound Healing. Thomas H. Lanman, M.D., and Theo- 
dore H. Ingalls, M.D. Reprinted from Annals of Surgery, April, 1937. 

Examination of the Child with Chronic Pyelonephritis. Allan M. Butler, M.D., and 
Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. Reprinted from the New England Journal of Medicine, 
November 4, 1937. 

On the Administration of Evipal Soluble to Infants and Children. Henry W. Hudson, 
Jr., M.D. Pub. New England Journal of Medicine, May 27, 1937. 

Congenital Branchiogenic Anomalies. A Report of 82 Cases. W'illiam E. Ladd, M.D. , 
and Robert E. Gross, M.D. Pub. Am. Jr. Surgery, 39:2:234-248, February, 1938. 

The Surgical Treatment of Chronic Pulmonary Suppuration in Children. With Special 
Reference to Bronchiectasis. Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. Pub. Am. Jr. Surgery, 39:2:249- 
266, February, 1938. 

Intraspinal Tumors in Infancy and Childhood. Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. Pub. 
Am. Jr. Surgery, 39:2:342-376, February, 1938. 

The Early and Late Treatment of Burns in Children. Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. 
Pub. Am. Jr. Surgery, 39:2:275-311, February, 1938. ' 

Indications for Splenectomy in Childhood. Results in Fifty-tiro Operated Cases. 
Louis K. Diamond, M.D. Pub. Am. Jr. Surgery, 39:2:400-421, February, 1938. 

Incarcerated Inguinal Hernia in Infancy and Childhood. Augustus Thorndike, Jr., 
M.D., and Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. Pub, Am. Jr. Surgery, 39:2:429-437, February, 
1938. 



SURGICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE OUT-PATIENT 

DEPARTMENT— INCLUDING POST-OPERATIVE CASES 

DISCHARGED FROM HOUSE 

Diseases of Nutrition 

Malnutrition 1 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 10 

Rickets 3 

Scurvy 3 

— 17 

43 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Respiratory System 

Cyst of nose, unclassified 

Deviated septum 

Fibroma of nose 

Sinusitis 

Abscess, pharyngeal 

Foreign body in pharynx 

Abscess, peritonsillar 

Tonsillitis 

Lpper respiratory infection 

Bronchiectasis 

Bronchitis . 

Bronchopneumonia 

Empyema 

Pyopneumothorax 

Alimentary System 

Anomaly of mandible 

Cyst of jaw, unclassified 

Abscess, alveolar 

Dental caries 

Gingivitis ._ 

Stomatitis 

Submucous cyst of mouth 

Vincent's angina 

Sublingual cyst 

Tongue-tie 

Thryoglossal cyst 

Branchiogenetic sinus 

Cleft palate 

Harelip 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Anomaly of lip 

Granuloma of lip 

Parotid cyst, unclassified 

Stricture of parotid duct 

Foreign body in esophagus 

Stricture of esophagus 

Pyloric stenosis 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 

Appendicitis 

Peritonitis 

Thrombosis, omental 

Constipation 

Diarrhoea 

Enteritis 

Megacolon 

Anomaly of gastro-intestinal tract 

Foreign body in gastro-intestinal tract. . . 
Intestinal hemorrhage, etiology unknown 

44 



1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

2 

1 

7 
32 

1 

2 

1 
14 

1 

68 



1 

1 

4 

3 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

35 

6 

5 

20 

12 

6 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

17 

12 

36 

1 

1 

6 

1 

1 

1 

1 

34 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Alimentary System — Continued 

Intestinal parasites 1 

Intussusception 10 

Meckel's diverticulum 1 

Abscess, peri-anal 2 

Fissure of anus 8 

Fistula in ano 3 

Imperforate anus 6 

Abscess, ischiorectal 2 

Fistula, rectovaginal 1 

Polyp, rectal 14 

— 267 

1 
Genito-Urinary System 

Hydronephrosis 1 

Pyelonephritis 1 

Embryoma of kidney 2 

Enuresis 5 

Exstrophy of the bladder 1 

Urinary incontinence, etiology unknown 2 

Urinary retention, etiology unknown 2 

Caruncle of urethra 1 

Posterior urethral valves 1 

Stricture of urethral meatus 1 

Urethritis 4 

Anomaly of foreskin 1 

Atrophy of testicle 1 

Cyst of prepuce, unclassified 1 

Epispadias 2 

Hydrocele 63 

Hypospadias 10 

Balanitis 19 

Masturbation 1 

Phimosis 294 

Posthitis 1 

Undescended testicle 42 

Hypertrophy of clitoris 1 

Labial adhesions 2 

Pseudohermaphrodism 1 

Ruptured hymen 1 

Sinus of mons pubis 1 

Vaginitis, non-specific 2 

464 

Diseases of the Breast 

Abscess of breast 2 

Hypertrophy of breast 7 

Mastitis 11 

20 

45 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Cardio-Vascular Diseases 

Anemia 1 

Anomaly of femoral artery 1 

Heart disease, rheumatic 2 

Hemangio-endothelioma of forehead 1 

Hemangiomata and naevi 252 

Telangiectasis 8 

Lymphatic System 

Lymphadenitis, auricular 5 

Lymphadenitis, axillary 17 

Lymphadenitis, cervical 117 

Lymphadenitis, cervical, tuberculous 1 

Lymphadenitis, epitrochlear 4 

Lymphadenitis, femoral 1.5 

Lymphadenitis, inguinal 22 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric 2 

Lymphadenitis, popliteal 1 

Lymphadenitis, submaxillary 6 

Lymphadenitis, submental S 

Lymphangiectasis of leg 1 

Lymphangioma of face 1 

Lymphangitis of arm 2 

Lymphangitis of thigh 1 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Frolich's syndrome 1 

Goitre, colloidal 1 

Nervous System 

Behavior problem 1 

Birth injury, unclassified 3 

Chorea 1 

Concussion, cerebral 16 

Convulsions 2 

Defective speech 2 

Deficiency, mental 4 

Habit spasm 1 

Hydrocephalus 22 

Injury to median and ulnar nerves 1 

Klippel-Feil syndrome 1 

Meningocele . 26 

Neuroblastoma, adrenal 1 

Neurofibromatosis, von Recklinghausen's disease 2 

Paralysis, brachial, obstetrical 2 

Paralysis of extremities, due to spina bifida 2 

Paralysis, facial . 1 

Spina bifida 23 



265 



203 



111 



46 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Skin 

Abscesses 35 

Abrasions 55 

Avulsion of toe-nail 1 

Blister 10 

Bites, cat 3 

Bites, dog 42 

Bites, insect 13 

Bites, rat 2 

Burns 50 

Carbuncle of neck 1 

Cellulitis . 30 

Comedo 1 

Contractures following burns 6 

Contractures — other than burns 4 

Contusions 88 

Cyst, eyebrow 1 

Cyst, eyelid 3 

Cyst, sebaceous 14 

Cystic hygroma of neck 1 

Dermatitis, unclassified 56 

Eczema 4 

Edema, angioneurotic 1 

Fibroma, arm 2 

Fibroma, chin. . 1 

Folliculitis 1 

Foreign body 29 

Fungus infection of skin 1 

Furunculosis 67 

Granuloma of umbilicus 31 

Hematoma, unclassified 29 

Hypertrophy of toe-nail l 

Impetigo 1 12 

Ingrown toe-nail 7 

Keloid 7 

Lacerations 318 

Lipoma, sacral region 2 

Omphalitis 2 

Paronychia 44 

Pilonidal sinus 8 

Ringworm 1 

Scabies 2 

Septic wound 17 

Serum sickness 1 

Tumor of finger, unclassified 1 

Ulcer, unclassified 2 

Verruca vulgaris 38 

Web of neck 1 

Wound, puncture 10 

Wringer injury 5 



1061 



47 



THE CHILD KENS HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Bones and Joints 

Absence of radius ] 

Achondroplasia ] 

Anomaly of hand 4, 

Anomaly of lower extremity 1 

Anomaly of spine 2 

Asymmetry of skull 2 

Bifid thumb 1 

Bursitis 

Chondropoikylia 1 

Club feet 2 

Club fingers 1 

Deformity of finger, traumatic 1 

Dislocation of epiphysis of knee 1 

Dislocation of radius 3 

Dislocation of spine 2 

Fracture of clavicle 22 

Fracture of elbow 5 

Fracture of femur 7 

Fracture of fibula 5 

Fracture of humerus 12 

Fracture of metacarpus 2 

Fracture of nose 3 

Fracture of phalanx 7 

Fracture of radius 12 

Fracture of radius and ulna 13 

Fracture of skull 15 

Fracture of tibia 6 

Fracture of tibia and fibula 2 

Fracture of ulna 5 

Osteochondroma of femur 1 

Osteomyelitis of femur : 1 

Osteomyelitis of humerus 1 

Osteomyelitis of os calcis 1 

Osteomyelitis of skull 1 

Polydactylism 5 

Slipped radial epiphysis 2 

Sarcoma of femur 1 

Snapping thumb 4 

Septic elbow 1 

Septic knee 1 

Subluxation of elbow, traumatic 1 

Subluxation of radius, traumatic 1 

Teratoma of buttocks and sacrum 1 

Traumatic amputation of finger 1 

Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Absence of pectoralis major muscle 1 

Camptodaetylism 2 

Diastasis recti 5 

48 



168 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of. the Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia — Continued 

Ganglion 6 

Hernia, epigastric 6 

Hernia, femoral 2 

Hernia, incisional : . . . . 3 

Hernia, inguinal 184 

Hernia, umbilical 110 

Pronated feet 4 

Severed tendon 1 

Sprains 20 

Strains 1 

Syndactylism ; 3 

Torticollis . 1 



349 



Diseases of the Eye 

Anomaly of eyelid 1 

Chalazion 1 

Conjunctivitis 5 

Ecchymosis of eyelid 2 

Eye strain 1 

Foreign body in eye 2 

Hordeolum 2 ' 

Ptosis of eyelid 1 

Strabismus 2 

— 17 
Diseases of the Ear 

Anomaly of ear 7 

Atresia of auditory canal 1 

Fibroma of ear 1 

Otitis media 14 

Supernumerary auricles 4 

Tumor of ear, unclassified 1 

— 28 
Specific Infectious Diseases 

Influenza 1 

Vaccinia 1 

Whooping cough 2 

— 4 
Unclassified 

Poisoning, ammoniated ice 1 

Poisoning, kerosene 1 

Poisoning, lead 2 

Deferred 39 

Left before seen 7 

No disease 60 

Transferred to other departments or hospitals 21 

Dead on admission 1 

132 

New cases 1922 

Secondary diagnosis 1235 

Total 3157 

49 



THE CHILD HEX'S HOSPITAL 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS 

WITH ANAESTHESIA 

Aspiration of tumor 2 

Circumcision 107 

Dilatation of esophagus 1 

Dilatation of urethra 16 

Debridement 3 

Endothermy 133 

Incision and drainage of abscess and septic wounds 136 

Lysis of adhesions for tongue tie 2 

Paracentesis 251 

Dorsal slit for paraphimosis 2 

Proctoscopy 1 

Reduction of fractures 23 

Reduction of dislocated thumb 1 

Removal of hemangioma 6 

Removal of carbuncle 1 

Removal of fibroma 1 

Removal of foreign body, region unspecified 8 

Removal of cysts 6 

Removal of granuloma 1 

Removal of growth on chest , 1 

Removal of aural appendages 1 

Removal of keloid 1 

Removal of tumor of ear 1 

Removal of wen 6 

Removal of warts ' 2 

Removal of nail for paronychia 42 

Tooth extraction 1 

Wound sutures 94 

Total .- 



850 



WITHOUT ANAESTHESIA 

Carbon-dioxide snow treatment 



490 



50 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

SURGICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

New Old 
Diseases of Nutrition 

Dehydration 3 

Malnutrition 2 

Nutritional disturbance, acute, and chronic 17 

Rickets * 6 

Scurvy 2 

Vomiting, recurrent 3 

33 

Respiratory System 

Bifid nose 2 

Deformity of nose 10 2 

Deviated nasal septum 1 

Ethmoiditis 1 

Nasal obstruction 1 

Rhinitis 2 

Sinusitis 4 3 

Tonsillitis 53 3 

Tuberculous tonsillitis 1 

Upper respiratory infection 79 

Asthma 4 1 

Bronchiectasis 2 

Bronchitis 5 

Fistula, broncho pleural 1 

Foreign body in bronchus 1 

Abscess of lung 2 1 

Atelectasis 4 1 

Pneumonia 52 3 

Pulmonary suppuration 7 

Empyema 32 4 

Foreign body in pleural cavity 1 

Hemothorax 1 

Pleurisy 2 

Pleurodynia 1 

Pyopneumothorax 3 

Tuberculosis of pleura 1 

264 27 

Alimentary System 

Alveolar abscess 3 

Anomaly of mandible 1 

Cleft of mandible, congenital 1 1 

Dental caries 22 5 

Gingivitis 1 

Malerupted tooth 1 

Micrognathia, congenital 2 

51 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Alimentary System — Continued 

Macrostoma, congenital 

Retarded dental development 

Rhabdomyoma of tongue 

Tongue tie, congenital 

Abscess, parotid 

Abscess of thyroglossal cyst 

Thyroglossal cyst, congenital 

Anomaly of lip, congenital 

Bifid tongue 

Calculus, salivary duct 

Nasopharyngitis 

Parotitis 

Branchiogenetic sinus 

Branchiogenetic vestiges 

Cleft palate 

Harelip 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Salivary cyst 

Sinus of lip, congenital 

Stricture of parotid duct 

Vincent's angina 

Cardiospasm 

Esophageal atresia, congenital 

Esophageal stricture 

Foreign body in esophagus 

Pyloric stenosis 

Pylorospasm 

Abscess, pelvic 

Adhesions, appendiceal 

Adhesions, duodenal 

Appendicitis, acute , 

Appendicitis, acute and chronic 

Appendicitis, chronic 

Appendicitis, interval 

Appendicitis with generalized peritonitis 

Appendicitis with localized peritonitis 

Appendicitis, subacute 

Appendix, tuberculous 

Colitis 

Constipation 

Dilatation of colon, congenital 

Evisceration of intestines 

Gastro-enteritis 

Hemorrhage, intestinal 

Impacted feces 

Incomplete rotation of cecum 

Intestinal obstruction, extrinsic 

Intestinal obstruction, extrinsic and intrinsic. 

Intestinal obstruction, intrinsic 

Intestinal parasites 

52 



1 




1 




1 




2 




1 


1 


1 




8 


2 


1 


1 


1 




1 




21 




1 




.5 


2 


1 




33 


9 


20 


10 


25 


76 


1 




1 




2 




1 




1 




3 




2 


37 


1 




28 




1 




1 




1 




1 




63 




1 




22 






1 


11 




19 




4 




1 




2 


4 


3 




2 


2 


2 




2 




1 




3 


1 


1 




11 




2 




3 


1 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Alimentary System — Continued 

Intestinal perforation 

Intussusception 

Meckel's diverticulum 

Megacolon 

Partial ileus 

Prolapse of ileum 

Reduplication of jejenum, congenital. 

Volvulus 

Abscess of liver 

Hepatitis : , 

Obliteration of bile ducts 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown . . 

Abscess, abdominal wall. 

Abscess, subdiaphragmatic 

Anomaly of abdominal wall 

Peritonitis 

Umbilical fistula 

Abscess, ischio rectal 

Abscess, perianal 

Atresia of rectum, congenital 

Atresia of vagina, congenital 

Fistula in ano 

Fistula, fecal 

Fistula, recto vaginal, congenital . . . . 

Incontinence of feces 

Imperforate anus, congenital 

Rectal bleeding 

Rectal prolapse 

Stricture of rectum 



Genito Urinary System 

Aberrant renal vessel. . . . 

Abscess, perinephric 

Anomaly of kidney 

Calculi, renal 

Double kidney 

Ectopic kidney 

Hermaphrodism 

Horseshoe kidney 

Tuberculous kidney 

Hydronephrosis 

Hydroureter 

Megaloureters 

Nephritis, hemorrhagica. 

Ptosis, renal 

Pvelitis 



1 




17 


1 


5 


1 


1 


1 


1 






1 


1 




5 




1 




1 




2 




32 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




20 




1 




1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




6 




4 


7 


3 


1 


11 


11 


3 


1 


2 




1 




483 


181 



1 


1 


1 




2 




1 


1 


1 




1 






1 




1 


1 




1 


1 


15 


5 




4 


2 




3 


1 


6 





53 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Genito-Urinary System — Continued 

Pyelonephritis 

Pyonephrosis 

Ureteritis 

Ureterocele 

Bifid renal pelvis 

Cystitis 

Dilatation of bladder 

Diverticulum of bladder 

Enuresis, functional 

Exstrophy of bladder 

Fistula, urethral 

Incontinence of urine 

Micturition, frequent 

Obstruction, urinary 

Retention of urine 

Glycosuria 

Pyuria 

Obstruction, urethral 

Stricture of urethra 

Stricture of urethral meatus 

Urethral valves 

L^rethritis 

Absence of testicle 

Anomaly of genitalia 

Balanitis 

Calculi, prostatic 

Epispadias 

Fistula, recto, vaginal, congenital 

Foreign body in vagina 

Hydrocele 

Hypertrophy of clitoris 

Hypospadias 

Infarction of testicle 

Menarche 

Menorrhagia 

Necrosis of testicle 

Orchitis 

Phimosis 

Posthitis 

Torsion of testicle , 

Undescended testicle 

Varicocele 

Vulvo-vaginitis, non specific 



8 


3 


1 


1 


3 




2 




2 


1 


9 


3 


1 




2 




2 




1 


7 


1 




3 


1 




1 


1 




1 




1 




6 




1 


1 


1 


2 


1 




1 


1 


2 


2 


3 




1 




2 






3 


1 


3 


4 


7 


2 


1 


39 


1 




10 



12 



60 

2 
1 
36 
2 
3 



257 



66 



Diseases of the Breast 

Abscess of breast . . 



54 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Cardio Vascular Diseases 

New Old 

Anemia 7 1 

Aneurysm, arterial venous 1 

Arteritis, hypogastric 1 

Congenital heart disease 6 5 

Erythroblastosis 1 

Hemopericardium 1 

Hepatosplenomegaly 1 

Infarct of scalp . 1 

Infection of hypogastric artery 1 

Jaundice, congenital hemolytic 1 

Leucopenia 1 

Myocarditis, diphtheritic 1 

Pericarditis 1 

Phlebitis : 2 

Purpura 3 

Rheumatic heart disease with mitral stenosis 2 

Splenomegaly 1 

Thrombo-phlebitis 1 

Transposition of abdominal viscera and heart 1 

34 6 

Lymphatic System 

Lymphadenitis, axillary 8 

Lymphadenitis, cervical 17 

Lymphadenitis, cervical, tuberculous 3 1 

Lymphadenitis, femoral 6 1 

Lymphadenitis, generalized ,. 2 

Lymphadenitis, inguinal 6 

Lymphadenitis, mediastinal, tuberculous : 1 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric i 5 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric, tuberculous 1 

Lymphadenitis, submandibular 1 

Lymphadenitis, submaxillary 1 

Lymphadenitis, submental 2 

Lymphangiectasis 1 

Lymphagitis 3 

56 3 

Nervous System 

Abscess of brain 3 

Aplasia, cerebral 1 

Arachnoiditis . 3 

Atrophy, cerebral 2 

Behavior problem . 3 

Birth injury, unspecified , 3 

Brain tumor . 12 9 

Convulsions 1 

55 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Nervous System — Continued 

Concussion, cerebral 13 

Cord injury 3 1 

Deficiency, cerebral 7 1 

Deficiency, cortical 2 

Deficiency, mental 11 5 

Dysostosis, cranial 1 

Edema of brain 3 

Encephalitis 2 2 

Epilepsy 2 2 

Hemorrhage, cerebral 1 

Hemorrhage, intracranial 2 

Hemorrhage, mid-brain 1 

Hemorrhage, subarachnoid 3 

Hemorrhage, subdural 1 

Horner's syndrome 2 

Hydrocephalus 20 2 

Idiocy, microcephalic 2 1 

Idiocy, Mongolian 2 

Injury, brachial plexus 1 

Meningismus 1 

Meningitis, influenzal 1 

Meningitis, pneumococcus 1 

Miningitis, B. Protens 1 

Meningitis, staphylococcus 1 

Meningocele 6 

Meningoencephalocele 1 

Microcephalus 1 

Paralysis, brachial 3 

Paralysis, extremities, due to meningocele 7 

Paralysis, facial 1 

Paralysis, spastic 4 

Paralysis, sphincters, due to meningocele 3 2 

Paralysis, ulnar 1 

Parkinson's Syndrome 1 

Poliomyelitis, acute anterior 1 

Poliomyelitis, old 2 

Porencephaly 1 

Spina bifida with meningocele 16 5 

Spina bifida, occulta 4 

Thrombosis, omental 1 



164 



31 



Diseases of the Skin 

Abrasions 7 

Abscess, head, face and neck 3 

Abscess, lower extremities 12 

Abscess, multiple -. . 1 

Abscess of trunk 9 

Abscess, upper extremities 7 

56 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Diseases of the Skin — Continued 

Bites, insect 1 

Burns 21 

Burn contractures 5 

Cellulitis 21 

Cephalhematoma 4 

Contusions 17 

Dermatitis 3 

Dermatitis, ammoniacal 1 

Eczema 8 

Erysipelas 2 

Foreign body in lower extremity . 1 

Foreign body in upper extremity 3 

Furuncle of thigh 1 

Furunculosis 3 

Granuloma of umbilicus 1 

Impetigo contagiosa 3 

Infection, acute, etiology unknown 1 

Ingrown toe nail 1 

Intertrigo 1 

Lacerations 27 

Mononucleosis 1 

Omphalitis 2 

Paronychia 3 

Pediculosis capitis - 2 

Pilonidal sinus 8 

Scabies 1 

Scar contracture 1 

Septic hand 1 

Serum sickness 2 

Wound, punctured 1 

Wringer, injury ■ 1 

Ulcer of skin 1 



3 
15 



188 



21 



Diseases of the Bones and Joints 

Absence of digit 

Absence of radius 

Ankylosis of hip 

Anklyosis of knee 

Anklyosis tempero-mandibular joints. . . 

Anomaly of face 

Anomaly of lower extremity 

Anomaly of rib 

Anomaly of sacrum 

Anomaly of spine 

Anomaly of upper extremity 

Arthritis, proliferative 

Arthritis, toxic 

Bifid thumb 

57 



2 
1 
1 

2 
4 

I 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Bones and Joints — Continued 

Itone plate ] 

Cervical ribs 1 

Chondrodystrophy ] 

Contractures, acquired 1 

Claw hands ] 

Club foot 4 4 

Crush : 1 

Dislocation of hip, congenital 3 

Dislocation of hip, pathological 3 1 

Exostosis ] l 

Fracture, clavicle 1 

Fracture, femur 6 2 

Fracture, fibula 1 

Fracture, humerus 15 1 

Fracture, humerus and radius 1 

Fracture, metatarsal 1 

Fracture, nose 1 

Fracture, phalanx 1 

Fracture, radius 3 

Fracture, radius and ulna 8 

Fracture, skull 17 

Fracture, tibia i 

Fracture, tibia and fibula 3 

Fracture, ulna 1 

Hemivertebrae 1 

Microdactylia, congenital 1 

Osteitis 1 

Osteitis fibrosis cystica 1 

Osteoarthropy 1 4 

Osteomyelitis, clavicle 1 

Osteomyelitis, femur 4 5 

Osteomyelitis, femur and tibia 1 

Osteomyelitis, fibula 2 

Osteomyelitis, humerus 2 

Osteomyelitis, multiple 1 

Osteomyelitis, os calcis 1 1 

Osteomyelitis, os pubis 1 

Osteomyelitis, phalanx 2 

Osteomyelitis of rib 3 

Osteomyelitis of scapula 2 

Osteomyelitis of tibia 1 

Polydactylism 5 1 

Scoliosis, functional 1 

Scoliosis, structural 1 

Septic metatarso-phalangeal joint 1 

Short fingers and toes 1 

Slipped epiphysis 1 

Sprain 1 

Subluxation of knee 2 

Synovitis 2 

58 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Bones and Joints — Continued 

Syndrome — Klippel-Feil 1 

Tuberculosis of humerus 1 

Webbing of neck 1 

131 40 

Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Avulsion of tibial spinous process 1 

Diastasis recti 2 

Ganglion 6 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 1 3 

Hernia, epigastric 2 

Hernia, femoral 1 1 

Hernia, incisional 1 

Hernia, inguinal 175 12 

Hernia, umbilical 44 15 

Hernia, ventral 1 

Injury to ulna and median nerves 1 

Pronated feet .' 2 4 

Severed tendons 2 

Snapping thumbs .2 2 

Syndactylism 2 2 

Torticollis 2 



245 



39 



Tumors 

Angioma — neck and buttocks 

Cystic disease of the lung 

Embryoma of kidney 

Fibroma 

Ganglioneuroma, lumbar region. 

Hemangioma, arterio-venous fistula. . . . 

Hemangioma 

Hemangioma, endothelioma 

Hematoma 

Hygroma 

Keloid 

Lipoma 

Lymphangioma 

Neuroblastoma 

Neurofibroma , 

Nevus 

Papilloma of bladder 

Polyp, intestinal 

Polyp, introitus 

Polyp, rectal 

Sarcoma 

Sebaceous adenoma of skin 

Teratoma 

59 



1 




3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


2 


40 


35 


2 




22 


1 


4 


2 


2 


1 


3 




3 


4 


3 


3 


2 




4 


2 


1 




3 


2 


1 




5 




2 




1 




1 





THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Tumors — Continued 

Tumor of buttocks 1 

Tumor of finger (type unknown) 1 

Verruca vulgaris 2 

Bone cyst 1 2 

Brain cyst 1 

Dermoid cyst 4 

Sebaceous cyst 5 

122 59 

Diseases of the Eye 

Aberrant tear duct, congenital 2 

Abscess, orbital 2 

Amaurosis 1 

Optic Atrophy 2 

Cataract 2 

Coloboma 1 2 

Conjunctivitis 3 

Dacrocystitis 1 

Hemianopsia 1 2 

Hordeolum 2 

Injection of naso-lacrimal sac 1 

Opacity, corneal 1 

Papilledema 1 1 

Strabismus 5 1 

Tumor of conjunctiva, type unknown 2 

21 12 

Diseases of the Ear 

Anomaly of the ear 6 2 

Deaf mutism 1 

Foreign body in ear 1 

Mastoiditis 4 

Otitis media 20 5 

Supernumerary auricles 3 

35 7 

Specific Infections 

Bacteremia 1 

Diphtheria carrier 1 

Dysentery 4 

Mumps 1 

Pertussis 2 

Scarlet fever 1 

Septicemia 9 

Thrush 2 

Vaccinia 1 

Vulo- Vaginitis, streptococcus 1 

22 1 
60 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Unclassified 

Allergy 1 

Anomalies, multiple 1 

Deferred 11 3 

Gaucher's disease 2 

Hemorrhage, post-operative 3 

No diagnosis 2 

No disease 5 

Poisoning 4 

Pyrexia, etiology unknown 1 

Retarded development, physical 1 

Shock, surgical , . 3 

Tuberculin reactor 1 

Tuberculous contact 1 

Positive tuberculin: 5 

41 3 

Number of cases admitted to surgical ward 1237 

Number of cases admitted to private ward 288 

Total 1525 

New diagnosis 2097 

Old diagnosis 496 

Total . 2593 



SURGICAL OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

Operations on the Respiratory Tract 

Deformity of nose 

Submucous resection with plastic to nose 1 

Foreign body in bronchus 

Bronchoscopy 1 

Bronchoscopy with removal of foreign body 1 

Bronchoscopy with tracheotomy 1 

Removal of foreign body 1 

Tracheotomy 1 

Pulmonary suppuration 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol injection 4 

Exploration of thoracic cavity 2 

Lobectomy 1 

Rib resection with drainage 1 

Thoracotomy with drainage of lung 1 

Empyema 

Chest tap with rib resection 1 

Decortication and rib resection 2 

Exploration of wound 1 

Intercostal drainage 13 

Rib resection 31 

61 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Operations on Respiratory Tract — Continued 

Rib resection and exploration of cavity 1 

Rib resection and exploratory thoracotomy 1 

Secondary exploration of pleural cavity 1 

Thoracentesis 1 

Foreign body in pleural cavity 

Removal of foreign body 1 

Pyopneumothorax 

Rib resection 1 

69 

Gastro-Enteric Operations 

Dental caries 

Extraction of teeth 12 

Macrostoma 

Plastic to mouth 1 

Abscess, thyroglossal cyst 

Incision and drainage 1 

Hypertrophied tonsils 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 20 

Tuberculous tonsillitis 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 1 

Salivary cyst 

Removal 1 

Stricture of parotid duct 

Attempted dilatation with insertion of catheter 1 

Dilatation 2 

Insertion of catheter 1 

Tonsillitis 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 3 

Hemorrhage, post-operative 

Resuturing of wound 1 

Suturing of tonsil bleeder 1 

Branchiogenetic sinus 

Excision 4 

Branchiogenetic vestiges 

Removal 1 

Anomaly of lip 

Endothermy 1 

Cleft palate — only 

Plastic 41 

Removal of sutures 4 

Harelip — only 

Plastic 24 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Buccal inlay with Thiersch graft 1 

Exploration of retropharyngeal area 2 

Pharyngoplasty and plastic to palate 1 

Plastic to lip : • 28 

Plastic to palate 51 

Plastic to palate and tonsillectomy 1 

62 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Gastro-Enteric Operations — Continued 

Plastic to palate and excision of harelip scar 1 

Plastic to nose 7 

Plastic to nose and lip 3 

Plastic to nose with bone graft 1 

Removal of premaxilla 1 

Removal of sutures 3 

Rhabdomyoma of tongue 

Removal 1 

Tongue tie 

Freeing of tongue 1 

Esophageal stricture 

Dilatation 42 

Gastrostomy and dilatation. 4 

Fistula, tracheo-esophageal 

Esophago-esophagostomy and closure of fistula 1 

Exploration and esophagostomy 1 

Thoracotomy and exploration 1 

Thyroglossal cyst 

Excision 6 

Excision and incision and drainage 1 

Pyloric stenosis 

Pyloromyotomy 32 

Resuture of wound 1 

Adhesions, appendiceal 

Exploratory laparotomy with freeing of adhesions 1 

Adhesions, duodenal 

Abdominal exploration with freeing of adhesions and appendectomy 1 

Amebiasis 

Proctoscopy 1 

Appendicitis, acute 

Appendectomy 52 

Appendectomy with drains 9 

Appendectomy with freeing of Lane's kink 1 

Exploratory laparotomy with appendectomy 2 

Appendicitis, acute and chronic 

Appendectomy 1 

Appendectomy with drains 1 

Appendicitis, chronic 

Appendectomy 21 

Appendectomy and exploratory laparotomy 7 

Appendicitis, interval 

Appendectomy 1 

Appendicitis with peritonitis 

Appendectomy 1 

Appendectomy with drains 19 

Appendectomy with drains and appendicostomy 3 

Gas dressing 1 

Incision and drainage 16 

Incision and drainage with appendectomy 1 

63 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Gastro-Enteric Operations — Continued 

Appendicitis, subacute 

Appendectomy 

Exploratory laparotomy with appendectomy 

Tuberculous appendix 

Appendectomy 

Colitis 

Closure of enterostomy 

Colectomy, complete 

Proctoscopy 

Re-opening of enterostomy 

Witzel enterostomy 

Dilatation of colon 

Iliosigmoidostomy 

Lumbar sympathetic ganglionectomy 

Proctoscopy 

Resection 

Side to side anastomosis 

Spinal anesthesia 

Foreign body in gastro-intestinal tract 

Exploratory laparotomy with removal of nail 

Hemorrhage — intestinal 

Exploratory laparotomy with appendectomy 

Proctoscopy 

Incomplete rotation of cecum 

Repositioning of cecum 

Intestinal obstruction, extrinsic 

Closure of enterostomy 

Exploratory laparotomy 

Exploratory laparotomy with lysis of adhesions 

Exploratory laparotomy with lysis of adhesions 

and Witzel enterostomy 

Lysis of adhesions 

Proctoscopy 

Witzel enterostomy 

Intestinal obstruction, extrinsic and intrinsic 

Exploratory laparotomy with freeing of adhesions 

Witzel enterostomy 

Intestinal obstruction, intrinsic 

Exploratory laparotomy, side to side anastomosis and ileostomy. 

Intestinal polyp 

Cystoscopy 

Proctoscopy 

Proctoscopy with cauterization , 

Removal 

Intussusception 

Exploratory laparotomy 

Exploratory laparotomy with reduction 

Reduction 

Resection of ileum and enterostomy 

64 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Gastro-Enteric Operations — Continued 

Meckel's diverticulum 

Excision 

Proctoscopy 

Resection 

Resection and lysis of adhesions 

Partial ileus 

Exploratory laparotomy and biopsy 

Prolapse of ileum 

Re-suturing of abdominal wall 

Reduplication of ileum, congenital 

Resection of reduplication of jejunum and side to side anastomosis. . 
Volvulus 

Reduction 

Abscess of liver 

Exploratory laparotomy and incision and drainage 

Obliteration of bile ducts 

Exploratory laparotomy 

Hepatostomy 

Resuture of wound 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 

Exploratory laparotomy with appendectomy 

Abscess, subdiaphragmatic 

Incision and drainage 

Exploration of abscess 

Peritonitis 

Exploratory laparotomy with drainage 

Incision and drainage 

Incision and drainage with Witzel enterostomy 

Umbilical fistula 

Exploration of abdomen and excision of sinus tract 

Abscess, ischio-rectal 

Incision and drainage 

Abscess, peri-anal 

Incision and drainage 2 

Fistula in ano 

Excision 2 

Incision and curettage of fistula 11 

Fistula, fecal 

Excision of fistula 2 

Fistula, recto-vaginal 

Colonic irrigation and ether examination , 1 

Ether examination 3 

Excision and perineorrhaphy 1 

Imperforate anus 

Closure of enterostomy and end to end anastomosis 1 

Exploration and sigmoidostomy 1 

Exploration and plastic 1 

Perineal repair 1 

Perineorrhaphy 1 

Plastic to anus 3 

65 



THK CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Gastro-Enteric Operations — Continued 

Plastic to perineum 2 

Sigmoidostomy 4 

Rectal bleeding 

Exploratory laparotomy with appendectomy 1 

Proctoscopy 3 

Rectal polyp 

Proctoscopy 1 

Proctoscopy with excision 3 

Removal 1 

Rectal prolapse 

Cauterization of rectal mucosa 1 

Stricture of rectum 

Anal dilatation 1 

Proctoscopy 2 

Proctoscopy and anal dilatation 1 

599 



Operations on the Genito-Urinary System 

Aberrant renal vessel 

Exploration and ligation of vessels 2 

Anomaly of kidney 

Cystoscopy 3 

Calculus, renal 

Cystoscopy 1 

Nephrolithotomy - 1 

Double ureter 

Cystoscopy with pyelography 1 

Heminephrectomy 1 

Ectopic kidney 

Cystoscopy 1 

Hydronephrosis 

Cystoscopy 8 

Cystoscopy with retrograde pyelography 1 

Nephrectomy 3 

Suprapubic cystotomy 1 

Pyelitis 

Cystoscopy 2 

Pyelonephritis 

Cystoscopy 4 

Megaloureters 

Cystoscopy 2 

Suprapubic cystotomy 1 

Suprapubic cystotomy and plastic 1 

Urethral dilatation 2 

Ptosis, renal 

Cystoscopy 1 

Nephropexy 1 

Nephropexy with appendectomy 1 

66 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations on the Genito-Urinary System — Continued 

Ureterocele 

Marsupialization of ureterocele and exploration of wound 1 

Suprapubic cystotomy 1 

Diverticulum of bladder 

Cystoscopy 1 

Nephrectomy with excision and ureterectomy 1 

Exstrophy of bladder 

Cystectomy 1 

Ureterosigmoidostomy 3 

Papilloma of bladder 

Excision 1 

Enuresis, functional 

Cystoscopy , 1 

Bacilluria 

Cystoscopy 2 

Hematuria 

Cystoscopy 1 

Pyuria 

Cystoscopy 1 

Suprapubic cystotomy and urethral dilatation 1 

Vaginal and rectal examination 1 

Obstruction, urethral 

Dilatation with irrigation 5 

Punch removal of fibrous bands 1 

Suprapubic cystotomy with insertion of catheter 1 

Suprapubic cystotomy with punch removal 1 

Stricture — urethra 

Dilatation 2 

Stricture of urethral meatus 

Meatotomy 1 

Absence of testicle 

Exploration I 3 

Anomaly of genitalia 

Plastic 1 

Calculi, prostatic 

Cystoscopy 1 

Prostatic exploration with removal of calculi 1 

Suprapubic cystotomy 1 

Urethral dilatation 4 

Epispadias 

Plastic 1 

Eoreign body in vagina 

Removal of foreign body 1 

Hermaphrodism 

Exploratory laparotomy with biopsy 1 

Hydrocele 

Excision 32 

Excision with exploration 1 

Hypospadias 

Dilatation 5 

67 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations on the Genito-Urinary System — Continued 

Dilatation and circumcision 

Plastic 

Removal of sutures 

Suprapubic cystotomy, urethral dilatation, meatomy and 

insertion of catheter 

Necrosis of testicle 

Orchidectomy 

Phimosis 

Circumcision 

Reduction 

Torsion of testicle 

Orchidectomy 

L^ndescended testicle 

Exploration 

Orchidopexy 

Varicocele 

Excision 

Exploration 



Cardio-Vascular Operations 

Arteritis, hypogastric 

Incision and drainage 

Hepato-splenomegaly 

Splenectomy 

Jaundice, congenital hemolytic 

Splenectomy 

Purpura 

Splenectomy 

Splenectomy, oophorectomy and salpingectomy. 



26 



182 



Operations of the Lymphatic System 

Lymphadenitis, cervical 

Biopsy 

Incision and drainage 

Lymphadenitis, cervical, tuberculous 

Excision 

Incision and drainage 

Lymphadenitis, femoral 

Incision and drainage 

Lymphadenitis, inguinal 

Incision and drainage 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric 

Biopsy 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric, tuberculous 

Biopsy 

Lymphadenitis, submaxillary 

Incision and drainage 

68 



1 
5 

2 
2 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations on the Lymphatic System — Continued 

Lymphadenitis, submental 

Incision and drainage 3 

Lymphangiectasis 

Endothermy 1 

Lymphangioma 

Amputation of breast and Thiersch graft 1 

Biopsy 1 

Endothermy 1 

Excision 2 

Incision and endothermy 1 

Plastic with endothermy 1 

Lymphoid hypertrophy of pharynx 

Excision of adenoid and lymphoid tissue 1 

— 33 

Operations on the Skin and Celluar System 

Abscess — head, face and neck 

Incision and drainage 1 

Abscess of lower extremities 

Exploration 1 

Incision and drainage 2 

Abscess of trunk 

Incision and drainage 7 

Abscess of upper extremities 

Incision and drainage 3 

Burns 

Debridement 6 

Debridement and application of tannic acid and silver nitrate 1 

Debridement with escharization 2 

Debridement and Thiersch graft 1 

Excision of scar and plastic to cheek 1 

Gas dressing , 2 

Burn contractures 

Excision of scar and Thiersch graft 3 

Delaying of rope graft 1 

Inlaying of rope graft 1 

Plastic 16 

Raising rope graft 3 

Spreading of rope graft 3 

Swinging rope graft 2 

Transplant 5 

Cellulitis 

Incision and drainage 1 

Cephalohematoma 

Evacuation 1 

Contracture, other than burns 

Plastic 2 

Contusions 

Burr holes 1 

Foreign body in lower extremity 

Removal 3 

69 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations of the Skin and Cellular System — Continued 

Eoreign body in upper extremity 

Removal 

Furuncle of thigh. 

Incision and drainage 

Ingrown toe nails 

Plastic 

Lacerations 

Debridement and suturing 

Irrigation 

Irrigation and suturing 

Suturing 

Paronychia 

Fish mouth incision 

Incision and drainage 

Pilonidal sinus 

Excision 

Septic hand 

Incision and drainage 

Wringer injury 

Thiersch graft 



96 



Operations on the Bones and Joints 

Amputation of stump 

Resection 

Ankylosis, tempero-mandibular joints 

Buccal inlay 

Anomaly of sacrum 

Cystoscopy 

Arthritis, proliferative 

Biopsy 

Bone plate 

Removal 

Claw hands 

Plastic to thumb 

Removal metacarpal and plastic to hand 
Crush 

Freeing pedicle graft 

Pedicle graft 

Thiersch graft 

Dislocation of hip, congenital 

Closed reduction 

Exostosis 

Removal 

Fracture of femur 

Application of cast 

Reduction, closed 

Fracture of fibula 

Reduction, closed 

70 



2 
2 

1 
1 
1 



5 
1 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations on the Bones and Joints — Continued 

Fracture of humerus 

Application of plaster 1 

Attempted reduction, closed and open 1 

Excision of bony overgrowth 1 

Reduction, closed 6 

Reduction, open 1 

Fracture of humerus and radius 

Reduction, closed 1 

Fracture of phalanx 

Reduction, open. 1 

Fracture of radius 

Reduction, closed 3 

Reduction, open 2 

Fracture of radius and ulna 

Reduction, closed 8 

Fracture of skull 

Decompression with Sylvian vessels 

Elevation of depressed fracture 

Exploration 

Fracture of tibia 

Application of cast 

Fracture of tibia and fibula 

Reduction, closed 

Osteitis 

Biopsy 

Osteitis fibrosa cystica 

Curettage : 

Osteomyelitis of femur 

Application of cast 

Gas dressing 10 

Incision and drainage 4 

Incision and drainage and currettage 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy 

Sequestrectomy 

Osteomyelitis of femur and tibia 

Gas dressing 

Incision and drainage 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 

Sequestrectomy 

Osteomyelitis of fibula 

Sequestrectomy and curettage 

Osteomyelitis of humerus 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis, multiple 

Excision and plastic 

Osteomyelitis of os calcis 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis of phalanx 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy 

71 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations on the Bones and Joints — Continued 

Osteomyelitis of rib 

Incision and drainage 2 

Thoracotomy 1 

Osteomyelitis of scapula 

Incision and drainage 1 

Osteomyelitis of tibia 

Osteotomy and drainage 1 

Polydactylism 

Removal 5 

Slipped epiphysis 

Reduction, closed 1 

Subluxation of knee 

Exploration 1 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 1 

Tuberculosis of humerus 

Aspiration 1 

Webbing of neck 

Plastic 2 



112 



Operations on the Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Ganglion 

Removal - 6 

Hernia, epigastric 

Herniorrhaphy 2 

Hernia, femoral 

Herniorrhaphy '. 1 

Hernia, incisional 

Herniorrhaphy 1 

Hernia, inguinal 

Exploration 1 

Herniorrhaphy 161 

Herniorrhaphy and section and removal 1 

Reduction 1 

Reduction and appendectomy 1 

Hernia, umbilical 

Herniorrhaphy 26 

Severed tendon 

Suturing 2 

Snapping thumbs 

Plastic 1 

Syndactylism 

Pedicle graft . 1 

Plastic 1 



72 



206 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations on the Nervous System 

Abscess of brain 

Aspiration 

Burr holes with aspiration : . . . 

Incision and drainage 

Aplasia, cerebral 

Encephalogram 

Arachnoiditis 

Decompression and lysis of adhesions 

Ventriculogram 

Brain cyst 

Exploration with removal of cyst 1 

Brain tumor 

Bone flap with biopsy 1 

Bone flap with extirpation 2 

Bone flap with removal i 

Burr holes and ventriculogram 3 

Burr holes, ventriculograms and encephalogram 

Cerebellar exploration and excision 

Cerebellar exploration with extirpation 

Lumbar and subdural tap 

Re-elevation with excision 

Sub-occipital exploration 

Ventriculogram. 

Ventriculogram and bone flap 

Ventriculogram with partial removal and re-elevation 

Cerebral injury, traumatic 

Burr holes 

Cerebral defect 

Encephalogram 

Cord injury 

Cistern puncture with lipiodol injection 

Intra-thecal injection of lipiodol 

Laminectomy and exploration 

Laminectomy and lysis 

Deficiency, cortical 

Ventriculo-encephalogram 

Edema of brain 

Subtemporal decompression 

Encephalitis 

Burr holes 

Encephalogram 

Subtemporal decompression 

Epilepsy 

Bone flap 

Burr holes < 

Encephalogram 

Hemorrhage, intracranial 

Burr holes 

73 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Operations on the Nervous System — Continued 

Hemorrhage, subarachnoid 

Arrest of hemorrhage 

Suboccipital exploration 

Hydrocephalus 

Burr holes with injection of air 

Cerebellar exploration 

Combined tap 

Combined tap and injection P.S.P 

Combined tap, injection P.S.P. and ventriculogram 

Exploration and lysis of adhesions 

Subdural tap with lumbar tap 

Suboccipital decompression and exploration 

Subtemporal decompression 

Subtemporal decompression and ventriculostomy 

Ventricular tap and injection P.S.P 

Ventriculogram 

Ventriculogram and combined tap 

Idiocy, microcephalic 

Encephalogram 

Intracranial lesion, unknown type 

Bone flap 

Burr holes and ventriculogram . . 

Meningocele 

Excision 5 

Removal of sutures 1 

Meningocele with spina bifida 

Excision 17 

Resuture of wound 2 

Neurofibroma 

Excision with Wolfe graft 1 

Partial extirpation 1 

Paralysis, facial 

Exploration and suturing 1 

Paralysis of sphincters, due to meningocele 

Sigmoidostomy 1 

Paralysis, cerebral 

Encephalogram 1 

Paralysis, spastic 

Encephalogram 1 

Exploration 1 

Personality change 

Burr holes 1 

Porencephaly 

Bone flap 1 

Encephalogram 2 

Ventriculogram 1 

Thrombosis, omental 

Exploratory laparotomy with excision and appendectomy 2 



107 



74 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Tumor Operations 

Adenoma, sebaceous 

Removal 1 

Angioma 

Excision 1 

Embryoma of kidney 

Exploratory laparotomy with excision 1 

Nephrectomy 3 

Fibroma 

Excision and endothermy 1 

Removal 1 

Ganglioneuroma 

Laminectomy and biopsy 

Partial removal 1 

Hemangio-arterio venous fistula 

Arterial injection of thorostrast 1 

Excision 1 

Injection of varicose veins 1 

Ligation of varicose veins 1 

Hemangioma 

Carbon dioxide snow treatment 1 

Endothermy 43 

Excixion 10 

Excision and dioxide snow treatment 1 

Excision and Wolfe graft 1 

X-Ray treatment t 

Hemangio-endothelioma 

Attempted ventriculograms 1 

Excision 3 

Hematoma 

Bone flap with exploration and evacuation 2. 

Bone flap with removal of hematoma 5 

Burr holes 2 

Burr holes with drainage of cyst , 2 

Decompression with evacuation of blood clot 

Exploration with removal of hematoma 

Re-elevation of bone flap with removal of blood clot 

Removal of hematoma 

Ventriculogram 

Ventriculogram and exploration 

Ventriculogram with evacuation of hematoma 

Hygroma 

Excision 2 

X-Ray treatments 4 

Keloid 

Removal 3 

Lipoma 

Removal 2 

Neuroblastoma 

Excision 1 

Exploratory laparotomy with partial removal 1 

75 




THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Tumor Operations — •( 'untinued 

Exploratory laparotomy with excision, biopsy and X-Ray treatment. 

Rib resection and biopsy 

X-Ray treatment 

Nevus 

Excision 

Excision and Wolfe graft 

Excision, Wolfe graft and Thiersch graft 

Removal of mole 

Thiersch graft 

Polyp, introitus 

Removal 

Sarcoma 

Amputation 

Biopsy 

Excision 

Teratoma 

Partial excision 

Tumor of buttocks 

Removal 

Bone cyst 

Curettage of bone cyst 

Curettage and irrigation 

Cystic disease of the lungs 

Rib resection and exploration 

Dermoid cyst 

Excision of tumor and appendectomy 

Removal 

Sebaceous cyst 

Incision and drainage 

Removal 

Operations of the Eye and Ear 

Aberrant tear duct 

Dilatation of lacrimal duct 

Abscess, orbital 

Incision and drainage 

Anomaly of ear, congenital 

Plastic 

Conjunctivitis 

Dilatation 

Supernumerary auricles 

Removal 

Unclassified Operations 

Deferred 

Biopsy • 

Laminectomy 

Proctoscopy 

76 



137 



1 
1 

6 

2 
2 



12 



1 
1 

2 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Unclassified — Continued 
Gaucher's disease 

Splenectomy 2 

No diagnosis 

Cystoscopy 2 

No disease 

Exploration 1 

Exploratory laparotomy 1 

Proctoscopy 1 

Puncture wound 

Incision and drainage 1 

— 12 

Total number of operations 1570 

Total number of anesthesias in surgical ward 1215 

Total number of anesthesias in private ward 327 

Total anesthesias 1542 



Report of the Orthopedic Department 

j\ S USUAL there have been many visitors from our own country 
and abroad the past year. This service has always been a Mecca 
for visitors who are interested in our methods of treating the crippled 
child. 

Teaching of Undergraduates 

The schedule of teaching third and fourth year students has re- 
mained unchanged. 

Teaching of Physiotherapists 

There have been ten pupils taking the nine months course in physical 
therapy under Miss Merrill's direction and there were a number of stu- 
dents who took the summer course under the direction of Dr. Legg, Dr. 
Sever and Miss Merrill. The country is very fortunate in having these 
students sent out to various cities and towns. Owing to the Child Wel- 
fare activities, there is a great demand for well-trained physiotherapists. 

Post-graduate Teaching 

Post-graduate teaching in orthopedics continued during the past 
year. There were several doctors who took courses given by the 
members of our Staff under the auspices of the Courses for Graduates 
of the Harvard Medical School. 

Research 

Several articles have been published during the past year by various 
members of the Staff. Strides are being made in research on joint and 

77 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

bone growth and also on pseudo-muscular dystrophy and arthritis. The 
Departments of Orthopedics and Pathology have numerous problems 
awaiting solution because of lack of funds. This work should be done 
and we are losing a valuable opportunity in not being able to enlarge 
our output because no one seems interested enough to supply ways and 
means. It is all very well to treat the deformed and handicapped but 
we could perform a greater service to science and to future patients if 
we could investigate more scientifically the results of the daily routine 
clinical work. 

Since we left the old hospital on Huntington Avenue, Orthopedic 
Surgery has made tremendous advances for several reasons: 

1. There are more patients. 

2. The problems presented are more varied. 

3. The interns have had a previous training in general surgery. 
For these reasons we have all been given a better insight into diseases of 
bones and joints that were formerly unrecognized and often untreated 
because of lack of fundamental knowledge. 

Internes 

There is a large waiting list of candidates for internship and those 
selected have been excellent. 

Resident 

Dr. Pinckney Harral finished his residency last year and went to 
San Francisco where he is associated with Dr. LeRoy Abbott, Professor 
of Orthopedic Surgery in the University of California and with Dr. 
Bost, a former intern and resident at the Children's. Dr. Harral's place 
was filled by Dr. C. W. Dawson who ends his term of service in September 
1938. Dr. Carroll Lawson is the incoming resident. 

I wish to take this opportunity to thank all the members of the 
House and Visiting Staffs for their unselfish devotion to their duties. 
I also wish to express my appreciation to the Nursing Staff, to the Super- 
intendent of Nurses and the Director of the Hospital for their help and 
cooperation. We are particularly indebted to the Department of Path- 
ology for assisting us unstintedly and whole-heartedly in many ways 
and finally I wish to express my appreciation for the cooperation of the 
other Departments of the Hospital. FRANK R. OBER, M.D. 



78 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

ORTHOPEDIC DISEASES TREATED IN THE 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

Congenital Malformations 

Head, Xeck, and Trunk 

Klippel-Feil syndrome 2 

Torticollis 44 

Webbing of neck 1 

Anomaly of thorax, unclassified 2 

Spine 

Absence of sacrum 1 

Anomaly of spine, unclassified 7 

Meningocele 5 

Scoliosis 2 

Spina bifida 3 

Tpper extremity 

Sprengel's deformity 1 

Anomaly of arm, unclassified 2 

Anomaly of hand, unclassified 2 

Anomaly of finger, unclassified 3 

Flexion deformity of finger 1 

Polydactylism 1 

Snapping thumb 1 

Lower extremity 

Dislocation of hip 19 

Flexion contracture of hip 1 

Shortened femur 1 

Dislocation of knee 2 

Flexion contracture of knee 1 

Absent fibula 1 

Anomaly of leg, unclassified 1 

Hemiatrophy of leg 1 

Anomaly of foot, unclassified 4 

Shortened tibia 1 

Contracture of fascia lata 1 

Pes planus 1 

Talipes calcaneo-cavus 1 

Talipes calcaneo- valgus 48 

Talipes equino-varus -. 49 

Accessory scaphoid 1 

Absence of 5th toe of metatarsus 1 

Adduction deformity of toe 4 

Anomaly of toe, unclassified 10 

Flexion deformity of toe 2 

Hallux valgus 3 

Hammer toe 2 

79 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Miscellaneous 

Anomalies, multiple 5 

Arthrogryposis ] 

Dyschondroplasia 3 

Hemiatrophy, one side of body 2 

Osteogenesis imperfecta 1 

245 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 

Head, Neck, and Trunk 

Fracture of skull 1 

Torticollis, acquired 5 

Spine 

Poor posture 52 

Scoliosis, functional 6 

Scoliosis, structural 8 

Upper extremity 

Sprain of shoulder 1 

Fracture of clavicle 30 

Fracture of humerus . . . 23 

Fracture of epicondyle 2 

Dislocated elbow 2 

Fracture, supracondylar, of elbow 2 

Sprain of elbow 6 

Fracture of radius and ulna ' 8 

Fracture of radius 20 

Madelung deformity of wrist 1 

Sprain of wrist 1 

Dislocation of metacarpal 2 

Fracture of metacarpal 4 

Flexion contracture of finger 1 

Fracture of phalanx 5 

Tenosynovitis of flexor pollicis longus tendon 1 

Lower extremity 

Dislocation of hip, pathological 3 

Flexion contracture of hip 1 

Fracture of femur 1 

Slipped femoral epiphysis 1 

Sprain of hip 1 

Flexion contracture of knee . 2 

Internal derangement of knee 2 

Recurrent dislocation of patella 1 

Sprain of knee. 3 

Fracture of tibia 10 

Fracture of fibula 1 

Epiphyseal fracture lower end of fibula and tibia 1 

Fracture of tibia and fibula 5 

80 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease— Continued 

Sprain of ligaments of tibia and fibula 1 

Fracture of foot, multiple 1 

Pronated feet 646 

Foot strain '. . . . 11 

Pes cavus 10 

Talipes equino-valgus, acquired -. 1 

Talipes equino-varus, acquired 25 

Sprain of ankle 9 

Metatarsalgia 1 

Tenosynovitis, peroneus longus sheath 1 

Tenosynovitis, extensor hallicus longus tendon, traumatic 1 

Tenosynovitis of knee, traumatic 1 

Miscellaneous 

Osteochondritis, unclassified 3 

924 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis of phalanx 1 

Tuberculosis of wrist 1 

' - . 2 

Non-Tuberculous Arthritis 

Arthritis of hip, toxic 2 

Arthritis of knee, atrophic 1 

Arthritis of knee, meningococcus 1 

Arthritis, proliferative — Still's disease 1 

Septic ankle 1 

Septic hip 3 

Septic knee 1 

— 10 

Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System 

Brodie's abscess of tibia 1 

Osteomyelitis of femur 3 

Osteomyelitis of humerus 2 

Osteomyelitis of scapula 1 

Periostitis of fibula 1 

8 



Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Congenita amyotonia 2 

Dystrophy, pseudohypertrophic 1 

Myelitis 1 

Neuritis, peripheral 1 

Paralysis of extremities, due to meningocele 1 

Paralysis, obstetrical 18 

Paralysis, peroneal 1 

Paralysis, spastic 33 

Poliomyelitis, old 33 

Short leg, tibia and fibula, neurological origin 1 

92 

81 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Rickets and Its Deformities 

Rickets with bow legs 

Rickets with knock knees 

Rickets with multiple deformities. 

Tumors 

Ganglion of hand 

Ganglion, popliteal 

Tumor of sternocleidomastoid. . . . 



42 
83 
23 



1 

2 
1 



148 



Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 
Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Apophysitis 

Coxa vara 

Coxa plana 

Exostosis, metatarsus 

Exostosis, os calcis 

Exostosis, of tibia 

Kohler's disease 

Osgood-Schlatter's disease 

Unclassified 

x^brasions 

Appendicitis 

Birth injury, unspecified 

Blister 

Cellulitis 

Clavus 

Coccygodynia 

Coeliac disease 

Contusions 

Dermatomyositis 

Epidermophytosis 

Fatigue 

Foreign body 

Gaucher's disease 

Hemangioma 

Hematoma 

Hemophilia 

Impetigo 

Lead poisoning 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 

Malnutrition 

Mental retardation 

Phimosis 

Pyloric stenosis 

Rheumatic fever 

Scurvy 

82 



o 
3 
4 
4 
1 
1 
1 
5 



3 
1 
3 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 
26 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
4 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 



24 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Unclassified — Continued 

Umbilical hernia 1 

Undescended testicle 2 

Verruca vulgaris 1 

Deferred 52 

Left before seen 6 

No disease 27 

Transferred to other services 2 

159 

New cases 851 

Secondary diagnosis 765 

Total 1616 



ORTHOPEDIC DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

Congenital Malformations New Old 

•Head, Neck, and Trunk 

Anomaly of ear 1 

Anomaly of thorax 1 

Cervical spine 1 

Torticollis 34 2 

Spine 

Anomaly of sacrum 2 

Anomaly of spine 2 1 

Hemivertebrae 1 

Scoliosis, structural 1 5 

Spina bifida with meningocele 4 4 

Upper extremity 

Absence of humerus 1 

Absence of radius • 1 

Absence of upper extremity 1 1 

Rudimentary fingers 1 

Lower extremity 

Absence of tibia 1 

Absence of toes 1 

Anomaly of lower extremity 2 2 

Congenital constricting band of leg 1 

Contractures, hip and knee 3 

Coxa vara 2 2 

Dislocation of hip 17 13 

Dislocation of patella , 2 

Shortened femur '. . 2 1 

Talipes calcaneo valgus 1 

Talipes equino valgus 2 1 

Talipes equino varus 25 27 

Miscellaneous 

Anomalies, multiple 3 4 

Osteochondritis Deformans Juvenilis , 1 

83 



THE CHILD RBVS HOSPITAL 



Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Osteogenesis imperfecta 

Polydactylism 

Sprengel's deformity 

Syndactylism 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 

Head, Neck, and Trunk 

Concussion, cerebral 

Contusions 

Fracture of pelvis 

Fracture of pubis 

Laceration 

Torticollis 

Spine 

Dislocation of spine 

Scoliosis, functional 

Scoliosis, structural 

Upper extremity 

Avulsion of epicondyle of humerus 

Deformity of elbow 

Dislocation of elbow 

Fracture of humerus 

Fracture of radius and ulna 

Wrist drop 

Lower extremity 

Ankylosis 

Dislocation of hip, pathological 

Fracture of femoral epiphyses 

Fracture of femur 

Fracture of meniscus of knee 

Fracture of tibia 

Fracture of tibia and fibula 

Genu valgum 

Hallux valgus, acquired 

Internal derangement of knee 

Pronated feet 

Recurrent dislocation of patella 

Slipped epiphysis 

Slipped femoral epiphysis 

Talipes calcaneo-cavo-varus 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus 

Talipes cavo- varus 

Miscellaneous 

Abrasions, multiple 

Fractures, multiple 



84 



108 



1 

3 
2 
1 



75 



2 
1 
1 

1 
1 
3 
7 
5 
1 

1 
5 
1 
7 
1 
2 
3 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
9 

4 

1 

87 



1 

2 



2 
1 



1 
10 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculids 1 

Tuberculosis of femur 8 

Tuberculosis of humerus 1 

Tuberculosis, miliary 1 

Tuberculosis of the spine 4 

Tuberculosis of the ulna 1 

Tuberculous dactylitis 1 

Tuberculous bursitis, gluteal 1 

Tuberculous tenosynovitis 1 

19 

Non-Tuberculous Arthritis 

Arthritis, atrophic 4 5 

Arthritis, non-specific 1 

Arthritis, proliferative — Still's disease 5 

Arthritis, toxic 1 

Arthritis, traumatic 1 1 

Arthritis, unknown etiology 1 

Septic ankle 1 

Septic hip 5 

Septic ilium 1 

20 6 

Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System 

Osteomyelitis, diffuse 1 

Osteomyelitis of femur 3 2 

Osteomyelitis of fibula 3 

Osteomyelitis of humerus 2 

Osteomyelitis of ilium 1 

Osteomyelitis of metatarsal bone ■ 1 

Osteomyelitis of os calcis 1 

Osteomyelitis of phalanx 1 

Osteomyelitis of rib 2 

Osteomyelitis of scapula 1 

Osteomyelitis of tibia 2 

Periostitis of tibia 1 

13 8 

Tumors 

Angioma, cavernous, of thigh 1 

Baker's cyst 1 

Cord tumor, astrocytoma . . . . 2 

Cyst of semilunar cartilage 1 

Fibro-liposarcoma 1 

Lymphangioma 1 

Osteitis fibrosa cystica 2 

Sarcoma 1 

8 2 

85 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 
Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Apophysitis 1 

Atrophy of bone 1 

Atrophy of leg 1 

Bursitis 3 

Contractures, acquired 2 3 

Coxa plana 6 1 

Coxa vara 2 1 

Dermatomyositis 1 

Epiphyseal lesion, etiology unknown 1 

Exostosis 1 

Faulty union 5 2 

Hemarthrosis 1 1 

Muscular dystrophy 3 

Peroneal spasm 1 

Post-operative septic wound 1 

Slipped femoral epiphysis 1 

Synovitis 3 

30 12 

Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Amyotonia, congenita 1 

Deficiency, cerebral 1 

Deficiency, mental • 2 

Degeneration central nervous system 1 

Hematomyelia 1 

Paralysis, brachial, obstetrical 2 3 

Paralysis, cerebral 1 

Paralysis of extremities due to meningocele 2 1 

Paralysis of extremities and trunk due to tumor of cord 1 

Paralysis, facial 2 1 

Paralysis, spastic 10 2 

Paralysis, Volkmans 2 

Poliomyelitis, anterior, convalescent 3 

Poliomyelitis, old 46 53 

Porencephaly 1 

Sciatic nerve, post-operative tourniquet palsy 1 

75 62 

Rickets and Its Deformities 

Deformities due to rickets 1 1 

Rickets 1 1 

Rickets with bow legs 2 

Rickets with bow legs and knock knees 1 1 



86 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Unclassified 

Abscesses, lower extremities , 

Appendicitis, acute 

Cellulitis 

Chicken pox 

Deferred 

Dermatitis 

Dermatitis, ammoniacal 

Embolism, pulmonary 

Foreign body in lower extremity 

Furunculosis 

Gastro-enteric disturbance 

Gauchers disease 

Hemophilia 

Hydrocephalus 

Hypertrophied tonsils and adenoids 

Incontinence of feces 

Intracranial hemorrhage 

Measles 

Nasopharyngitis 

Poisoning, luminal 

Pneumonia, lobar 

Rheumatic heart disease 

Sinus, post-operative draining sinus from foreign body. 

Speech defect 

Strabismus 

Upper respiratory infection 

Xanthomatosis 



i 
3 



36 12 

Number of cases treated in Orthopedic ward 374 

Number of cases treated in Private ward 42 

Total 416 

New cases 401 

Secondary diagnosis 190 

Total 591 



ORTHOPEDIC OPERATING ROOM REPORT 



Congenital Malformations 

Head, Neck, and Trunk 
Torticollis 

Myotomy 



37 



Upper Extremity 

Deformity of upper extremity 

Lengthening of extensor tendons and radius with 

insertion of Kirschner wire 

Removal of Kirschner wire 



87 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

( Congenital Malformations — Continued 
Lower Extremity 
Absence of tibia 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 2 

Lengthening of tendo- Achilles and posterior tibial tendon with 

freeing of intermuscular septum 1 

Removal of Kirschner wire ] 

Congenital deformity of lower extremity 

Osteotomy 3 

Tendon and muscle transplant 2 

Coxa vara 

Osteotomy, adductor myotomy with insertion of Kirschner wire .... 1 

Dislocation of hip 

Adductor myotomy 

Application of cast 

Exploration hip joint and shelf operation 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 

Manipulation and application of cast 2 

Reduction, closed 15 

Reduction, closed with insertion of Kirschner wire 

Reduction, open 

Talipes equino varus 

Application Morris traction 

Application Morris traction with insertion of Kirschner wire 

Arthrodesis, Hoke 

Arthrodesis, Hoke and wedge osteotomy 

Brewster counter sinking 

Insertion of Kirschner wires 

Ligamentous release with application of Morris traction 

Ober ligamentous and plantar fasciotomy 

Ober ligamentous 

Ober ligamentous and wedge osteotomy 

Plantar fasciotomy 

Plantar fasciotomy, capsulotomy with lengthening of 

tendo- Achilles 

Plantar fasciotomy and manipulation 

Plantar fasciotomy, manipulation and capsulotomy 

Removal of Kirschner wires 4 

Removal Morris traction 1 

Lower Extremity 

Talipes equino varus 

Removal Morris traction with Kirschner wires 2 

Removal Morris traction and application of cast 1 

Revision Hoke arthrosesis 1 

Steindler stripping with application of Morris traction 2 

Tendon lengthening 1 

Wedge osteotomy 1 

Miscellaneous 
Polydactylism 

Removal of digits, fingers and toes. 1 

88 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Scoliosis, structural 

Fasciotomy and insertion of pin to tibia 1 

Sprengel's deformity (elevation of scapula) . . 

Lengthening of muscles and removal of tip of acromion 1 

109 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 

Head, Neck, and Trunk 
Torticollis 

Manipulation 1 

Upper Extremity 
Dislocation of elbow 

Reduction, closed. 2 

Fracture of humerus 

Manipulation and reduction 1 

Reduction, closed , 1 

Fracture of radius and ulna 

Reduction, closed 5 

Lower Extremity 

Dislocation of hip, pathological 

Application of cast 1 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 2 

Manipulation 1 

Reduction, closed 1 

Flexion contracture of hip, post-operative tumor 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 1 

Fracture of meniscus of knee 

Excision of internal meniscus 1 

Internal derangement of knee 

Excision of cartilage : 1 

Exploration of right knee joint 1 

Genu valgum, old epiphyseal injury to tibia 

Osteotomy 1 

Fracture of tibia 

Reduction, closed 1 

Lower Extremity 

Fracture of tibia and fibula 

Debridement, reduction with application of cast 

and insertion of Kirschner wire 1 

Reduction, closed 1 

Flexion contracture of toe 

Arthrodesis of terminal phalangeal joint of great toe -. . . 1 

Hallux, valgus acquired 

Removal exostosis and transplant of tendons 1 

Talipes calcaneo-cavo-varus, etiology unknown 

Triple arthrodesis 1 

Talipes cavo varus due to spina bifida 

Fasciotomy 1 

— 27 

89 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Non-Tuberculous Arthritis 

Arthritis, generalized atrophic 

Aspiration 1 

Osteotomy and fasciotomy 1 

Arthritis, atrophic of wrist 

Aspiration 1 

Septic ankle 

Aspiration, incision and drainage 1 

Septic hip 

Incision and drainage 2 

6 
Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System 

Osteomyelitis of femur 

Exploration and curretage 1 

Incision and drainage 1 

Osteomyelitis of fibula 

Exploration with biopsy and curettage 1 

Incision and drainage 1 

Osteomyelitis of humerus 

Incision and drainage 2 

Osteomyelitis of metacarpal 

Incision and drainage with sequestrectomy. . . : 1 

Osteomyelitis of rib 

Incision and drainage 1 

Osteomyelitis of tibia 

Incision and drainage 1 

Incision and drainage and saucerization 1 

Incision and drainage with sequestrectomy £ 

Periostitis of tibia 

Exploration and biopsy 1 

— IS 

Paralysis and Other Neuromuscular Diseases 

Paralysis, brachial, obstetrical 

Myotomy and osteotomy 1 

Paralysis, peroneal 

Insertion Kirschner wire 1 

Arthrodesis and tendon transplant 1 

Paralysis, spastic 

Adductor myotomy and obturator neurectomy 1 

Arthrodesis, Hoke 2 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, with counter sinking 1 

Lengthening of hamstrings 1 

Lengthening of tendo- Achilles 3 

Neurectomy — Stoffel 1 

Tendon and muscle transplant 1 

Poliomyelitis, old 

Arthrodesis, Hoke 15 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, with bone block i 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, wkth counter sinking 2 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, with counter sinking and 

tendon and muscle transplant 1 

90 



ORTHODONTIA DEPARTMENT 

Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases — Continued 

Arthrodesis, Hoke, fasciotomy and tendon and muscle transplant. . . 6 

Arthrodesis, Hoke with plantar fasciotomy. 1 

Arthrodesis, Hoke with tendon transplant 8 

Arthrodesis, Hoke and wedge osteotomy 1 

Brewster counter sinking 3 

Epiphyseal arrest 3 

Exploration of sinus and removal of sutures 1 

Fasciotomy 5 

Fasciotomy and application of apparatus 1 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 2 

Lengthening of tibia and fibula ". 2 

Manipulation 5 

Osteotomy of femur 2 

Osteotomy of tibia. . . 1 

Removal of apparatus 1 

Removal of Kirschner wire 1 

Removal of traction 1 

Removal of traction with application of spica 1 

Spinal fusion 1 

Steindler stripping with application of traction 2 

Steindler stripping, fasciotomy with insertion of Kirschner wire 1 

Tendon and muscle transplant 16 

Tendon and muscle transplant and osteotomy of femur 1 

Tendon and muscle transplant and fascial sling 1 

Tendon and muscle transplant and reefing of capsule of shoulder ... 1 

101 

Rickets and Its Deformities 

Rickets with multiple deformities 

Osteotomy of tibia 1 

Rickets with bow legs and knock knees 

Osteoclasis of tibia 1 

Osteotomy of femur and osteoclasis of tibia and fibula 1 

Manipulation 1 

4 

Tumor Operations 

Angioma, cavernous of thigh 

Injection of Diodrast 1 

Baker's cyst of knee 

Excision 1 

Cyst of semilunar cartilage of knee 

Excision 1 

Fibro-liposarcoma of humerus 

Disarticulation ' . . . 1 

Lymphangioma of knee 

Removal 1 

Osteitis fibrosa cystica 

Exploration and packing 1 

Sarcoma, osteogenic of femur 

Biopsy 1 



91 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 
Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 
Bursitis, prepatella 

Excision ] 

Incision and drainage 1 

Exostosis of femur 

Removal 1 



Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis of femur 

Aspiration 1 

Tuberculous Bursitis, gluteal 

Excision of bursa 1 



Unclassified 

Abscess, lower extremities 

Incision and drainage 2 

Deferred 

Application of cast 1 

Dermatomyositis 

Fasciotomy with biopsy 1 

Foreign body in lower extremity 

Exploration of sinus with removal of silk sutures 2 

Removal of foreign body 1 

Gaucher's disease 

Biopsy 1 

8 

Application of cast 4 

Gas dressing 11 

Total number of operations 280 

Total number of anesthesias in Orthopedic ward 310 

Total number of anesthesias in Private ward 37 

Total anesthesias 347 



Report of the Muscle Training Clinic 

DURING the year 1937 the total number of treatments given at the 
Muscle Training Clinic was 3654. New patients admitted for 
diagnosis and treatment were as follows: 

Cerebral Palsy 33 

Obstetrical Palsy 7 

Spinal Cord Injury 1 

Miscellaneous 6 

RANDOLPH K. BYERS, M,D. 

92 



BACTERIOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Report of the Bacteriology Laboratory 

1937 

THE YEAR 1937 has again shown an increase in the work performed 
in the laboratory. A total of 16,574 examinations were made, which 
is an increase of 2935 from the previous year. The laboratory has shown 
a consistent increase in the total examinations done during the past ten 
years. 

Because of the desirability of adding certain diagnostic procedures 
for patients on the private ward and the necessity of consolidating other 
tests under the direction of the laboratory, another full-time technician 
was added to the laboratory personnel September 1. The laboratory 
feels fortunate in having obtained the services of Mrs. Cornelia A. Dingle, 
who received her training at the central laboratory of the Connecticut 
State Department of Health. The responsibility of this technician is 
chiefly to the private ward for examinations of clinical-pathological 
nature and to carry out the procedures for electrocardiograms, blood 
sedimentation rates and basal metabolisms for patients on the private 
ward, the public wards, and in the out-patient department. These extra 
procedures, which only a few years ago were considered merely as special- 
ized tests for research on special patients, have proven their worth and 
are now considered as necessary aids in the diagnosis and treatment of 
many diseases of childhood. A glance at the summary of the examina- 
tions performed in the laboratory will show the rapid adoption and use 
of these procedures. It will be interesting to watch the growth of this 
department of the laboratory. 

A room on the fourth floor balcony of the main hospital building, 
formerly the kitchen for the fourth floor of the private ward, was chosen 
as the most secluded location for the performance of the basal metabo- 
lisms and electrocardiograms. The room was tastefully repainted, 
equipped with special curtains to exclude the light so that the electro- 
cardiogram films could be developed safely, and proper furniture for 
carrying out the procedures was added. A new machine of the latest 
type was purchased for determining the basal metabolisms. 

The laboratory can hold its enviable position only if it is always 
conscious of certain fundamental ideas. The careful performance of 
accepted procedures and tests, a ready willingness to help any doctor 
with some special problem of diagnosis, constant watchfulness for new 
ideas and the seeking of new knowledge by research, make a solid foun- 
dation of such a department. It is hoped that these functions will always 
be maintained at their present high level. 

93 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Miss Marian Sweet has completed her tenth year as assistant bac- 
teriologist. Drs. John Regan, Alan Hill, Glidden Brooks, and Henry 
Work have served as house officers in the laboratory during the past year. 

BENJAMIN W. CAREY, JR., M.D. 



Bacteriological Examinations 

Cultures from 

Nose and throat for diphtheria bacilli 44.5-1 

Blood 715 

Spinal fluid 781 

Surgical specimens and miscellaneous cultures 2419 

Feces 1518 

Urine 813 

Guinea pig inoculations for diphtheria bacilli 24 

Guinea pig inoculations for tubercle bacilli 93 

Agglutination tests 145 

Vaccines prepared 22 

10,984 

Clinical Pathology 

Routine urine examinations 2169 

Blood 

Hemoglobin estimations 621 

Red cell counts 615 

White cell counts 950 

Differential counts 670 

Bleeding time estimations 32 

Clotting time estimations 37 

Groupings 167 

Spinal fluid examinations 58 

Feces examinations 26 

Miscellaneous 69 

(Since September 1, 1937) 

Electrocardiograms 112 

Basal metabolisms 11 

Sedimentation rates 53 



5590 

Bacteriological examinations 10,984 

Total 16,574 



94 



PHYSICAL THERAPEUTICS DEPARTMENT 

Report of Physical Therapeutics 

1937 

THERE were no real changes in the work of the Department during 
the year. The special clinics for the treatment of faulty posture 
and scoliosis, and for muscle training in neurological cases were continued, 
as was the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission's main clinic in 
Bader Building. Aside from these, the orthopedic service referred the 
largest number of cases, both from the wards and from the Out-Patient 
Department. As it was not a year of a polio epidemic, the number of 
cases and treatments was about at the usual level. 

An interesting group of patients from the surgical service were the 
children referred to the pool and gymnasium for stretching exercises to 
increase range of motion after skin grafting had been done for extensive 
burns. It was found that much improvement could be obtained. 

The carbon arc solarium was in use during the winter months for a 
group of orthopedic ward children undergoing long hospitalization. 
Ultra violet therapy was carried out on the wards for many different 
conditions as in other years. 

While it is generally thought that the pool is useful only in the after- 
care of polio cases, more than half of the ward patients referred for work 
in the pool had some other type of disability, such as arthritis and post- 
operative stiffness or weakness. 

Fifteen women completed the nine months graduate course in physio- 
therapy and some are now scattered in Colorado, Indiana, Texas, Louisi- 
ana, Michigan, Ohio, New Jersey, and New York, while one is at the 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and two are in the Polio unit at the Massa- 
chusetts State Hospital at Lakeville. 

The summer course included a group of six public health nurses from 
the Crippled Children's Division of their respective states. At the sug- 
gestion of the Washington Children's Bureau, a four months Boston 
course was arranged to prepare these women to start the program for 
crippled children in their communities. Simmons College, the Nurses 
Training School of the Children's Hospital, Boston Community Health 
Association and the summer physiotherapy course of Courses for Gradu- 
ates, Harvard Medical School, cooperated, and it was felt that the train- 
ing obtained would be valuable in starting an emergency program, al- 
though the short physiotherapy course did not fully qualify them as 
physiotherapists. 

The Bouve Boston School of Physical Education sent its physical 
therapy major students for training in the Spring of 1937. 

95 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

At the present time there is a great need for physiotherapists ex- 
perienced in the care of crippled children to fill positions in many com- 
munities where this work has previously been neglected, and many 
doctors are anxious to obtain women who have had training at this 

HoSpital - JANET B. MERRILL 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY 
STATISTICS 



Hospital Wards 

Orthopedic 

Surgical 

Medical 

Throat 

Neurological 

Private 

Infants* Hospital . 
Hospital Staff. . . . 
School of Nursing. 
Employees 



Light General 

General Ther- P. T. Light Pool 

P. T. apy Pool Treat- Treat- Treat- Muscle 

Cases Cases Cases ments ments ments Exams TOTAL 



136 


12 


20 


3065 


203 


787 


38 


4093 


17 


25 


5 


233 


570 


90 


1 


894 


39 


2 


3 


80 


14 


58 


35 


187 





1 








6 








6 


3 


2 


1 


25 


39 


2 


1 


67 


8 


7 


3 


22 


55 


38 


3 


118 


4 

















5 


5 


13 


2 





35 


41 








76 


19 


2 





49 


7 








56 


4 








23 











23 


243 


53 


32 


3532 


935 


975 


83 


5525 



O. P. D. Pool 

H. I. P. C 36 

Private 6 

42 

O. P. D. 

Orthopedic 112 

Surgical 12 

Private 1 

Medical 2 

Arthritic 19 

Scoliosis 354 

Light 9 

Private 2 

H. I. P. C 1093 (119 new) 

Neurological 177 



1577 
233 

1810 



1577 
233 

1810 



1060 




15 


1075 


71 




1 


72 


2 






2 


7 




1 


8 


45 






45 


2044 






2044 




43 




43 




13 




13 


4313 






4313 


3693 






3693 



1781 11,235 56 17 11,308 

Total 2204 cases Treatments 18,643 



96 



HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 

The Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission 

1937 

THE Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission was organized in 1916 
for the study and treatment of Infantile Paralysis. The After-care 
Clinic is held in the Bader Building each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 
morning. The services of this Clinic are free to all sufferers from the 
disease and suspected cases are admitted for diagnosis. 

Field Clinics are held on a regular schedule in Arlington, Beverly, 
Cambridge, Dedham, East Boston, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, 
Maiden, Quincy, Somerville and Waltham. 

During 1937 the State Department of Health reported 359 cases of 
poliomyelitis — 88 of these came to the Commission Clinic for treatment, 
in addition to 44 other new cases with the onset of paralysis prior to 1937. 

The extent of the work of the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commis- 
sion for 1937 is very vividly expressed by the following figures: 18,500 
treatments were given to 1244 individual patients. Of these 1577 were 
Pool treatments; 5890 Hospital Clinic treatments; 6304 Field treatments 
and 5923 treatments were given by the Community Health Association 
Nurses. 

The interest in the work of the Clinic is world-wide as is indicated 
by the addresses of some of our guests. They came during 1937 from 
London and Oxford, England; Melbourne and Sydney, Australia; 
Peiping, Chengtu and Shanghai, China; Manila, Philippines; Brussels, 
Belgium; Stockholm, Sweden; Bologne, Italy Havana, Cuba; and St. 
Anthony, Newfoundland. 

A fine spirit of cooperation exists between the Commission workers 
and those of the Hospital as is evidenced by the number of Infantile 
cases operated upon in the wards and then referred back to the Clinic 
for post-operative care. 

The Clinic continues to serve as a teaching clinic for House Officers 
of the Children's Hospital, Medical School students and Physiotherapy 
students. 

Praise is due the Community Health Association for the care and 
treatments given the cases in the Boston District, either at one of their 
clinics or in home visits. 

The Commission wishes to extend its sincere gratitude to the many 
associations and individuals who have made possible transportation to 
and from the Clinic, warm clothing and the necessary apparatus for 
those patients whose families were unable to care for these needs. Special 
mention should be made of the Volunteer Red Cross drivers, the Noemi 
Club, U. O. T. S. No. 11 and the Kiwanians. . 

ARTHUR T. LEGG, M.D. 

97 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
THE HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 

Number of regular clinics held at the Children's Hospital 152 

Number of doctor clinics held in outside cities and towns 6 

Total 158 

Number of visits made to the Children's Hospital clinics 5890 

Number of old cases seen at the doctor clinics in outside cities 

and towns 251 

Number of visits made in the field by Commission workers. . . . 6304 

Number of visits made in the field by the Community Health 

Association 5923 

Total 18,368 

Number of new cases seen at the Children's Hospital Clinic. ... 119 

Number of new cases seen with 1937 onsets 88 

Number of new cases seen at Doctor clinics held in outside cities 

and towns 13 

Total new cases 132 

Total number of visits at all Harvard Infantile Paralysis Com- 
mission Clinics 18,500 

Total number of individual cases seen 1,244 

Number of H. I. P. C. cases operated on in the Children's 

Hospital 61 



Report of the Otolaryngological Department 

1937 

SINCE the last annual report the organization of the Throat Service 
has undergone several changes. In September, 1937, Dr. Charles 
Ferguson, a former Resident at this Hospital, was appointed Resident in 
this department. The advantages of the services of two full-time sur- 
geons is only too obvious, and it is hoped that the arrangement can be 
continued. Dr. Ferguson has introduced, among other things, the record 
system used by the Surgical Service which should make more readily 
available for study and follow-up purposes the records of this depart- 
ment. His services will be greatly missed next year. 

In September, 1937, the two rooms opposite the Throat Operating 
room were given over by the Hospital for use as offices by the Assistant 
Otolaryngologist, Dr. Carlyle G. Flake. This arrangement has the 
obvious advantage of having a visiting physician in closer contact with 
the activities of the service than would otherwise be possible, for direc- 
tion and instruction of the house staff in the care of patients and in case 
of emergency. 

The present staff has proven entirely adequate to attend the needs of 
the service both in the Out-Patient Department and in the Wards. 

98 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

This has obviated the necessity of our calling upon a large visiting staff 
composed of busy physicians who, despite the inconvenience gave un- 
selfishly of their time and skill. As a consequence of this change in policy, 
the Resident bears the brunt of actually running the service and receives 
considerably more operative work. 

There have been several notable improvements in the matter of 
equipment. A modern operating table has been obtained and has made 
working conditions much more pleasant and efficient for all concerned. 
The new automatic suction apparatus fills adequately an absolute neces- 
sity for good ear, nose, and throat work and bronchoscopy. Numerous 
smaller additions have been made in the way of new instruments, solu- 
tion basins, etc. Dr. Harold Tobey has very generously allowed us the 
use of his 2-A Audiometer for testing those patients with hearing diffi- 
culty. It was formerly necessary to send them to other hospitals for 
such tests. The service has need of further equipment for hearing tests 
and new instruments. No doubt these will be acquired in due time. 

HAROLD G. TOBEY, M.D. 

REPORT OF NUMBER OF OPERATIONS FOR 
THROAT DEPARTMENT 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy — Out-Patient Department 624 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy — Ward 68 

Tonsillectomy 1 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy and Antrum Irrigation 3 

Adenoidectomy — Out-Patient Department 44 

Adenoidectomy — Ward 32 

Adenoidectomy and Cauterization of Eustachian tube. . .• 1 

Mastoidectomy, simple 81 

Mastoidectomy, secondary 8 

Mastoidectomy and Adenoidectomy 16 

Mastoidectomy, radical 4 

Mastoidectomy, with Ligation of jugular — Phlebotomy 1 

Secondary suturing mastoid wound 4 

Incision and drainage of post-aural abscess 3 

Removal of nipple from ear drum 1 

Exploration of sinus and dura 1 

Incision and drainage of temporal abscess, re-opening of 

furuncle in ear canal 1 

Removal of wax from ear canal 1 

Antrotomy with irrigation 11 

Antrotomy with adenoidectomy 11 

Antrotomy and bronchoscopy with injection of lipiodol 1 

Antrotomy, radical 2 

Bronchoscopy 10 

Bronchoscopy with injection of lipiodol, and X-ray 24 

Bronschoscopy with cauterization 1 

99 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Removal of foreign body 

Tracheotomy 1 

Excision of scar tissue — trachea 

Laryngoscopy 1 

Laryngoscopy with removal of papilloma 

Laryngoscopy with incision and drainage of retropharyngeal abscess .... 

Laryngoscopy with removal of foreign body 

Laryngoscopy with suspension 

Laryngoscopy with adenoidectomy 

Laryngoscopy with biopsy 

Laryngoscopy and suspension with incision and drainage of cyst 

from ventricle 

Esophageal Dilatation 

Esophagoscopy with removal of foreign body 1 

Esophagoscopy under fluroscope 

Esophagoscopy and bronchoscopy 

Esophagoscopy 

Incision and drainage of retropharyngeal abscess 

Incision and drainage of parotid gland 

Incision and drainage of temporal abscess — re-opening of 

furuncle ear canal 

Incision and drainage of sub-a-pneumatic abscess of scalp 

Incision and drainage of retropharyngeal abscess and removal of 

hypertrophied mucous membrane 

Decompression of frontal bone with incision and drainage of extra-dural 

and sub-dural abscess 

Excision of nasal polyp 

Ligation of carotid artery 

Submucous resection 

Biopsy, nostril 

Removal of hypertrophied mucous membrane of nostril 

Excision of septal polyp ; 

Biopsy nasopharynx 

Injection of lipiodol via nasal catheter 

Examination of pharynx 

Insertion of intubation tube 

Total 

Tonsil bleeders 9 

Adenoid bleeders 3 



105& 



THROAT CASES IN THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 



Abscess of ear 2 

Abscess, post -aural 12 

Abscess, peritonsillar 1 

Adenitis, cervical . 15 

Adenitis, preauricular 2 

Adenitis, post auricular 3 

100 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Adenoids 41 

Atresia auditory canal 1 

. Bleeding, post tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 2 

Bronchitis . 4 

Cerumen 22 

Conjunctivitis 2 

Cyst of ear drum 1 

Deafness 8 

Dental caries 9 

Deviated septum 22 

Diarrhoea 1 

Epistaxis ."...• 23 

Foreign body in bronchus 1 

Foreign body in ear , 4 

Foreign body in esophagus 2 

Foreign body in nose : 15 

Foreign body in throat 2 

Fracture of nose 10 

Furunculosis 16 

Hay fever 1 

Hemorrhage, post-operative 1 

Hypertrophy of tonsils and adenoids 53 

Hypertrophy of turbinates 1 

Impetigo contagiosa , 9 

Laryngeal stridor 1 

Laryngitis 3 

Laryngo-tracheo-bronchitis 1 

Lymphangioma of nose 1 

Mastoiditis 27 

Mal-occlusion of teeth 1 

Nasal deformity 1 

Nasal obstruction 3 

Nasopharyngitis 24 

Otalgia 3 

Otitis externa 11 

Otitis media 385 

Papilloma of larynx 1 

Rhinitis 14 

Scarlet fever 2 

Sinusitis 29 

Tumor of nose 1 

Tumor of larynx 1 

Upper respiratory infection 40 

No disease 47 

Diagnosis deferred 33 

New cases in Throat Department 637 

Secondary diagnosis 277 

Total 

101 



914 



914 



THE CHILDREN'S EIOSPITAL 
PRIVATE WARD THROAT CASES- 1937 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy 669 

Adenoidectomy 33 

Mastoidectomy, bilateral 14 

Mastoidectomy, left 32 

Mastoidectomy, right 20 

Antrum puncture 6 

Submucous resection 2 

Ethmoidectomy 3 

Turbinectomy 2 

Esophageal djlatation 2 

Bronchoscopy 1 

Resuturing 3 

Excision thyroglossal cyst 1 

Excision nasopharyngeal tumor 2 

Plastic to mastoid scar 2 

Ligation left jugular vein 1 

Incision and drainage tonsillar abscess 1 

Incision and drainage sub-maxillary abscess 1 

Incision and drainage brain abscess 1 

Incision and drainage post aural abscess 2 

Incision and drainage mastoid abscess 1 

Incision and drainage ethmoid sinus. 1 

Total 800 



Report of the Roentgenological Department 

1937 

PROBABLY no field of medicine has made more progress in the diag- 
nosis and treatment of disease during the last decade or two than 
that concerned with the practice of Roentgenology. It has been said that 
the X-Ray has been the greatest single aid to medicine since the de- 
velopment of the microscope. 

The constantly greater use of the X-Ray is reflected in the increased 
number of examinations made in this department during the past year. 
Since our primary function is to render service to all branches of the 
hospital, this increase is doubly significant in that it is so uniformly 
distributed among the Hospital's various services. 

Facilities for the proper practice of Roentgenology are necessarily 
quite expensive. Apparatus, personnel, and adequate space are all of 
importance. Obviously, those directly concerned with the practice of 
this specialty have an important responsibility to medicine in general 
and to their specialty in particular. 

It is felt that a high standard of service has been maintained although 
the greater demands have taxed the Department of Roentgenology to 

102 



ROENTGENOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

its capacity, and have emphasized the need for more adequate and 
efficient equipment if requests are to be met and the standard main- 
tained. 

The first major change in personnel of the X-Ray Department since 
1926 was made this year when Dr. G. M. Wyatt of Cleveland was made 
associate in Roentgenology. 

Dr. E. C. Vogt who since 1926 has been full-time roentgenologist has 
established an office for private practice and at present devotes half 
time to the hospital. EDWARD C. VOGT 



TABULATION OF PATIENTS 



Out-Patient Department 

Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Throat 

Total 

Ward 

Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Throat 

Total ■ 

Infants 

Private 

Bader Building 

Isolation 

Miscellaneous 

Doctors 

Nurses 

Employees 

Total 

Total cases examined 

Total cases treated 

Total exposures (films) 

103 



1936 


1937 


1956 


2096 


922 


865 


1140 


1349 


255 


298 



4273 



2957 



4607 



1089 


1077 


939 


1171 


635 


646 


294 


234 



3128 



910 


1041 


799 


1055 


273 


260 


80 


75 


104 


63 


29 


41 


183 


214 


-217 


197 


2595 


2946 


9981 


10,850 


156 


169 


27,705 


30,320 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



X-RAY REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 1937 

Radiographic Cases 



January 

February . 
March . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September. 
October . . 
November 
December . 



January . . 
February . 
March . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September. 
October . . . 
November . 
December . 



X-Raij 


Old 




New 


Treat- 




Films 


Cases 




Caset 


ments 


Totals 


2.538 


445 




426 




4 


875 


2266 


468 




349 




14 


831 


2662 


588 




428 




10 


1032 


2688 


519 




448 




20 


987 


2520 


534 




472 




24 


1030 


2627 


509 




435 




22 


966 


2497 


462 




379 




7 


848 


2192 


366 




389 




11 


766 


2516 


462 




419 




10 


891 


2639 


487 




380 




1 


868 


2525 


341 




485 




26 


852 


2650 


558 


t 


332 


" 


14 
L69 


904 


30,320 


5739 


1,942 


10,850 




Private 






Bader 


Iso- 




Cases 


Infants Bldg 


lation 






112 

112 

119 

102 

121 

96 

50 

50 

84 

77 

60 

72 




84 

103 

75 

104 

100 

107 

74 

74 

78 

66 

76 

100 


24 
24 
26 
20 
25 
24 


30 
30 
26 
31 


16 






13 






23 






19 




4 










































1055 



1041 



260 



75 



Report of the Department of Pathology 

1937 

THIS is a combined report of the activities of the Department of 
Pathology for 1936 and 1937 since no report was published in 1936. 
The routine work of the laboratory has continued during 1936 and 
1937 with constant emphasis on thorough and carefully prepared records. 
Procedures that but a few years ago might have suggested special re- 
search efforts are now regarded as part of a complete routine study of 
problems presented by a surgical specimen or a postmortem examina- 

104 



PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

tion. It is evident that there is no sharp dividing line between the main- 
tenance of a proper routine, which answers the immediate requirements 
imposed upon the laboratory in a given case, and future study which is 
dignified by the term research. The reasons for maintaining what once 
might have been called an elaborate routine have been discussed in 
previous reports. It is sufficient to state that the routine efforts of the 
laboratory have been accepted by the clinical staff and have been in- 
, corporated in the factors responsible for the steady progress of the Hospi- 
tal as a whole. 

Because it is believed that one of the important functions of the 
laboratory is to carry on investigative work, special emphasis will be 
placed on that phase of our activities in this report. "When the new 
quarters of the Department of Pathology were built provision was 
made for experimental work. Although no special equipment was in- 
stalled, the rooms were built to permit simple rearrangement for any of 
the research activities within the scope of pathology. With the collabora- 
tion of Dr. Wilson, experiments concerned with the general problem of 
respiration of the new born have been continued, following a line of work 
which has been going on for several years. The Department played host 
during 1936 to the full or part-time research activities of ten doctors not 
directly associated with the Pathology Department, and supported that 
work in various ways. Representatives of the surgical, orthopedic, 
medical and neurosurgical services of the Hospital are included in that 
group. Stimulated and supported to an appreciable extent by the 
Pathology Department, the orthopedic, surgical and dental services 
have concentrated many of their recently undertaken experimental 
activities in our laboratories. Our animal room houses all the experi- 
mental animals used by Dr. McKhann and the members of his depart- 
ment. Under the direction of Dr. Wolbach and Dr. Blackfan, Dr. Ingalls 
is completing a two-year study of certain phases of the vitamin C prob- 
lem. Under their direction also, Dr. May has carried out studies on the 
vitamin A problem. Professor Conel of Boston University, and recently 
appointed Research Fellow in the Department of Pathology of Harvard 
Medical School, has submitted for publication the result of six years' 
work: the first volume of his basic study on the postnatal development 
of the brain, "The Cerebral Coitex of the New Born." 

Dr. Farber returned in June 1936 to resume his duties as Pathologist. 
His year abroad as a Moseley Traveling Fellow of Harvard University 
was spent largely with Professor C. Heymans at Ghent. He has very 
modestly refrained from entering as publications from this Department, 
the numerous publications which came out of the year's work. Of more 
importance to the Hospital, however, is the fact that Dr. Farber brings 
back to the institution many new ideas and new methods of experimental 

105 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

approach to the solution of problems frequently presented in the clinic 
and in the postmortem room. Happily, the present quarters have per- 
mitted the establishment of a modestly equipped laboratory where, 
among other problems, Dr. Farber is actively studying the problem of 
pulmonary edema. An explanation has already been obtained for the 
occurrence of one type of acute pulmonary edema — that associated with 
lesions of the central nervous system. Dr. Farber's experimental results 
may now be correlated with postmortem facts and they have cleared up 
the pathogenesis of a hitherto perplexing and not infrequent factor in 
immediate causation of death. 

Dr. Harris has completed a long and difficult study of one phase of 
congenital heart disease. The Department is collaborating with various 
members of the clinical staff in the study of several problems of interest. 
These will be mentioned in the next report. 

The collection of microscopic preparations of bone has reached a 
considerable size. This has been prepared by a part-time technician 
subsized through the efforts of Dr. Ober. Special studies on tumors of 
early life conducted for the past seven years, and aided by valuable end- 
result information gathered by Dr. MacCollum of the Surgical Service, 
have resulted in the accumulation of data of considerable importance. 

The educational activities of the department continue as in previous 
years. The official and unofficial instruction of students in the second, 
third, and fourth years constitutes a good portion of the work of the 
department. Five internes, representing all three clinical services, serve 
from six to eight months in the laboratory before entering on ward duties. 
The weekly clinical-pathological conference, which helps the Hospital 
meet one of the requirements for A. M A. approval, acts as an important 
clearing-house for problems in diagnosis and treatment. It serves, also, 
as an important exercise in both post and undergraduate teaching. 

The above brief account of the activities of the Department of 
Pathology indicates that more and more the Department is engaging in 
activities beyond those of most hospital departments of pathology. The 
development has been a wholly logical one, brought about through collab- 
oration with the clinical staff and the realization that the pathology of 
early life is a very different field from adult pathology. Whereas in 
adults the important noninfectious causes of death are largely the out- 
come of the deterioration of tissues that we associate with the aging 
process, in early life we deal with tissues and organs unaffected by age 
and presumably amenable to recovery, provided pathogenesis can be 
discovered. Dr. Farber's year abroad was in realization that the pathol- 
ogist must acquire techniques with instruments other than the scalpel 
and the microscope. More and more the pathologist is compelled to 
supplement his training in the morphologic aspects of disease by knowl- 

106 



PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

edge of physiology and biochemistry. It is to be hoped that gradually 
the department may be permitted to expand in the experimental ap- 
proach to causes of disease and mechanisms of death suggested, though 
not amenable to solution, by analyses of gross and microscopic observa- 
tions. 

The Department has been fortunate in the intelligent and devoted 
assistance offered by its permanent force. Mention should be made of 
the excellence of the photographic work of Mr. Harding, whose efforts 

have enriched our permanent records. c «rnT d a /^tt h TR 

b. JoUKl VVULrJACti, 1V1.L). 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

1936 

Farber, Sidney, Butler, A. M., and Wilson, J. L.: Dehydration and Acidosis with 
Calcification at Renal Tubules. J. of Ped. 8:489, 1936. 

Krakower, Cecil: Pulmonary Embolus Containing Cerebral Tissue. Arch, of Path. 
22:113-115, 1936. 

Fothergill, LeRoy D., Krakower, Cecil A., and Freeman, Don: The Pathogenic 
Significance of "Late Lactose-Fermenting" Coli-like Bacilli. J. of Ped. 9:23, 1936. 

Hudson, Henry W., and Krakower, Cecil: Acute Appendicitis and Measles. N. E. J. 
of Med. 215:59-64, 1936. 

Krakower, Cecil: The Lipoid Factor in Glycogen Storage Disease. J. of Ped. 9:728, 
1936. 

Ingalls, Theodore Hunt: The Role of Scurvy in the Etiology of Chronic Subdural 
Hematoma. N. E. J. of Med. 215:1279-1281, 1936. 

1937 

Farber, S., Heymans, C, Bouckaert, J. J., Jourdan,' F., and Nowak, Stanley J. G.: 
Survival and Revival of Nerve Centers Following Acute Anaemia. Arch. Neuro. and 
Psychia. 38:304-307, 1937. 

Farber, Sidney: Studies on Pulmonary Edema: 

1. The Co?isequences of Bilateral Cervical Vagotomy in the Rabbit. J. Exper. Med. 

66:397-404, 1937. 

2. The Pathogenesis of Neuropathic Pulmonary Edema. J. Exper. Med. 66:405-411, 

1937. 

3. Observations on Experimental Pulmonary Edema. Preliminary Report. Am. J. 

Dis. Child. 54:1194, 1937. 
Farber, Sidney: Book: The Postmortem Examination, Chas. C. Thomas, Springfield, 
111. 1937. 

Bailey, Orville T., and Hass, George M.: Dural Sinus Thrombosis in Early Life: 
Recovery from Acute Thrombosis of the Superior Longitudina. Sinus and Its Relation to 
Certain Cerebral Lesions in Childhood. Brain, 60:293, 1937. 

Bailey, Orville T., and Hass, George M.: Dural Sinus Thrombosis in Early Life: 
1. The Clinical Manifestation and Extent of Brain Injury in Acute Sinus Throm- 
bosis. J. Ped. 11:755, 1937. 
1. The Clinical Manifestation and Extent of Brain Injury in Acute Sinus Throm- 
bosis. J. Ped. 11:755, 1937. 

107 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Lanman, T. II., and Ingalls, T. II.: Vitamin (.'. Deficiency and Wound Healing. 
An Experimental and Clinical Study. Ann. Surg. 105:010-02.5, 1937. 

Hodges, R. G.: Nonhemolytic Streptococcus Meningitis. J. Ped. 10:066, 1937. 



SECTIONS ON PATHOLOGY CONTRIBUTED FOR 
THE FOLLOWING PUBLICATIONS 

1. Chronic Pyelonephritis and Arterial Hypertension. Allen M. Butler. J. of Clin- 
Inves. 16:889-897, 1937. 

2. Duplication of Alimentary Tract. William E. Ladd. So. Med. J. 10:363, 371, 1937 

*The papers of the Chief of the Department of Pathology Dr. S. B. Wolbach, are 
not included in this list of publications. 

The following men served in the Department of Pathology during 1936 and 1937. 
All except two of those, who had regular services, continued in the hospital in one of 
the clinical departments affer leaving the Department of Pathology. 
Dr. Smith O. Dexter, November 1, 1935 to May 1, 1930 (House Officer in Pathology). 
Dr. Thomas W. Botsford, October 1, 1935 to April 1, 1936 (Surgical Service). 
Dr. O. George Bates, July 1, 1935 to July 1, 1936 (Voluntary Assistant and Substitute 

House Officer). 
Dr. Edward G. Ewer, September 1, 1935 to March 1, 1936 (Orthopedic Service). 
Dr. Paul V. Wooley, January 1, 1936 to February 15, 1936 (Medical Service). 
Dr. Frederick W. Rutherford, January 15, 1936 to June 15, 1936 (Surgical Service). 
Dr. Guy Darrell Ayer, March 15, 1936 to June 15, 1936 (Acting Resident). 
Dr. F. Bert Brown, March 1, 1936 to September 1, 1936 (Orthopedic Service). 
Dr. J. B. Campbell, April 1, 1936 to October 1, 1936 (Surgical Service). ' 
Dr. Richard G. Hodges, July 1, 1936 to January 1, 1937 (Medical Service). 
Dr. F. L. Marting, July 1, 1936 to January 1, 1937 (Surgical Service). 
Dr. Harold N. Johnson, August 1, 1936 to July 1, 1937 (Resident Pathologist). 
Dr. William Elliston (England), January 1, 1936 to June 1, 1936 (Voluntary Assistant 
in Pathology). 

Dr. Otto Aufranc, November 1, 1936 to June 30, 1937 (Orthopedic Service). 

Dr. Nathan Talbot, January 1, 1937 to June 30, 1937 (Medical Service). 

Dr. Dean W. Tanner, January 1, 1937 to March 1, 1937 (Surgical Service). 

Dr. George Austen, Jr., January 1, 1937 to July 1, 1937 (Surgical Service). 

Dr. Leo J. McDermott, March 1, 1937 to November 1, 1937 (Orthopedic Service). 

Dr. L. E. Rector, July 1, 1937 to July 1, 1938 (Resident Pathologist). 

Dr. Charles H. Cutler, July 1, 1937 to March 1, 1938 (Medical Service). 

Dr. Allan M. Hill, July 1, 1937 to January 1, 1938 (Medical Service). 

Dr. McChord Williams, July 1, 1937 to November 1, 1937 (Surgical Service). 

Dr. Robert R. White, July 1, 1937 to January 1, 1938 (Surgical Service). 

Dr. Herman Y. Tyler, July 1, 1937 to October 3, 1937 (Voluntary Assistant). 

Dr. Marion L. Connerley, July 19, 1937 to November 1, 1938 (Surgical Service). 

Dr. Richard N. Neff, November 1, 1937 to May 1, 1938 (Surgical Service). 

Voluntary Student Assistants for summer 1937: Mr. Bliss, Mr. Parkin, Mr. Lercy. 

Dr. Cecil Krakower, who took over the duties of Pathologist on July 1, 1935, served 

until July 1, 1936 when Dr. Sidney Farber, who had been on leave of absence during that 

year, returned. Dr. Krakower is now an Associate in Pathology in The School of 

Tropical Medicine, Puerto Rico. 

108 



PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

AUTOPSIES 

Deaths Autopsies 

Infants' Hospital 124 100 

Children's Hospital* Ill 62 

Private Ward 16 4 

251 166*** 
Outside 14 

180 

1937 

Infants' Hospital 

Children's Hospital* 

Private Ward 



13 


86 


95 


56 


15 


5 


23 


147** 




16 



Outside 

163 
Autopsies Performed 

Year Children's Infants' Combined 

1934 76 110 186 

1935 79 96 175 

1936 66** 100 166 

1937 61** 86 147 

Total Deaths 

Year Children's Infants' Combine 

1934 138 133 271 

1935 149 129 278 

1936 .'. 127 124 251 

1937 '.. 110** 113 223 

Percentage of Autopsies Obtained 

Year Children's Infants' Combined 

1934 49.0 82.7 62.0 

1935 53.0 74.4 62.9 

1936 51.9 80.6 66.1 

1937 55.5 76.1 65.9 

*Includes all services except Infants' and Private Ward 
**In eludes Private Ward 
***Outside autopsies not included 

SURGICAL SPECIMENS 

Year Number 

1934 524 

1935 591 

1936 520 

1937 526 

109 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Annual Report of the Orthodontia 

Department 

1937 

SINCE the last report of the Orthodontia and Dental Departments 
was made, many and very satisfactory changes and additions have 
been accomplished. 

About April 1937 work was started on a descriptive booklet with 
photographs explaining the amount of work required, (from birth to 
maturity) in the Surgical, Orthodontia and Dental Departments of the 
Hospital, for the children with a cleft palate, harelip or both. 

With the help of Mr. Meyer and under his supervision the booklet 
was completed in September. Its objective was to obtain sufficient 
money to provide the Hospital with a new Dental Department. 

Armed with this completed booklet several contacts were made, each 
one leading closer to the charitable foundation that contributed an 
amount sufficient to provide the Hospital with its present Dental De- 
partment. 

Two complete new dental chairs and units, one C D X Dental X-Ray 
machine for the exclusive use of the Dental Department, one new 
sterilizer, several other items of dental furniture, as well as -many new 
instruments were purchased and the old dental chair and unit were 
refinished and brought up to date. 

In addition we are now in possession of a fairly well equipped dental 
laboratory with most of its equipment purchased with this fund. 

Last but not least we were able to purchase a speech recording ma- 
chine, so that we are now able to make a permanent record of the speech 
of all children receiving orthodontic treatment. This machine, which 
the patient himself hears, records the progress made at each periodic 
recording and these records are an incentive to still better performance. 

The room in which these records are made is not satisfactory, and 
further assistance is desired to improve this very important service in 
our effort to free the child from the self-consciousness of abnormal 
sounds. 

Miss Esther Segal is in charge of this work. 

The Orthodontia Clinic is open one-half day per week v :1l iv 
operators, one volunteer dental assistant and one speech correctionist 
on duty. At least one more operator will join the staff this fall. 

It is the writer's objective to eventually have this clinic in operation 
at least five half days a week with two or three operators on duty each 
morning. 

110 



ORTHODONTIA DEPARTMENT 

Thanks to the Charitable Foundation and the cooperation of Mr. 
Meyer and the Hospital Directors this objective is now possible. 

Starting with one operator in 1930 there are now eight persons giving 
part of their time to dental service in the hospital. 

Total cases accepted to date 67 

Total cases receiving regular treatment 48 

Number failing to keep appointments 114 

New patients examined (Nov. 1936 to April 1938) 16 

New cases accepted (Nov. 1936 to April 1938) 3 

Treatments rendered from November 1936 to 

April 20, 1938 683 

In addition a large number of patients are under observation and 
report once or twice a year for examination. 

It will be possible this next year to accept a larger number of new 
patients for active treatment. HARRY W. PERKINS, D.M.D. 

Report of the Department of Stomatology 

1937 

nPHIS Department has been organized under the direction of a com- 
mittee appointed by the Hospital Staff. Its aim is to furnish the 
Hospital with a well rounded consultation service together with adequate 
treatment of dental and oral lesions. Subsidiary aims are the training 
of graduates in dentistry in the methods of diagnosis and treatment of 
disease used by the Hospital Staff and the instruction of the Staff in 
diagnosis and principles of treatment of mouth lesions. Further aims are 
the acquisition of new knowledge by clinical and pathologic study of the 
oral manifestations of disease. 

During the past two years Dr. Ellis Jump has served most ably as 
house officer and resident in stomatology. 

The statistics of services rendered are as follows: 

Consultations answered 75 

Oral study and diagnosis 171 

Permanent fillings: permanent dentition 234 

Permanent fillings: deciduous dentition 168 

Treatments 43 

Extractions: permanent dentition 43 

Extractions: deciduous dentition 152 

Surgical 5 

During the past year Dr. Jump has also engaged in an intensive 
study of the forming stages of the dental apparatus under the supervision 
of the Department of Pathology. He has prepared for publication a 
report concerning the vascularization of the enamel organ of human 
teeth. PAUL BOYLE, Stomatologist 

ill 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Photographic Department Report 

1937 

EACH year it seems to be usual to report more photography being 
employed throughout the hospital. The year of 1937 was no ex- 
ception, there being recorded an increase of 340 patients and 567 more 
views of clinical subjects than in 1936. The total increase over 1936 
was 1075 negatives and 1915 prints. The Surgical Department has 
nearly doubled its use of this department, cases handled jumping from 
375 in 1936 to 604 in 1937. 

A half-time clerk has been attached to the Department to care for 
the large amount of clerical work which the photographer had hitherto 
been doing single handed. The part-time clerk has been of some help, 
but a full-time secretary is urgently needed, one who has had some 
training in office routine. At present, with part-time help, the depart- 
mental work is constantly dragging behind. The photographer is hopeful 
that some way will be found to supply a full-time worker in the very 
near future. 

A new reflex focusing device has been worked out, and it is now being 
installed on the camera. This apparatus will aid in speeding up the 
making of clinical negatives. 

Another recent development by this department is "Phantom Pho- 
tography," which is a method of double exposing to show limitation of 
motion in joints. It is of considerable aid to the Orthopedic Department. 

In last year's report mention was made of a new method of polarizing 
light, which it was thought at that time might be of service to the De- 
partment of Pathology, but when the apparatus was placed on the market 
it was found that the cost was prohibitive. 

A synchronized photo flash lamp has been installed on a press camera 
and it is of material aid in publ city photography on the wards. One 
series of pictures produced in December more than justified the purchase 
of the apparatus. 

The photographer attended the annual convention of the Biological 
Photographic Association held at Rochester, N. Y. in September and 
read a paper on "Phantom Photography." 

Papers prepared during the year included the following: 

A Photographic Aid to Plastic Surgery. Journal Biological Photographic Associa- 
tion. Volume 5, No. 3. 

The Correct Use of Safelights. Journal Biological Photographic Association. Volume 
5, No. 3. 

Record Keeping. Journal Biological Photographic Association. Volume 5, No. 4. 

112 



PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT 

Photography of Colored Objects. Journal Biological Photographic Association. 
Volume 5, No. 4. 

Phantom Photography. Journal Biological Photographic Association. Volume 
6, No. 2. 

The Organization and Equipment of a Photographic Department. Radiography and 
Clinical Photography, March 1938. 

FERDINAND R. HARDING 



PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT REPORT 
STATISTICS 



Service Cases Views 

Orthopedic 412 1063 

•Surgical 604 1517 

Medical 157 376 

Infants' Hospital 82 184 

Pathology-Infants' Hospital 73 144 

Pathology-Children's Hospital 148 269 

Scoliosis Clinic 77 272 

Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission 68 166 

Orthopedic Follow-up Clinic 26 79 

Ward IX — Neurological 15 40 

Private Ward . 15 25 

Director's Office 13 37 

Ward VI— Throat 9 23 

Dental Clinic 7 12 

Ward XI — Isolation 5 9 

Muscle Training Clinic • 4 8 

School of Nursing 1 2 



Total 1716 4236 

Miscellaneous negatives 792 

Miscellaneous prints 2203 

Lantern slides 482 

Color plates 31 

Motion pictures 53 

Charges $750. 40 

Inventory supplies 37. 81 

Cost of supplies 787. 81 

For Scoliosis Clinic 

Film packs developed 49 

Prints made for Scoliosis Clinic 638 

Grand Total — Negatives for all purposes 5024 

Prints for all purposes 7073 

113 



I 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Occupational Therapy Report 

1937 

NTERESTING figures present themselves when comparing past 
years with 1937. 

1934 774 patients) 

1935 762 patients) have had the privilege of 

1936 1189 patients) Occupational Therapy. 

1937. 1350 patients) 

In addition, story hours and recreational periods have been provided al- 
most daily. 

The number of projects finished was 1137. Occupational Therapy 
cannot be thought of only in terms of articles finished. Each child is 
considered individually from the standpoint of diagnosis, personality, 
and latent ability. The activity of each child is kept within the limit of 
his physical ability and understanding. Always there is kept before him 
the standard of perfection of which he is capable. The child learns to 
take pride in doing his work well. The endeavor is always to keep the 
life of the sick child as nearly normal as possible. The children are happy. 
For those who are here over a period of time one sees a definite improve- 
ment in mental outlook and self-control. 

Cost of Supplies 

Total for the year was $152.97. 

Average yearly cost per child approximately 12 cents. 
Donations of all kinds have helped keep this figure low. 

Students 

Fifteen affiliated from the Boston School of Occupational Therapy. 
An increase of eight since 1936. 

Volunteers 

1934, 26; 1935, 32; 1936, 57; 1937, 65. 

This year volunteers have given a minimum of 2066 hours, the equiva- 
lent of 258 working days. These volunteers represent the Junior League, 
Garland School, Regis College, Wellesley College, Nursery Training 
School, W heelock School of Kindergarten, teachers of grade schools, 
and other individuals interested in philanthropic work. Of this number, 
several are entering their third year of service. This group of volunteers 
are to be congratulated upon their loyalty and dependability. 

Student Nurses 

As in past years, each affiliating group received a one hour lecture on 

114 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 

Occupational Therapy and its relation to child growth and the normal 
child. 

Second-year Children's Hospital students received 10 hours each, 1 
hour of lecture, 6 hours of craft work, and 3 hours of ward assignments. 

Children's Library 

This continues to be an important part of the Occupational Therapy 
Program. The most recent addition was the gift of 250 volumes from the 
1937 Herald-Traveler Book Fair. The volumes in the library number 
over 1600 and are housed on the shelves of the Welfare Room. Occu- 
pational Therapy students assisted by volunteers have had charge of 
cataloguing, care and shelf arrangement. Library service is given to the 
wards twice a week. The children are helped with book selection and 
are taught how to care properly for their books. Book certificates are 
•given to each child who reads five books chosen from a certified reading 
list. A circulation was shown of: 

525 books in 1935 
1308 books in 1936 
2090 books in 1937 

The Occupational Therapy Committee members have given their 
whole-hearted interest and loyal support to this work. The Department 
expresses many thanks to them, the Welfare Committee, and others for 
their most generous cooperation. JESSIE A. NESS, 

Director of Occupational Therapy 



Report of the Social Service Department 

1937 

DURING the year 1937 activity in the Social Service Department 
was increased in a very satisfactory manner. In January the Con- 
valescent Home of the Children's Hospital added Mrs. Evelyn Karp, 
a full-time medical social worker, to its staff. Many of the children who 
are sent from the wards and Out-Patient Department to the Convales- 
cent Home later return here for continued observation and for a long 
time we have been aware of the opportunities for losing sight of our 
patients or their particular needs in transit. Mrs. Karp, however, sees 
the patients at this Hospital on the day they go out to Wellesley and 
has a chance to talk with their parents. Later she consults with the 
resident physician regarding their progress and after giving him the 
benefit of her knowledge of the family situation, they plan for the time 

115 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

when the patient may be discharged. She also works closely with any 
one of the Hospital social workers who may have known the patient 
previously, and we have found it a fairly simple process to transfer or 
continue responsibility for social treatment. She divides her time be- 
tween the Convalescent Home, the Hospital, visits to the patient's 
home and community resources. We have felt that Mrs. Karp has done 
much to make the Convalescent period an integral part of medical 
treatment. 

In September, by vote of the Board of Managers, two additional 
medical social workers were added to this staff — Miss Virginia Mailhouse 
took over the work of the Medical Out-Patient Department which had 
previously been carried by the Director of Social Service; Miss Margaret 
Erwin came to work with the Cardiac and Rheumatic Fever patients 
releasing Miss Snow for full-time work on the Medical Ward. For a 
long time we have felt the need to give more service on the ward. The 
care and thought which goes into the study of the children admitted to 
the ward demands an early review of the social aspects in each instance. 
Up to this time it has been impossible to coordinate the medical and 
social treatment except in a small group of those who presented the 
most outstanding needs. With a full-time social worker, however, each 
case receives consideration, and the social information can be correlated 
in the plan for treatment. The social worker also serves as a liason per- 
son at the time of discharge. One is not surprised to find mothers of 
diabetic children who are disturbed when they first find themselves 
responsible for the management of these cases. It is one thing to give 
insulin under supervision at the Hospital but quite another thing when 
one does it the first time at home alone. Reassurance and help in ad- 
justing to such responsibility makes the care of the patient that much 
more adequate. 

The State Department of Public Health asked us to appoint an epi- 
demiologist and a half-time stenographer for the Syphilis Clinic whose 
headquarters w ere to be at this Hospital but who were to serve in con- 
junction with seven others similarly appointed to other hospital social 
service departments. Miss Mary Frances York, a social worker, came to 
us in September. Her salary and that of the stenographer is paid by the 
State. To her are referred those patients who have failed to keep regular 
appointments in the various Syphilis Clinics, and it is her duty, as well 
as that of the other epidemiologists, to see that these delinquent patients 
return to clinic. Such service is part of a nation-wide attempt to get all 
patients with syphilis under adequate medical care. The problem of 
follow-up in our own clinic is not serious as most parents are willing to 
give their children what they might not bother to take for themselves. 

116 



SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

.We are glad, however, to cooperate in this way in a program which has 
long needed such intensive effort. 

We were sorry to lose Mrs. Heffron who, in October, moved to New 
York. Her place on Dr. Crothers' service has been taken by Miss 
Bowden and Mrs. M. E. Crockett was appointed to the latter's place on 
the Orthopedic Service. 

In addition to the change in personnel, we have been able to consoli- 
date the department from an administrative standpoint. Because of 
the increase in the number of workers more desk space was necessary and 
we were fortunate to be allowed a large corner of the Out-Patient Ad- 
mitting Room. The two Department stenographers, the epidemiologist 
and her part-time stenographer, and the social worker from the Con- 
valescent Home have desks there. It is proving to be the business office 
of the Department and adds a feeling of unity which was hard to maintain 
when the routine business was carried on in widely separated offices. 

Mrs. Flaherty stopped the social worker in clinic one November 
morning. "Glory be to God, Miss Greene," she said, "I've just paid my 
dollar to the Red Cross. Ever since the day they took my Tommie and 
me up to Monson I've never forgotten them." This fittingly expresses 
our own feelings about the Red Cross. In 1937 they transported 272 
different children making 674 two-way trips to clinic. Without them 
these children would have been unable to get back for medical care or 
the effort to bring them in would have been so great their care here would 
have been very irregular. One mother with heart disease, who has been 
advised not to walk up subway stairs, must bring her little boy every day 
for a whole week. Another child in a body cast must be brought in to 
have it changed. One little girl who had been accidently shot in the back 
was left with paralysis of the lower extremities and needed weekly trips 
from Watertown to clinic for physiotherapy. These and many others 
are brought to the Hospital and taken home by Red Cross drivers who 
always manage to make the trip no matter how bad the driving may be 
nor how great the distance. 

During this past year we have had our usual students from the Sim- 
mons School of Social Work. The need to supervise their efforts in social 
treatment challenges us to re-define our own thinking about our work and 
does much to obviate any routine approach we may tend to develop. 
Various members of the staff have also given twenty-five lectures to 
different groups of student nurses and have supervised their time in field 
work in the Social Service Department. 

We are glad to acknowledge the funds given us by the Committee of 
the Permanent Charity Fund Incorporated and the Boston Council of 
Social Agencies, for use in supplying medical relief for those patients 
unable to pay for special recommendations. It would be impossible to 

117 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

serve some of these patients otherwise. The Zonta Club has very gener- 
ously continued to support a part-time occupational therapist for chil- 
dren at home in bed. 

The close of this year, therefore, finds the Department better equipped 
than ever before to meet the needs of those who come to this Hospital 
seeking care and understanding. AMY W. GREENE, Director 



STATISTICAL REPORT OF THE SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Total number of patients served during the year 5374 

Group I — Requiring full social study and treatment 864 

Group II and III — Requiring less comprehensive study and 

brief or isolated services 4431 

Group IV — Cases closed after social examination or inquiry. ... 79 

Total 5374 

Staff 

Social workers, January to October 6 

October to December 3 

Total - 9 

Secretarial 2^ 

Volunteers 1 

Student nurses 30 

Student social workers 4 



Report of the School of Nursing and 
Nursing Service 

DURING the calendar year 1937 and the forty-ninth year of the 
School, we graduated 25 students from the three-year course and 
2 students from the five-year course, and admitted 44 students. 271 
students completed the affiliating course, 12 the supplementary course 
for graduate nurses, and 5 students from Simmons College had the 
course in Ward Administration. « 

On the closing day of the year there were 98 students in the Chil- 
dren's Hospital School of Nursing, 75 affiliates, and 2 post graduate 
students. While the number of Children's Hospital students has de- 
creased and the number of affiliating students has increased, the gross 
total of student nurses has not changed much during the past five years. 
We still believe that we should admit more Children's Hospital students. 
The change in the regulation at Simmons College whereby we can only 
admit 30 students in September affects us somewhat, as there are more 

118 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

applicants in September and they do not want to wait until January. 
Our number of applicants for the January class is usually very small. 
While the gross total on the closing day of the year may be the same as 
last year, there are actually fewer for assignment to the general wards 
and special departments, due to affiliations and more enrolled in the pre- 
clinical course at Simmons. 

This year we graduated the last of the five-year students who received 
both the diploma from this School and the degree from Simmons College. 

The Children's Hospital School of Nursing has always pursued a 
policy of selective admission and selective retention. We have further 
supplemented the more common methods of selection of students by the 
introduction of psychological and aptitude tests and having applicants 
who live within a hundred and fifty miles of Boston examined by our 
own physician before the application is acted upon. The health program 
has been amplified to include periodic physical examinations with an 
X-Ray of the chest, monthly weights, and an increase in the vacation 
period for students. In the last Annual Report we called attention to the 
hours students were working on the wards and in addition were expected 
to attend classes and study. Last spring the youngest class in the School 
was placed on a six-day week. No change in hours was made as this 
group does not have a full weekly schedule of ward assignments. In 
November all student nurses, except those on night duty and in the Diet 
Kitchen, were placed on a six-day week, and the hours of Children's 
Hospital students on day duty were reduced by 1, 2, or 3 hours a week 
according to their class schedule. This reduction of hours affected about 
35 students. Our next step should be to reduce the hours of student night 
nurses. While it is true that the inauguration of the six-day week does 
make some difficulties in administration, we believe that the disadvan- 
tages are outweighed by the advantages. 

Our illness record for student nurses in 1937 was very high. The 
majority of this illness was within the first four months. The illness 
record for the first month following the inauguration of the six-day week 
for students is lower than the same month last year but it is too early to 
deduce that it is a result of the six-day week. 

We have lost 15 students from the School roll this year as against 9 
in 1936. These included a student with Tuberculosis, one with Diabetes, 
and a second-year student who died on Christmas Eve from Pneumonia. 

The housing problem at Gardner House is acute during our peak 
times. It has been temporarily solved by dividing the floor sitting rooms 
into two giving us five additional bedrooms and moving the Infirmary 
to the third floor of the Isolation Building. 

During this year we have had a larger turnover in our graduate 
personnel than at any time during the last ten years. Practically all 

119 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

of the group had served from five to seven years, and the majority of 
resignations were due to marriage. Others have advanced their positions 
by going to other institutions or have taken post graduate work. 

In October the Private Ward Operating Room was placed under 
the jurisdiction of the Supervisor of the Main Operating Room as we 
believe that this will make for more flexibility of service. 

There have been six graduates added to the staff during the year, 
but three of them have been for special positions rather than to help 
in the bedside care, which is our most pressing need as the result of 
changes in treatment of patients. The writer has the picture of two 
decades to compare, 1917, 1927, and 1937. There are few elements in 
the situation which are parallel. In 1935 we called attention to the grow- 
ing use of treatments which were exceedingly time-consuming. It grows 
on apace. A few figures may be enlightening. During the month of 
December over 700 sterile sets for transfusion and hypodermoclysis use 
were sent out from the Operating Room. In order to have specific com- 
parisons we compared treatments given on the three Surgical Wards for 
December 1936 and 1937. They speak for themselves. 



Surgical Service 




Dec. 1936 


Dec. 1937 


Daily average census 




56.3 


60.9 


Transfusions 




10 


33 


Intravenous Injections 




16 


88 


Intravenous Injections 


plus 






Hypodermoclyses 




28 


103 


Hypodermoclyses 




22 


19 



Time studies made in the Infants' Hospital showed that to give an or- 
dinary transfusion required the time of two nurses for approximately 
27 minutes. Every so often, however, the time for an individual trans- 
fusion is greatly increased owing to the difficulty of getting into the vein 
of a small baby and may amount to 1^ hours, or even 2 hours, for each 
nurse. The usual clysis required the time of two nurses for 24 minutes 
each and one nurse 15 minutes more to assist with this treatment. With 
the older children the time of administration is increased, due to larger 
amounts being given. In addition the solutions have to be made, and the 
sets prepared, assembled, and sterilized. The administration of a trans- 
fusion or an intravenous injection of salt solution is no longer an emer- 
gency measure, but a general therapeutic measure. 

While the Main Operating Room had 100 less cases than in 1936, 
the character of the cases has changed from general surgery to specialized 
surgery, operations which last from three to six hours rather than one 
hour. There were 148 brain cases in 1937 as against 83 in the year pre- 
vious. But this not only affects the Operating Room but the ward ser- 
vice, as these neurosurgical cases may not be left alone for from twenty- 

120 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

four to forty-eight hours after operation. Several years ago the special 
nursing care for a patient with hare lip, beyond the basic feeding and 
bathing, consisted of removing a crust if it appeared and giving sterile 
water before and after feeding. Now each child has an intravenous and 
hypodermoclysis, a rectal distillation, cleansing of the lip every one-half 
to one hour for the first twelve hours, cleansing before and after feeding 
six times daily, and sterile water before and after feeding. And, in addi- 
tion, one surgeon requires that his patients have constant care for the 
first twenty-four hours following operation in order that hot packs for 
the incision may be changed every fifteen minutes. There is also a grow- 
ing tendency on the part of the staff to order constant care for other 
children, due to the nature of the treatments which have been instituted. 
An example of this may be shown by two children on the Surgical Service 
during the month of December. Our own general duty staff gave 1383/2 
hours of care to these children together, 73 hours for one, and 17 hours 
for another, or a total of 228^ hours, the equivalent of the time of a 
general duty nurse for 4^ weeks. In addition, we had special nurses for 
119 hours on these same cases. Nor were these the only cases being given 
special care at the time. 

While the examples used have been mainly from the Surgical Service, 
the same trend toward the requirement of more nursing service is seen 
in all services. Witness a picture of the traction used in the old days and 
the one now used on the Orthopedic Service. The Neurological Service 
was open 365 days in 1931 and did 78 encephalograms, whereas in 1937 
it was open 297 days and did 131. It takes the time of a student nurse 
for from %\ to 3 hours for each procedure, and in addition the time of 
the head nurse for about one hour. 

We cite these instances not in criticism of the demands on the nursing 
service, but to show the changing trend of the work of the Children's 
Hospital and the need for providing more graduate nurses who can be 
utilized for bedside nursing. 

The medical staff continues to give its cooperation to the School, 
and the Welfare Committee and the Ladies' Aid Committee of the In- 
fants' Hospital have maintained their friendly interest by continuing 
the teas for the staff. STELLA GOOSTRAY, 

Principal, School of Nursing 

C. H. students enrolled, January 1, 1937 96 

C. H. students enrolled, January 1, 1937 

in five-year course at Simmons College 2 

Admissions — C. H. students 44 

— 142 

Completed course during year — 3-year students 25 

Completed course during year — 5-year students 2 

121 



THK CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Temporarily off enrollment 

First-year students 2 

Second-year students 1 

3 
Resignations — ill health 

First-year students 1 

Second-year students 1 

Third-year students 2 

4 

Resignations — miscellaneous reasons 

Junior students 1 

First-year students 1 

- 2 

Dismissals 

Preliminary students 3 

Junior students 2 

First-year students 1 

Second-year students 1 

- 7 
Died 

Second-year student 1 

C. H. students enrolled, December 31, 1937 

C. H. students enrolled, December 31, 1937 98 

Affiliating students enrolled 75 

Graduate students enrolled 2 

C. H. students on affiliation, not in residence 29 

C. H. students in residence but attending Simmons College. . 

Pre-clinical Course 30 

Public Health Course . 2 32 

Total number of students assigned to Wards and special 

departments 

Children's Hospital 92 

Infants' Hospital 22 

Affiliating students completing course during year 

Graduate students receiving additional experience in pediatrics 
during the year ....... 

Days of illness 

Daily average of C. H. students in residence 

Infirmary days 

Average days of illness per C. H. student in residence for 

the year 

Daily average of affiliates and post graduates in residence . 
Infirmary days 

122 



175 



61 

114 

271 
12 

953 



44 
98 



70.462 

13.5 
74.218 



708 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Average days of illness per affiliate or post graduate for 

the year 9.53 

Graduate Staff (Permanent), December 31, 1937 

School of Nursing Office 5 

Children's Hospital 

Night Supervisors 3 

Day Supervisor 5 

Head Nurses 10 

General Duty Nurses 

Days 8 

Nights 7 

- 33 

Operating Room and Anaesthesia 9 

Out-Patient Department 5 

Infants' Hospital 7 

Private Ward (2 floors only open) 16 

75 



Report of the Welfare Committee 

1937 

IpHIS year the Welfare Committee celebrated its one hundred and 
•*- seventy-fifth regular meeting in April by having Dr. McKhann 
give an extremely interesting, illustrated lecture on "Progress in the 
Control of Communicable Diseases." A buffet luncheon was served at 
Gardner House immediately afterwards for the Committee and members 
of the Staff. 

Congratulations go to the Avery Lectures Committee who are having 
their fifth and most successful season. From the proceeds of the fourth 
season's lectures, Occupational Therapy was supported for another year 
and the balance used for specific needs in the Hospital. 

On May seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth, the Committee 
again had an exhibit at the New Ocean House at Swampscott in con- 
junction with the annual meeting of the Massachusetts State Federation 
of Women's Clubs. We distributed five hundred copies of 'Scope made 
up as a special Women's Club number. Chances were sold on a hand 
crocheted bedspread given to us by a friend. Occupational Therapy 
projects made by the children were displayed and there was a special 
exhibit of samples of knitted articles which friends could make for our 
little patients. Education is always a valuable form of publicity; this 
exhibit is one of the biggest forms of publicity undertaken for the Hospital 
as it is so far reaching. At this time, I would like to thank our Secretary 

123 



WELFARE COMMITTEE 

and the members of the Committee who were kind enough to give their 
time at Swampscott in my absence. 

The Occupational Therapy Committee keeps us in constant touch 
with the progress in this department and with the wonderful work being 
done in all parts of the Hospital. 

Ruby Newman again gave his services for Donation Day. In addi- 
tion to the music, everyone enjoyed their Hoodsies, cookies and ginger 
ale! 

The Girl Scouts were untiring in their efforts to keep us supplied with 
fascinating animals and scrapbooks. 

The name of the Birthday Bed Fund has been changed to The Birth- 
day Club. A large drive for new members in the form of a competition 
among the ladies of that committee was started in November. 

The Tea Committee had a very successful season, ending with a 
large Christmas Tea for the Nurses and Doctors. The Gold Coast 
Orchestra from Harvard played and some little colored boys from the 
Robert Gould Shaw House sang and danced. They all gave their ser- 
vices and certainly made the afternoon very enjoyable for everyone. 

November was a record month for visitors to the Hospital and I 
would like to thank everyone on the Committee for their superb coopera- 
tion on "Open House Day." 

The C. H. Clubs had another successful season. New groups were 
interested and it is hoped that they may be added to the "regulars" 
to help increase this fund another year. 

The Holiday Committee brought joy to all the children in the Hospital 
with favors and ice cream distributed on each of the sixteen holidays. 

The Thrift Shop continues its successful career as a valuable source 
of revenue for the Hospital thanks, not only to kind friends who remem- 
ber to send in any saleable articles which they no longer need, but also 
to the energetic group of ladies who work there each Monday in the 
interest of The Children's Hospital. 

Three hundred and ten knitted articles were turned in to the Hospital 
during the year through the Knitting Committee. This is a better record 
than either of the two previous years. 

The Speakers' Bureau had fewer engagements during 1937 due largely 
to a saturation point having been reached in the present program set-up. 
However, an idea is being discussed which, it is hoped, will form the 
nucleus for a new and interesting campaign to be launched in the near 
future. 

In closing I would like to thank the President, Trustees and the Direc- 
tor for their many kindnesses to us throughout the year. 

JESSIE B. COX 

February 23, 1938 Chairman 

124 



WELFARE COMMITTEE 



WELFARE COMMITTEE OF THE CHILDREN'S 
HOSPITAL— 1937 



Chairman 
Mrs. William C. Cox 

Vice Chairman 
Mrs. William DeFord Beal 

Mrs. Gordon Abbott 
Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 

(New member October 1937.) 
Mrs. Arthur W. Allen 
Mrs. Joel M. Barnes 
Miss Betty A. Bartlett 
Mrs. Lawrence Black 
Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 
Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 
Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 
Mrs. Albert Bradley Carter 
Mrs. Edwin F. Cave 
Mrs. George A. Clapp 
Miss Louise Coburn 
Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 
Mrs. Channing H. Cox 
Mrs. Maurice J. Curran 

(Resigned March 1937.) 
Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

(New member March 1937 as Chair- 
man of the Ladies Aid Committee of 
the Infants' Hospital.) 
Mrs. Charles Devens 
Mrs. Ralph H. Doane 
Mrs. Edward C. Donnelly 
Mrs. Samuel Eliot 
Mrs. H. Wendell Endicott 
Mrs. Carl H. Ernlund 
Mrs. Donald Falvey 
Mrs. Charles Feehan 

(New member March 1937 as Presi- 
dent of the League of Catholic 
Women.) 
Mrs. John W. Hallowell 
Miss Lucile A. Harrington 

(Automatically dropped as past Presi- 
dent of the League of Catholic 
Women.) 
Mrs. Bartlett Harwood 
Mrs. Stephen Heard 

(New member December 1937.) 
Mrs. John H. Johnson 
Mrs. John H. Kimball 



Corresponding Secretary 
Mrs. John G. Palfrey 

Treasurer 
Mrs. Dudley P. Rogers 

Mrs. Gelston T. King 

(Resigned October 1937.) 
Mrs. Louis E. Kirstein 
Mrs. William E. Ladd 
Mrs. Thomas H. Lanman 
Miss Constance B. Learned 
Miss Elizabeth C. Leland 
Mrs. Francis B. Lothrop 
Miss Mary Meehan 
Mrs. George H. Monks 
Mrs. John W. Myers 
Mrs. William Brace Pratt 
Mrs. Frank A. Royce 

(Resigned March 1937.) 
Mrs. William E. Russell 

(New member December 1937.) 
Mrs. William L. Shearer, Jr. 

(Dropped 1937; remarried and moved 
away. ) 
Mrs. William L. Shearer, III . 

(New member February 1937.) 
Miss Ida C. Smith 

(New member March 1937.) 
Miss Mary L. Spaulding 
Mrs. Frank H. Stewart 
Mrs. Philip Stockton 
Mrs. William Sutton 
Mrs. Robert C. Terry 
Mrs. Philip H. Theopold 
Mrs. Richard K. Thorndike, Jr. 

(Resigned October 1937.) 
Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 
Mrs. Richard P. Waters 
Mrs. Edwin S. Webster 
Mrs. Nehemiah H. Whitman 
Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 
Mrs. Lilian A. Winchester 
Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott 

Honorary Members 
Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 
Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 
(Elected March 1937.) 



125 



Former House Officers and Residents 



Abbott, F. B 1915 

*Adams, John D 1902 

Adams, Wm. B 1920 

Adelman, Maurice 1922 

Allison, Nathaniel 1901 

Ames, Frederick D 1934 

Amiral, Hiram H 1916 

Anderson, Arthur 1923 

Anderson, Randolph L 1926 

Anderson, Samuel A., Jr 1925 

Andrews, Edward A 1896 

Andrews, Sumner C 1916 

Atsatt, Rodney F 1927 

Austen, George 1937 

Ayer, J. B., Jr 1907 

Bailey, Orville T. 1935 

Bailey, Walter C 1898 

Baker, Frederick H 1892 

Baker, Horace M 1917 

Baldwin, Herman T 1895 

Ball, John D 1923 

Barber, Carol Glenn 1921 

Barnes, Frederick W., Jr 1937 

Barr, Joseph S 1928 

Barrett, M. F 1903 

Bartlett, Daniel E 1905 

Bartlett, Fred A 1908 

Baty, James M . 1929 

Beekel, Fred 1907 

Bell, Donald . 1921 

Bender, Norman 1921 

Benjamin, James D., U. S. N..1914 

Bennett, Charles B 1923 

Berkley, Hugh K 1916 

Binns, J. Frazier 1929 

Biorkman, Gustav 1918 

Billig, Harvey F., Jr 1936 

Blair, Montgomery 1929 

Bolowtow, Nathan A 1917 

Bost, Frederick C 1929 

Botsford, Thomas W 1937 

*Bowditch, Henry 1 1902 

Bowditch, Horace K 1905 

Bressler-Pettis, Chas. W 1917 

Briggs, Maurice T 1917 

Bromer, Ralph 1915 

Brostrom, Frank 1929 

Brown, Charles L 1923 

*Brown, David R 1918 



20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

224 Thayer St., Providence, R. I. 

950 East 59th St., Chicago, 111. 

1204 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

9 Walnut St., Worcester, Mass. 

122 East 76th St., New York, N. Y. 

202 Professional Building, Richmond, Va. 

2326 W. Grace St., Richmond, Va. 

1298 Center St., Newton Center, Mass. 

1374 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

1421 State St., Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

87 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 

29 Whitman Rd., Worcester, Mass. 

Lumberton, N. C. 

96 Middlesex Rd., Newton, Mass. 

2308 Oakmart Ave., Santa Ana, Cal. 

14805 Detroit Ave., Hand Bldg., Cleveland, O. 

Convalescent Home, Wellesley, Mass. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

231 Main St., Brockton, Mass. 

308 Beale St., Wolla'ston, Mass. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

7039 Superior Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

115 Saranac Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. 

1122 University Ave., Berkeley, Cal. 

1136 West 6th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

414 Doctor's Bldg., Nashville, Tenn. 

34 East 32d St., New York, N. Y. 

226 Union Oil Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 

1155 16th St., N. W., Washington, D.C. 

224 Thayer St., Providence, R. I. 

157 16th Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 



(Not in practice) Grant City, Mo. 

Lynn Shore Drive, Lynn, Mass. 

Episcopal & Ortho. Hosp., Philadelphia, Pa. 

3411 Prytania St., New Orleans, La. 

2011 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

14 North State St., Concord, N. H. 



* Deceased 



126 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Brown, F. Bert 1938 

Brown, John E., Jr 1933 

Brown, Lloyd T 1908 

Brown, Percy 1900 

Browne, Trevor S 1924 

Bryant, Charles S 1899 

Bryant, Clarence E . 1906 

Burpee, Benjamin P 1916 

Byers, Randolph K 1924 

Byrne, Harry V 1929 

Calder, Harold G 1908 

Campbell, James B 1937 

Canada, Charles C 1934 

Canaday, John W 1934 

Carey, Benjamin W 1935 

Carpenter, George 1920 

Carson, Paul C 1921 

Carter, Marshall A 1935 

Catterson, L. F 1926 

Cave, Edwin 1927 

Chamberlain, John W 1935 

Chapin, William E 1926 

Churney, Otto 1929 

Clarke, George W 1904 

Clarke, M. Melvin 1927 

Clifford, Stewart 1929 

Cochrane, J. Joseph 1925 

Coe, Herbert E 1907 

Coggswell, William Jr 1892 

Cole, Walter F 1920 

Cook, Robert J 1916 

Coonse, G. Kenneth 1927 

Corson, Carl C 1936 

Cozen, Lewis 1938 

Crandall, Arthur R 1896 

Cravener, Edward K 1929 

Crawford, Henry B 1930 

*Creesy, Everett L 1900 

Crothers, Bronson 1912 

Cudney, Ethan B 1925 

Cunningham, Allen 1915 

Curnen, Edward C, Jr 1938 

Daniels, George F 1923 

Darrah, Rufus 1887 

Davidson, William D 1933 

David, S. D 1923 

Davis, Arthur G 1922 

Dawson, Clyde W. 1937 

*Deceased 



Sharon, Ga. 

270 E. Town St., Columbus, Ohio 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

95 Pinckney St., Boston, Mass. 

Death Valley, Cal. 

Millinocket, Mass. 

15 Fairmount Ave., Hyde Park, Mass. 

814 Elm St., Manchester, N. H. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

371 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

224 Thayer St., Providence, R. I. 
Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

Staunton, Va. 

Glenns Falls, N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Behnie Dillon Bldg., Nashville, Tenn. 

401 North Emporia, Wichita, Kans. 

Los Altos, Cal. 

New Sharon, Iowa 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

22 North 9th St., Richmond, Va. 

Babies Hosp. of Alameda Co., Oakland, Cal. 

85 Seneca St., Dundee, N. Y. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

198 Union Ave., Framingham, Mass. 

Medical & Dental Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

Capitol Bldg., Helena, Mont. 

Jefferson Bldg., Greensboro, N. C. 

97 Grove St., New Haven, Conn. 

370 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

90 Myrtle St., Boston, Mass. 

Massachusetts General Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

48 Church Green, Taunton, Mass. 

Home Savings Loan Bldg., Youngstown, O. 

263 Hazelwood Ter., Rochester, N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

527 W. Iroquois Rd., Pontiac, Mich. 

76 Church St., Winchester, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

129 E. 69th St., New York, N. Y. 

810 E. Powell Ave., Evansville, Ind. 

911 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 



127 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Deering, Charles F 1911 

Derby, Joseph C 1924 

Dexter, Smith 1936 

Diamond, Louis K 1929 

Dietrich, Harry F 1936 

Dillon, Victor M 1931 

Divers, Douglas 1924 

Dodd, J. E 1912 

Domser, Benjamin M 1911 

Doolittle, Leroy 1917 

Dresel, Rudolph L 1919 

Drissen, Edward 1931 

Dubois, Robert 1923 

*Dunn, C. H 1902 

Dwan, Paul F 1931 

Dye, Paul J 1926 

Duckett, J. Warner 1929 

Eastman, Alexander 1900 

Eaton, Percival J 1885 

Eckles, Lucius E 1935 

Eley, R. C 1929 

Ellis, Richard W. B 1929 

Ely, T. W 1910 

Emerson, George E 1905 

Emerson, Paul 1915 

Emidy, Herman L 1926 

Eveleth, Charles W 1904 

Ewer, Edward G 1937 

Farber, Sidney 1928 

Fay, William E 1887 

Ferguson, Charles F 1937 

Fisher, James T 1895 

Fisher, William H 1929 

Fiske, Eben W 1912 

Fiske, William B 1885 

Fitch, Ralph R ... 1904 

Fitts, John B 1916 

♦FitzSimmons, H. J 1910 

Flake, CarlyleG 1937 

*Fletcher, A. S 1909 

Fletcher, F. L 1928 

Flint, Carlton P. . . 1898 

Floyd, Cleveland 1905 

Fort, F. L 1923 

Fortune, Clayton W 1930 

Foshee, Clyde H 1931 

Foster, Joseph B 1929 

Foster, Thomas 1919 



Danvers, Mass. 

20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

36 Follen St., Cambridge, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

559 So. Ardmore Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

566 10th Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

Pulaski, Va. 

121 Franklin St., Framingham, Mass. 

5-6 Prospect Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

908 Fidelity Bldg., Duluth, Minn. 

490 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Port Washington, Wis. 

125 East 72d St., New York, N. Y. 

825 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Sewall Rd., Wolfeboro, N. H. 

4105 Live Oak St., Dallas, Texas 

44 Chestnut St., Springfield, Mass. 
627 Commercial St., Provincetown, Mass. 

Eskridge, Kan. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Rearsby, Leicestershire, Eng. 

Bedford, Mass. 

South Weymouth, Mass. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

162 Main St., Woonsocket, R. I. 

1 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

181 Brookside Drive, Berkley, Cal. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Melrose, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Ill N. Vermont Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

801 Salem St., Maiden, Mass. 

Westinghouse Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

315 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 
318 W. Franklin St., Richmond, Va 
520 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Milford, N. H. 

246 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

1022 Park St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 

Louisville City Hospital, Louisville, Ky. 

1028 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

131 State St., Portland, Me. 



♦Deceased 



128 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Fothergill, Leroy 1930 

Fowler, Charles B 1929 

Frawley, W. T 1910 

Frazee, John W 1930 

Freeman, Don W 1938 

*Fregeau, Wheaton 1933 

Freiburg, Joseph A 1927 

Friedman, Eli .1918 

Fitz, George W 1890 

Gage, Homer 1885 

Gallo, James F 1925 

Gallup, Henry E 1928 

Gamble, James L 1912 

Ganz, Robert N 1927 

Gates, 11. E 1908 

(Not in practice) 

Gear, Patrick 1919 

George, F. W 1904 

Giddings, Paul D 1937 

Gill, MacLean 1935 

Gillespie, Elmer H 1930 

Gillespie, Norman 1917 

Glover, Donald M 1921 

Goeringer, C. Fred. 1937 

Goldloom, Alton 1917 

Goldman, Ahbrum 1918 

Goldthwaite, Joel E 1888 

Goodale, Robert L 1924 

Goodwin, Edward S 1928 

Gordon, John K 1921 

Graham, W. T ..1910 

Green, Hyman 1916 

Green, William T 1931 

Greene, D. Crosby, Jr 1898 

Griffin, Charles H 1923 

Griffith, Jesse B 1919 

Gross, Harold G 1890 

Gross, Herman W 1896 

Gross, Robert 1932 

Grover, Joseph 1 1913 

Guest, George M 1926 

Guy, P. F 1926 

Haig, Ray T 1924 

Haight, Harry W 1911 

*Hall, Herbert J 1894 

Hall, Robert G 1910 

Hand, Delbert W 1935 

Hanflig, Samuel 1931 



300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass- 

411 30th St., Oakland, Cab 

184 North St., Pittsfield, Mass, 

311 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass 

3577 Alaska Ave., Cincinnati, O. 

311 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Peconic, L. I., N. Y 

8 Chestnut St., Worcester, Mass. 

317 Bellinger St., Herkima, N. Y. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass, 

19 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

144 Walnut St., East Dedham, Mass. 

127 Lincoln St., Holyoke, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

14 North State St., Concord, N. H. 

101 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

632 Columbia Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 

10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, O. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

1543 Crescent St., Montreal, Que. 

121 East 60th St., New York, N. Y. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

258 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

304 State St., Albany, N. Y. 

1538 Sherbrooke St., W. Montreal, Que. 

401 Medical Arts Bldg., Richmond, Va. 

483 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

85 Dudley Rd., Newton Center, Mass. 

404 County St., New Bedford, Mass. 

Willinsburg, Pa. 

Eureka, Cal. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

281 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Cincinnati Children's Hosp., Cincinnati, O. 

782 South 49th St., Tacoma, Wash. 



Highland Park, J. J. 

801 Stevens Bldg., Portland, Ore. 

Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio 

371 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 



*Deceased 



129 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Hansell, W. Whitfield 1917 

Harbin, Maxwell 1923 

Harper, Edwin A 1934 

Harris, Albert H 1931 

Harris, Herbert E 1936 

Harris, Jerome S 1936 

Harral, Pinckney 1935 

Hartman, Frederick B 1935 

Harvey, Campbell 1921 

Hass, George 1931 

Hassman, David M 1915 

Haven, George 1882 

Helmick, Arthur G 1913 

Henry, Myron 1922 

Herrick, Theodore P 1920 

Hertig, A. T 1932 

Heyl, Henry L 1935 

Hibben, F. H 1914 

Higgins, Frank A 1891 

Hight, Donald 1935 

Hightower, Robert A 1936 

Hill, A. Morgan 1928 

Hill, Lewis W 1915 

Hitchcock, Harold H 1922 

Hockwalt, Wm. Richard 1929 

Hodgen, John T 1915 

Hodges, Richard G 1938 

*Hogarth, Walter P 1921 

Hopkins, Frank Read 1930 

Horner, Albert A 1913 

Hosley, Walter A 1906 

Howard, A. A 1910 

Howard, Philip 1927 

Howe, Walter C 1897 

Howell, William W 1899 

Hubbard, Elliot, Jr 1918 

Hubbard, John P 1931 

Huddleston, John 1899 

Hudson, Henry W., Jr 1927 

Hugenberger, Paul W 1934 

Hughes, Grey C 1936 

Hughes, Harry C 1937 

Humphreys, Storer P 1936 

Hunt, Fred C 1925 

Hunt, George P 1919 

Hunting, Nathaniel S 1886 

Huntington, Frederick 1926 

Hurd, Arthur H 1936 

Huston, Lewis L 1937 

Hyatt, Gilbert T 1933 



519 So. Surety Bldg., Des Moines, la. 

Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland, O. 

Bedford, Va. 

219 W T aterman St., Providence, R. I. 

270 West End Ave., New York City 

5920 Julian Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Orchard Lake, Mich. 

Winthrop House, Cambridge, Mass. 

1728 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

78 South Fifth St., Columbus, Ohio 

4866 W. Lake Harriet Blvd., Minneapolis, Minn 

12429 Cedar Rd., Cleveland Hts., Ohio 

Carnegie Institute, Washington, D. C. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Newton, Mass. 

University of Virginia, Charlotteville, Va. 

314 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1810 Wealthy S. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1624 Franklin St., Oakland, Cal. 

518 Almeda Place, Dayton, Ohio 

Grand Rapids Clinic, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

26 Walker St., Cambridge, Mass. 

1112 Church St., Lynchburg, Va. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

46 Waban Ave., Waban, Mass. 

Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 

279 Clarendon St., Boston, Mass. 

29 Highland St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Hinckley Rd., Milton, Mass. 

. 1101 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

234 Marlboro St., Boston, Mass. 

Shackleford Hospital, Martinsville, Va. 

Route 1, Box 310, Englewood, Col. 

Mass. General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

161 West 61st St., New York, N. Y. 

34 Fenn St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

1136 Hancock St., Quincy, Mass. 

Medical Arts Bldg., Scranton, Pa. 

1432 North Hayworth Ave., Los Angeles 

117 12th St., N. E. Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Truesdale Hospital, Fall River, Mass. 



"Deceased 



130 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Ilfeld, Frederic W 1936 

Jackson, George H 1918 

Jacobus, Lawrence 1928 

Jeans, Philip 1910 

Jenks, Harrison D 1893 

Jennings, Robert E 1934 

Jennings, Percy H., Jr 1937 

Johann, A. E 1910 

Johnson, Erick St. John 1904 

Johnson, Harold N 1937 

Jones, Frank S 1932 

Jones, Harold W 1901 

Jones, J. Lawrence 1921 

Joplin, Robert J 1934 

Judy, J. A : . . . 1926 

Jump, Ellis B., D.M.D 1938 

Karp, Meir G 1935 

Keane, Clarence 1905 

Keever, Henry F 1909 

Kendrick, James 1 1932 

Kennard, John H 1938 

Key, John A 1920 

Key, William A 1928 

King, Donald 1917 

King, Edward 1917 

King, James M. . . 1926 

Knowles, W. F 1882 

Koplik, Louis 1931 

Kuhns, John G 1927 

Kyle, Bernard 1921 

Lanman, Thomas H 1920 

Larned, F. J 1914 

Larson, Carol B 1937 

Legg, Arthur T 1900 

Legge, Robert F 1936 

Levine, S. Z 1923 

Linde, Frederick G 1925 

Lindemann, E. E 1911 

Logan, George B 1937 

Lonergan, Robert C 1925 

Lord, Robert M 1920 

Low, Harry C 1896 

Low, Merritt B 1934 

Lucas, William P. . 1906 

Luther, Elliott H 1926 

MacCollum, Donald W 1932 

McDonald, Francis Chas 1930 



1007 8th St., Las Vegas, New Mexico 

310 S. Michigan Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 

242 Moss Ave., Redlands, Cal. 

Children's Hospital, Iowa City, Iowa 

143 Park St., E. Orange, N. J. 

Bellevue Hospital, New York 

Liberty Bldg., Des Moines, Iowa 

32 Chestnut St., Boston, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

179 Allyn St., Hartford, Conn. 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

401 Argyle Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Barney Community Center, Dayton, Ohio 

Bridgewater, N. H. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Silverton, Ore. 

69 Maple Rd., Auburndale, Mass. 

2201 Wellborn St., Dallas, Texas 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

Wash. Univ. Medical School, St. Louis, Mo. 

Shriner's Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 

205 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Hayward Bldg., Ashville, N. C. 

Wellsville, Ohio 

Lenox, Mass 

311 East 72d St., New York, N. Y" 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass' 

1011 Church St., Lynchburg, Va' 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

6 Roble Rd., Berkley, Calif. 

525 East 68th St., New York, N. Y. 

384 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

503 Ninth Ave., S. W. Rochester, Minn. 

636 Church St., Evanston, 111. 

122 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 

139 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Deerfield, Mass. 

490 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

State Sanatorium, Westfield, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
370 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 



"Deceased 



131 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



McElroy, William D 1933 

McGoverney, Richard B 1930 

McGuire, Joseph H 1917 

McKeever, Francis M 1930 

McKhann, Charles F 1923 

McLaughlin, William 1931 

McNeil, Donald 1930 

Mahoney, P. J 1930 

Manning, J. B 1908 

Maraldi, Carl F 1927 

Marion, J. W. J 1911 

Marr, Myron W 1908 

Martin, James W 1924 

Marting, Frank L 1937 

Matchet, Foster 1935 

McDermot, Leo J 1935 

Mathews, Samuel 1928 

Maxwell, Cyrus 1928 

May, Charles D 1938 

Meade, T. Stanley 1934 

Merriam, Joseph C 1925 

Metzer, Butler 1897 

Mewburn, F. H. H 1922 

Miller, H. L 1918 

*Miller, Harold F 1929 

Miller, J. Fleek 1934 

Miller, Ralph T 1927 

Milleken, Ralph A 1926 

Miner, Henry R 1920 

Moore, Beveridge H 1918 

Moore, Chester B 1912 

Moore, George C 1905 

Moore, Stephen H 1938 

Morrissey, E. James 1935 

Morris, Harry D 1937 

Morse, William R 1916 

Moulton, Robert T 1937 

Mueller, Harry L 1937 

Mumford, Eugene B 1905 

Muro, Felipe 1920 

Murphy, John P 1933 

Myers, A. E 1913 

Myers, Ernest E 1932 

Myers, Samuel W. 1902 

Naive, Jesse B 1921 

Nathan, Louis 1930 

Nelson, Richard L 1932 

Newsam, A. Roland 1922 

Nichols, Wallace J 1933 



*Deceased 



Industrial Hospital, Youngstovvn, Ohio 

515 State St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Medical Arts Bldg., Dallas, Texas 

1136 W. 6th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

116 Melrose Ave., N. S., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Medico Dental Bldg., Sacramento, Calif. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1515 State St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 

276 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Pinehurst, N. C. 

1418 Medical Arts Bldg., Omaha, Neb. 

1476 Glenwood Blvd., Schenectady, N. Y. 

Shriners' Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Worcester City Hospital, Worcester, Mass. 

1718 Wellington Rd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Auburn, N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

913 Sloyd Ave., Richmond, Va. 

198 L T nion Ave., Framingham, Mass. 

41 Ocean St., Lynn, Mass. 

416 McLeod Bldg., Edmonton, Alberta, Can. 

163 High St., Taunton, Mass. 

413 Hudson Ave., Newark, Ohio 

45 Main St., Ware, Mass. 

404 Hume-Mansur Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Falls City, Neb. 

30 North Michigan Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

384 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

475 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

3328 Daniel St., Dallas, Texas 

329 So. Front St., Milton, Pa. 

Shriner's Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 

Chengtu, China 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Detroit Children's Hosp., Detroit, Mich. 

Chamber of Com Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Farmington, Mich. 
2815 Park Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 



84 Hutchins St., Roxbury, Mass- 
Davidson Co. T. B. Hosp., Nashville, Tenn. 
69 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 
5442 Merrimac Ave., Dallas, Texas 
453 Angell St., Providence, R. I. 
102 Forest St., Medford, Mass. 



132 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



♦Nichols, E. H 1889 

Norton, Paul L 1934 

Norton, Rupert 1891 

Nutter, John A 1906 

Ober, Frank R 1914 

O'Connor, Dennis 1926 

O'Meara, John W 1919 

O'Neil, Frank C 1937 

Osgood, Rudolph 1930 

Otis, Henry S 1882 

Overlander, Charles L 1906 

Packard, Robert G 1915 

Page, Calvin G 1893 

Painter, Charles F 1893 

, Palfrey, F. W 1903 

Parker, Willard S 1912 

Parnall, Edward 1932 

Patchen, Paul J 1931 

Patrick, William F 1917 

Patterson, Robert L 1934 

Peckham, Frank E 1888 

Pelkan, Karl F 1925 

*Pegram, John C, Jr 1896 

Percy, Karlton G 1913 

Perkins, John W 1884 

Perry, Sherman 1909 

Peters, William C 1904 

Phelps, Winthrop 1924 

Pierce, F. Richard 1935 

Pike, Maurice 1928 

Pinckny, F. H 1914 

Pinkerton, Henry 1926 

Pitkin, Horace C 1927 

Pohl, John F 1933 

Pokorny, Norman A 1933 

Pollitzer, Richard M 1926 

Porter, Donald W 1914 

Porter, Robert B 1901 

Pratt, Henry 1933 

Prescott, H. D 1903 

(Retired) 
Pyle, Henry D 1929 

Radcliffe, Ernest J 1925 

Ramsay, Robert E 1918 

Ramsey, W. S 1914 

Rawlings, Junius Mott 1929 

Rector, John M 1933 



♦Deceased 



264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

48 Chesterfield Ave., Westmount, P. E. 1. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

789 Howard Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

390 Main St., Worcester, Mass. 

Children's Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio 

33 Clarendon St., Boston, Mass. 

443 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

1707 East 18th Ave., Denver, Col. 

128 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

52 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

311 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

277 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 

8254 South Buffalo Ave., Chicago, 111. 

410 Taylor St., Portland, Ore. 

1143 Prince Ave., Athens, Ga. 

215 Saint Clair Bldg., San Jose, Calif. 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

22 Walnut St., Winchester, Mass. 

45 State St., Bangor, Me. 

New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn. 

Long Island Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

179 Allyn St., Hartford, Conn. 

Morristown, N. J. 

Bryantville, Mass. 

Mill Valley, Calif. 

1945 Medical Arts Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

105 E. North St., Greenville, S. C. 

58 Grumbull St., New Haven, Conn. 

North Easton, Mass 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

26 Grove St., New Bedford, Mass. 

518 Sherland Bldg., South Bend, Ind. 

62 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 

65 N. Madison Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 

407 E. Kingsley St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

4700 Hastings St., El Paso, Texas 

2000 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 



133 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Reed, Carson R 1935 

Reese, C. A 1907 

Regan, John W 1937 

Register, John F 1935 

Reidy, John A., Jr 1938 

Rew, Willard B 1934 

*Robb, William A 1931 

Roberts, Madison Hines 1921 

Roberts, Sumner 1929 

Roberts, Wyatt 1916 

Robertson, L. B 1913 

Rogers, William 1923 

Ross, Alan S 1931 

Ross, Fred E 1912 

Rowland, Russell S 1904 

Rowley, Howard F 1923 

Rubin, Gabriel J 1926 

Rue, Homer A 1920 

Rutherford, Frederick H 1937 

Ryerson, Edwin W 1897 

*Sadler, Roy A 1909 

Saeger, Ernest T 1919 

Sander, John F 1926 

Sanford, Charles H 1913 

Schlesinger, W. F 1927 

Schott, Harry J 1921 

Schultz, Robert V 1931 

Schultz, Reuben 1929 

Schwartz, Eugene 1934 

Scudder, Cuarles 1886 

Seabold, William W 1935 

Seelye, Walter B 1929 

Segar, Louis 1914 

Selleseth, Iver F 1920 

*Selva, Julio 1892 

Sever, James W 1901 

Shannon, James 

Shannon, Paul W 1934 

Sherwood, David W 1929 

Shortell, Joseph 1918 

Simon, Royal 1931 

Skinner, Marcus 1913 

Smith, Clement A. 1931 

Smith, Edward T 1936 

Smith, F. R 1921 

Smith, L. D 1924 

Smith, Richard M 1909 

Smyth, Francis Scott 1923 

Snedeker, Lendon 1932 



Natchitoches, La. 

Beaumont du Perigord, Dordogne, France 

Charleston, So. Carolina 

Greeleyville, So. Carolina 

Yakima, Wash. 

104 Ponce de Leon Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

1920 S. 10th St., Birmingham, Ala. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

345 Bronson Ave., Ottawa, Can. 

134H W. Ninth St., Erie, Pa. 

5140 Second Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

278 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 

483 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

626 S. Lorena St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

122 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

32 Townsend St., Lansing, Mich. 

923 Walton Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

1216 Roosevelt Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

375 Walnut St., Wellesley, Mass. 

610 E. Main St., Paola, Kans. 

144 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

502 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, M 

603 Cobb Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

266 Hume-Mansur Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

701 W. Lake St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

321 Dartmouth St., Boston, Mass. 
Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Can. 

Tiffin, Ohio 

66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

466 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Shriner's Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 

Box 682, Selma, Ala. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

Houston, Texas 

107 East 67th St., New York, N. Y. 

272 Ogden Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 

66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

3d St. and Parnassus Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 

66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 



"Deceased 



134 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Soule, Herbert C, Jr 1922 

*Soutter, Robert 1898 

Spalding, Roger 1903 

Spaulding, Charles L 1899 

Spencer, Harvey 1928 

Spencer, J. B 1908 

Spicer, Charles M 1915 

Spring, C. W 1883 

Stanton, James T 1938 

Steinberg, Alfred 1920 

Stetson, Frank E 1897 

Stevenson, Edward . 1927 

Stewart, Steele F 1920 

Stickney, Edwin P .1891 

Stickney, William 1906 

Stiefel, D. M 1924 

• Stoeffler, Walter 1928 

Storey, Carroll L 1916 

Storey, Thomas A 1905 

Stratford, Eldredge W 1931 

Sweet, Lewis K 1931 

Sylvester, Philip H 1907 

Talbot Fritz B 1905 

Teft, Richard C 1922 

Thiery, R. O. . . . 1924 

Thompson, Milton S., Jr 1935 

Thompson, Vernon P 1926 

Thurber, D. Packard 1918 

Thomkies, James S 1910 

Treanor, John P., Jr 1925 

Tso, Ernst 1919 

Tucker, James 1929 

Tucker, J. F 1883 

Turner, Arthur R 1929 

Turtle, William J 1936 

Ulrich, Joseph M 1920 

Van Meter, Agram L 1915 

Van Ornum, Earl N 1928 

Vincent, Beth 1903 

Virkler, Stanley, D.M.D 1935 

Vogel, Harold T 1926 

Wachter, Harry E 1936 

Walthal, Damon 1916 

Walker, John H. . . . 1933 

* Warren, Henry S 1889 



122 Rutgers St., Rochester, N. Y. 

Duxbury, Mass. 

572 Washington St., Wellesley, Mass. 

1106 Republic Bldg., Denver, Colo. 

613 Auburn Ave., Chariton, Iowa 

1623 R St., N. W., Washington, C. D. 

South Dartmouth, Mass. 

West 23d St., Lawrence, Kans. 

2007 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 

58 Pleasant St., Arlington, Mass. 

541 David Whitney Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

420 N. Arsenal Dr., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Stanford University, San Francisco, Calif. 

1723 Hobart St., Washington, C. D. 

c-o J. Osmond Hyd 

Pekin Union Medical School, Pekin, China 

25 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

475 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

319 No. Windsor Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

417 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

5831 Margerita St., Dallas, Texas 

520 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

c-o American Mission, Ichann, China 

401 Medical Arts Bldg., Richmond, Va. 

8122 Drexel Ave., Chicago, 111. 
66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

193 W. Market St., Akron, Ohio 

427 Bank of America Bldg., Stockton, Calif. 

1709 W. 8th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

925 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

372 Washington St., Wellesley, Mass. 

3536 80th St., Jackson Hts., L. I., N. Y. 

/ 

920 E. 59th St., Chicago, 111. 

906 Grand Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

Hampton, Conn. 



^Deceased 



135 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Washburh, Alfred 1924 

Washburn, Frederic A 1894 

Watson, Richard G 1924 

Webster, Fred P 1903 

Weigel, Edgar W 1927 

Weigele, Carl E 1923 

Weir, Dwight 1932 

Weiler, Howard G 1930 

Wheeler, Warren E 1937 

Whitford, Warren 1930 

Whittemore, Frank S 1890 

Wilcox, John C 1936 

Wilens, Gustav 1920 

Wilson, Edward H 1923 

Wilson, Franklin D 1919 

Wilson, James L 1929 

Wilson, James 1920 

*Wilson, Louis T 1902 

Woo, Lan Sing 1919 

Wood, Benjamin E 1907 

Woodberry, H. S 1914 

Woodbury, William P 1906 

Wormelle, Charles B 1901 

Wylie, Eugene C 1894 

Wyman, Edwin T 1912 

Wysen, Frank L 1916 

* Young, Ernest B 1895 

Young, W. H 1909 



1950 Forest Parkway, Denver, Colo. 

190 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

1624 Franklin St., Oakland, Calif. 

156 Free St., Portland, Me. 

970 Park Ave., Elizabeth, N. J. 

147 Garrison Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

36 Mulberry St., Mansfield, Ohio 

2314 Morningside Ave., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

2208 Ridgewood Ave., Alliance, Ohio 

Windsor Locks, Conn. 

2349 W. 21st St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

258 Geneses St., Utica, N. Y. 

395 E. Broad St., Columbus, Ohio 

5352 Studeley Ave., Norfolk, Va. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Nursery & Child's Hosp., New York, N. Y. 

St. Luke's Hospital, Shanghai, China 
475 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 



75 Gardner St., Allston, Mass. 

556 Washington St., Dorchester, Mass. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Clifton Forge, Va. 



66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 



*Deceased 



136 



The Children's Hospital 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE, BOSTON 

Telephone Aspinwall 5930 



THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT CLINICS 



NOT OPEN TO PERSONS ABLE TO PAY A DOCTOR'S FEE 
AGE LIMIT — 12 YEARS 

Medical (By Appointment) — Every morning. Tel. Aspinwall 5930. 

Medical Clinic Branches. (By Appointment from Medical Clinic Only.) 

Heart Wednesday a.m. 

Eczema Thursday a.m. 

Luetic Monday p.m. 

Diabetic Monday, 2.00 p.m. 

Boston Lying-in Discharged Baby Clinic Wednesday, 2.00 p.m. 

Children's Hospital Medical Discharge Clinic Wednesday, 2.00 p.m. 

Infants' Hospital Discharge Clinic Wednesday, 2.00 p.m. 

Anaphylaxis Clinic Tuesday — Friday, 2 p.m. 

Muscle Training Clinic ( Bader Bldg.) Mon., Wed., Fri., 2.00 p.m. 

New cases, Friday 2.00 p.m. 

Surgical — Every morning, 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Carbon Dioxide Treatment Wednesday, 10.45 a.m. 

Surgical-Neurological Wednesday, 8.30 a.m. 

Ear, Nose and Throat — Tuesday and Thursday, 8.30-10.00 a.m. (By Appointment) 

Orthopedic — Every morning, 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Arthritis Clinic — Alternate Thursdays at 2.00 p.m. (By Appointment.) 

Infantile Paralysis (Bader Bldg.) Tues., Thurs., Fri., 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Physiotherapy — (Bader Bldg.) 

Scoliosis-Posture — Tues. and Thurs., 2.00 to 3.30 p.m. — Sat. 8.30 a.m. 
Med. Surg. Orth. Physiotherapy— Mon., Wed., Fri., 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 
Light Therapy — Mon., Wed., Fri. By appointment from clinics only. 

New cases — Monday 9.00 a.m. 
Exercises — Pool — By appointment only. 

Orthodontia — Tuesday and Wednesday 9.00 a.m. For children who have been operated 
on for Hare Lip or Cleft Palate. By appointment only. 

Dental Clinic — Thursday 10.00 a.m. By appointment from Orthodontia. 

No Clinics on Sundays or Holidays 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Form of Bequest 

I give, devise, and bequeath to 
The Children's Hospital, in the 
City of Boston, and Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, incorpo- 
rated in the year 1869, the sum 
of 




69th and 70th 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



1938 - 1939 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Form of Bequest 

I give, devise, and bequeath to 
The Children's Hospital, in the 
City of Boston, and Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, incorpo- 
rated in the year 1869, the sum 
of 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

1869 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

for the Years 
1938 and 1939 



BOSTON • MASSACHUSETTS 

MCMXL 



OFFICERS OF THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

1940 

President Vice-President 

Samuel H. Wolcott F. Murray Forbes 

Treasurer Secretary 

Edward L. Bigelow Gordon Abbott 

State Street Trust Co., Boston 

Counsel for the Corporation 

James Garfield 
of 
Choate, Hall & Stewart 
30 State Street, Boston 

Committee on Investments 

Edward L. Bigelow (Ex-officio) William Arthur Dupee 

Harvey H. Bundy Samuel H. Wolcott 

Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr. 

Executive Committee 
Alexander Wheeler, Chairman 
Edward L. Bigelow Samuel H. Wolcott 

F. Murray Forbes, Jr., Secretary F. Murray Forbes, Sr. 
Arthur G. Rotch Mrs. William E. Russell 

and such other members of the Board of Managers as the President may select from 
time to time, to serve for a period of approximately three months each. 

Social Service Committee 
Mrs. George H. Monks, Chairman Dr. Robert B. Osgood 

Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. Dr. William E. Ladd 

Mrs. Francis B. Lothrop Dr. Bronson Crothers 

G. Peabody Gardner Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan 
Dr. Frank R. Ober Dr. William T. Green 

Dr. Thomas H. Lanman 

Committee on the School of Nursing 

Gordon Abbott, Chairman Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan 

Mrs. Charles A. Newhall Dr. Thomas H. Lanman 

Mrs. George H. Monks Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 

John S. Ames, Jr. Miss Sophie Nelson 

Bancroft Beatley, LL.D. 

Private Ward Committee 
Alexander Whiteside, Chairman Dr. Richard M. Smith 

Mrs. Nathandil Winthrop Dr. Harold G. Tobey 

Dr. William E. Ladd Dr. Henry W. Hudson, Jr. 

Dr. R. Cannon Ely 

Publicity Committee 

Donald T. Carlisle, Chairman John C. Kiley 

F. Murray Forbes George v. L. Meyer 

Mrs. Carl Ernlund 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 

1940 

Alexander Whiteside 1914 

Samuel H. Wolcott (Ex-Officio) 1915 

George v. L. Meyer 1915 

F. Murray Forbes (Ex-Officio) 1918 

Mrs. George H. Monks 1921 

Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 1921 

Louis E. Kirstein 1921 

G. Peabody Gardner 1921 

William Arthur Dupee 1922 

Pliny Jewell 1922 

Henry W. Palmer 1923 

Arthur G. Rotch 1923 

Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 1927 

Harvey H. Bundy 1927 

Louis F. S. Bader 1930 

James Garfield 1931 

Gordon Abbott 1932 

F. Murray Forbes, Jr 1932 

Lawrence Foster 1 932 

Edward L. Bigelow (Ex-Officio) 1933 

Miss Ida C. Smith 1933 

Louis A. Shaw 1934 

Alexander Wheeler . . 1934 

Frank D. Comerford 1935 

Mrs. Nelson S. Bartlett 1936 

John C. Kiley 1936 

Lawrence Coolidge 1936 

Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr 1936 

John S. Ames, Jr 1937 

Charles Stockton 1937 

Donald T. Carlisle 1938 

Hermann F. Clarke 1939 

Mrs. William E. Russell (Ex-Officio) 1939 

John J. Burns 1940 

Amory Coolbdge 1940 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



FORMER MEMBERS OF THE 
BOARD OF MANAGERS 



♦Abbott, Gordon 1896-1937 

♦Abbott, Jere 1871-1895 

♦Ames, F. L 1886-1893 

♦Ames, Oliver 1894-1920 

Ames, Mrs. F. L 1926-1929 

♦Baylies, Walter C 1908-1910 

♦Bigelow, Alanson 1876-1884 

♦Bigelow, George T 1870-1877 

♦Blake, Clarence J 1895-1918 

♦Blake, J. A. Lowell 1911-1938 

♦Bremer, S. Parker 1923-1925 

♦Brooks, Phillips 1884-1885 

♦Browne, Dr. Francis H 1870-1915 

Caswell, Mrs. William W. 1924-1925 

Cox, Mrs. William C 1936-1939 

♦Dana, S. B 1899-1901 

Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 1934-1935 

♦Emmons, Nathaniel 1870-1885 

♦Emmons, Robert W. 2nd . .1903-1928 

Endicott, William 1904-1928 

♦Faulkner, Charles 1870-1885 

♦Fearing, Albert 1870-1875 

♦Fiske, Charles H 1870-1898 

♦Gardner, George P 1885-1939 

♦Green, Samuel A 1870-1883 

♦HallowellJohnW 1925-1926 

Hardwick, Huntington R. . .1930-1933 

Herrick, Robert F., Jr 1921-1925 

Hollster, Paul M 1926-1926 

♦Howe, George D 1871-1880 

♦Hunnewell, F. W 1895-1917 

Hunnewell, F. W. 2nd 1915-1924 

♦Hunnewell, H. H 1886-1901 

♦Ingalls, William 1870-1902 

♦Johnson, Samuel 1870-1871 

♦Joy, Charles H 1887-1887 

♦Kuhn, W. P 1877-1880 

♦Lawrence, John 1908-1914 



♦Lincoln, Roland C 1884-1885 

♦Manning, J. M 1881-1882 

♦Mudge, E. R 1874-1878 

♦Peabody, Oliver W 1884-1896 

♦Perkins, Thomas N 1904-1916 

♦Phelan, James J 1921-1934 

♦Phillips, John C 1881-1883 

Phillips, William 1931-1935 

♦Pickering, H. G 1879-1886 

Pickman, Dudley L., Jr. . . .1916-1925 

♦Pierce, Wallace L 1901-1920 

♦Robbins, Chandler 1870-1882 

♦Rogers, Mrs. Dudley P. . . .1928-1939 

♦Sargent, F. W 1918-1919 

♦Seabury, William H 1902-1933 

♦Sears, J. Montgomery 1883-1905 

Sears, Philip S 1916-1925 

Seymour, Robert W 1923-1925 

♦Shattuck, Dr. F. P 1888-1919 

♦Spaulding, J. P 1879-1896 

♦Stearns, Frank W 1916-1925 

♦Stockton, Howard 1897-1902 

♦Stockton, Philip 1924-1925 

Stone, Albert, Jr 1930-1933 

♦Stone, Dr. James A 1928-1929 

♦Strong, Edward A 1870-1873 

♦Sturgis, Russell, Jr 1870-1871 

♦Thacher, George 1886-1896 

♦Thacher, Isaac 1870-1883 

♦Thayer, E. V. R 1886-1907 

♦Thayer, Nathaniel 1870-1883 

♦Thomas, W. B 1897-1902 

Tuckerman, John A 1919-1920 

♦Wetherell, John G 1887-1897 

Wheeler, Henry 1898-1926 

♦Winthrop, Robert C 1870-1894 

*Young, Charles L 1884-1901 

♦Deceased. 



STAFF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D. 
William E. Ladd, M.D. 
Frank R. Ober, M.D. . 
S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. 
George v. L. Meyer . 
Sidney Farber, M.D. . 



Physicia n-in-Ch ief 

Surgeon-in-Chief 

Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief 

Pathologist-in-Chief 

Director 

Secretary 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Director 
George v. L. Meyer 

Assistants to the Director 
Miss Madeline S. Gibbs, R.N. Miss Fanny C. Knapp, R.N. 

4 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Admitting Officers 

Miss Anna C. Kendall, R.N. 
Miss Katherine W. Nelson, R.N. 
Miss Muriel J. Seff, R.N. 

Admitting Officer, 0. P. D. 
Miss Priscilla E. Hedley 

Admitting Officers, Private Ward 

Miss Priscilla Eaton, R.N. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Worth, R.N. 

Abatement Adjuster 
Miss Ethel Preble 



Bookkeeper 
Chester E. Budden 

Dietitian 
Mrs. Martha H. Stuart, B.S. 

Housekeeper 
Mrs. Isabel Hall 

Photographer 
Ferdinand Harding 

Purchasing Agent 
Miss Elizabeth C. Fitzgerald 



Record Librarian 
Mrs. Daisy J. Jacobs 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 
Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D., Physician-in-Chief 



Bronson Crothers, M.D. 
Louis K. Diamond, M.D. 
James L. Gamble, M.D. 
Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 



Visiting Physicians 

Charles F. McKhann, M.D. 
Richard M. Smith, M.D. 
Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 
Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 



Associate Visiting Physicians 

Allan M. Butler, M.D. R. Cannon Eley, M.D. 

Randolph K. Byers, M.D. Charles D. May, M.D. 

John A. V. Davies, M.D. Clement A. Smith, M.D. 

Philip H. Sylvester, M.D. 



Stewart H. Clifford, M.D. 

Henry E. Gallup, M.D. 

Stanton Garfield, M.D. 

Nathan Gorin, M.D. 
*Hyman Green, M.D. 
*Gerald N. Hoeffel, M.D. 



Associate Physicians 

Eliot Hubbard, Jr., M.D. 
John P. Hubbard, M.D. 
Wilfred L. McKenzie, M.D. 
Dorothea M. Moore, M.D. 
Henry N. Pratt, M.D. 
Abraham S. Small, M.D. 



*Sidney H. Weiner, M.D. 



John K. Brines, M.D. 
Allen M. Hill, M.D. 
Mark I. Makler, M.D. 
Robert T. Moulton, M.D 
Fe Del Mundo, M.D. 

*Special Clinics 



Don W. Freeman, M.D. 
Charles D. May, M.D. 



Assistant Physicians 

Lendon Snedeker, M.D. 
Nathan B. Talbot, M.D. 
Edward L. Tuohy, M.D. 
William J. Turtle, M.D. 
Lucille Williamson, M.D. 
Wilson M. Wing, M.D. 

Resident Physicians 

1938 

Ralph A. Ross, M.D. 
Paul V. Wooley, M.D. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE — Continued 



Edward C. Curnen, M.D. 



1939 

David H. Clement, M.D. 
Ralph A. Ross, M.D. 



Glidden L. 
Charles H 



Brooks, M.D. 
Cutler, M.D 



1940 

J. Mace Harkey, M.D. 
Harry Shwachman, M.D. 
Ernest M. Worden, M.D. 



1938 
Richard G. Hodges, M.D. 
S. Halcuit Moore, M.D. 
James T. Stanton, M.D. 
David M. Clement, M.D. 
Nathan B. Talbot, M.D. 
Harry Shwachman, M.D. 

1939 
John K. Brines, M.D. 
Allen M. Hill, M.D. 
Charles H. Cutler, M.D. 
Wilson M. Wing, M.D. 



House Officers 

Glidden L. Brooks, M.D. 
Henry M. Work, M.D. 

1940 
Fred H. Allen, Jr., M.D. 
John H. Dingle, M.D. 
Winthrop I. Franke, M.D. 
Clifford Grulee, Jr., M.D. 
Charles M. Campbell, M.D. 
Rowland L. Mindlin, M.D. 
Donald E. Nitchman, M.D. 
Wilson G. Shugerman, M.D. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

Frank R. Ober, M.D., Orthopaedic Surgeon-in-Chief 



Surgeons 

*Arthur T. Legg, M.D. 
James W. Sever, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons 
A. H. Brewster, M.D. 
*Seth M. Fitchet, M.D. 
William T. Green, M.D. 
Robert H. Morris, M.D. 



Assistant Visiting Surgeons 
William Elliston, M.D. 
Paul W. Hugenberger, M.D. 
Meir G. Karp, M.D. 
Miriam Katzeff, M.D. 
John G. Kuhns, M.D. 



1938 
Clyde W. Dawson, M.D 



1938 
F. Bert Brown, M.D. 
Lewis Cozen, M.D. 
John A. Reidy, M.D. 
Carter R. Rowe, M.D. 
Otto B. AuFranc, M.D. 

1939 
O. Sherwin Staples, M.D. 
Leo J. McDermott, M.D. 
Luther M. Strayer, M.D. 
Frederic W. Rhinelander, M.D. 

*Deceased 



Resident Orthopedic Surgeons 

1939 
Carol B. Larson, M.D. 

1940 
Leo J. McDermott, M.D. 

Orthopedic House Officers 

Samuel E. Flook, M.D. 
William H. Blodgett, M.D. 
Robert Boyd, M.D. 

1940 
William J. Tobin, M.D. 
Russell V. Fuldner, M.D. 
Charles L. Sturdevant, M.D. 
Robert M. O'Brien, M.D. 
C. Fred Goeringer, M.D. 
Eugene E. Record, M.D. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

S. Burt Wolbach, M.D., Pathologist-in-Ckief 

Pathologist 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 



Residents in Pathology 



1938 
Lewis E. Rector, M.D. 



1939 
Lewis E. Rector, M.D. 



1940 
Henry J. Tweddell, M.D. 



1938 
Wolfgang W. Zuelzer, M.D 

1938 
Richard S. Neff, M.D. 
Marion L. Connerley, M.D. 



1938 
Charles H. Cutler, M.D. 
Glidden L. Brooks, M.D. 
Wilson G. Shugerman, M.D. 



1938 
Luther M. Strayer, M.D. 
Samuel E. Floor, M.D. 



House Officers Pathology 

1939 
Walter S. Sheldon, M.D. 



Surgical 

1939 
Orvar Swenson, M.D. 

Medical 

1939 

Clifford G. Grulee, M.D. 
Fred H. Allen, Jr., M.D. 

1940 
Edward C. Dyer, M.D. 

Orthopaedic 

1939 
Robert Boyd, M.D. 
Robert M. O'Brien, M.D. 



1940 
Eugene E. Record, M.D. 

Voluntary Assistants 

J. B. Bartram, M.D. 
W. G. Snow, M.D. 
Don L. Thurston, M.D. 
Eugene Kaplan, M.D. 
Frederic Thomas, M.D. 
Victor Santamarina, M.D. 
Eugene Galan, M.D. 

Student Voluntary Assistants 
Mr. T. C. Chisholm 
Mr. W. F. Hickey 
Mr. Carl Gardner 
Mr. Nicholas Santacross 
Mr. W. B. Pomeroy 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

William E. Ladd, Surgeon-in-Chief 

Visiting Surgeons 

Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 
Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. 

(Neurosurgery) 
Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 
(Otolaryngology) 

Associate Visiting Surgeons 
George D. Cutler, M.D. 
Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. 
Robert E. Gross, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons 

Henry W. Hudson, M. D. 
Patrick J. Mahoney, M.D. 
Augustus Thorndike, Jr., M.D. 

Assistant Surgeon 
John W. Chamberlain, M.D. 

Ear, Nose and Throat Visiting Otolaryngolosit Dental 

Harold G. Tobey, M.D. Orthodontist 

Research Associate in Otolaryngology Harry W " P^ns, D.M.D. 

Lyman G. Richards, M.D. Assistant Orthodontist 

Associate Visiting Otolaryngologist Edward L. Silver, D.D.M. 
Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 

Associate Otolaryngologist 
Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 

Resident Surgeons 

1938 
James B. Campbell, M.D. Robert E. Gross, M.D. 

(Fellow in Neurosurgery) 

1939 
Thomas W. Botsford, M.D. James B. Campbell, M.D. 

1940 
James B. Campbell, M.D. Dean W. Tanner, M.D. 

(Fellow in Neurosurgery) 

Assistant Resident Surgeons 
1938 1939 

John M. Moore, M.D, Henry L. Heyl, M.D. 

1940 
James B. Blodgett, M.D. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Resident Otolaryngologists 
1938 1939 

Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 

1940 
John M. Hill, M.D. 

Surgical House Officers 

1938 

C. Fred Goeringer, M.D. Dean W. Tanner, M.D. 

George Austin, Jr., M.D. John A. Sandmeyer, M.D. 

John H. Kennard, M.D. Robert S. Meyers, M.D. 

1939 

McChord Williams, M.D. Richard S. Neff, M.D. 

Robert R. White, M.D. Charles L. Dimmler, M.D. 

Rutledge W. Howard, M.D. Dean K. Rizer, M.D. 

1940 

Marion L. Connerley, M.D. Orvar Swenson, M.D. 

Harold R. Hoover, M.D. Donald D. Matson, M.D. 

Chilton Crane, M.D. Eben Alexander, Jr., M.D. 

Dental House Officers 
1938 1939 

Ellis B. Jump, D.M.D. John C. Brown, D.M.D. 

1940 
Robert L. Legg, D.M.D. 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

Visiting Bacteriologist 
Hans Zinsser, M.D. 

Associate Visiting Bacteriologist 
Leroy D. Fothergill 

Bacteriologist 
John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

Associate Bacteriologist 
Miss Marion Sweet, A.B., M.S. 

Resident Physicians Bacteriology 

1938 
Henry M. Work, M.D. 

1939 
Winthrop I. Franke, M.D. 

1940 
Charles G. Jennings, M.D. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS — Continued 

House Officers Bacteriology 
1938 1939 

Wilson G. Shugerman, M.D. Fred H. Allen, Jr., M.D. 

Clifford Grulee, Jr., M.D. Edward C. Dyer, M.D. 

1940 
Eugene Kaplan, M.D. 



Roentgenologist 

George M. Wyatt, M.D. 

Associate Roentgenologist 

L. Alexander Vance, M.D. 

Opthalmologist 

J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 

Assistant Opthalmologists 
Paul A. Chandler, M.D. 
E. B. Goodall, M.D. 
Trygve Gunderson, M. D. 

Director of Physical Therapeutics 
Miss Janet Merrill 

Director of Paralytic Clinic 
Miss Mary E. Trainor, R.N. 

Occupational Therapist 
Miss Jessie Ness 



Dermatologist 

E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 

Assistant Dermatologist 
Austin W. Cheever, M.D. 

Stomatologist 

Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 

Associate Stomatologists 
Paul K. Losch, D.M.D. 
David Weisberger, D.M.D. 

Assistant Stomatologist 
Stanley B. Virkler, D.M.D. 

Volunteer Assistant in Stomatology 
John C. Brown, D.M.D. 

Research Associate in Psychology 
Elizabeth Lord, Ph.D. 

Director of Social Service 

Miss Marion Hall 

Assistant Chemist 

Miss Elsie A. MacLachlan, B.S. 



Visiting Pharmacologists 

Reid Hunt, M.D. 
Otto Krayer, M.D. 

Visiting Physiologist . 
Hallowell Davis, M.D. 

Visiting Biological Chemist 
A. Baird Hastings, M.D. 



Fred R. Blumenthal, D.M.D. 
J. Lewis Bremer, M.D. 

T. DUCKETT JONES,M.D. 

L. M. S. Miner, M. D. 



Consulting Staff 

Charles G. Mixter, M.D. 
F. B. Mallory, M.D. 
*John L. Morse, M.D. 
Robert B. Osgood, M.D. 



*Deceased 



Merrill C. Sosman, M.D. 



10 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
SCHOOL OF NURSING AND NURSING SERVICE 

Superintendent of Nurses and Principal of School of Nursing 
Stella Goostray, R.N. 



Assistant Principal of School of Nursing 
Mary E. Norcross, R.N. 

Second Assistant and Supervisor of Private 
Ward 

Muriel B. Vesey, R.N. 

Instructors 

Emily G. Pearson, R.N. 

Elizabeth Romine, R.N. 

Medical Service 

Helen E. Riedel, R.N., Supervisor 
Marjorie Parsons, R.N., Head Nurse 
Theresa Hurley, R.N., Head Nurse 

Surgical Service 

Frances E. Leary, R.N., Supervisor 
Edith M. Ahrens, R.N., Head Nurse 
Hilda M. Robinson, R.N., Head Nurse 
Barbara T. Lanigan, R.N., Head Nurse 

Orthopedic Service 

Kathryn Cheney, R.N., Supervisor 
Agnes O. Broadland, R.N., Head Nurse 
Margaret Regan, R.N., Head Nurse 

Throat Service 

Martha W. Ghen, R.N., Supervisor 
M. Aldra Dickie, R.N., Head Nurse 

Neurological Service 

Esther H. Read, R.N., Supervisor 

Isolation Service 

Ethel M. Trafton, R. N., Supervisor 

Infants' Medical Service 
Harriet B. Russell, R.N., Supervisor 
Mary G. Chapman, R.N., Head Nurse 
Thelma M. Reynolds, R.N., Head Nurse 



Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Isabelle M. Jordan, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses at Night 
Dorothy Pratt. R.N. 

Night Supervisors 

Marjorie S. Lovell, R.N. 
Elizabeth F. Webster, R.N. 

Operating Room 

Edith C. Jenkins, R.N., Supervisor 
Louise Destromp, R.N., Assistant 
Eleanor R. Samsel, R.N., Assistant 

Out-Patient Department 

Maud Gillespie, R.N., Head Nurse and 

Instructor, Medical Clinic 
Mary E. Downey, R.N., Asst. Head 

Nurse, Medical Clinic 
Helen C. Harding, R.N., Head Nurse, 

Orthopedic Clinic 
Dorothy E. Fitzgerald, R.N., Head 

Nurse, Surgical Clinic 
Marian G. Perkins, R.N., Head Nurse 

Isolation Clinic 

Private Ward 

Margaret C. Foster, R.N., Head Nurse 
Sarah J. Vickery, R.N., Head Nurse 
Elva R. Faucher, R.N., Head Nurse 

Nurses' Infirmary 

Marian S. Perkins, R.N., Head Nurse 

Anesthetists 

B. Elaine Lank, R.N., Chief 
Sara A. Metzler, R.N., 
Helen E. Fitzgerald, R.N. 
Ruth Hodgdon, R.N. 



11 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 

With the year 1940 has begun the 71st calendar year of The Children's 
Hospital. 

The 70th year of its existence was celebrated with three June days 
of formalities and festivities, serious scientific sessions and joyous re- 
unions of graduates. Friends of the Hospital from every walk of life 
came to pay honor to the ideal which since 1869 four generations of 
doctors, laymen and devoted women have labored to realize. It was a 
notable occasion, planned purely to tie together the accomplishments of 
the past years in a greater public realization of their value. At none of 
the exercises or entertainments was financial help for the work asked for. 
The wards, the children, the laboratories, the exhibits, the talks with 
the staff could be counted on to create their own appeal. 

The occasion emphasized as nothing else could have the growing 
realization that hospital care of children is highly specialized and that 
those engaged in it can bring about results which the technique that is 
applied to adults cannot reach. 

A series of dramatic expositions of this was made on two recent 
occasions by the surgical and medical staffs. The surgical staff showed 
on the screen tumors and intestinal malformations once nearly always 
fatal; photographs of terrible burns; cruel facial and other deformities. 
Then were led into the amphitheatre the little patients themselves, re- 
stored and smiling. In times past they would have remained the vic- 
tims of their misfortunes. The medical demonstration was equally 
dramatic; showing cures now taken as routine through chemical and 
bacteriological advances, of illnesses once violently dangerous, such as 
pneumonia, diabetes, meningitis, deficiency diseases and others. 

In the realization that science of adult surgery and science of child 
and infant surgery can be quite distinct, it may have seemed to some 
of the Managers that the Medical Profession has been slow. But within 
the last few months the Harvard Medical School has announced that is 
would establish a chair of child surgery in the school, to be known at 
"The William E. Ladd professorship of Child Surgery at the Children's 
Hospital," provided the friends of The Children's Hospital joined in es- 
tablishing an endowment fund to maintain the chair. 

This realization of the special nature of child surgery and of child 
medical treatment makes demands on The Children's Hospital which it 
is having difficulty in meeting. The advance in these sciences moves 

13 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

fast, and facilities, equipment and room must be found to give scope to 
the men who are devoting their lives to the work. 

These men are not only serving the children who are brought to the 
Hospital, but they are making laboratory discoveries and working out 
operative and care techniques which are contributing in wide fields to 
the security of all children. 

In the efforts of the Staff, the Board of Managers is most anxious 
to cooperate. The limitations of its financial resources makes it neces- 
sary to be first convinced that each new step and each new demand 
leads to greater efficiency and to greater life saving and health giving 
possibilities. The improvements in medical science do not result in 
reduced overhead as do commercial discoveries. On the contrary, they 
mean additional equipment, more technicians, more space, greater 
operating cost. 

The most difficult factor of all these is the provision for space. 
Practically every service is in need of more room and more modern 
operating rooms are vitally needed. The staffs are working under 
handicaps which if continued are bound to limit their scope and their 
usefulness. In sanctioning any new demands the Board feels that it has 
gone as far as it safely can, without making provision for special funds 
to take care of them. Therefore, consideration is being seriously given 
by the Board for a general appeal for capital funds. Studies of the most 
important needs are being made and estimates prepared, none of 
which are far enough advanced to make possible a course of action at 
the present time. But however difficult the times may be for the raising 
of funds the Managers see clearly that in the science of child care the 
Hospital cannot stand still. It must continue to go forward as it always 
has done in the 70 years of its existence. 

Board of Managers 



14 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 

The year 1939 was a strenuous period for the administration in that 
the previous year resulted in a net deficit of over $40,000, and the Board 
of Managers demanded of the administration rigid economies. Econo- 
mies in an institution of this kind require the cooperation of the Staff 
as well as the employees, and it is most gratifying to report that thanks 
to this cooperation, normal expenses were curtailed to a very satis- 
factory degree. 

While the expense figures for the year would indicate an increase in 
normal expenses, a careful analysis shows that this increase was due to 
abnormal expenses, namely the necessary increases in various fields 
which were voted by the Board of Managers, or which were entailed 
as a result of new procedures and methods in the caring and cure of our 
patients. 

This point is brought out not with a view to defend the position of 
the administration but to emphasize and reiterate that modern medi- 
cine, just like modern transportation is making rapid and costly ad- 
vances each year. 

The "horse and buggy" days are over. Railroads are being obliged 
to readjust themselves to the competition from the more flexible and 
speedier automobile and aeroplane. 

Vast amounts of capital are being spent in order to perfect and im- 
prove the automobile and the aeroplane; to make them ever more 
serviceable less liable to break down or to accidents. 

Likewise, progressive hospitals are never satisfied but are endeavor- 
ing to perfect cures and to devise preventative measures to prevent 
break downs and disease. 

Without being boastful, but because of the attitude of our Board of 
Managers since our creation in 1869, it would be fair to include The 
Children's Hospital in the progressive group. 

The 70th Anniversary of the founding of the hospital and the 50th 
Anniversary of the founding of the School of Nursing was celebrated in 
June, 1939. Graduates came to the event from far and wide, not merely 
to rejoice over this Anniversary, but to interchange ideas and to build 
for the future. 

It was indeed most gratifying to observe the faith that these gradu- 
ates have in the institution. Likewise, the institution felt justified pride 
in the graduates and in the work that they are doing to raise the stand- 

15 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

ards of medicine in all parts of the United States and in many foreign 
lands. Particularly may the Hospital rejoice in the ever extending 
frontiers of its influence. 

A high position in the hospital world was a dream of a few enthusi- 
asts in 1869 whose courage and enthusiasm overcame the multitude of 
skeptics that surrounded them. This dream has become a realization 
because of the unselfish tenacity of purpose and self-sacrificing efforts 
of the members of the Staff and because of the enthusiastic and pro- 
gressive attitude on the part of the Board of Managers. 

The 70th Anniversary was a revelation, I am sure, to many. It un- 
covered assets we scarcely were aware we owned. It also brought to 
light shortcomings. We admire even more than ever before the courage 
of the founders, the courage of the managers, who when the need has 
presented itself in the past, went out and obtained the support of the 
community. Each and every time the task seemed more difficult, and 
each and every time it was crowned with success. 

The 70th Anniversary gives us reason for pride in retrospect, but 
let us be fearful of looking behind at past accomplishments, — rather 
must we muster our courage and face the difficult task that lies ahead. 

G. v. L. Meyer, Director 



16 






THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



STATISTICAL REPORT— IN-PATIENT 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

For the year ended December 31, 1938 



Pri. 
Remaining Dec. 31, 1937 21 
Admitted 1446 

Treated 1467 

Discharged 1441 

Remaining Dec. 31, 1938 26 



Pub. T. 

162 183 

3829 5275 

3991 5458 

3849 5290 

142 168 

















Daily 






Admissions 




Bed Capacity 


Bed 


' Occupancy 




Pri. 


Pub. 


T. 


Pri. Pub. 


T. 


Pri. 


Pub. T. 


Medical 


434 


803 


1237 


10 . 44 


54 


1 


39 46 


Surgical 


279 


1445 


1724 


10 66 


76 


5 


59 64 


Orthopedic 


60 


344 


404 


10 47 


57 


2 


34 36 


Throat 


641 


949 


1590 


12 31 


43 


9 


15 24 


Neurological 


13 


208 


221 


— *15 


15 


— 


9 9 


Isolation 


19 


80 


99 


— *38 


38 


1 


3 4 



1446 3829 5275 



42 241 283 



24 159 183 



Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Throat 

Neurological 

Isolation 



■ Hospital Days 
Pri. Pub. T. 

2582 14102 16684 



Operations 
Pri. Pub. T. 



Deaths and 
Autopsies 
Pri. Pub. Total 

D A D A DA 

7 2 41 21 48 23 



1913 21419 23332 348 1433 1781 4 4 57 50 61 54 



657 12342 12999 

3261 5641 8902 

71 3177 3248 

419 1133 1552 



54 
679 



345 399 
935 1614 



6 

2 
8 



3 6 3 

2 2 2 
2 8 2 



8903 57814 66717 1081 2713 3794 11 6 114 78 125 84 



Percentage of Autopsies 55% 68% 67% 



♦Interchangeable— Public SOCIAL SERVICE DEPT.— Both Hospitals 

and Private 

Isolation Wards closed May 14 Group I Group II Group III Group IV Total 
to Dec. 1, 1938 

Bader Ward Closed June 30 to 
Sept. 6, 1938 72 327 1719 68 2186 



17 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



THE INFANTS' HOSPITAL 

For the year ended December 31, 1938 



Remaining Dec. 31, 1937 
Admitted 

Treated 
Discharged 

Remaining Dec. 31, 1938 

Capacity 

Daily Occupancy 

Hospital Days 



27 Operations 

'22 Surgical 

Orthopedic 

749 Throat 

715 



34 



60 Deaths 
35 Autopsies 
12937 Percentage of Autopsies 



30 
17 

47 



107 
84 

79% 



STATISTICAL REPORT— IN-PATIENT 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

For the year ended December 31, 1939 









Pri. 


Pub. 


T. 










Remaining Dec. 


31, 


1938 


26 


142 


168 










Admitted 






1780 


3777 


5557 










Treated 






1806 


3919 


5725 










Discharged 






1780 


3760 


5540 










Remaining Dec. 


31, 


1939 


26 


159 


185 








Daily 










Admissions 




Bed 


' Capacity 


Bed Occupancy 








Pri. 


Pub. 


T. 


Pri. 


Pub. 


Total 


Pri. Pub. Total 


Medical 






670 


876 


1546 


10 


44 


54 


12 37 , 49 


Surgical 






286 


1373 


1659 


10 


66 


76 


8 54 62 


Orthopedic 






54 


360 


414 


10 


47 


57 


2 36 38 


Throat 






731 


890 


1621 


12 


31 


43 


7 15 22 


Neurological 






18 


190 


208 


-0- 


*15 


15 


1 8 9 


Isolation 






21 


88 


109 


-0- 


*38 


38 


1 4, 5 



1780 3777 5557 42 241 283 



31 154 185 















Deaths and 


t 




Hospital Days 




Operations 




Autopsies 






Pri. Pub. T. 


Pri. 


Pub. 


Total 


Pri. 
D A 


Pub. 
D A 


Total 
D A 


Medical 


4430 13533 17963 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


8 5 


28 19 


36 24 


Surgical 


2923 19613 22536 


298 


1273 


1571 


- - 


62 51 


62 51 


Orthopedic 


667 13218 13885 


51 


342 


393 


- - 


3 2 


3 2 


Throat 


2577 5544 8121 


716 


883 


1599 


2 1 


5 4 


7 5 


Neurological 


153 3028 3181 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


- - 


3 1 


3 1 


Isolation 


317 1635 1952 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


— — 


5 2 


5 2 



11067 56571 67638 1065 2498 3563 10 6 106 79 116 85 



Percentage of Autopsies 60% 75% 73% 

"Interchangeable — Public and Private 
Isolation Wards Closed May 10 to Nov. 28 



Bader Ward Closed June 28 to Sept. 5. 



18 



V 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

THE INFANTS' HOSPITAL 

For the year ended December 31, 1939 



Remaining Dec. 31, 1938 
Admitted 

Treated 
Discharged 


34 

755 

789 

757 


Operations 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Throat 

Deaths 

Autopsies 

Percentage of Autopsies 


36 
2 

17 


Remaining Dec. 31, 1939 


32 


55 


Capacity 

Daily Occupancy 

Hospital Days 


60 

36 

12960 


118 

96 

81% 



STATISTICAL REPORT— OUT-PATIENT 



For the year ended December 31, 1938 



Clinic 

Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature 

Infantile Paralysis 

Throat 

Muscle Training 

Lamp 

Dental 



Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature 

Infantile Paralysis 

Throat 

Muscle Training 

Lamp 

Dental 









Total 


Free 


Part Rate 


Full Rate 


Visits 


8067 


2208 


17625 


27900 


4480 


855 


7479 


12814 


3019 


556 


5735 


9310 


810 


174 


1120 


2104 


4379 


-0- 


-0- 


4379 


1324 


250 


2057 


3631 


2219 


324 


1295 


3838 


5 


-0- 


8 


13 


156 


175 
4542 


60 


391 


24459 


35379 


64380 






Total 


New Cases 


Transfers 


Old Cases 


Visits 


4935 


716 


22249 


27900 


1938 


720 


10156 


12814 


877 


415 


8018 


9310 


14 


113 


1977 


2104 


62 


-0- 


4317 


4379 


322 


763 


2546 


3631 


7 


38 


3793 


3838 


-0- 


4 


9 


13 


-0- 


7 
2776 


384 


391 


8155 


53449 


64380 



19 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Emergencies 








Medical 


125 


Total Number of Individuals 


17581 


Surgical 


812 


Daily Av. No. of New Cases 


27 


Orthopedic 


108 


Daily Av. No. of Total Visits 


213 


Throat 


195 


Minor Operations 


976 



1240 



STATISTICAL REPORT— OUT-PATIENT 

For the year ended December 31, 1939 



Clinic 

Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature 

Infantile Paralysis 

Throat 

Muscle Training 

Lamp 

Dental 









Total 


Free 


Part Rate 


Full Rate 


Visits 


7503 


3087 


16541 


27131 


4340 


1285 


7800 


13425 


2900 


905 


5529 


9334 


852 


190 


1255 


2297 


3718 


-0- 


-0- 


3718 


1139 


370 


1854 


3363 


1741 


213 


1391 


3345 


29 


-0- 


-0- 


29 


267 


10 


139 


416 



Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature 

Infantile Paralysis 

Throat 

Muscle Training 

Lamp 

Dental 



22489 


6060 


34509 


63058 








, Total 


New Cases 


Transfers 


Old Cases 


Visits 


4570 


783 


21778 


27131 


2269 


838 


10318 


13425 


989 


541 


7804 


9334 


11 


104 


2194 


2309 


42 


-0- 


3676 


3718 


286 


710 


2367 


3363 


11 


39 


3283 


3333 


-0- 


-0- 


29 


29 


-0- 


3 
3018 


413 


416 


8178 


51862 


63058 



Emergencies 








Medical 


211 


Total Number of Individuals 


17772 


Surgical 


974 


Daily Av. No. of New Cases 


27 


Orthopedic 


71 


Daily Av. No. of Total Visits 


208 


Throat 


267 


Minor Operations 


840 



1523 



20 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



s 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Balance Sheet as of December 31, 1938 

ASSETS 
Current Assets: 

Cash in bank and on hand $59,187.93 

Accounts receivable 12,018.18 

Infants' Hospital, balance on share of 

operating costs 5,059.58 

Accrued interest and dividends 36,973.85 

Materials and supplies on hand 25,105.89 

Prepaid expenses 2,770.45 

Investment Securities: 

General fund investments 2,515,577.80 

Restricted Fund investments 1,487,212.46 

Other Investment Property: 

Real estate 458,750.00 

Mortgages receivable 63,000.00 

Plant and Equipment: 

Land 211,128.03 

Hospital buildings 1,813,332.35 

Dormitory property 883,116.19 

Furniture, equipment and improvements 

(depreciated value) 35,701.20 

Total Assets 

LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Liabilities: 

Accounts payable (current bills) 18,916.53 

Credit balances, accounts receivable.. . . 1,440.74 

School of Nursing, tuitions unearned. . . 3,412.56 

Capital: 

General Fund 6,074,772.25 

Restricted Investment Funds 1,493,606.56 

Temporary Special Funds 16,785.27 

Total Liabilities and Capital 

21 



$141,115.88 



4,002,790.26 



521,750.00 



2,943,277.77 
$7,608,933.91 



23,769.83 



7,585,164.08 
$7,608,933.91 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Balance Sheet as of December 31, 1939 

ASSETS 
Current Assets: 

Cash in bank and on hand $57,568.60 

Accounts Receivable 18,333.90 

Infants' Hospital, balance on share of 

operating costs 11,518.13 

Accrued Interest and dividends 41,034.81 

Materials and Supplies on hand 24,288.22 

Prepaid expenses 2,205.98 

Investment Securities: 

General Fund investments 2,655,313.24 

Restricted Fund investments 1,506,977.19 

Other Investment Property: 

Real Estate 458,750.00 

Mortgages Receivable 63,000.00 

Plant and Equipment: 

Land 211,128.03 

Hospital buildings 1,813,332.35 

Dormitory property 883,116.19 

Furniture, equipment and improvements 

(depreciated value) 38,429.29 

Total Assets 

LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 
Liabilities: 

Accounts payable (current bills) 18,386.13 

Credit balances, accts. receiv 1,755.20 

School of Nursing, tuitions unearned. . . 3,561.24 

Capital: 

General Fund 6,228,219.93 

Restricted Investment Funds 1,513,884.95 

Temporary Special Funds 19,188.48 

Total Liabilities and Capital 

22 



$154,949.64 



4,162,290.43 



521,750.00 



2,946,005.86 
$7,784,995.93 



23,702.57 



7,761,293.36 
$7,784,995.93 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 

For the Year 7938 
Income: 

Hospital revenue $250,923.94 

Income from investments 179,242.79 

Donations and subscriptions 81,474.05 

Subscriptions through Welfare Commit- 
tee (net) 12,809.55 

Miscellaneous Income 17,264.30 

Total Income $541,714.63 

Expenses: 

Operation of Hospital 578,097.85 

Taxes 474.95 

Publicity 1,850.17 

Treasurer's office (financial matters). . . 4,700.56 

Miscellaneous 3,047.93 

Total Expenses 588,171.46 

Operating Deficit $46,456.83 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 

For the Year 1939 
Income: 

Hospital revenue $281,176.32 

Income from investments 199,808.67 

Donations and Subscriptions 74,053.60 

Subscriptions through Welfare Commit- 
tee (net) 9,332.55 

Miscellaneous income 15,762.62 

Total Income $580,133.76 

Expenses: 

Operation of Hospital 592,764.59 

Taxes 458.85 

Publicity 955.30 

Treasurers' Office (financial matters) . . . 5,423.16 

Miscellaneous 5,158.69 

Total Expenses 604,760.59 

Operating Deficit 24,626.83 

23 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

LEGACIES AND GIFTS FOR INVESTMENT 

Received during igj8 

FOR GENERAL FUND 

LEGACIES 

Estate of 

Gordon Abbott $10,000.00 

Jay Abrams 250.00 

Bemis Library Trust (add'l) 50,000.00 

Martha L. C. Berry (add'l) 250.00 

George H. Burgess 16,716.06 

Lucy H. Eaton 500.00 

George Baldwin French (add'l) 6,000.00 

Ida C. Gilbreth (add'l) 17.00 

John C. Hatch 364.93 

Agnes M. Lindsay 5,000.00 

Carrie Etta Sillaway 5,729.89 

$94,827.88 

FOR RESTRICTED INVESTMENT FUND 

Estate of 

Sara H. Barnet "Ann Barnet Fund" $2,500.00 

Helen Sewell Briggs 7,961.67 

Katherine Dutton 811.73 

Elise Fay Loeffler "Temple R. Fay Fund" 40,282.50 

$51,555.90 



Income of Funds Added to Principal of Said Funds — 
In Accordance with Wording of Deed of Gift — 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund $292.98 

Horace A. Latimer Fund 778.58 

Esther Andrews Solby Fund 37.71 

Elizabeth C. Ware Fund 293.12 

$1,402.39 



LEGACIES AND GIFTS FOR INVESTMENT 

Received during 1939 

FOR GENERAL FUND 

LEGACIES 

Estate of 

James Henry Anderson $28,303.92 

Helen C. Butterfield (add'l) 303.84 

24 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Emery Francis Close 1,000.00 

Alice E. Cochran 100.00 

Mary F. Drown (add'l) 2.27 

Mary Agnes Eaton (add'l) 657.04 

Grace M. Edwards 25,000.00 

Mildred Johnson (add'l) 400.00 

Clement G. Kelsey 1,010.68 

Harriet R. G. Mullaly 15,817.36 

Isabelle G. Neal (add'l) 5,820.41 

Edward J. O'Connell 250.00 

Dudley L. Pickman . , 5,000.00 

Nellie M. Seavy 5,715.16 

Anne Spooner . . 7,500.00 

Francis Welch 15,000.00 

Gifts 

Bemis Library Trust (additional) 50,000.00 

$161,880.68 



FOR RESTRICTED INVESTMENT FUND 

Estate of 

Sara H. Barnet "Ann Barnet Fund" (additional) $2,500.00 

Mabel C. Davis "Clara S. Davis Fund" 12,500.00 

Gifts 
William E. Ladd Chair of Pediatric Surgery 

Mrs. Louis F. S. Bader $1,000 

Mr. Louis F. S. Bader 1,000 

James Dean 1 00 

Sarah Elizabeth Fenno 1,000 

Mrs. Richard Saltonstall 500 



3,600.00 

Edythe Marshall Fund 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene G. Kraetzer, Jr. . . 50.00 

$18,650.00 

Income of Funds Added to Principal of Said Funds 
In Accordance with Wording of Deed of Gift 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund $315.71 

Horace A. Latimer Fund 839.00 

Esther Andrews Solby Fund . 360.90 

(Portion of income transferred to temporary 

fund for cost of transportation of patients) . . 200.00 

. 160.90 

Elizabeth C. Ware Fund 312.78 



$1,628.39 



25 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

OTHER SPECIAL PURPOSE GIFTS 1938 

Previous Jan. 1, 1939 

Unexpended Received Expended Expended 

Apparatus (special) Neuro- Balance 1938 1938 Balance 

logical Dept $307.67 $150.00 $103.35 $354.32 

Boston Counci lof Social Agen- 
cies— Medical Relief Fund 102.78 139.28 134.25 107.81 

Children's Pleasure and Em- 
ergency Fund 8.15 8.15 

Committee of the Permanent 

Charity Fund .43 610.00 562.46 47.97 

Dental Research Fund 107.93 107.93 

Dickens Fellowship Tiny Tim 

Fund 38.10 40.00 44.42 33.68 

Furniture (special) for Ward V 33.60 33.60 

Holiday Parties 105.00 105.00 

Infantile Paralysis — Presi- 
dent's Birthday Ball 1,242.57 1,242.57 

Light Fund 41.92 41.92 

Mangle Fund— Community 

Federation 2,666.00 2,666.00 

McKhann, Emily Priest 30.81 2.39 28.42 

New Bed Fund 60.00 60.00 

Occupational Therapy Fund 50.00 50.00 

Orthopedic Ward Beds 114.55 114.55 

Orthodontia Equipment Fund 3,540.00 152.00 3,528.87 163.13 

Physiotherapy Fund 50.00 ' 50.00 

Pierce, Henrietta M. Pleasure 

Fund 390.26 198.75 257.16 331.85 

Pleasure Fund 160.00 26.15 117.20 68.95 

Prouty, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis 

I. Gift 11,250.00 11,250.00 

Research in Children's Sur- 
gery Godfrey M. Hyams 

Fund 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Rollins, Adelaide H., Splint 

Fund 276.96 42.89 319.85 

Shuman Clothing Fund 93.51 39.75 114.16 19.10 

Katharine E. Silsbee Fund 

for Splints 910.65 998.50 1,909.15 

Solby, Esther Andrews Taxi 

Fund 72.07 200.00 259.04 13.03 

Surgical Dept. Fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Tuberculosis, Research in. . . 215.00 200.00 415.00 

Wheel Chair Fund 25.00 25.00 

Zonta Club for Occupational 

Therapy 131.18 220.00 312.90 38.28 

Total $8,769.99 $22,271.47 $12,376.99 $18,664.47 

26 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



OTHER SPECIAL PURPOSE GIFTS 1939 

Previous Jan. 1, 1940 

Unexpended Received Expended Unexpended 

Balance 1939 1939 Balance 

Apparatus (special) Neurolo- 
gical Dept $354.32 $67.11 $287.21 

Boston Council of Social Agen- 
cies— Med. Relief Fd 107.81 $160.99 203.70 65.10 

Committee of the Permanent 

Charity Fund 47.97 613.95 526.16 135.76 

Dental Research Fund ... 107.93 107.93 

Dickens Fellowship Tiny Tim 

Fund 33.68 50.00 5.50 78.18 

Harwood, Mary Louise Fund. 849.65 804.93 44.72 

Infantile Paralysis President's 
Birthday Ball 1,000.00 692.65 307.35 

Library Fund 631.25 431.00 354.01 708.24 

McKhann, Emily Priest 28.42 28.42 

Occupational Therapy Fund . 50.00 50.00 

Orthodontia Equipment Fund 163.13 99.47 63.66 

Pathology Fund 400.00 26.43 373.57 

Physiotherapy Fund 50.00 50.00 

Pierce, Henrietta M. Pleasure 

Fund 331.85 210.00 188.84 353.01 

Pleasure Fund 68.95 96.50 160.70 4.75 

Prouty, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis I. 
Gift 11,250.00 11,250.00 

Research in Children's Sur- 
gery, Godfrey M. Hymans 
Fund 5,000.00 1,407.87 3,592.13 

Rollins, Adelaide H. Splint 

Fund 45.32 45.32 

Shuman Clothing Fund 19.10 42.00 61.10 

Katharine E. Silsbee Fund for 

splints 1,050.00 700.04 349.96 

Social Service Florence Night- 
ingale Assoc. Fund 40.00 40.00 

Solby, Esther Andrews Taxi 

Fund 13.03 200.00 168.07 44.96 

Surgical Dept. Fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Wheel Chair Fund 45.00 41.85 3.15 

Zonta Club for Occupational 

Therapy 38.28 295.00 218.53 114.75 

Total $19,295.72 5,529.41 5,665.86 19,159.27 



27 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



GIFTS TOWARDS CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL DAYS 

A donation of $1,000 carries with it the privilege of dedicating the 
services of the whole Hospital for one day. 

A donation of $100 gives the same privilege for one Ward for one 
day. 



Inscription 

December 23rd 

The service of this Ward is given 

in loving memory of 

Arthur T. Bradlee 

January 1st 
The service of this Ward is given 
in loving memory of 
A. F. R. 



Donor 



Mrs. Arthur T. Bradlee 



Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 



DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 

The Hospital is deeply and sincerely indebted to the 1,410 individuals 
and 270 organizations and clubs who contributed $83,386.15 towards 
the running expenses in 1939, some making their contributions direct 
to this Hospital and many kindly designating for the benefit of , this 
Hospital part of their contributions to the Community Federation of 
Boston, of which this Hospital is one of the participating charities. 



RESTRICTED INVESTMENT FUNDS 

1869 to December 31, 1939 

Bader Building, Third Floor Completion $3,208.17 

Charles Tidd Baker 15,349.66 

Ida Chase Baker 60,000.00 

Ann Barnet 5,000.00 

Alanson Bigelow 5,000.00 

Laura A. Brown 9,957.05 

Helen SeweU Briggs 63,878.93 

Helen G. Coburn 49,900.50 

CosteUo C. Converse 25,000.00 

Mary A. Coombs 17,844.04 

Marian Frances and Sarah Winter Coppenhagen 5,000.00 

Susie Dodge Crawford 5,000.00 

Harriet Otis Cruft 20,000.00 

28 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Lilla Sargent Cunningham 5,000.00 

Clara S. Davis 12,500.00 

Caroline T. Downes 51,314.00 

Charles H. Draper 23,934.12 

Eliza J. Bell Draper 1,000.00 

Eugene F. Farnham 5,104.00 

Temple R. Fay 69,532.50 

Marjorie Forbes 5,000.00 

Thomas A. Forsyth 2,000.00 

Amelia Greenbaum 48,175.97 

Robert Millholland Hanna, Jr 5,000.00 

Henry C. Haven 5,000.00 

Charles Hayden Foundation 3,000.00 

William H. Hervey : 11,821.97 

William Hilton. . 10,000.00 

Mary S. Holbrook. . . . 15,465.42 

Charles W. Holzer 41,666.67 

George S. Hyde 8,625.88 

Henry Clay Jackson 35,000.00 

Charles P. Jaynes 11,447.00 

Mrs. Jerome Jones , 9,935.95 

John D. W. Joy 5,000.00 

Claude L. Kettle 5,000.00 

Kate Andrea Knowlton 2,245.00 

William E. Ladd Chair of Pediatric Surgery 3,600.00 

Horace A. Latimer 40,791.53 

Madeleine Lee, In memory of 5,000.00 

Joseph W. Leighton 12,000.00 

Maria D. Lockwood Trust 5,109.27 

Mrs. Edythe Marshall , 2,250.00 

James C. Melvin 49,251.25 

James C. Melvin, Jr 5,000.00 

Margaret A. and John Merriam 6,000.00 

Alice Appleton Meyer 1,500.00 

Kate M. Morse 15,000.00 

Mary E. Moseley 4,250.00 

Albert H. and Margaret Ann Munsell 21,105.32 

Albert N. Parlin 50,000.00 

Amy Peabody 50,000.00 

Henry G. Pickering 4,969.56 

Henrietta M. Pierce 5,000.00 

Grace Winthrop Rives, In memory of 50,000.00 

Adelaide H. Rollins, Splint 1,079.11 

Frank Davison Rust, Memorial No. 1 6,200.00 

Frank Davison Rust, Memorial No. 2 4,000.00 

Sarah Gardner Sears 5,000.00 

Elizabeth G. Shepard 3,100.00 

A. Shuman, Clothing 1,000.00 

29 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Katharine E. Silsbee 25,000.00 

Esther Andrews Solby 6,178.82 

Harriet W. Taber 2,584.48 

Helen Hallett Thompson 10,363.15 

John Parker Townsend 3,000.00 

Elizabeth C. Ware 30,101.80 

Elizabeth White 100,000.00 

Mabel Wilbur 5,000.00 

Edwin A. Wyeth 50,000.00 

Charles Loring Young 5,000.00 

Unnamed restricted funds 247,543.83 



Total $1,513,884.95 



GIFTS TO ESTABLISH MEMORIALS 

Endowed Beds 

By vote of the Board of Managers, and until further action by the 

Board, a gift of $25,000 will endow a bed. 

MEMORIALS 

Following a recommendation of the Staff, the Managers decided to 
remove all memorial tablets from the walls of the wards, and place them 
in the future on a panel over the nurses' station of each ward, or else- 
where, and, accordingly, it was voted that in the future a donor of 
$1,000 has a right to place a memorial for a five-year period on the 
memorial panel. 

Two Memorials 
Frances Adele Close 
Hattie Adele Close 

One Memorial 

Lotta M. Crab tree Bed 

From the Trustees, Lotta M. Crabtree Estate 

One Memorial 

Catherine Smith 

"In memory of my mother" 

30 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

One Memorial 
"In memory of Mary Hutchins Taft 
from her son, Charles, September, 1938" 

One Memorial 
"In memory of Adelaide Augusta Thomas" 

A complete list of memorials follows: 
MEMORIALS 

To December 31, 1939 

WARD 1, LOWER A 

Prouty Ward 
In memory of Anne and Olivia Prouty, 1917, 1921 



WARD 1, LOWER B 



Henry Augustus Turner Memorial Bed 

Mabel C. Chester, Brookline, Mass. She 
filled her niche, laughed often and 
loved much. 1865-1921 

Donated by Caroline Shapera. In lov- 
ing memory of her son, H. Clarence 
Shapera, Quebec, Canada, 1881-1891 

In memory of Charles Henry Pierce 

Abigail M. Curran, 1924 

Ellen L. Doe 

Gertrude Gouverneur Hunnewell. Born 
February 3, 1862. Died March 15, 
1890 

George F. Kimball Cot 

Francis Welles Hunnewell. Born Nov- 
ember 3, 1838. Died September 30, 
1917 

President of The Children's Hospital 
1901-1917 

In Loving Memory of Ruth Faxon 



In Loving Memory of Wallace L. Pierce 

In Memory of Sullivan Amory, Febru- 
ary 22, 1878-May 5, 1881 

In Loving Memory of Philip Leverett 
Saltonstall, Jr., April 17, 1922- 
April 8, 1925 

James Henry Williams, 1843-1908 

Presented by the Massachusetts Child- 
ren of the American Revolution in 
Memory of their National Founder, 
Harriet M. Lothrop 

In Loving Memory, Robert Pearce 
Williams, Aetat. 13 years, 1907 

Annie Louise Richards Bed 

In Memory of Mrs. Ida Chase Baker, 
Benefactress of this Institution 

Robert Louis Stevenson 

Carrie Elizabeth Tyer, 1883-1885 
(Sun Parlor) 



WARD 1, UPPER 



Maria Frances Coppenhagen 
Sarah Winter Coppenhagen 
Florence Dean Curtis 
Jessie Preston Draper 
Margaret Constance Ellis 
In Loving Memory of 

Alice M. C. Matthews 
Susan Wells Preston 
Sara P. Lowell Blake 
Florence Cobb Brooks, 1912-1918 
Rosamond Freeman 
Theresa Pierce 
Bertha F. Taylor 
Harriet Elizabeth Pierce Wood 



Ellen Richards Slater 
In Loving Memory of 

Hazel Mills Angevine 
Madeleine Rich Bed 
From the Ethel Maud Clapp Memorial 

Fund (Isolation Room) 
Massachusetts State Federation 

of Women's Clubs 
Irene Wood Memorial Bed 
In Memory of Clara 
Elizabeth G. Shepard 
Maria P. Bowen Memorial Bed 
In Memory of Hope Clement, 1875- 

1899 (Sun Parlor) 



31 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



IDA C. SMITH WARD 
MEMORIAL CUBICLES 



In Memory of Robert C. Morse 

In Memory of Alice Mary Longfellow 

1850-1928 
Gift of Gloria Grant Brown 
In Memory of Catherine A. Fairbanks 
In Loving Memory of Janet Dyas 

Shearer 
In Memory of Harriet Atherton Bubier 

Bergman 

MEMORIAL ROOM 



Brookline Woman's Club — 1929 
Given in Memory of Her Father 

William H. Sands by his daughter 

Ethel 
In Loving Memory of James Woolsen 

Hurlbut 
In Memroy of Marie Agassiz Pelton 

(2 cubicles) 



In Loving Memory Mary Pauline Du Pont 
WARD 2 



In Tender Memory of Lois Dorman 

Russel. A Beloved Little Child 
Abigail P. Banchor 
Boston Section Council of Jewish 

Women 
Women of Somerville, 1 922 
Donated by The Ladies' Dog Club, 1924 
Gift of Dorchester Club Women, 1921 
In Loving Memory of Ralph Hudson 

Crocker, 1916 
In Memory of Katy Lucy Walsh, 

Benefactress of this Hospital 
In Loving Memory of Gail Gorham 

Whitcomb, May 2, 1920 
Children of Eliza James Bell Draper 
Cora Belle Towle, K. T. A., E. A., G. A. 
In Memory of Adelaide Augusta 

Thomas 



Charles A. Chapman 

In Memory of Annie T. Auerbach. Born 

in Philadelphia, Pa., May 3, 1851. 

Died in Brookline, Mass., August 1, 

1916 
Ruth E. Martin 
Herbert Billings Rose. Born January 2 1 , 

1912. Died June 26, 1917. Aged 5 

years, 5 months and 5 days 
Carlos Wilson Bed 
Chestnut Hill, 1923 
In Memory of Willard Smith Curtis, 

1920 
The Amaranth Literary Circle 
Martha Higginson Barbour 
Gift of Dorchester Club Women, 1922 
Catherine Smith "In Memory of My 

Mother" 



WARD 4 



Brookline Woman's Club 

Kent Pettingill 

Livingston Wadsworth 

Brookline, 1923 

In Loving Memory of Charles Dalton, 

April 18, 1905-April 2, 1910 
In Loving Memory of William Gray, 

May 2, 1906, September 22, 1909 
Donated by the Swedish Women 

of Greater Boston, 1922 
Catholic Women of Boston 
In Memory of Charlotte Lowell 

August 23, 1918-March 5, 1927 
In Memory of 

Bessie Rochester Edwards 
Bessie Rochester Edwards 
First President Past President Parley 
Massachusetts Maine Daughters, 

February, 1922 



Dorothy Quincy Cot 

Rachel Tower Tarbell 

Wellesley Hills Woman's Club Bed, 

1921 
Brookline Aid 
In Memory of Edward Jerome Hitch- 

ings 
Lotta M. Crabtree Bed 
In Loving Memory of Dorothy Win- 

throp. July 17, 1878-July 23, 1907 
Sarah Wyman Whitman — Lily Bed 
In Memory of Mary Devlin, born in 

Ireland, 1831, died in Salem 1894 
In Memory of 

Bessie Porter Edwards 
Southborough Woman's Club, 1934 
In Memory of Marjorie Forbes 



32 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



WARD 5, LOWER A 



This Ward is named in memory of Elizabeth White, beloved mother of George 
Robert White, A Public Spirited Citizen of Boston, who died January 27, 1922, 
and by his will, among other generous bequests for the welfare of the City, gave 
liberally towards the support of this Hospital. 



WARD 5, LOWER B 



To the Memory of Stephen Wheatland 
In Memory of Edward Ellery 

Knowlton 
In Loving Memory of 

Herman John Huidekoper 
James C. Melvin, Jr. 
Francis Skinner 

Harriet M. Billings Memorial Bed 
Charles Dickens, 1812-1870 
Albert H. Munsell 
Charles Loring Young, President of the 

Children's Hospital, 1896-1901. 
Frances Adele Close 
In Memory of Mary Hutchins Taft 

from her son, Charles, September, 

1938 



Robert Millholland Hanna, Jr. 

In Loving Memory of Agnes Hosmer, 
November 17, 1901 -August 15, 1914 

In memory of William F. Resor 

Given in Memory of her mother, 
F. Josephine Sands, by her 
daughter Ethel 

In Memory of John White Hallowell, 
1878-1927, Manager of this Hospital, 
1924-1927 

Mary E. Moseley 

Hattie Adele Close 

Richardson Bed In Memory of Fred- 
erick and Arthur Richardson 



WARD 5, UPPER 



Julia H. Appleton Memorial Bed 

Frances Todd Baldwin 

Selina Jarvie Fletcher 

Ellen Maria Pierce 

Mary Ellen Putnam, 
July 21, 1862-May 21, 1866 

Sarah Eliza Thacher Cot 

Louise Julia Tucker, In Loving Mem- 
ory, April 25, 1882 

Neurological Bed, 1924, donated through 
Mary E. Trainor 



In Loving Memory of Lothrop Melcher, 

in the interest of Neurology 
Sarah Wyman Whitman — Lily Bed 
Margaret Ann Munsell 
In Memory of Anna Goodwin Tuttle 
In Memory of Louise Shearer Butler 
In Memory of Jack Marvin 
Frank Seaver Billings Memorial Bed 
Louis Bridgman Memorial Bed 
In Very Loving Memory of 
S. Parker Bremer (Sun Parlor) 



DONATIONS TOWARDS SUBSCRIPTION BEDS 
AND C. H. CLUB BEDS 1938 

A donation of $100.00 towards a Subscription Bed or a C. H. Club 
Bed gives for one year to the donor the right to nominate one person 
at a time to one of such Beds, subject to the rules and regulations of the 

Hospital. ,, . 

JSumber 

of Beds 
Ames, Mrs. John S. and Mrs. Hobart (for use of North Easton District 

Nursing Association) 1 

Bradley, Mrs. J. D. Cameron 1 

Buzzards Bay C. H. Club "In memory of Mrs. N. Penrose Hallowell, 

Sr." ' 7 

33 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Daffodill C. H. Club 5 

Donald, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm 1 

Duxbury C. H. Club, "Rosalind Harwood Bed 1895-1903" 1 

Hunnewell, Mrs. Henry S 1 

Hunnewell, James M 1 

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 1 

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. George H., Jr., "In memory of M. C. Cunningham" 1 

Lothrop, Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. "Cora Belle Towle Bed" 1 

Manchester C. H. Club 5 

Marblehead C. H. Club 1 

Prout, Mr. and Mrs. Henry B., "In memory of Henry Byrd Prout, Jr." 1 

Ratchesky, A. C. Charity Foundation 5 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Robert 1 

Swampscott, C. H. Club 4 

Sewing Circle of 1919 2 

Thorp, Miss Alice A 1 

Warren, Mr. and Mrs. Bayard 1 

Weston, C. H. Club 1 

Total number of beds 43 



DONATIONS TOWARDS SUBSCRIPTION BEDS 

AND C. H. CLUB BEDS 1939 

Number 
' of Beds 
Ames, Mrs. John S. and Mrs. Hobart (for use of North Easton District 

Nursing Association) 1 

Bradley, Mrs. J. D. Cameron 1 

Buzzards Bay C. H. Club 6 

Daffodill C. H. Club 3 

Donald, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm 1 

Hunnewell, Mrs. Henry S 1 

Hunnewell, James M 1 

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 1 

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. George H. Jr., "In memory of M. C. Cunningham" 1 

Lothrop, Mr. and Mrs. Francis B. "Cora Belle Towle Bed" 1 

Manchester C. H. Club 3 

Marblehead C. H. Club 3 

Ratshesky, A. C. Charity Foundation 5 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Robert 1 

Swampscott, C. H. Club 5 

Thorp, Miss Alice A 1 

Warren, Mr. and Mrs. Bayard 1 

Total number of beds 36 

34 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



CERTIFICATE OF AUDITORS 

To the Officers and Board of Managers 
of The Children's Hospital: 

We have made an examination of the accounts and records of The Children's 
Hospital for the year ended December 31, 1939. 

We have satisfied ourselves that all recorded cash receipts were deposited 
in banks and that all disbursements were properly authorized and supported 
by cancelled checks and/or by vouchers or other evidences of payment. We 
have verified the balances of cash on hand by certificates from the bank and 
by actual count. 

We have inspected the securities held in the general and restricted funds 
and have seen that all transactions during the year pertaining thereto were 
properly recorded and that all collectible income therefrom was accounted for. 
The securities are generally carried at cost, or in the case of bequests, at market 
or assigned values at the date of acquisition. 

In our opinion, based upon such examination and subject to the qualifica- 
tion that securities are shown at book value which is higher than market value, 
the accompanying statements of assets and liabilities and of income and ex- 
pense fairly present the financial condition of the Hospital at December 31, 
1939, and the results of its operations for the year then ended, in conformity 
with generally accepted accounting principles applied on a basis consistent 
with that of the preceding year. 

(Signed) Charles F. Rittenhouse & Co. 

Certified Public Accountants 

Boston, Massachusetts. 
February 23, 1940 



35 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SERVICE 

Since its inception in 1869, the Children's Hospital of Boston has 
never faltered in "poor" times as well as in "good" times in providing 
the best of medical, surgical and nursing care for children. This, in 
addition to recognition for its research and teaching activities has ad- 
vanced the institution to its present eminent position among pediatric 
hospitals. Though these be "troublous" times it must not falter now 
when the opportunity for reducing the morbidity and mortality of 
diseases in children is greater than ever before in the history of medicine. 

Our responsibility in this new era is greater than heretofore because 
of the new means of preventing disease and the rapidly increasing array 
of remedies which are so specific for particular disease. For instance 
by means of sulfanilamide the ravages of disorders caused by the strep- 
tococcus, the meningococcus, the colon bacillus, and other organisms 
can now be effectively minimized. Within recent months another new 
drug — sulfapyridine — has been discovered. This chemo-therapeutic 
substance so far gives promise of being specific in its action against cer- 
tain strains of pneumococcus— one of the causative agents in pneu- 
monia — in meningitis, in pyelitis and other forms of illness so often 
fatal or seriously handicapping to children. 

However, the treatment of disease by such highly potent chemical 
drugs requires experienced care in order that they may do what they 
purport to do without causing toxic reactions. The type of infecting 
organism must be determined in the Bacteriology Laboratory; the 
proper dosage must be checked in the Chemistry Laboratory and early 
evidences of toxic reactions may be found in the Hematology Labora- 
tory. The efficiency and mode of action of these new remedies are 
being constantly studied here for the prime objective of the Hospital 
has always been to offer to the patients entrusted to its care, the in- 
creasing benefits derived from recently acquired knowledge, newer 
diagnostic technics and special skill in various fields. An equally im- 
portant service is rendered by the Children's Hospital to the children 
in the community through the large staff of practicing physicians who 
by their contact with the activities going on in the Hospital may keep 
abreast of the new approaches to the prevention and treatment of 
disease. 

An idea as to the burden of the work which falls upon the medical 
and nursing staffs concerned with the daily work of the Medical 
Division of the Children's Hospital may be gained from the number of 

. 36 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

children treated in the past two years. During 1938, in the public 
wards, including the Isolation and Neurological units, there were 1091 
patients, a number closely approximating that for 1937. In the Medical 
Out-Patient Department there was a total of 27,900 visits — or over 1500 
more than in 1937. During 1939, there were 1,154 patients admitted 
to the public wards, and a total of 27,131 visits were made to the Medi- 
cal Out-Patient Department. 

In the Isolation Unit (open December to May) 168 patients were 
admitted in the years 1938 and 1939 as against 201 in the years 1936 
and 1937. This decline in admissions reflects the change in the in- 
cidence of communicable diseases during these years, which was noted 
in all hospitals accepting patients with such diseases. It is interesting 
that there was a fifty per cent increase in the number of private patients 
in 1938 as compared with the preceding year, in spite of the decline in 
total number of cases. A similar increase in the number of operations 
performed in the Unit took place. The question might well be raised 
as to the desirability of making the service afforded by the Isolation 
Unit more flexible so that instead of having the Unit open at certain 
months, it would be possible to open it when the demand for care of 
patients with communicable diseases appears. 

For a long time pediatricians have been trying to solve mental and 
social problems of children and at the same time not lose sight of the 
need for continuous attention to concomitant physical disease. Dr. 
Crothers and his associates, pioneers in this field, have demonstrated 
that proper appraisal of such problems requires cooperative study by 
experts trained in neurology, psychology, social science and education, 
as well as in pediatrics and nursing. Frequently, children as well as 
parents are insured happy lives from the application of the findings of 
such a group of investigators in the solution of their difficult personal 
and social problems. 

Furthermore, while the physical effects of diseases such as typhoid, 
scarlet fever, meningitis, rheumatic fever, etcetera, and recovery from 
them, are readily apparent, the disturbing influence on the mind is not 
so obvious. Dr. Elizabeth E. Lord, Research Associate in Pediatrics, 
and Psychologist to the Hospital for the past ten years, has produced 
convincing evidence that restoration to normal mental health and de- 
velopment may lag as much as two years behind physical recovery. 
The practical importance of this lies in the assistance which this factor 
provides in defining the problems of convalescence, so that undue 
strain may not be placed on the mind as well as the body of a growing 

37 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

child recovering from an illness. This program, having to do with 
Mental Hygiene, has been made possible through a generous grant 
from the Commonwealth Fund which is interested in determining the 
part the pediatrician should play in the social and psychological as- 
pects of medicine. Naturally, now that this type of service is acknowl- 
edged as a most important part of medical care and also has become an 
integral part of the plan for research and teaching, we must look for 
other support so that this aspect of medical care may be maintained, 
if and when this philanthropic gift is liquidated. 

In this connection it is of more than passing interest to mention the 
part which the Wellesley Convalescent Home of the Children's Hospi- 
tal plays in providing medical care for so many of the Hospital patients 
who require longer periods of study and closer supervision than is pos- 
sible in the home. Since 1936 the patients referred from the Children's 
Hospital have been under the constant care of a resident and a visiting 
physician supported by the Home. The resident, by working part time 
in the medical clinic, has a better opportunity to know the problems 
of the children subsequently to be transferred to the Convalescent Home 
and to refer back to the wards those patients requiring further hospital 
study and observation. Exchange visits made to the Convalescent 
Home by the members of the Hospital staff have done much to bring 
about closer cooperation between the two institutions. Through such 
visits our physicians are able to learn more about the problems of con- 
valescence and to observe their little friends for a longer time. 

This arrangement with the Wellesley Convalescent Home, besides 
affording the best of medical and nursing care to the children before 
they return to their activities at home is an economic advantage to 
the Children's Hospital. In 1938 there were 472 patients at the Home 
at a daily cost of $2.30 per patient, — 279 of these children were ad- 
mitted from the Children's Hospital, or in other words 59.11 per cent 
of the total admissions. Of these children 144 or 48.03 per cent were 
medical cases. 

The work of the Medical Out-Patient Department has been so ex- 
panded as to completely fill every morning, six days a week. In addi- 
tion to the regular general Medical Clinic which is carried on every 
morning and which, during the past years has been attended by a 
larger number of patients than ever before, special clinics meet as 
follows: The Luetic Clinic, the Celiac and Diabetic Clinics and the 
Child Health Conference, on Monday afternoon; the Allergy Clinic for 
the study and treatment of cases of asthma, hay fever and specific 

38 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

sensitivity, on Tuesday and Friday afternoons; the Rheumatic Fever 
Clinic for children with the various manifestations of rheumatic fever, 
including rheumatic heart disease, on Thursday afternoon. In addi- 
tion, the following special clinics, because of limitation of space, must 
be held in the morning together with the general Clinic: — 1. Monday 
and Thursday mornings — Neurological Clinic. 2. Wednesday morning 
— Cardiac Clinic — chiefly for patients with congenital heart malforma- 
tions. 3. Thursday morning — Eczema Clinic and Thyroid Clinic. 
4. Friday morning — -Special Endocrine Clinic. 

Space does not permit nor is it necessary to enlarge further on the 
worthwhile service supplied by these special clinics as they were fully 
described in the report of 1937. Brief mention should be made, how- 
ever, of the fact that each special clinic is under the direction of a 
pediatrician who, in addition to his usual activities in the general 
Clinic, is especially interested in the study of diseases of children which 
fall within his special field of interest. 

In every academic year, one hundred and thirty-five third year 
students of the Harvard Medical School receive their instruction in the 
fundamental principles relating to the diseases of children in the 
Medical Out-Patient Department, and nearly one hundred fourth 
year medical students receive actual practical experience in the wards 
of the Hospital. Each year there are, in addition, a relatively large 
number of physicians who attend the Courses for Graduates offered by 
Harvard Medical School, as well as the Harvard School of Public 
Health. Also a number of volunteer physicians, seeking further ex- 
perience in the treatment of children's diseases attend the clinic. The 
teaching of medical students as well as graduate students is a problem 
which we must keep constantly before us in order to maintain a high 
standard for the physicians and students who in ever larger numbers are 
seeking instruction here. 

In the Fall of 1937, an additional Resident was appointed whose 
duties were to assist in the work of the Out-Patient Department. This 
has immeasurably strengthened the staff of experienced men working 
in this clinic. In 1938 the Resident service was increased from twelve 
months to sixteen and a half months and a scheme of rotation of the 
residents on the Medical Service was incorporated to insure well- 
trained and capable men in' key positions. Under the new arrangement, 
each resident serves four months in charge of the Children's Wards, 
four months in charge of the Infants' Hospital Wards, four months as 
the officer admitting patients to the Infants' Hospital and the Medical 

39 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Wards of the Children's Hospital and four months in the Medical Out- 
Patient Department. The admitting officer is the resident in charge of 
the Isolation Unit when it is open for the reception of patients. 

In 1939 a much needed service for the medical care of the patients 
in the Private Ward was instituted by the appointment of a Resident 
in charge. We were extremely fortunate in securing the services of Dr. 
J. M. Harkey for this position. Through his experience and good judg- 
ment in meeting the many problems which arise, he has already 
demonstrated the desirability of continuing this service. 

The heavy responsibility of the care of patients, teaching duties and 
clinical investigation could not be met without the wholehearted co- 
operation of the many experienced practicing pediatricians who are 
members of the Medical Staff. Most of these physicians are engaged in 
very active practice and a system of vacations has been inaugurated so 
that it may be possible to relieve them from the burden which they 
carry in the Out-Patient Department and thus permit them to have 
more free time to attend interesting clinics and conferences, thereby 
helping them to keep up with he rapid advances in the field of pediatrics. 

We know that the training of young doctors is an integral part of 
the work of a hospital but do not always realize just how important it is. 
The whole medical life of a doctor is probably influenced more by his 
few years training in the Hospital than by the many years of medical 
experience in practice. The principles he learns and the habits he ac- 
quires will determine to a very great extent whether he is to be a 
successful or an unsuccessful doctor. It is conservatively estimated that 
every house officer will in his medical life-time be responsible for the 
care of the sickness of several times as many children as the hospital 
deals with annually. Thus we can see the tremendous influence that 
this Hospital will have, through the training of house officers and resi- 
dents, on the health not only of the children in this community, but of 
children all over the United States. 

We cannot lose sight of the fact that the plan of the Hospital since 
its inception has embraced "A study of voluntary nursing, including 
moral and religious nurture, by cultivated Christian women." This 
purpose might be said to have been carried out as early as 1889 when 
Sister Theckla, at the request of the doctors, visited the children in their 
homes. Seven years later, the Out-Door Relief was organized with a 
visiting physician and nurses. These responsibilities of the Hospital 
have been continued since 1 909 under the name of the Social Service 
Department. The change of emphasis of Social Service since those days 

40 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

to the centering of attention around the patient as part of a family 
group as well as an individual with a developing personality, has 
gradually come into clearer focus. In order to plan wisely for the 
treatment of patients we need to know more about the social environ- 
ment and emotional factors. Now, the medical social worker makes a 
study of each admission as soon as possible after the child comes into 
the ward. In this way, the interns and residents, armed with informa- 
tion to be correlated with their medical studies, can plan for discharges 
and after-care long before the day of discharge arrives. The importance 
of this early consideration of the whole problem becomes clearer when 
one realizes the many social problems which need adjustment for 
children coming from a wide geographical area. 

It would be remiss not to direct attention to the various research 
activities of the Medical Department. In the past two years a relatively 
large number of contributions dealing with many different sides of 
clinical and laboratory investigation and of medical education, have 
been published by the Medical Division of the Children's Hospital. 
Whereas mention cannot be made of the nature of each of these con- 
tributions, it is particularly interesting to illustrate the way in which 
new diseases gain recognition. 

A hitherto unrecognized disease affecting infants and children was 
observed in September and October 1938. The clinical staff quickly 
became aware that a new problem had presented itself. The usual 
thorough studies made on the wards permitted an accurate characteri- 
zation of the clinical features of the disease, which will be of great 
value should subsequent outbreaks occur. The exact nature of the 
disease was determined by a post mortem examination of the first 
child who died and by subsequent animal inoculation studies. The 
disease was quickly established in mice by the pathology and bac- 
teriology laboratories. Final identification of the offending infectious 
agent as the virus which causes encephalitis in horses was accomplished, 
with the cooperation of the Department of Bacteriology of the Harvard 
Medical School and the Rockefeller Institute. It will be recalled that 
a large number of horses died of encephalitis in Massachusetts in the 
summer of 1938. In all, approximately thirty infants and children and 
adults suffered from this disease, and eight of these were admitted to 
the Infants' and Children's Hospitals. The prompt recognition of this 
new malady illustrates the plan of organization in this Hospital and the 
cooperation which is possible with outside laboratories and with the 
State Department of Health in matters of general importance. 

41 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

It is not out of place here to mention briefly certain changes oc- 
curring in the field of medical economics which may affect the future 
policies of this Hospital. The public and the medical profession have 
approved of the extension of tax funds for the medical care of groups of 
the truly needy people in this country. It is important that any such 
distribution of costs of medical care be accomplished with due regard 
to the maintenance and establishment of a high standard of medical 
practice. Already a number of voluntary cost-distribution prepayment 
schemes with this aim in mind are being introduced throughout almost 
every section of the country. If this indicates the future trend of medi- 
cine, the Hospital's role in undergraduate and graduate teaching, in 
research, and in maintaining its present high standards of medicine 
will become increasingly more important. While "the old order 
changeth, giving way to new," the Children's Hospital might well con- 
sider continuing its service to the public by giving a demonstration of 
exemplary medical care that would set a much needed standard 
throughout the entire country. 

Dr. Benjamin W. Carey resigned in 1938 to accept an appointment 
as Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the Wayne University Medical 
School in Detroit, in association with Dr. Cooley, and with Dr. Wilson 
who left us in 1937. In the Fall of 1938, Dr. Paul V. Wooley, Jr. re- 
signed from our staff to accept an appointment as Assistant Director 
of the Massachusetts State Antitoxin and Vaccine Laboratory. The 
going away of physicians who have received a large part of their train- 
ing at the Hospital, to accept advanced positions elsewhere, while a 
great loss to us, signifies the fulfillment of one of the primary purposes 
of our work, — the training of men in special fields of medicine. 

The celebration of the Seventieth Anniversary of the founding of 
the Children's Hospital and the Fiftieth Anniversary of the founding of 
the Nurses' Training School was held June 8, 9 and 10, 1939, and was 
attended by the Managers, graduates, friends and employees of the 
Hospital. Once again it was emphasized that the Children's Hospital 
of 1939 with its full complement of closely integrated units feels it is 
prepared to carry out the primary aims of its founders; effectively to 
care for sick children, to train men and women in its special field, and 
to add to our knowledge concerning the diseases of early life. 

This report would not be complete without a mention of the resig- 
nation of Miss Amy W. Greene, Director of the Social Service Depart- 
ment, who for the past eight years has supervised so ably the social 
service work of the Hospital. Miss Greene went to Baltimore to accept 

42 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

a position of responsibility in the Social Service Department of Johns 
Hopkins Hospital. 

Appreciation is expressed to the Director of the Hospital for his un- 
derstanding and helpfulness in making it possible to meet the many 
problems which arise in ministering to sick children. Special recogni- 
tion should be given to his Associates, the members of the Nursing Staff 
and the Social Service Workers, for their untiring and conscientious 
devotion to the best interests of the children and the Hospital as well 
as to the members of the Medical Staff who have played such an im- 
portant part in the accomplishments of these years. 

Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D. 



43 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

1938 

Congenital Malformations 

Absence of deciduous teeth 1 

Amputation of lower leg, intra-uterine 1 

Anomaly of chest 1 

Anomaly of cervical spine 2 

Anomalies, multiple 1 

Anomaly of penis 1 

Anomaly of ribs 2 

Anomaly of skull 1 

Anomaly of toenails 1 

Cleft palate 2 

Club feet 1 

Dwarfism 5 

Funnel chest 3 

Hypospadias 6 

Ichthyosis, linearis neuropathica unilateralis congenita .... 1 

Lop ear 1 

Meningocele 1 

Micrognathia 4 

Patent ductus arteriosus 2 

Pilonidal sinus 1 

Polydactylism 1 

Spina bifida 5 

Syndactylism 3 

Tongue tie 4 

Torticollis 5 

Thyroglossal cyst 1 

Undescended testicle 12 

— 69 

Diseases of the Newborn 

Cephalhematoma 2 

Granuloma of umbilicus 1 

Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn 1 

Icterus neonatorum 1 

Omphalitis 2 

Prematurity 20 

— 27 

Diseases of the Breast 

Hypertrophy of breast 2 

Mastitis 2 



44 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of Nutrition 

Acidosis 20 

Aerophagy 18 

Anorexia 25 

Carbohydrate intolerance 1 

Carotinemia 2 

Celiac disease 3 

Celoid syndrome 1 

Dehydration 1 

Food capriciousness 9 

Lipodystrophy 1 

Malnutrition 157 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 70 

Pica 5 

Regulation of feeding 508 

Rickets 17 

Rumination 3 

Scurvy 21 

Vomiting 18 

880 

Respiratory System 

Catarrh 4 

Deviated septum 9 

Epistaxis 25 

Foreign body in nose 2 

Hay fever 50 

Nasal obstruction 7 

Post-nasal drip 1 

Rhinitis 107 

Sinusitis 80 

Asthma 175 

Bronchiectasis 2 

Bronchitis 262 

Tracheitis 5 

Croup 1 ( 

Laryngeal stridor 30 

Laryngitis 18 

Laryngo-spasm 1 

Abscess of lung 1 

Pneumonia 65 

Pneumonitis 2 

847 

Alimentary System 

Abscess, alveolar 7 

Abscess, tooth 1 

Carious teeth 115 

Defective dental enamel 1 

45 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Alimentary System — Continued 

Dental aplasia 1 

Delayed dentition 2 

Difficult dentition 11 

Malocclusion of teeth 4 

Precocious dentition 1 

Bifid uvula 2 

Carbuncle of gum 1 

Geographical tongue 2 

Gingivitis 10 

Macroglossia 2 

Stomatitis 79 

Thrush 8 

Vincent's angina 8 

Abscess, retropharyngeal 2 

Adenoids, hypertrophied 32 

Tonsillitis 219 

Tonsils, diseased 29 

Tonsils, hypertrophied 48 

Tonsils and adenoids, hypertrophied 16 

Tonsils and adenoids, infected 13 

Turbinates, hypertrophied 5 

Upper respiratory infection . 624 

Parotitis 1 

Pharyngitis 195 

Nasopharyngitis 87 

Pyloric obstruction 1 

Pyloric stenosis 2 

Pylorospasm 3 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 32 

Appendicitis, acute 1 

Appendicitis, chronic 3 

Appendiceal adhesions, post-operative 1 

Enteritis 18 

Enterospasm 1 

Indigestion, intestinal 18 

Intestinal parasites 67 

Colitis 3 

Constipation 142 

Diarrhea 23 

Fecal impaction 3 

Fecal incontinence 2 

Foreign body in G.I. tract 

Meckel's diverticulum 

Melena 

Spastic colon 

Cirrhosis of fiver 

Jaundice 35 

46 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Alimentary System — Continued 

Diastasis recti 5 

Hernia 51 

Fissure in ano 6 

Pruritis ani 2 

Stricture of anus 1 

Hemorrhoids 4 

Prolapse of rectum 3 

1863 

GenitoUrinary System 

Hypertrophy of clitoris 1 

Nephritis 8 

Nephrosis 3 

Pyelitis 14 

Pyelonephritis 16 

Diuresis 4 

Enuresis 148 

Albuminuria 11 

Bacilluria 2 

Glycosuria 1 

Hematuria 1 

Pyuria 15 

Balanitis 4 

Phimosis 74 

Preputial adhesions 9 

Priapism 1 

Atrophy of testicle 1 

Vaginitis 46 

Redundant labia majorae 3 

Vulvitis 1 

Ulcer of urinary meatus : 2 

Ulcer of penis 1 

321 

Circulatory System 

Angioneurotic edema 9 

Bradycardia 1 

Congenital heart disease 60 

Dextro-cardia 1 

Endocarditis 1 

Functional heart murmur 15 

Interventricular septal defect 4 

Mitral insufficiency 1 

Mitral regurgitation 3 

Mitral stenosis 3 

Potential heart disease 1 

47 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Circulatory System — Continued 

Rheumatic heart disease 22 

Tachycardia 3 

Telangiectasis 3 

Diseases of the Blood, Blood Forming, and 

Lymphatic System 

Anemia, unclassified 16 

Anemia, hemolytic 4 

Anemia, hypochromic 11 

Anemia, hypoplastic 1 

Anemia, nutritional 55 

Anemia, secondary 58 

Erythroblastosis, foetalis 3 

Hemarthrosis 1 

Hemophilia 1 

Leukemia 2 

Purpura 4 

Smith-Howard syndrome 2 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 172 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Cretinism 4 

Diabetes 2 

Frohlick's syndrome 2 

Goiter, thyrotoxic 1 

Hypothyroidism '2 

Hypertrophy of thyroid 1 

Obesity 18 

Persistent thymic enlargement 1 

Pituitary dysfunction 1 

Pituitary -ovarian dysfunction 1 

Neuro-Muscular System 

Behavior problem 168 

Birth injury 18 

Brain tumor 1 

Cerebral agenesis 3 

Cerebral deficiency 20 

Cerebral injury 3 

Chorea 50 

Chorea, hemi 4 

Convulsions 63 

Defective speech 33 

Speech retardation 8 

Encephalitis, post-pertussis 1 

Encephalitic syndrome, post 1 

48 



126 



330 



33 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Neuro-Muscular System — Continued 

Epilepsy 28 

Habit spasm 39 

Headaches 5 

Hematoma, subdural 5 

Hemiplegia 4 

Hydrocephalus 15 

Idiocy 2 

Insomnia 2 

Masturbation 10 

Meningismus . . . 1 

. Mental retardation 88 

Microcephalus 10 

Mongolism : 28 

Myelitis 1 

Nervous child 6 

Night terrors 8 

Paralysis, obstetrical 9 

Paralysis, spastic 19 

Poliomyelitis, old 2 

Psychoneurosis 2 

Retarded development 2 

Scaphocephaly 1 

Somnabulism 1 

Syncope, vasovagal 1 

Specific Infectious Diseases 

Abscess of trunk 2 

Abscess of lower extremities 1 

Dysentery 2 

Gonorrhea 1 

Grippe, intestinal 2 

Influenza 1 

Measles 13 

Mumps 37 

Pertussis 74 

Rat bite fever, convalescent 1 

Rheumatic fever 59 

Roseola infantum 6 

Scarlet fever 13 

Streptococcus throat 3 

Syphilis 6 

Vaccinia 1 

Vaginitis, gonorrheal . 1 

Varicella 17 

Undulant fever , 4 

Undulant fever contact 2 

49 



659 



246 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis, healing 1 

Tuberculosis, hilum 2 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 6 

Tuberculin reactor 58 

Skeletal System 

Arthritis, rheumatic 1 

Bow legs 6 

Coxa plana 1 

Deformity of sternum 1 

Flat feet 12 

Fracture, clavicle 2 

Fracture, femur 1 

Fracture, skull 2 

Fracture, tibia 1 

Funnel chest 2 

Hypermotility of joints 1 

Knock knees 14 

Lordosis 4 

Poor posture 18 

Pronated feet 32 

Scoliosis 2 

Septic hip 1 

Sprain of ankle 2 

Strain, back 2 

Strain, foot -1 

Tenosynovitis of finger 1 

Diseases of the Skin 

Acne 1 

Acrodynia 2 

Alopecia, areata 1 

Alopecia 3 

Angiomata 1 

Burns 4 

Dandruff 1 

Dermatitis 201 

Dermatographia 1 

Ecchymosis 1 

Ecthyma 2 

Eczema 366 

Epidermophytosis 20 

Eponychia 1 

Erysipelas 2 

Erythema 5 

Folliculitis 1 

50 



67 



107 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Diseases of the Skin — Continued 

Fungus infection 

Furunculosis 

Herpes 

Ichthyosis 

Impetigo, contagiosa 

Insect bite 

Intertrigo 

Keratosis 

Lichen planus 

Lupus erythematous 

Miliaria 

Mole 

Molluscum contagiosum 

Paronychia 

Pediculosis 

Pityriasis rosea 

Poison ivy 

Pruritis 

Psoriasis 

Pustule 

Pyodermia 

Ringworm 

Ritter's disease 

Seborrhea 

Scabies 

Sunburn 

Trichophytosis 

Ulcers 

Urticaria 

Vitiligo 



4 

46 

12 

2 

285 

39 

16 

3 

1 

1 

27 

1 

2 

6 

7 

7 

8 

2 

3 

2 

14 

26 

1 

25 

29 

2 

3 

2 

47 

1 



1237 



Diseases of the Eye 

Astigmatism 

Blepharitis 

Blindness 

Cataracts, congenital . . 

Conjunctivitis 

Corneal opacities 

Dacrocystitis 

Defective vision 

Eye strain 

Hypermetropia 

Keratitis 

Myopia 

Nystagmus, congenital. 
Pinguecula 



2 
2 
1 

2 
24 



51 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Eye — Continued 

Ptosis of eyelids 3 

Reading difficulty 2 

Refraction error 1 

Strabismus 20 

69 

Diseases of the Ear 

Cerumen 1 

Deafmutism 3 

Deafness 8 

Foreign body in ear 4 

Mastoiditis 4 

Otitis media 308 

Tubotympanitis 1 

329 

Tumors 

Abdominal tumor 1 

Embryoma of kidney 2 

Hemangioma 12 

Lipoma 1 

Lymphangioma 2 

Nevus 10 

Papilloma 2 

Sublingual cyst 1 

Warts 12 

Wen 1 

— 44 

Unclassified 

Abrasions 3 

Athetosis 1 

Bite, dog 1 

Concussion 1 

Contusion 1 

Drug rash 1 

Fatigue 6 

Hypertonia 1 

Ingestion, arsenic 1 

Ingestion, borax 1 

Ingestion, calomine 1 

Ingestion, cough mixture 1 

Ingestion, ex-lax 1 

Ingestion, furniture polish 1 

Ingestion, hair wave lotion 1 

Ingestion, kerosene 2 

Ingestion, lead 2 

Ingestion, lead arsenate 1 

Lacerations 3 

52 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Unclassified — Continued 

Poisonings, food 1 

Poisonings, lead 10 

Regulation of habits 118 

Regulation of hygiene 2 

Retardation, physical 2 

Serum sickness 4 

Streptococcic carrier 1 

Trichophagy 1 

Splenomegaly 2 

Von Gerke's disease 1 

Dead on arrival 8 

Deferred 51 

Eloped 8 

No diagnosis 5 

No disease 547 

Not seen 5 



Diseases of the Breast 

Hypertrophy of breast 1 

Mastitis 1 

Diseases of Nutrition 

Aerophagy 6 

Celiac disease 6 

Celoid syndrome 1 

Hyperemesis 1 

Improper feeding 439 

Malnutrition 154 

53 



172 



624 



New Cases 4935 

Secondary Diagnosis 3119 

Total 8054 



MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

1939 

Diseases of the Newborn 

Cephalhematoma 4 

Craniotabes 1 

Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn 1 

Omphalitis 1 

Prematurity 11 



18 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of Nutrition — Continued 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 44 

Pica 3 

Rickets 2 

Rumination 6 

Scurvy 16 

Tetany 1 

Vomiting, non specific 16 

695 

Diseases of the Respiratory System 

Common cold 756 

Deviated septum 18 

Ethmoiditis 1 

Epistaxis 23 

Foreign body in nose 1 

Hay fever 34 

Nasal obstruction 3 

Sinusitis 75 

Asthma 236 

Bronchiolitis 1 

Bronchitis . 204 

Tracheitis 6 

Laryngo tracheitis 4 

Hoarseness, cause unknown 1 

Laryngeal stridor 21 

Laryngitis 16 

Atelectasis, pulmonary 1 

Empyema 1 

Pneumonia 28 

1430 

Diseases of the Alimentary System 

Abscess, alveolar 5 

Caries, teeth 77 

Difficult dentition 1 

Malocclusion of teeth 5 

Oidium albicans 1 

Geographical tongue 1 

Gingivitis 8 

Stomatitis 36 

Thrush 14 

Vincent's Angina 22 

Abscess, tonsillar 2 

Adenoids, hypertrophied 35 

Tonsillitis 223 

Tonsils, hypertrophied 79 

Tonsils and adenoids, hypertrophied 171 

Turbinates, hypertrophied 1 

54 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Alimentary System — Continued 

Foreign body, throat 1 

Atresia of nasal passage 1 

Pharyngitis 146 

Lymphoid hyperplasia, pharynx 1 

Cardiospasm 2 

Pylorospasm 11 

Pyloric stenosis 1 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 26 

Appendicitis 2 

Enteritis 1 

Intestinal parasites 87 

Colitis 4 

Constipation 110 

Diarrhoea, non specific 28 

Fecal impaction 1 

Foreign body in G. I. Tract 1 

Gastritis 1 

Melena 1 

Megacolon 1 

Spastic colon 3 

Jaundice, catarrhal 1 

Diastasis recti 3 

Hernia, inguinal 9 

Hernia, umbilical 28 

Fissure in ano 7 

Hemorrhoids 1 

Prolapse of rectum 2 

1161 

Diseases of the Genito-Urinary System 

Nephritis 14 

Hydronephrosis 2 

Pyelonephritis 59 

Enuresis 65 

Albuminuria 39 

Glycosuria 2 

Urinary incontinence 2 

Urinary retention 2 

Abnormality of penis (external meatus) 1 

Atrophy of testes 1 

Balanitis 5 

Hydrocele 8 

Hypospadias 8 

Phimosis 57 

Preputial adhesions 10 

Ulcer of penis 2 

Undescended testicle 11 

55 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Genito-Urinary System — Continued 

Pruritis vulvae 1 

Vaginitis 27 

Vulvitis 2 

Ulcer of urinary meatus 2 

320 

Diseases of the Circulatory System 

Arrhythmia, cardiac 4 

Cardiac decompensation 1 

Cardiac enlargement 5 

Congenital heart disease 51 

Dextro-cardia 1 

Functional heart murmur 13 

Mitral regurgitation 3 

Myocarditis 1 

Rheumatic heart disease. 22 

Tachycardia 1 

102 

Diseases of the Blood and Blood Forming 

Organs and Lymphatic System 

Anemia, unclassified 16 

Anemia, erythroblastic 1 

Anemia, hemolytic . . . 1 

Anemia, iron deficiency 18 

Anemia, macrocytic 1 

Anemia of newborn . 1 

Anemia, nutritional 23 

Anemia, secondary 78 

Erythroblastosis, foetalis 1 

Hemophilia 2 

Hepatosplenomegaly, cause undetermined 1 

Purpura, hemorrhagica 2 

Splenomegaly, cause undetermined 4 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 133 

282 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Cretinism 2 

Diabetes mellitus 1 

Goitre, simple 1 

Goitre, adolescent 2 

Hypothyroidism 1 

Thyroid hypertrophy 1 

- 8 

Diseases of the Nervous System 

Behavior problem 1 67 

Birth injury to brain 12 

56 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Nervous System — Continued 

Brain tumor 1 

Cerebral deficiency 37 

Cerebral diplegia 1 

Chorea 36 

Convulsions, cause undetermined 56 

Defective speech 45 

Dizziness, unknown origin 1 

Encephalitis, post infectional 2 

Encephalopathy, post traumatic 1 

Epilepsy 26 

Habit spasm . 15 

Headaches 5 

Hematoma, subdural 3 

Hemiparesis 1 

Hemiplegia 3 

Hydrocephalus 4 

Hypochondriasis 1 

Hysteria 2 

Idiocy 1 

Instability, emotional 1 

Instability, vasomotor 1 

Masturbation 4 

Meningismus . 1 

Mental deficiency 13 

Mental retardation 66 

Microcephalus 12 

Migraine 3 

Mongolism 20 

Nervous child 4 

Neurosis ■. 1 

Night terrors 5 

Palsy, Bell's 5 

Palsy, brachial 2 

Palsy, Erb's 2 

Paralysis, diphtheritic 2 

Paralysis , facial 2 

Paralysis, spastic 5 

Personality defect 1 

Poliomyelitis, old 2 

Regulation of habits 122 

Retarded development 9 



Specific Infectious Diseases 

Abscess, lower extremities 1 

Abscess, upper extremities 2 

Abscess, periosteal 1 

57 



703 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Specific Infectious Diseases — Continued 

Cellulitis, eyelid 1 

Dysentery 12 

Grippe 1 

Influenza 3 

Measles 6 

Measles, German 10 

Mononucleosis, infectious 1 

Mumps 36 

Pertussis 70 

Poliomyelitis 1 

Rheumatic fever 54 

Roseola infantum 5 

Scarlet fever 6 

Syphilis 5 

Vaginitis, gonorrheal 5 

Varicella 14 

234 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis, healed 2 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 7 

Tuberculosis of skin 1 

Tuberculosis, tracheo-bronchial lymphnodes 1 

Tuberculin reactor 42 

— 53 

Diseases of the Musculo-Skeletal System 

Amyotonia congenita 2 

Anomalous Wormian bone 1 

Anomaly of spine 1 

Arthritis , 4 

Bowlegs 3 

Brachycephaly 1 

Bursitis, prepatella 1 

Club feet 3 

Constriction of toe 1 

Contractures 5 

Dysostosis, cleido-cranio 1 

Dysostosis, multiplex 1 

Epiphyseal injury, spine 1 

Foot strain 7 

Fracture, skull 2 

Funnel chest 3 

Hammer toes 1 

Hypertelorism 1 

Hypertrophy of arm 1 

Knock knees 9 

Osgood-Schlatter's disease 1 

58 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Musculo-Skeletal System — Continued 

Oxycephaly 1 

Pectus excavatum 1 

Pigeon breast 1 

Polydactylism 1 

Poor posture 14 

Pronated feet 51 

Spina bifida 2 

Syndactylism 2 

Torticollis 1 

Diseases of the Skin 

Acne vulgaris 2 

Alopecia areata 4 

Bullae, hemorrhagic 1 

Dermatitis, unclassified 187 

Drug rash 1 

Burns 4 

Eczema 371 

Epidermophytosis 20 

Erysipelas, arm 1 

Erythema 5 

Felon 1 

Folliculitis 3 

Fungus infection 9 

Furunculosis 32 

Hematoma 1 

Herpes 10 

Hypertrichosis 3 

Ichthyosis 4 

Insect bite : 12 

Intertrigo 13 

Keratosis 2 

Lichen planus 1 

Miliaria 16 

Molluscum contagiosum 1 

Paronychia 4 

Pediculosis capitis 8 

Pityriasis rosea 6 

Poison ivy 6 

Pruritis 1 

Ringworm 36 

Scabies 29 

Scleroderma 2 

Seborrhea 19 

Telangiectasis 2 

Ulcer, leg 1 

59 



124 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Skin — Continued 

Urticaria 

Vitiligo 

Yeast infection of skin 



Diseases of the Eye 

Anomaly of eye 

Blepharitis 

Conjunctivitis 

Dacrocystitis 

Epicanthus 

Exophthalmos 

Eye strain 

Foreign body, eye 

Impaired vision 

Keratitis, interstitial 

Myopia 

Nystagmus 

Nystagmus, congenital 

Obstruction of naso-lachrymal duct . 

Ptosis, eyelid 

Strabismus 



Diseases of the Ear 

Anomaly of ear 

Cerumen in ear canals . 

Deafness 

Foreign body in ear . . . 

Lop ears 

Mastoiditis 

Otitis media 



Tumors 

Angiomata, skin 

Fibroma, lip 

Fibroma, scalp 

Glioma 

Hemangioma 

Lipoma 

Lymphangioma, buttocks . 

Lymphoma 

Nevus 

Warts 



Unclassified 
Abrasions . 
Allergy. . . 



60 

1 
1 



15 



881 



1 

6 
16 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

9 

1 

3 

3 

1 

1 

1 
10 
— 58 

2 

3 

2 

1 

2 

4 
310 
324 



— 25 

5 
10 



60 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Un classified — Continued 

Anomalies, multiple 2 

Asphyxia 1 

Bite, dog 1 

Carotenemia 2 

Concussion , 1 

Contusion 1 

Dwarfism 2 

Dysphagia 1 

Eructation 1 

Fatigue 5 

Ingestion, ant poisoning 2 

Ingestion, dirt 1 

Ingestion, fuel oil 1 

Ingestion, gasoline 1 

Ingestion, K. Mn. 04 1 

Ingestion, noxon 1 

Ingestion, paint 1 

Ingestion, phenolphthalein 1 

Ingestion, range oil 1 

Ingestion, thyroid pills 1 

Ingestion, wintergreen 1 

Laceration 2 

Niemann Pick's disease 1 

Obesity 79 

Pilonidal sinus 4 

Poisoning, bromide 1 

Poisoning, food 1 

Poisonings, lead 4 

Poisonings, oak 2 

Serum sickness 2 

140 

Dead on arrival 8 

Deferred 54 

No diagnosis 3 

No disease ( 252 

Not seen 16 

Referred to other departments 1 

Referred to other hospitals ; 1 

335 

New cases 4570 

Secondary diagnosis 2325 

Total 6895 



61 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1938 



Congenital Malformations 
Accessory rib 



Anomalies, multiple 

Anomaly of genito-urinary tract . 

Anomaly of kidney 

Anomaly of rib 

Anomaly of spine 

Bifid kidney 

Bifid pelvis 

Bifid ureter 

Bifid uvula 

Calcaneo-valgus deformity 

Cataract, congenital 

Club feet 

Cord bladder 

Cord rectum 

Cystic disease of the lung 

Dislocation of hips 

Double kidney 

Double ureter 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Hermaphroidism 

Hydrocephalus 

Hypospadias 

Meckel's diverticulum 

Megaloureters . . . 

Microcephalus 

Pilonidal sinus 

Spina bifida 

Stricture of ureteral orifice 

Undescended testicle 



New 

1 
1 
3 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 



3 
1 

6 



Diseases of the Newborn 

Anemia of the newborn 

Congenital cyanosis 

Craniotabes 

Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn . 

Marasmus 

Prematurity 



45 



2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



Old 



2 
1 
1 



62 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of Nutrition Mew Old 

Acidosis 7 3 

Carrier virulent Klebs-Loeffler bacilli 1 1 

Celiac disease 9 2 

Dehydration 14 

Emaciation 1 

Gastro-enteric disturbance 35 1 

Ketosis 4 2 

Lipodystrophy 1 

Malnutrition 43 1 

Pellagra 1 

Poor eating habits 1 

Rachitic deformities 1 

Rickets 8 1 

Under-development 1 

Vitamin deficiency. 6 

Vomiting 9 

140 13 
Respiratory System 

Epistaxis 4 1 

Rhinitis 5 

Sinusitis 25 3 

Laryngeal edema 1 

Laryngeal stridor 2 

Laryngeal tracheo-spasm 1 

Laryngitis 6 

Tracheitis 1 

Asthma 28 7 

Bronchiectasis 9 1 

Bronchitis 55 4 

Foreign body in bronchus 4 

Laryngo-tracheitis 2 

Peribronchial infiltration 1 

Atelectasis 6 1 

Collapse of lung 1 

Emphysema 1 

Empyema 19 

Lung abscess 5 

Pneumonia, broncho 59 1 

Pneumonia, lobar 10 

Pneumonia, primary 140 8 

Pneumonia, secondary 13 1 

Pneumonia, unresolved 1 

Pneumonia, unclassified 13 2 

Pleural thickening 1 

Pulmonary fibrosis 1 

63 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Respiratory System — Continued Mew Old 

Pulmonary suppuration 2 

Pleurisy 6 1 

Pleuritis 1 

Mediastinal glands 2 

424 31 
Alimentary System 

Abscess, alveolar 1 

Abscess, gingival 1 

Abscess, retropharyngeal 2 

Carious teeth 16 

Edema of uvula 1 

Hemorrhage, gingival 1 

Nasopharyngitis 38 2 

Pharyngeal abscess 1 

Pharyngitis 72 6 

Stomatitis 9 

Tonsillitis 67 5 

Upper respiratory infection 61 4 

Appendicitis 17 1 

Colitis 2 

Diarrhea 3 

Duodenal obstruction 1 

Duodenal ulcer 1 

Enteritis 10 2 

Gastro-enteritis 1 

Hemorrhage into gastro-intestinal tract 1 

Intussusception 1 

Malposition of cecum 1 

Malrotation of colon 1 

Megacolon 2 

Melena 1 

Multiple perforation of gastro-intestinal tract 1 

Pyloric spasm 1 

Ulcerative colotis 2 

Injury to intestinal tract 1 

Intestinal obstruction 2 

Sprue 2 1 

Anomalous position of liver 1 

Biliary cirrhosis 1 

Jaundice 7 

Liver disease due to unknown cause 1 

Abdominal pain, undetermined origin 16 2 

Ascites 2 4 

Constipation 2 

Peritonitis 7 2 

64 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Alimentary System — Continued Mew Old 

Hernia 12 

Fecal incontinence 3 

Fissure in ano 1 

372 31 
Genito-Urinary System 

Aberrant renal vessel 1 

Anomaly of kidney 1 

Glomerulonephritis 3 6 

Hydronephrosis 5 1 

Megaloureters 1 

Nephritis 30 15 

Nephrosis 8 11 

Nephrotic syndrome 3 

Obstruction of ureter 2 

Polycystic kidney 1 

Pyelitis 14 

Pyelonephritis 14 13 

Renal emboli 1 

Uremia 1 

Cystitis 2 

Eneuresis 4 

Urinary incontinence 1 

Albuminuria 5 

Bacilluria 1 

Glycosuria 1 

Hematuria 5 1 

Pyuria 7 

Urethral stricture 1 

Urethritis 1 

Adhesions of prepuce 2 

Balantitis 2 

Hydrocele 1 

Phimosis 14 

Pruritis vulvae 1 

Vaginitis 1 

Vulvo-vaginitis, chronic 2 

Vulvo-vaginitis, non-specific 4 

167 48 
Circulatory System 

Active carditis 1 1 

Cardiac decompensation 7 1 

Cardiac dilitation 1 

Cardiac failure 1 

Cardiac hypertrophy 1 

65 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Circulatory System — Continued New Old 

Cardiac irregularity (heart block) 1 

Cardiac murmur, functional 2 

Congenital heart disease 16 5 

Congestive failure 3 1 

Endocarditis 7 2 

Heart block 1 

Hypertension 4 

Mitral stenosis and insufficiency 1 

Myocarditis 4 

Pancarditis, rheumatic 4 

Paroxysmal auricular tachycardia 1 1 

Pericardial effusion 2 

Pericarditis 1 2 

Potential heart disease 1 1 

Rheumatic carditis 4 

Rheumatic heart disease 26 8 

Teleangiectasis, capillary 1 

Teleangiectasis, spider 1 

90 23 
Diseases of the Blood and Blood Forming 
Organs and Lymphatic System 

Anemia, aplastic 1 7 

Anemia, etiology unknown 3 4 

Anemia, hemolytic 5 

Anemia, hypochromic 2 

Anemia, hypoplastic 6 

Anemia, macrocytic, hyperchromic 2 1 

Anemia, secondary 64 5 

Bacteremia 8 

Enlargement of spleen 1 

Eosinophilia 1 

Erythroblastosis 2 

Extravasation of blood 1 

Hemophilia 12 

Hemorrhage from esophageal varices 1 

Hepatosplenomegaly 4 1 

Leukemia 5 5 

Meningococcemia 1 

Mononucleosis, infectious 2 

Purpura 12 

Septicemia, hemolytic streptococcus 3 

Septicemia, organism unknown 6 1 

Septicemia, staphylococcus 2 3 

Splenomegaly with gastric hemorrhage 2 3 

Splenomegaly 2 1 

66 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Diseases of the Blood and Blood Forming 

Organs and Lymphatic System — Continued 

Subarachnoid hemorrhage 

Subdural hemorrhage 

Thalassanemia 

Thrombocytopenia 

Toxemia 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 

Lymphadenopathy 



New Old 



Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Coma, diabetic 

Cretinism 

Diabetes mellitus 

Dwarfism 

Gigantism 

Goitre, adolescent 

Goitre, non-toxic 

Hypertrophy of thyroid gland 

Hypothyroidism 

Hypo-pituitarism 

Insulin shock 

Obesity 

Precocious puberty 

Sexual precocity 



Neuro-Muscular System 

Aphasia 

Athetosis 

Atrophy, cerebral . . 

Behavior problem 

Birth injury 

Brain abscess 

Brain tumor, unclassified 

Cavernous sinus thrombosis 

Cerebral spastic infantile paralysis . 

Cerebral hypoplasia 

Chorea 

Concussion, cerebral 

Conversion hysteria 

Convulsions 

Defective development 

Deficiency, cerebral 

Deterioration, cerebral 

Educational problem 



58 
2 

94 

1 
1 
25 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
6 
1 
1 

52 

1 
1 

5 

25 
8 
2 

11 
1 
3 
2 

17 
1 
1 

37 
3 

45 
1 
2 



54 



15 



18 
1 



67 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Neuro-Muscular System — Continued j^ ew old 

Embolus, cerebral 2 

Emotional instability 2 

Encephalitis 23 1 

Encephalopathy 19 7 

Epidural lipoma of sacral region 1 

Epilepsy 26 5 

Feeblemindedness 2 

Habit disturbance 4 

Hematomyelia, in cervical cord 1 

Hemiatrophy 1 

Hemiparesis 9 2 

Hemorrhage, cerebral 1 1 

Hemorrhage, intracranial 1 

Hydrocephalus 3 

Hypertelorism 1 

Idiopathic convulsive state 2 

Idiopathic paroxysmal psychic equivalent 1 

Intracranial lesion 1 

Irregular mental development 1 

Juvenile Tabes 1 

Lenticular degeneration 1 

Masturbation 1 

Meningismus 9 

Meningitis, influenzal 10 

Meningitis, meningococcic 2 

Meningitis, micro-aerophalic ,1 

Meningitis, organism unknown 5 

Meningitis, pneumococcus 3 

Meningitis, streptococcus 1 

Meningococcemia 1 

Meningo-encephalitis 1 

Mental deficiency 60 7 

Mongolism 5 1 

Muscular dystrophy 3 

Neoplasm 2 

Neuritis 2 

Palsy, Bell's 1 

Palsy, brachial 3 1 

Palsy, cerebral 20 2 

Paralysis, extremities 1 

Paralysis, facial 2 1 

Paralysis, infantile 1 

Paralysis, leg muscles 1 

Paralysis, spastic 19 3 

Paresis 1 

Poliomyelitis, old 1 3 

Polyneuritis 1 

68 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Neuro-Muscular System — Continued 



Porencephaly 

Potential educational failure . 
Probably epileptic equivalent . 

Psychosis 

Psychoneurosis 

Psychopathic personality. . . . 

Scaphocephaly 

Sclerosis, multiple 

Spinal cord injury 

Speech defect 

Tantrums 

Thrombosis, cerebral. ...... 

Thrombosis, mesenteric 

Tonic neck reflexes 



New Old 

1 
3 



Specific Infectious Diseases 

Abscess, arm 

Abscess, cervical 

Abscess, multiple 

Abscess, pelvic 

Abscess, thigh. 

Acrodynia 

Cellulitis 

Common cold 

Diphtheria 

Diphtheria contact 

Dysentery 

Erysipelas 

Furunculosis 

Hemolytic streptococcus carrier . 

Infection, unclassified 

Intestinal parasites 

Measles 



Mumps 

Mumps meningitis . 

Paronychia 

Rheumatic fever. . 
Roseola infantum . 

Scarlet fever 

Scarlatina 

Septic throat 

Syphilis 

Tetanus 

Trichinosis 

Tularemia 



447 

2 
1 

2 
1 
1 

1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
4 
4 
5 
1 
4 

13 
8 
7 
1 
2 

31 
7 

23 
1 
1 
6 
1 
3 
1 



47 



3 
1 

1 

3 



69 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Specific Infectious Diseases — Continued New Old 

Typhoid fever 2 

Ulcer, decubitus 1 

Ulcer, heel 1 

Undulant fever 3 

Varicella 14 

Vulvovaginitis, gonorrheal 1 

Whooping cough 14 1 



172 19 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculin reactor 35 6 

Tuberculosis, childhood type, ? healed . 1 

Tuberculosis, mediastinal 1 

Tuberculosis, miliary 1 

Tuberculosis, primary 1 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 2 

Tuberculous dactylitis 1 

42 6 

Skeletal System 

Arthritis 2 

Collapse of intervertebral disc 1 

Deformity from old hemiparesis 1 

Delay of ossification 1 

Flat feet 1 

Fracture, clavicle 2 

Fracture, phalanx 1 1 

Fracture, skull 3 2 

Fracture, multiple . 1 

Hemarthrosis 1 

Injury, head 1 

Irritation of joints 1 

Lordosis 2 

Osteitis 1 

Osteomyelitis 8 1 

Paralysis of diaphragm 1 

Pes cavus 1 

Physical retardation 1 1 

Polyarthritis 2 

Pronated feet 1 

Scoliosis, functional 1 

Scoliosis, postural 1 

Scoliosis, structural 4 

Torticollis 2 

70 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Skeletal System — Continued 

Trophic changes and sensory defect of lower extremities. 



Under-development . 



Diseases of the Skin 

Burns 

Contusions 

Dermatitis 

Dermatomyositis . 

Eczema 

Epidermophytosis 

Erysipelas 

Erythema nodosum 

Herpes simplex 

Hirsutism 

Hypertrichosis 

Ichthyosis 

Impetigo 

Insect bites 

Lacerations 

Lupus erythematosis disseminatus . 

Scabies 

Serum reaction 

Urticaria 

Verruca vulgaris 

Vitiligo 

Xanthoma tuberosum 



Diseases of the Eye 

Abnormal pupillary reaction . . . 

Atrophy, optic 

Blepharitis 

Coloboma 

Fetal membrane, right lens 

Conjunctivitis 

Glass eye 

Hordeola 

Hypermetropia 

Keratitis 

Microphthalmia 

Paralysis, extrinsic muscle of eye . 

Retinitis 

Strabismus 



New 


Old 


1 




41 


7 


5 




1 


1 


16 


1 


1 




14 


6 


1 




2 




4 




3 




1 




1 




2 




5 




2 




5 




2 




1 




14 


1 



8 

27 



71 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Ear 

Abscess, post aural . 

Deafness 

Mastoiditis 

Otitis media 



New 

2 

5 

18 

131 



Old 



4 
9 



Tumors 



Carbuncle 

Lung cyst 

Neuroblastoma 

Neurofibromatosis 

Ovarian tumor 

Tumor of adrenal cortex 

Tumor, ? pituitary or supracellar . 



157 

1 
1 
3 
1 
1 



13 



Unclassified 

Allergic state, unclassified . . 

Asphyxia 

Breath-holding 

Cocainism 

Coma, cause undetermined . 

Cyanosis 

Deferred 

Drug reaction 

Edema, facial 

Edema, peripheral 

No disease 

Poisoning, ivy 

Poisoning, lead 

Methyl alcohol intoxication . 
Pyrexia, unknown origin. . . 

Regulation of habits 

Syncope, cause unexplained , 



12 



52 4 

Number of cases treated in Medical Ward 1091 

Number of cases treated in Private Ward 466 

Total 1557 

New Cases 2429 

Secondary diagnosis 334 

Total - — 2763 



72 






MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1939 

Diseases of the Newborn J\few Old 

Anemia of newborn 1 

Erythroblastosis 1 

2 
Diseases of Nutrition 

Celiac disease . . 10 10 

Improper feeding 2 

Nutritional disturbance . 70 1 

Rickets 7 

Scurvy 1 

90 11 
Diseases of the Respiratory System 

Epistaxis 4 1 

Sinusitis 43 6 

Asthma 48 25 

Anomaly of large bronchi 1 

Bronchiectasis 10 

Bronchitis 71 4 

Foreign body in bronchus 2 

Laryngo-tracheo-bronchitis 7 

Fibroma of vocal cord ;■ 1 

Laryngitis 12 

Stricture, laryngeal 2 

Atelectasis, pulmonary 6 

Edema, pulmonary 2 

Hemorrhage, pulmonary. 2 

Lung abscess 3 

Pneumonia 244 12 

Pneumonitis, chronic 3 

Pneumothorax 1 

Empyema 15 3 

Pleurisy with effusion 6 

Thickened pleura 1 

484 51 
Diseases of the Alimentary System 

Abscess, alveolar 2 

Abscess, retropharyngeal 1 

Abscess, tonsillar 3 

Carious teeth 19 1 

Gingivitis 2 

73 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Alimentary System — Continued Mew Old 

Harelip and cleft palate 1 

Pharyngitis 54 2 

Stomatitis, chronic 1 

Tonsillitis 67 2 

Vincent's angina 3 

Esophageal varices 1 1 

Pyloric stenosis, congenital 3 

Pylorospasm 2 

Abscess of abdominal wall 1 

Abscess, appendiceal 1 

Appendicitis 15 

Cholecystitis 1 

Calcified mesenteric nodes 3 

Constipation 5 

Fecal impaction 1 

Entero-colitis 15 4 

Hypertonic colon 1 

Intestinal adhesions 1 

Intestinal obstruction 3 

Intestinal perforation 1 

Malposition of cecum 1 1 

Meckel's diverticulum 3 

Megacolon 1 1 

Melena 2 

Cholelithiasis 1 

Hepatitis , 1 

Abdominal pain of unexplained origin 25 4 

Ascites 1 

Diastasis recti 1 

Peritonitis 9 

Hernia, epigastric 1 

Hernia, inguinal 2 

Hernia, umbilical 1 

Fistula, anal 1 

Fistula, recto-vaginal 1 

Prolapse of rectum 1 

Imperforate anus 1 

Stricture of anus 1 

259 18 
Diseases of the Genito-Urinary System 

Aberrant renal vessel 2 

Abscess of kidney 1 

Abscess, perinephretic 1 

Absence of kidney, congenital 1 

Absence of kidney, surgical 1 

74 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Diseases of the Genito-Urinary System- 

Bifid pelvis and ureter 

Bifurcation of ureter 

Dilatation of ureter 

Embryoma of kidney 

Calculus in ureter 

Double pelvis 

Double ureter 

Hydronephrosis 

Megaloureter 

Nephritis, hemorrhagic 

Nephritis, glomerulo 

Nephrosis 

Polycystic kidney 

Pyelonephritis 

Urethral stricture 

Urethritis 

Enuresis 

Hemoglobinuria 

Incontinence of urine 

Levulosuria 

Exstrophy of bladder 

Tumor of bladder 

Absence of vagina 

Orchitis i . . 

Phimosis 

Priapism 

Torsion of spermatic cord 

Undescended testicle . . 



-Continued 



Vaginitis . 



Diseases of the Circulatory System 

Congenital heart disease 

Congestive heart failure 

Endocarditis 

Hypertension 

Myocarditis 

Rheumatic heart disease 

Sinus arrhythmia 

Tachycardia, paroxysmal auricular. . . 
Transposition of viscera 



Mew 


Old 


1 




1 




1 




1 


2 


1 






1 


1 




5 




1 




12 


1 


9 


1 


12 


7 




1 


31 


11 



3 




1 




103 


26 


29 


10 


5 


1 


3 




4 




3 




21 


2 


1 




1 




1 





Diseases of the Blood and Blood Forming Organs and 
Lymphatic System 

Agranulocytosis 

75 



68 



14 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Blood and Blood Forming Organs and 

Lympathic System — Continued New Old 

Anemia, blood loss 1 

Anemia, erythroblastic 3 

Anemia, unknown etiology 2 

Anemia, hemolytic 3 

Anemia, iron deficiency 3 

Anemia, secondary to infection 11 1 

Anemia, sickle cell 1 

Bacteremia 13 1 

Hemophilia 3 10 

Leukemia 12 2 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 69 3 

Lymphangiectasis 1 

Mononucleosis, infectious 2 

Pancytopenia 5 19 

Purpura, anaphylactoid 2 

Purpura, thrombocytopenic 2 

Rupture of spleen 1 

Smith-Howard syndrome 3 

137 46 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Adenoma, pituitary 1 

Adrenal hyperplasia 1 

Adrenal tumor . 1 

Diabetes mellitus 8 15 

Diffuse toxic goitre 1 

Dwarfism 2 

Goitre 1 1 

Hyper-insulinism 1 

Hypothyroidism 5 

Mamillary hyperplasia 1 

Pituitary dysfunction 2 

Precocious puberty 1 

Retarded growth 2 

27 21 
Diseases of the Nervous System 

Arachnoiditis 5 

Behaviour problem 21 1 

Birth injury to brain 15 5 

Brain injury 7 

Brain tumor, unclassified 5 1 

Cerebral anoxia 1 

Cerebral disturbance, undiagnosed 1 

76 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Nervous System — Continued New Old 

Chordoma 1 

Chorea 9 

Cord injury at lower cervical region 2 

Cyst formation of brain 1 

Deficiency, cerebral 78 14 

Developmental alexia 2 

Developmental word deafness 1 

Encephalitis 20 

Habit spasm 2 

Hematoma, extradural 1 

Hematoma, subdural 7 

Hemiparesis 1 

Hemorrhage, intracranial 7 1 

Hydrocephalus 2 1 

Idiopathic epilepsy 35 4 

Intracranial calcification 1 

Meningismus 6 

Meningitis, aseptic 1 

Meningitis, chorea-lymphocytic 2 

Meningitis, hemolytic streptococcus 1 

Meningitis, influenzal 8 1 

Meningitis, meningococcus 3 

Meningitis, organism unknown 4 

Meningitis, pneumococcus 5 

Meningitis, tuberculous 2 1 

Meningocele 1 

Meningocele with spina bifida 1 

Microcephaly , . 3 1 

Mongolian idiot 1 1 

Myelopathy 1 

Myeloradiculitis 3 1 

Neuritis 4 

Neurotic state 52 1 

Palsy, brachial 3 1 

Palsy, cerebral, congenital 47 8 

Paralysis, bladder, due to injury to cord 1 

Paresis, juvenile 1 

Poliomyelitis 12 5 

Porencephaly 1 1 

Progressive lenticular degeneration 1 

Radiculitis 1 

Speech defect 1 

Thrombosis, cerebral . 1 

389 51 



77 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Specific Infectious Diseases j\f e w Old 

Cellulitis 7 

Common cold 40 

Diphtheria carrier 1 

Dysentery, bacillary 20 2 

Furunculosis 7 

Intestinal parasites 11 6 

Malaria 2 

Measles 14 1 

Mumps 4 

Pertussis 11 

Pleurodina epidemic 1 

Rheumatic fever 43 2 

Scarlet fever 23 4 

Syphilis 8 9 

Tetanus 2 

Typhoid fever 3 

Undulant fever 2 

Varicella 10 

209 24 
Tuberculosis 

Tuberculin reactor 27 2 

Tuberculoma of brain 1 

Tuberculosis, active, renal 3 

Tuberculosis, mesenteric lymphnodes 2 

Tuberculosis, military 1 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary, childhood type 2 

Tuberculosis, tracheo-bronchial lymphnodes 3 

Tuberculosis, upper end of tibia 1 

Tuberculous pleurisy 1 

37 6 

Diseases of the Musculo-Skeletal System 

Absence of clinoids 1 

Abscess, jaw 1 

Achondroplasia 1 

Arthralgia, post-scarlatinal 1 

Arthritis 9 3 

Dislocation of hip 1 

Dyschondroplasia 1 

Dystrophy, muscular 1 

Dystrophy, osseous 1 

Effusion into knee joint 1 

Exostosis 1 

Fracture, elbow 1 

Fracture, radius and ulna 2 

78 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Musculo-Skeletal System — Continued New Old 

Fracture, skull 2 

Funnel chest 1 

Genu valgum 1 

Hemarthrosis 1 

Hemorrhage, subperiosteal 1 

Hypertelorism 1 

Micrognathia 1 

Osteitis 1 

Osteomyelitis 3 

Pronated feet 2 

Scoliosis, postural , 1 

Scoliosis, structural > 1 

Shortening of leg 1 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus 1 

Talipes equino-varus 1 

Torticollis 1 

Vertebral arch fusion defect 1 

Wringer arm 1 

40 8 

Diseases of the Skin 

Abscess, buttocks 2 

Abscess, scalp . 1 

Alopecia 2 

Burns 3 

Cicatrix 2 

Contusions 1 

Dermatitis, unclassified 6 1 

Dermatographia 1 

Dermatomyositis 1 1 

Eczema 15 3 

Erysipelas 6 

Erythema multiforme 2 

Hemangio-endothelioma 1 

Hemangioma 2 1 

Herpes simplex 3 

Hematoma 2 

Impetigo 12 

Lacerations 5 

Lupus erythematous disseminatus 1 

Para-psoriasis 1 

Pediculosis capitis 2 

Scabies 1 

Urticaria 3 

Verruca vulgaris 1 

74 8 

79 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Eye 

Abscess, retro-orbital 

Cataract 

Conjunctivitis 

Corneal ulcers 

Glaucoma 

Hemorrhage, conjunctival 

Microphthalmia 

Optic atrophy 

Panophthalmitis 

Persistent remnant of hyaloid artery . 

Pigmentation of ocular fundi 

Strabismus 



Diseases of the Ear 

Abscess, post-aural 

Deafness 

Mastoiditis 

Otitis media 

Polyp of ear 

Traumatic lesion in auditory canal. 
Hemorrhage from ear drum 



Unclassified 

Abscesses, multiple 

Acrodynia 

Allergic state, unclassified . 

Deferred 

Exposure to contagion. . . 

Gaucher's disease 

Hay fever 

Infection, unclassified 

Lipodystrophy 

No disease 

Obesity 

Pica 

Poisoning, drug 

Poisoning, lead 

Sulphanilamide reaction. . 



New Old 



13 



2 




2 




24 


3 


180 


9 


1 




1 




1 




211 


12 


1 




2 




9 




43 




14 


3 


2 




1 




22 




2 


1 


13 




7 


3 


1 




6 




2 


2 


5 





130 9 

Number of cases treated on the Medical Ward 1054 

Number of cases treated on the Private Ward 709 

Total 1763 

New cases 2271 

Secondary diagnosis 307 

Total 2577 



80 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Unclassified — Continued New Old 

Undetermined 2 

Vomiting 1 

50 15 

Number of cases treated in Orthopedic Ward 344 

Number of cases treated in Private Ward 60 

Total 404 

New cases 397 

Secondary diagnosis 130 

Total 527 



ORTHOPEDIC OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

1938 

Congenital Malformations 

Head, neck and trunk 
Torticollis 

Myotomy 20 

Spine 

Anomaly of vertebrae 

Application of plaster shell 1 

Scoliosis, structural with Sprengel's deformity 

Application of traction 1 

Resection, angle of scapula 2 

Spina bifida 

Brewster counter-sinking 1 

Lower Extremities 

Anomaly of bone (femur) 

Excision 1 

Anomaly of toe 

Plastic with osteotomy 1 

Plastic with tendon lengthening 3 

Coxa vara 

Osteotomy and adductor myotomy 1 

Dislocation of hips 

Reduction, closed 14 

Reduction, open with shelf 1 

Reduction, open with shelf and osteotomy 1 

Reduction, open, without shelf 1 

Roger- Anderson traction 3 

Hammertoe deformity 

Tendon lengthening and tenotomy 

97 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Hemihypertrophy 

Epiphyseal arrest 1 

Talipes equino-valgus 

Application of wire traction 3 

Open reposition of astragalus 2 

Talipes equino-varus 

Application of wire traction 14 

Manipulation and application of plaster 9 

Manipulation and plantar fasciotomy 1 

Ober ligamentous 5 

Tendo-Achillis lengthening 4 

Triple arthrodesis 12 

Miscellaneous 

Anomalies, multiple 

Astragalostomy and insertion of wire traction 1 

Arachnodactylia 

Hoke arthrodesis and plantar fasciotomy 1 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 

Lower Extremities 

Contusion of thigh, old hematoma 

Exploration 

Dislocation, first metatarso-phalangeal joint 

Open reduction with osteotomy 

Fracture, femur 

Application of plaster spica 

Fracture, fibula 

Reduction, closed 

Fracture, tibia 

Reduction, closed 

Fracture, tibia, compound 

Debridement and fixation in plaster 

Genu valgum 

Osteotomy , 

Genu varum 

Osteoclasis and application of cast 

Recurrent dislocation of patella 

Stabilization operation 

Talipes equino-varus 

Manipulation and plaster 

Plantar fasciotomy and stabilization 

Revision of Hoke arthrodesis 



105 



98 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

During the past year the Orthopaedic Department has continued to 
function with a forward looking program. The relationship between 
this Department and the Pathology Department is working out very 
smoothly and our internes are appreciative of this contact. 

Undergraduate Teaching: 

The schedule of teaching third and fourth year Harvard Medical 
students continues as in the past. 

Postgraduate Teaching: 

This form of teaching is under the auspices of the Courses of 
Graduates, Harvard Medical School. In April 1938, there were fifteen 
in the course and in April, 1939, there were nine enrolled. This is a 
refresher course designed for general surgeons who wish to keep up with 
the latest methods used in Orthopaedic Surgery. There are usually a 
few men from the United States Army or Navy enrolled in this course. 

Physical Therapy Teaching: 

Miss Merrill continues to teach this subject both to the third year 
medical students and to a large class of women students who spend nine 
months here preparing themselves as technicians in this now important 
field. The usual summer school courses in physical therapy were given 
this past year. 

The hospital has cooperated with the Orthopaedic Unit Services 
for Crippled Children which is administered by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health. We have had a number of 
patients from this source. 

Visiting Staff: 

Dr. William Elliston has been appointed Assistant Visiting Surgeon. 
Dr. Robert J. Joplin resigned in 1939, because, owing to heavy com- 
mitments elsewhere, he did not feel he had the time to devote to the 
service of the hospital. 

Internes: 

There is always a large list of applicants for appointments on our 
interne service in spite of the fact that opportunities for internships are 
greater than they were a few years ago. 

81 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Chief Resident: 

Dr. Carroll Larson succeeded Dr. Dawson as chief resident. Dr. 
Larson is now practising in Boston and Dr. Leo McDermott has been 
made resident for this year. 

Research: 

Fundamental problems in research are being carried out in co- 
operation with the Department of Pathology at the hospital and two 
very excellent pieces of work have been completed. Clinical problems 
of research are always being produced by several members of the staff. 
The publication of the results redound, of course, to the credit of the 
hospital. It is in this way that the medical profession is kept in con- 
tact with the work being carried on at the Children's Hospital. 

It is my painful duty to report the deaths of two of our Staff mem- 
bers. Dr. Arthur T. Legg died suddenly in July, 1939. Dr. Legg gave 
unselfishly of his time to the Children's Hospital for many years. His 
valuable counsel and advice will be missed and his position at the 
hospital will be a hard one to fill. Dr. Seth Fitchet died in September 
of this year. He gave many years of devoted service to the Orthopaedic 
Department of the Children's Hospital. 

All the departments of the hospital have cooperated with our de- 
partment and for these contacts I am most grateful. 

Frank R. Ober, M.D. 



82 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

ORTHOPEDIC OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

1938 

Congenital Malformations 

Head, neck and trunk 

Absence of pectoralis major 2 

Klippel Fiel syndrome 3 

Anomaly of chest 1 

Anomaly of ear 1 

Anomaly of lip 1 

Anomaly of sternum 2 

Torticollis 52 

Spine 

Malformation of cervical spine 7 

Meningocele 2 

Scoliosis 1 

Spina bifida 7 

Upper Extremity 

Sprengel's deformity 1 

Hypertrophy of upper extremity only 1 

Anomaly of hands < 2 

Adduction of thumbs 1 

Lower Extremity 

Dislocation of hip 13 

Tibial torsion 1 

Club feet 40 

Calcaneo-valgus 27 

Coxa vara 1 

Claw foot 1 

Pes planus 1 

Anomaly of toes 9 

Miscellaneous 

Achondroplasia 1 

Amyotonia, congenita 1 

Anomalies, multiple 4 

Anomaly of semi-lunar cartilage 1 

Arthrogryposis 1 

Dyschondroplasia 2 

Hemihypertrophy 3 

Metatarsus varus 13 

Pilonidal sinus 2 

Undescended testicle 1 



83 



206 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Deformities ang Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 

Head, neck and trunk 

Sprain of back 1 

Sprain of lumbo-sacral junction 1 

Torticollis, acquired 7 

Spine 

Poor posture 65 

Scoliosis, functional 21 

Scoliosis, structural 4 

Upper Extremity 

Sprain of shoulder 2 

Fracture, clavicle 17 

Fracture, humerus 13 

Contracture of elbow, traumatic 1 

Dislocation of elbow 1 

Fracture, elbow 3 

Sprain of elbow 6 

Fracture, radius and ulna 17 

Dislocation of head of radius 1 

Displacement of radial epiphysis 1 

Fracture, radius 25 

Subluxation of radius 1 

Fracture, ulna 4 

Sprain of arm 6 

Contracture of wrist, traumatic 1 

Fracture, wrist - 1 

Sprain of wrist 4 

Fracture, metacarpal 1 

Fracture, phalanx 5 

Sprain of thumb 2 

Tenosynovitis of finger 1 

Lower Extremity 

Contracture of hamstrings 1 

Contracture of internal rotators 1 

Dislocation of hip, traumatic 1 

Muscle strain of leg 1 

Fracture, femur 9 

Contracture, flexion of knee, secondary to osteomyelitis .... 1 

Sprain of knee 2 

Fracture, tibia 8 

Epiphyseal injury of fibula 1 

Sprain of ankle 12 

Fracture, scaphoid 1 

Pronated feet 574 

Foot strain 32 

Hallux valgus 1 

84 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 

or Disease — Continued 

Hallux varus 1 

Pes cavus 12 

Pes planus . 15 

Metatarsus varus 1 

Fracture, metatarsals 1 

Prominent fifth metatarsal base 1 

Contracture of heel cords 10 

Contracture of posterior lateral structure 1 

Tenosynovitis of ankle 1 

Tenosynovitis of hip 3 

Tenosynovitis of knee . . . 2 

Tenosynovitis of pollicis longus 1 

Arthritis 

Arthritis, atrophic, elbow 2 

Arthritis, atrophic, knee 1 

Arthritis, suppurative, knee 3 

Arthritis, suppurative, hip 3 

Arthritis, traumatic, metatarsal phalangeal joint 

Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System 

Brodie's abscess 1 

Osteomyelitis, ankle 1 

Osteomyelitis, femur 5 

Osteomyelitis, ischium 1 

Osteomyelitis, radius 1 

Osteomyelitis, tibia 

Paralysis and Other Neuromuscular Diseases 

Amyotonia 1 

Dystrophy, psuedo-hypertrophic 10 

Paralysis, obstetrical 11 

Paralysis, spastic 28 

Poliomyelitis, old 34 

Rickets and Its Deformities 

Rickets with bow-legs 57 

Rickets with knock-knees 93 

Rickets (under 2 years) 12 

Rickets (over 2 years) 5 

Tumors 

Angioma, arm 1 

Baker's cyst 3 

85 



906 



— 10 



— 10 



84 



167 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Tumors — Continued 

Fibroma, clavicle 

Ganglion, wrist 

Ganglion, popliteal 

Hemangioma, scrotum. . . . 
Hematoma, sternomastoid . 
Intracranial lesion (tumor) 
Osteochondroma, coccyx. . 

Sebaceous cyst, ear 

Tumor, soft tissue, patella. 



— 13 



Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 

Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Apophysitis 10 

Bursitis 5 

Coxa plana 9 

Coxa valga 1 

Coxa vara 4 

Epiphysitis of spine 1 

Exostosis 3 

Kohler's disease 2 

Osgood Schlatter's disease 3 

Unclassified 

Abscess, lower extremities 1 

Abscess, upper extremities 1 

Birth injury 1 

Cataract, congenital 1 

Central nervous system lesion 1 

Contusions 15 

Dystrophy of toenails 1 

Encephalomyelitis 1 

Enuresis 1 

Epidermophytosis 1 

Generalized ligamentous relaxation 3 

Habit spasm 2 

Hemarthrosis 1 

Hematoma 7 

Hemophilia 1 

Hernia, umbilical 1 

Hydrocephalus 1 

Hypertrophy of fat pads of feet 1 

Impetigo 1 

Lymphangiectasis 1 

Lymphadenitis 4 

Malnutrition 4 

86 



— 38 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Unclassified — Continued 

Mental deficiency 

Nutritional disturbance 

Obesity 

Osteochondritis of femoral epiphysis 

Otitis media 

Paronychia 

Peripheral nerve injury, old 

Phimosis 

Plantar wart 

Rupture, extensor tendon of finger 

Rupture, medial meniscus of knee 

Strabismus 2 

Telangiectasis . . 2 

Tonsillitis 3 

Upper respiratory infection 2 

Verruca 1 

— 75 

Deferred 11 

Eloped 5 

No disease 32 

Not seen 5 

— 53 

New cases 877 

Secondary diagnosis 685 

Total 1562 



ORTHOPEDIC DISEASES TREATED IN THE 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

1939 

Congenital Malformations 

Head, Neck and Trunk 

Anomaly of nose (developmental) 1 

Anomaly of skull 1 

Asymmetry of head 1 

Hematoma, sterno-mastoid 4 

Torticollis 52 

Deformity of chest 3 

Pectus excavtum 1 

Deformity of ribs and sternum 1 

Klippel-Feil Syndrome 2 

Spine 

Anomaly of coccyx 1 

Anomaly of spine 2 

87 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Lumbar hemivertebrae 1 

Scoliosis 4 

Spina bifida 4 

Spina bifida with meningocele 1 

Spina bifida with paralysis 1 

Upper extremity 

Sprengel's deformity 3 

Deformity of arm 1 

Hypertrophy of arm 1 

Synostosis, radius and ulna 2 

Club hands 1 

Deformity of hands 2 

Deformity of fingers 2 

Syndactylism, fingers 1 

Trigger finger 1 

Lower extremity 

Dislocation of hips 14 

Bow-legs 3 

Deformity of leg 1 

Deformity of knees 1 

Genu valgum 3 

Torsion of tibiae 5 

Deformity of foot 1 

Flat feet 2 

Club feet 71 

Cong, cavus feet 7 

Talipes equino varus 43 

Cong, calcaneo valgus 18 

Cong, talipes varus 3 

Cock-up deformity of toe 5 

Deformity of toes, miscellaneous 13 

Metatarus varus 11 

Accessory scaphoid 1 

Adduction of toes 2 

Overlapping toes 1 

Miscellaneous 

Achondroplasia 1 

Amyotonia 4 

Anomalies, multiple 7 

Arthrogryposis 2 

Dyschondroplasia 2 

Hemihypertrophy 1 

Osteogenesis imperfecta . 1 



88 



246 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 
or Disease 

Head, Neck and Trunk 

Sprain, back 1 

Sprain, neck 2 

Strain, back, chronic . 2 

Deformity of chest 2 

Pectus carinatum 1 

Torticollis, ? etiology 2 

Torticollis, positional 1 

Torticollis, spastic 1 

Torticollis, traumatic 1 

Spine 

Dislocation, cervical vertebra 1 

Poor posture 69 

Scoliosis, functional 11 

Scoliosis, structural 3 

Upper extremity 

Sprain, shoulder 2 

Fracture, clavicle 21 

Sprain, arm 3 

Flexion deformity, elbow 1 

Sprain, elbow 8 

Tenosynovitis, elbow 2 

Malunion of fracture, external epicondyle and capitullum. . 1 

Traumatic synovitis of elbow 1 

Fracture, humerus 30 

Separation of epiphysis, capitullum of humerus 1 

Fracture, radius 13 

Separation of epiphysis, radial-distal 1 

Subluxation, head of radius 3 

Fracture, ulna 4 

Fracture, radius and ulna 14 

Sprain, wrist 1 

Fracture, metacarpal 1 

Fracture, phalanx of finger 3 

Hemarthrosis, interphalangeal 1 

Lower extremity 

Tenosynovitis, hip 4 

Fracture, femur 1 

Epiphyseal injury, distal femur 1 

Slipped epiphysis, proximal femur 2 

Hematoma, thigh 1 

Hematoma, leg 1 

Contracture, hamstrings 16 

Dislocation, cartilage of knee 1 

89 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 

or Disease — Continued 

Flexion deformity, hips and knees 

Flexion deformity, knees 

Fracture, semilunar cartilage of knee 

Hyperextended knee 

Tenosynovitis, knee 

Fracture, tibia 

Fracture, tibia and fibula 

Torsion, tibial 

Fracture, malleolus, external 

Fracture, pubis 

Destructive process of ilium 

Effusion of ankle, traumatic 

Hematoma, ankle 

Sprain, ankle 

Contracture, fascial 

Contracture, heel cords 

Contracture, posterior structures of thigh 

Spasm, peroneal, foot 

Foot strain 

Acute Endemic Limp 

Spur, os calci, traumatic 

Fracture, phalanx of toes 



Tuberculosis 

Pott's disease 

Tuberculosis, hip 

Tuberculosis, knee 

Non-Tuberculous Arthritis 

Arthritis, atrophic — generalized. . . 

Arthritis, atrophic, knee 

Arthritis, toxic, knee 

Arthritis, atrophic, wrist and ankle. 

Arthritis, gonorrheal, wrist 

Septic ankle 

Septic elbow 

Septic knee 

Toxic hip 



Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System 

Osteomyelitis, femur 

Osteomyelitis, humerus 

Osteomyelitis, ilium 

Osteomyelitis, rib 



1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

14 
3 
9 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

20 
7 

13 
1 
1 

21 
6 
1 
1 



3 

1 
1 
1 



347 



1 
2 

1 
— 4 



14 



90 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 
or Disease — Continued 

Osteomyelitis, tibia 2 

Periostitis, fibula 1 

— 9 
Paralysis and Other Neuromuscular Diseases 

Dystrophy, muscular 6 

Paralysis, facial 2 

Paralysis, obstetrical 16 

Paralysis, spastic, cerebral 25 

Poliomyelitis, acute 2 

Poliomyelitis, old 7 

— 58 

Rickets and Its Deformities 

Rickets with bow-legs 66 

Rickets with knock-knees 140 

Rickets 23 

229 

Tumors 

Cyst, tibia 1 

Ganglion, popliteal 6 

Ganglion, wrist 2 

Warts, plantar 2 

— 11 
Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 

Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Apophysitis — os calcis 7 

Anteversion, femoral neck 37 

Bursitis 4 

Cavus feet 13 

Dysostosis, multiplex 1 

Hallux valgus 2 

Legg's Disease (Coxa Plana) 4 

Legamentous, relaxation 13 

Muscle strain 1 

Osgood Schlatter's Disease 1 

Plantar fat pads 1 

Pronated feet 550 

634 

Unclassified 

Abrasions 2 

Abscess, lower extremities 1 

Adenoids, hypertrophied 1 

Birth injury 2 

Bursa 2 

Callus 1 

91 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Unclassified — Continued 

Cellulitis, ankle 1 

Cellulitis, foot 1 

Cerebral deficiency 1 

Cerebral thrombosis 1 

Chorea 1 

Contusions 15 

Epidermophytosis 4 

Glandular dysfunction 1 

Guillain Barre's disease 1 

Heart disease, congenital 3 

Hemorrhagic Disease of Newborn 1 

Hernia, umbilical 2 

Hydrocephalus 2 

Hypermobility of joints 1 

Impetigo 3 

Ingrown toenail 1 

Intertrigo 1 

Joint Mouse 1 

Laceration 1 

Malnutrition 1 

Nephritis 1 

Nutritional disturbance 1 

Obesity 2 

Peripheral nerve injury 1 

Pertussis 1 

Phimosis f 2 

Rheumatic fever 1 

Tonsillitis 1 

Upper respiratory infection 1 

— 63 
Deferred 41 

No disease 36 

— 77 

New cases 989 

Secondary diagnosis 703 

Total 1692 

ORTHOPEDIC DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1938 

Congenital Malformations New Old 

Head, neck and trunk 

Torticollis 22 3 

Spine 

Anomaly of spine 2 1 

Scoliosis, structural with Sprengel's deformity 1 

Spina bifida 4 7 

92 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Congenital Malformations — Continued New Old 

Upper Extremities 

Club hand 1 

Deformity of ulna (cord constriction with gangrene) 1 

Lower Extremities 

Absence of lower leg 1 

Anomaly of femur . . . . 1 

Cavus foot 1 

Claw feet 1 

Cock-up deformity of toe or toes 5 1 

Coxa vara 2 

Dislocation of hip 23 15 

Hemihypertrophy 1 

Pronated feet . . . 2 1 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus , 1 1 

Talipes equino-valgus 1 2 

Talipes equino-varus 26 15 

Miscellaneous 

Anomalies, multiple 7 4 

Arachnodactylia 1 

Hemiatrophy 1 

Microcephalus 1 

Pilonidal sinus 1 



105 52 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 
or Disease 

Head, neck and trunk 

Fracture, skull 6 1 

Lacerations of face 1 

Torticollis, acute 6 2 

Spine 

Compression fractures, dorsal vertebrae 1 

Scoliosis, functional 1 1 

Upper Extremities 

Fracture, elbow 1 

Fracture, humerus 8 1 

Fracture, radius 3 1 

Fracture, radius and ulna 6 1 

Injury to profundus tendon 1 

Laceration of elbow 1 

Severed tendons of hand 2 

Subluxation of elbow 1 

Subluxation of shoulder 1 

93 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 

or Disease — Continued New Old 

Lower Extremities 

Abrasion of foot 1 

Dislocation of hip, old sepsis 1 

Dislocation, first metatarsal phalangeal joint 1 

Fracture, femur 10 

Fracture, fibula 1 

Fracture, tibia 5 1 

Genu valgum 1 

Genu varum 1 

Recurrent dislocation of patella 1 

Slipped upper femoral epiphysis 1 

Sprain of ankle 1 

Talipes equino-varus 2 

Tear of meniscus 4 

69 8 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis of foot 1 

Tuberculosis of spine 1 

2 
Arthritis 

Arthritis, atrophic 4 2 

Arthritis, suppurative 

Ankle ' 2 

Elbow 1 

Hip 3 

Knee 2 

Multiple 4 

Arthritis, tuberculous 

Knee 1 

17 2 

Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System 

Brodie's abscess 1 

Osteomyelitis 

Femur 9 

Humerus 1 

Ischium 1 

Multiple foci 1 

Radius 2 1 

Tibia ! 5 

Periostitis of tibia 3 



94 



22 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Miscellaneous of Bones, Joints, Muscles, 

Tendons and Fascia New Old 

Adhesions of tendo-Achillis 1 

Amyotonia, congenita 1 

Arthrogryposis 3 1 

Bursitis 3 

Contracture of tendo-Achillis 1 

Coxa magna 1 

Coxa plana 3 

Coxa vara 1 

Ganglia, multiple, on foot 2 

Hemarthrosis (hemophilia) 1 

Hydrarthrosis of knee 2 

Kyphosis ; 1 

Muscular dystrophy 7 1 

Osseous dystrophy (Morquio's disease) 1 

Osteogenesis imperfecta 3 

Peroneal palsy — etiology undetermined 1 

Supination deformity of forearm 1 

Synovitis 4 

Tenosynovitis 2 

Traumatic shortening of radius 1 

38 ~4 
Tumors 

Benign lesion of ilium — etiology undetermined 1 

Ganglion of joint 1 

Ganglion of tendon sheath 1 

Hemangioma of spine 1 

Hemangioma of thigh 5 1 

Lipoma of foot . 1 

Osteitis fibrosis cystica 1 

Osteitis fibrosis cystica localisata 1 

Osteochondroma 3 

Tumor of flexor tendon sheath of hand 1 

Tumor, tibia (Endarteritis obliterans) 1 

16 ~2 
Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Deficiency, mental 2 

Dejerine-Sottas disease 1 

Encephalitis 1 

Hydrocephalus 3 

Myelitis . 1 

Neuritis, due to lead 1 

Paralysis, brachial 9 

Paralysis, spastic 12 

Poliomyelitis, old 46 40 

72 44 
95 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Rachitic Deformities 

Bowing of legs 

Bowing of tibia 

Knock knees 

Multiple 



Unclassified 

Abscess, subcutaneous 

Anemia, secondary 

Bronchitis 

Calculus of submaxillary gland .... 

Cellulitis 

Deferred 

Dental caries 

Dermatitis 

Dislocated lens 

Eczema 

Epidermyophytosis 

Erysipelas 

Furuncle of neck 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Hematoma 

Hemophilia 

Hernia, inguinal 

Hernia, umbilical 

Hypertrophied tonsils and adenoids . 

Infection, olecranon bursa 

Infection, upper respiratory 

Infection, wound 

Lymphadenitis, cervical 

Lymphadenitis, inguinal 

Lymphadenitis, suppurative 

Syringomyelia 

Trophic ulcers 

Malnutrition 

Myopia 

Nystagmus 

Obesity 

Otitis media 

Phimosis 

Pneumonia, secondary 

Scar of leg , 

Sepsis of foot and toes 

Sinusitis 

Strabismus 

Strain, acute 

Talipes cavo-varus 



New 
1 
2 
1 
2 

6 
3 



Old 



2 

1 
2 
2 
1 

2 



3 
2 
1 



96 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 

or Disease — Continued 

Tear of meniscus 

Excision 

Upper Extremities 
Dislocation of elbow 

Reduction, closed 

Fracture, humerus 

Reduction, closed 

Fracture, radius 

Manipulation and plaster 

Reduction, open 

Fracture, radius and ulna 

Reduction, closed . . : 

Reduction, open 

Severed tendons of hand 

Muscle and tendon transplant 

Arthritis 

Arthritis, atrophic 

Knee aspiration 

Arthritis, suppurative 

Ankle — Incision and drainage 

Elbow — Incision and drainage 

Hip — Aspiration only 

Incision and drainage 

Knee — Aspiration only 

Incision and drainage 

Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System 

Brodie's abscess 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis, femur 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis, ischium 

Incision and drainage and osteotomy 

Osteomyelitis, multiple foci 

Curettage 

Incision and drainage 

Sequestrectomy 

Osteomyelitis, radius 

Incision and drainage 

Sequestrectomy 

99 



1 

8 

2 
1 

3 

1 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
— 8 



1 

4 

1 

1 
6 
2 

1 
1 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System — Continued 

Osteomyelitis, tibia 

Incision and drainage 1 

Periostitis 

Biopsy 1 

— 19 

Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Muscular dystrophy 

Biopsy of muscle 5 

Triple arthrodesis 1 

Neuritis, due to lead 

Arthrodesis, triple, and plantar fasciotomy 1 

Paralysis, brachial 

Exploration, brachial plexus 1 

L'Episcopo operation and Sever operation 1 

Reduction, open, shoulder 2 

Sever operation 2 

Paralysis, spastic 

Adductor myotomy and neurectomy 2 

Arthrodesis, Hoke 2 

Cistern puncture 1 

Lengthening of hamstring muscles 1 

Lengthening of tendo-Achillis 2 

Muscle and tendon transplant 2 

Stoffel operation 1 

Poliomyelitis, old 

Application of wire traction 4 

Arthrodesis, shoulder 1 

Arthrodesis, triple 14 

Brewster counter-sinking 9 

Epiphyseal arrest 2 

Erector spinae transplant 3 

Hoke arthrodesis and tendon transplant 8 

Mid-tarsal osteotomy with plantar fasciotomy 3 

Muscle transplant 20 

Nicola operation 1 

Ober fasciotomy 1 

Osteotomy, Macewen 1 

Panarthrodesis 1 

Plantar fasciotomy 2 

Spinal fusion 1 

— 95 

100 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Rachitic Deformities 

Rickets 

Osteoclasis of tibia 2 

Osteotomy of tibia 2 

Tumors 

Benign tumor of ilium 

Biopsy 1 

Ganglion of joint 

Excision 2 

Ganglion of tendon sheath 

Excision 2 

Hemangioma of thigh 

Excision 1 

Lipoma, sole of foot 

Excision 1 

Osteitis fibrosa cystica localisata 

Exploration and curettage 2 

Osteochondroma 

Excision 3 

Synovioma of flexor tendon sheath, hand 

Excision 1 

Tumor of tibia (Endarteritis Obliterans) 

Partial excision 1 



14 



Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 
Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Adhesions of tendo-Achillis 

Lysis of adhesions 1 

Hydrarthrosis of knee 

Aspiration 2 

Synovitis of hip 

Aspiration 3 

Traumatic shortening of radius 

Epiphyseal arrest and osteotomy of ulna 1 

— 7 

Unclassified 

Abscesses, subcutaneous 

Incision and drainage 3 

Hematoma 

Incision and drainage 1 

101 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Unclassified — Continued 

Scar of leg 

Freeing of scar 

Syringomyelia 

Biopsy of nodules, forearm and foot 

Talipes cavo-varus 

Biopsy, Saphenous nerve, Steindler stripping and application 
of cast 

Tonsillitis 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 

Application of plaster 1 

Total number of operations 306 

Total number of anesthesias in Orthopedic ward 345 

Total number of anesthesias in Private Ward 54 



Total anesthesias 399 



ORTHOPEDIC DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1939 

Congenital Malformations New Old 
Head, neck and trunk 

Torticollis 29 2 

Spine 

Fusion defect of posterior vertebral arch 2 1 

Hemi-vertebrae 1 1 

Klippel-Fiel syndrome 2 1 

Miningocele with spina bifida 2 1 

Scoliosis, structural 4 2 

Upper Extremities 

Club hand 2 1 

Deformity of finger 1 

Deformity of hand 1 

SprengePs deformity 3 

Synostosis of radius and ulna 2 

Lower Extremities 

Accessory scaphoid bone 1 

Anomaly of toe 1 

Coxa vara 1 

Deformity of foot 1 

Deformity of leg 1 

Discoid external meniscus of knee 1 

102 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Congenital Malformations — Continued New Old 

Dislocation of hip 15 12 

Hallux valgus 2 

Overlapping fifth toe 1 

Partial absence of tibia 1 

Polydaetylism 1 

Rudimentary feet , 1 

Shortening of leg 2 

Syndactylism 2 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus 1 

Talipes calcaneo-varus . . 2 

Talipes cavus 1 

Talipes equino-cavus 1 1 

Talipes equino-cavo-varus 3 2 

Talipes equino-valgus 1 1 

Talipes equino-varus 31 38 

Miscellaneous 

Arachnoidactylia 1 

Multiple congenital anomalies 3 6 

Pilonidal sinus 1 

Shortening of arm and leg 1 



123 72 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 
or Disease 

Spine 

Scoliosis, functional 4 

Scoliosis, structural 4 

Spondylolisthesis 1 

Upper Extremities 

Dislocation of elbow joint 1 

Fracture, carpo-scaphoid 1 

Fracture, cuneiform 1 

Fracture, humerus 6 

Fracture, radius and ulna 6 

Fracture, ulna 2 

Trigger thumb, acquired 2 

Lower Extremities 

Contracture, post-traumatic, fascia of thigh 1 

Deformity of hip, post-infectious 1 

Epiphyseolysis capital femoral epiphysis 3 

Fracture, femur 8 

Fracture, pelvis 1 

Fracture, tibia and fibula (delayed union) 

103 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 
or Disease — Continued 

Laceration of knee 

Mal-union of fracture of fibula 

Sprain of internal lateral ligament of knee 

Miscellaneous 

Scurvy 



New Old 
1 



44 



Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 

Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Arthrogryposis 3 

Contracture, heel cords 1 

Contracture, from birth injury 1 

Cyst, meniscus of knee 2 

Dermatomyositis 

Developmental cyst of tibia 1 

Dyschondroplasia 2 

Hemarthrosis (hemophilia) 1 

Hydrarthrosis of knee 2 

Inflammatory mass, sole of foot 1 

Juvenile kyphosis 1 

Non-union following fracture of clavicle 1 

Osteitis fibrosis disseminata 2 

Osteochondritis dissecans 1 

Osteochondritis, tibia and fibula 2 

Osteogenesis imperfecta ' 4 

Relaxation of ligamentous structures 2 

Tenosynovitis 1 

Tibio-fibula synostosis 1 

Undiagnosed condition of hip 7 

Undiagnosed condition of knee 2 

Undiagnosed condition of pelvis 1 

39 
Tumors 

Fibroma of flexor pollicis longus tendon 1 

Lipoma, scapular region 1 

Lymphoblastoma, lymphnodes 

Neuroblastoma with bony metastases 1 

Osteogenic sarcoma of tibia 1 

Popliteal ganglion 2 

6 
Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Abduction contracture of hip, post-poliomyelitis 1 

Birth injury of spinal cord 

104 



2 
3 
1 



10 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular 

Diseases — Continued New Old 

Cerebral palsy 18 10 

Charcot-Marie Tooth type of neuro-muscular atrophy .... 1 

Deficiency, mental 6 1 

Dystrophy, muscular 8 2 

Foot drop, post-poliomyelitis 1 

Hematoma, subdural 1 

Hydrocephalus 2 

Morvan's disease 1 

Myeloradiculitis 2 

Paralysis, brachial 6 5 

Paralysis, post-poliomyelitis 33 18 

Peroneal palsy 1 

Porencephaly 1 

Sprain of internal lateral ligament of knee 1 

Talipes calcaneo-cavo-valgus, post-poliomyelitis 1 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus, post-poliomyelitis 4 1 

Talipes calcaneo-varus, post-poliomyelitis 2 

Talipes calcaneus, post-poliomyelitis 1 

Talipes cavo-varus, post-poliomyelitis 2 4 

Talipes cavus, post-poliomyelitis 7 

Talipes equino-valgus, post-poliomyelitis 1 

Talipes equino-varus, post-poliomyelitis 4 1 

Talipes equinus, post-poliomyelitis 1 1 

103 48 
Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis, hip 1 

Tuberculosis, lung 2 

Tuberculosis, tibia 1 

Tuberculous meningitis 1 

Tuberculous spondylitis 1 

5 1 

Arthritis 

Arthritis, atrophic, generalized 6 

Arthritis, rheumatoid, knee 1 

Arthritis, suppurative 

ankle 1 1 

elbow 1 

hip ; 3 

knee 4 

Arthritis, traumatic . 1 1 

Toxic hip 6 

23 2 



105 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Infections, Non-Tuberculous of Osseous System New Old 

Destructive process of lamina, lumbar vertebra, type un- 
determined 1 

Osteomyelitis — Femur 4 2 

Garre (fibula) 1 

Humerus 3 

Ilium 2 

Ilium and clavicle 1 

Multiple 3 2 

Radius 1 

Tibia 2 

15 7 

Rachitic Deformities 

Rachitic changes in thorax 1 

Rickets, active 1 

Rickets, healed 2 

Rickets, old 1 1 

Rickets, with bow legs 6 1 

Rickets, with knock knees 4 3 

14 6 

Unclassified 

Abscess, subcutaneous 10 

Anemia, secondary 2 

Bacteremia 1 

Cardiac decompensation 1 

Catarrhal jaundice 1 

Concussion of brain 2 

Deferred 3 

Dental caries 6 

Diastasis recti 1 

Epidermophytosis 1 

Epilepsy 1 

Hematoma (hemophilia) 1 

Hematuria 1 

Hernia 6 

Hypertrophied tonsils and adenoids 8 

Hypospadias 1 

Impetigo 1 

Infection, wound 3 

Intestinal parasites 1 

Leukemia 1 

Mastoiditis 1 

Nephritis 2 

Obesity 1 

Otitis media 3 

106 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Unclassified — Continued New Old 

Paronychia 1 

Phimosis 6 

Rheumatic fever 3 

Septicemia 1 

Strabismus 1 

Thrush 1 

Undescended testicle . 4 1 

75 1 

Number of cases treated in Orthopedic Ward 360 

Number of cases treated in Private Ward 54 

Total 414 

New cases 447 

Secondary diagnosis . 157 

Total 604 



ORTHOPEDIC OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

1939 

Congenital Malformations 

Head, Neck and Trunk 
Torticollis 

Myotomy 24 

Spine 

Klippel-Fiel syndrome 1 

Encephalogram 1 

Scoliosis, structural 

Fasciotomy 2 

Spinal fusion 3 

Upper Extremities 
Club hand 

Osteotomy 2 

Deformity of finger 

Osteotomy 1 

Sprengel's deformity 

Ober operation 2 

Synostosis of ulna and radius 

Osteotomy and insertion of fascia 1 

Lower Extremities 

Accessory scaphoid bone 

Excision 1 

107 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Anomaly of toe 

Plastic 

Dislocation of hip 

Application of wire traction 

Insertion of pin and plaster cast 

Reduction, closed 

Reduction, closed, and tenotomy 

Reduction, open 

Shelf operation 

Overlapping fifth toes 

Tenoplasty 

Partial absence of tibia 

Bone lengthening 

Talipes equino-varus 

Application of wire traction 

Astragalectomy 

Capsulotomy and tendon transplant 

Capsulotomy and tendo-Achillis lengthening 

Manipulation and application of cast (under anesthesia). 

Plantar fasciotomy and wire traction 

Plastic operation to fifth toe 

Posterior and medial capsulotomy of ankle 

Ober ligamentous 

Osteotomy of fibula 

Tendo-Achillis lengthening 

Tendon transplant 

Triple arthrodesis 

Triple arthrodesis and tendon transplant 

Wedge osteotomy and Steindler stripping 

Miscellaneous 

Multiple congenital anomalies 

Application of wire traction 

Manipulation and application of cast 

Plastic 

Removal of wire traction and application of plaster 



1 
1 
11 
2 
4 
1 



15 
1 
1 
6 

26 
1 
1 
7 
4 
1 
1 
1 

14 
2 
1 



146 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 

Spine 

Scoliosis, structural 

Application of wire traction 

Fasciotomy 

Spinal fusion 

108 



2 
2 

2 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 
or Disease — Continued 

Upper Extremities 
Fracture, humerus 

Reduction, closed 3 

Repositioning 1 

Fracture, radius and ulna 

Reduction with application of plaster 5 

Fracture, ulna 

Reduction, fluoroscopic 1 

Trigger thumb, acquired 

Tenoplasty 2 

Lower Extremities 

Deformity of knee 

Manipulation 1 

Muscle and tendon transplant 1 

Epiphysiolysis — capital femoral epiphysis 

Reduction 1 

Fracture, femur 

Application of wire traction t 

Reduction, closed, with application of traction 2 

Fracture, tibia and fibula 

Reduction, fluoroscopic, with application of wire traction . . 1 

Removal of wire traction 1 



26 



Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis of hip 

Exploration and biopsy. 

Tuberculosis of tibia 

Exploration with biopsy . 



— 2 



Infections, Non-Specific, of Osseous System 

Destructive process of lamina, lumbar vertebra, type undeter- 
mined 
Biopsy of lamina 2 

Osteomyelitis, femur 

Gas dressing 2 

Incision and drainage 1 

Sequestrectomy 1 

Osteomyelitis, Garre (fibula) 

Biopsy 1 

Osteomyelitis, humerus 

Aspiration 1 

109 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Infections, Non-Specific, Osseous System — Continued 

Osteomyelitis, multiple 

Incision and drainage 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy 

Osteomyelitis, radius 

Sequestrectomy 

Osteomyelitis, tibia 

Application of wire traction and sequestrectomy 

Incision and drainage 

Rachitic Deformities 

Rickets with bow legs 

Osteoclasis of tibia 

Osteotomy of femur 

Osteotomy of tibia 

Repositioning of leg and application of plaster 

Rickets with knock knees 

Osteotomy of femur 

Osteotomy of tibia 

Removal of sutures and re-wrapping of cast 

Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 
Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia 

Arthrogryposis 

Encephalogram 

Cyst, meniscus of knee 

Excision 

Hydrarthrosis, knee 

Aspiration 

Inflammatory mass of sole of foot 

Biopsy 

Non-union following fracture of clavicle 

Excision of false joint 

Osteitis fibrosis 

Biopsy, tibia 

Osteochondritis dissecans of femur 

Removal of free body 

Osteochondritis, tibia 

Osteotomy of tibiae 

Undiagnosed condition of hip 

Aspiration 

Biopsy 

Undiagnosed condition of knee 

Aspiration 



4 
1 



1 

2 



3 
2 
4 
1 

2 
2 
1 



15 



2 

2 



— 14 



110 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Tumors 

Fibroma of flexor pollicis longus tendon 

Tenoplasty 

Neuroblastoma with bony metastases 

Biopsy of tibia 

Popliteal ganglion 

Excision 

Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Abduction contracture of hip, post-poliomyelitis 

Division of ilio-tibial band and intermuscular septum with 
muscle and tendon transplant 

Cerebral Palsy 

Adductor myotomy . 

Adductor myotomy and neurectomy 

Encephalogram 

Erector spinae transplant 

Insertion of wire traction 

Muscle and tendon transplant 

Contracture, flexion, adduction, wrist, post-poliomyelitis 

Tendon transplant 

Dystrophy, muscular 

Biopsy 

Biopsy, frozen 

Fasciotomy 

Paralysis, brachial 

Neurectomy, nerve, gastrocnemius 

Osteotomy of radius and ulna 

Sever operation , 

Tenotomy of hamstrings 

Triple arthrodesis 

Triple arthrodesis and tendon transplant 

Paralysis, post-poliomyelitis 

Arthrodesis, shoulder 

Brewster counter-sinking 

Epiphyseo-diaphyseal fusion 

Erector spinae transplant 

Exploration of old tendon transplant 

Fascial sling to palm 

Osteotomy of tibia 

Panarthrodesis 

Plastic operation for hallux valgus 

Posterior bone block, ankle 

Revision of tendon transplant 

Steindler stripping 

Ill 



1 
1 

1 

— 3 



3 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 



6 
6 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
5 
2 

2 
3 
2 
2 
1 
2 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases — Continued 

Tendon transplant ; 

Transposition of bone block, ankle 

Triple arthrodesis 

Triple arthrodesis and tendon transplant 

Peroneal palsy 

Muscle and tendon transplant 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus, post-poliomyelitis 

Triple arthrodesis 

Triple arthrodesis and tendon transplant 

Change of dressing and cast reapplied 

Talipes calcaneo-varus, post-poliomyelitis 

Wedge osteotomy 

Talipes cavo-varus, post-poliomyelitis 

Manipulation and reapplication of cast 

Removal of wire traction 

Steindler stripping, plantar fasciotomy and application of 
wire traction 

Wedge osteotomy 

Talipes cavus, post-poliomyelitis 

Fasciotomy, Steindler stripping and application of wire 
traction 

Removal of wire traction 

Triple arthrodesis 

Triple arthrodesis and Steindler stripping . 

Talipes equino-cavo-varus, post-poliomyelitis 

Plantar fasciotomy, Steindler stripping and application of 
wire traction 

Triple arthrodesis 

Triple arthrodesis and tendon transplant 

Revision of transplant 



110 



Unclassified 

Abscess, subcutaneous 

Incision and drainage, anterior aspect, lower leg 1 

Incision and drainage, chest wall 1 

Incision and drainage, gluteal region 1 

Incision and drainage, groin 2 

Incision and drainage, occipital region 1 

Infected wound 

Incision and drainage 1 

Removal of wires and incision and drainage 

Total number of operations 341 

Total number of anesthesias on Orthopedic Ward 342 

Total number of anesthesias on Private Ward 51 

Total 

112 



— 8 



393 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

The various activities of the Department of Pathology as described in 
the last report, have continued with an increasing demand upon the 
members of the department. There was a slight increase in the number 
of autopsies, and an appreciable increase in the number of surgical 
specimens examined. 

The first volume of a projected series of studies by Dr. J. L. Conel 
on the "Postnatal Development of the Human Cerebral Cortex" has 
appeared since the last report. This book, "The Cortex of the New- 
born" represents the results of seven years' work. It already has had 
important recognition and will become classic. Its publication was 
made possible by a grant from the John and Mary R. Markle Founda- 
tion. Funds from this source insure a continuation of Dr. Conel's 
work for another three years, by which time it is hoped that the studies 
necessary to describe and illustrate the development of the human brain 
will have been completed. The information Dr. Conel is supplying 
will be of permanent value to future investigators of neurological and 
psychiatrical diseases of children and adults. 

The value of routine autopsies performed in a thorough and careful 
manner was borne out by observations which led to the discovery that 
equine encephalitis is a disease which affects the human. On Septem- 
ber 3, 1938, a child died after a very short and somewhat unusual 
clinical course. A postmortem examination was carried out, and within 
a few days a diagnosis of encephalitis was made. The cooperation of 
the members of the Department of Bacteriology of Harvard Medical 
School and of workers in the Rockefeller Institute in New York City 
resulted in the identification of the causative agent as the virus of 
equine encephalitis. 

The attached list of publications demonstrates the variety of in- 
terests in the Department. 

The facilities of the Department of Pathology were utilized in the 
training of 25 doctors during 1938 and 1939. Some of these men had 
regular appointments, and others acted as Voluntary Assistants. The 
function of the Department of Pathology in the postgraduate training 
of doctors has been a most important one. In the ten years ending 
December 31, 1938, ninety doctors received training in the Department 
of Pathology, either as house officers, residents, or voluntary assistants. 
This number does not include a fairly large number of students who 
were admitted each summer for additional work in pathology. The 

113 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

policy of the Department has been to take in as many carefully selected 
men, either as house officers or voluntary assistants, as the Department 
can possibly hold. This is one of the few places in the world where 
adequate training in the pathology of diseases in infancy and childhood 
can be obtained. The increase in the requirements made by the various 
specialty boards has made some post-graduate training in pathology a 
necessity for many men. How far the Department can go in the direc- 
tion of post-graduate training in this unofficial manner can be an- 
swered by the physical limits of the laboratory and by the ability of the 
members of the Pathology Department to give time in directing and 
teaching these men. 

During 1939 the Department of Pathology played host to Dr. Fred- 
eric Thomas, head of the Department of Legal Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Ghent, Belgium, who came as a Senior Fellow of the Belgian- 
American Educational Foundation to work on the pathology of early 
life, with particular reference to medico-legal questions. Additional 
international flavor was added to the laboratory by the part-time ac- 
tivities of two Cuban doctors — Dr. Santamarina and Dr. Galan. 

There has been steady growth in volume and importance of the 
work done in the Pathological Department. The value of its services 
is freely recognized by the other departments, including the adminis- 
tration, and therefore it has been supported in an adequate manner. 
Comparison with the expenditures of other hospitals for pathological 
service indicates that the department is very economically adminis- 
tered, due to the able managements of Dr. Farber and Mr. Meyer. 

The time is approaching when an additional full-time man should 
be added to the staff of the department to free more of Dr. Farber's 
time in order to secure more fully the advantages of his wide training 
and experience for research work on his own initiative as well as in 
cooperation with other departments of the hospital. Through Dr. 
Farber, the Pathological Department has become the foremost of its 
kind in the world. Demands for instruction are growing and additional 
space would be highly desirable for teaching purposes, hence the time 
has come when a joint consideration of many issues on the part of the 
Hospital and Medical School is in order. 

S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. 



114 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

PUBLICATIONS* 

1938-1939 

Ingalls, Theodore Hunt: Studies on the Urinary Excretion and Blood Concen- 
tration of Ascorbic Acid in Infantile Scurvy. J. Ped., 10: 577, May, 1937. 
Ascorbic Acid Requirements in Early Infancy. N. E. J. Med., 218: 872, May, 
1938. 

Krakower, Cecil; and Botsford, Thomas W.: Intestinal Pneumatosis. J. Ped., 
13: 185, August, 1938. 

Conel, J. LeRoy: Distribution of Affected Nerve Cells in a Case of Amyotonia 
Congenita. Arch. Neuro, and Psychiatry, 40: 337, August, 1938. 

Fothergill, LeRoy D.; Dingle, John H.; Farber, Sidney; and Connerley, 
M. L.: Human Encephalitis caused by the Virus of the Eastern Variety of 
Equine Encephalomyelitis. N. E. J. Med., 219: 411, September, 1938. 

Farber, Sidney: Unexpected Death in Early Life. N. E. J. Med., 219: 836, Novem- 
ber, 1938. 

Ladd, William E.: Embryoma of the Kidney (Wilms' Tumor). Ann. Surg., 108: 
885, November, 1938. 

Blackfan, Kenneth D. ; and May, Charles D. : Inspissation of Secretion, Dilatation 
of the Ducts and Acini, Atrophy and Fibrosis of the Pancreas in Infants. J. 
Ped., 13: 627, November, 1938. 

Smith, Clement A.: The Dangers of Tuberculosis in Childhood. N. E. J. Med., 
219: 260, 1938. 

Farber, Sidney: Pathological Aspects of Cyanosis. N. E. J. Med., 219: 904, 
December, 1938. 

Jump, Ellis B.: The Vascularity of the Human Enamel Organ. J. Dent. Res., 17: 
525, December, 1938. 

Conel, J. LeRoy: The Postnatal Development of the Human Cerebral Cortex. 
December, 1938. Harvard University Press. 

Harris, Jerome S.; and Farber, Sidney: Transposition of the Great Cardiac 

Vessels. Arch. Path., 28: 427, October, 1939. 

Shohl, Alfred T.; Fan, Ch'uan H. and Farber, Sidney: Effect of A. T. 10 
(Dihydrotachysterol) on Various Types of Experimental Rickets in Rats. 
Proc. Society for Experimental Biology & Medicine, 42:529, 1939. 

*The papers were published either by, or with the assistance of, members of 
the Department of Pathology. The publications of the Chief of the Department, 
Dr. S. Burt Wolbach, are not included in this tabulation. 



115 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

AUTOPSIES Deaths 

Infants Hospital 118 

Children's Hospital* 106 

Private Ward 10 



234 



Autopsies 

98 

78 

6 

182 



Autopsies Performed 

Year Children's Infants'' Combined 

1936 66*** 100 166 

1937 61*** 86 147 

1938 73*** 81 154 

1939 84*** 98 182** 

Total Deaths 

Tear Children's Infants' 1 Combined 

1936 127 124 278 

1937 110*** 113 223 

1938 125*** 107 232 

1939 126*** 118 234 

Percentage of Autopsies Obtained 

Year Children's Infants' 1 Combined 

1936 51.9 80.6 66.1 

1937 55.5 76.1 65.9 

1938 64.0 75.7 69.7 

1939 73.6 83/05 77.7 

*Includes all services but Infants' and Private Ward 
**14 Outside Autopsies not included 
***Includes Private Ward 



Surgical Specimens 

Tear Number 

1936 520 

1937 526 

1938 716 

1939 678 



116 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

REPORT OF THE SURGICAL SERVICE 

As no report was published last year this statement covers the period of 
1938 and 1939. 

A little over three years ago a portion of the Surgical Staff gave up 
their extramural activities and devoted their whole time to The Chil- 
dren's Hospital. This was made possible by a grant from the Managers 
of the Hospital and the Harvard Medical School, and by the willingness 
of members of the Surgical Staff to accept a financial loss. Sufficient 
time has elapsed to evaluate the wisdom of this change in organization. 
There is no question but that this change has produced an improve- 
ment in the care of the patient, in the teaching of the medical student, 
and in the dissemination of knowledge. In short, it has accelerated 
progress in the field of Children's Surgery. 

One cannot expect brilliant results to follow each attempt at im- 
provement in surgical or medical therapy. One does not obtain success 
without many trials, errors, and disappointments. But time, effort, 
and money are not wasted thereby, because this constant and earnest 
effort has placed, and will continue to hold The Children's Hospital in 
the first rank of accomplishment. 

At these times the Staff is well aware of the financial difficulties of 
the Hospital. We are making every effort to cut down unnecessary ex- 
pense in the care of the patient, and ways can and will be found to do 
this, without detriment to the patient. Take for example, the use of 
breathing high concentrations of oxygen in the treatment of peritonitis. 
This form of treatment we have found to be of great value, and our re- 
sults justify the added financial burden assumed by the Hospital. Its 
value having been clearly demonstrated, efforts are already under way 
by engineers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology to construct 
some sort of apparatus that will be more efficient and so lessen the al- 
most prohibitive cost that at present places this valuable aid in treat- 
ment out of the reach of many. Few can now obtain its benefits outside 
of the charity wards of a great institution like The Children's Hospital. 

One hears much of the "scientific medicine" and the cold imper- 
sonal attitude of "scientific doctors." This need not be and is not the 
case particularly at The Children's Hospital. Our Service was proud 
that a patient came to us from Texas rather than going to another 
nationally known clinic as had been advised. The patient has returned 
home after a successful result in the operative cure of a congenital de- 
fect. The mother wrote us saying among other things, that she now 

117 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

knew that here her child was not "just another ward patient" but that 
the kindly, personal care given by nurses, house staff, and visiting sur- 
geons, was something she could not have believed had she not ex- 
perienced it. She added that she had been in other great hospitals that 
were externally and internally the last word in modern hospital con- 
struction but "they were but piles of bricks and marble compared to 
The Children's Hospital." This makes us view the somewhat outdated 
appearance of the Surgical Wards in its true value. External appear- 
ance, though important, must take second place to the human element 
that makes for true success in surgery. 

The Staff is happy to record that it has increased its field of useful- 
ness by accepting a larger number of patients, and giving improved 
treatment for a greater variety of conditions. The increased work does 
not mean increased bed capacity but greater efficiency in "turn over." 
The increasing number of difficult cases is reflected in the increased 
cost. In 1937 there were 1237 admissions and 1215 operations. In 
1938 there were 1445 admissions, 1510 operations, and a mortality of 
about 3 per cent in both years. In 1939 there were 1659 admissions and 
1 570 operations with the mortality remaining approximately the same, 
but with the increasing field of work and the surgical care of cases 
carrying greater risks these results are gratifying. 

A few of the notable advances that have taken place during these 
years should be mentioned. 

Dr. Robert E. Gross has opened up a new field of surgery by suc- 
cessfully operating on 8 patients suffering from a certain type of con- 
genital heart disease. These gratifying results have been reached only 
after careful planning, many hours spent in the pathological labora- 
tories of The Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, and 
by close cooperation of the heart clinic of The Children's Hospital. 
Many experimental operations were performed on animals and on the 
cadaver before operation was attempted on the living patient. 

Considerable success has been achieved in the treatment of congeni- 
tal diaphragmatic hernia. This condition has carried an excessive high 
mortality in the first weeks of life. In an extensive review of the liter- 
ature only 17 cases of reported cures have been found. From The Child- 
ren's Hospital 6 successful cases have resulted in the surgical care of 
these patients, and it is believed that with our present methods addi- 
tional successes will soon follow. 

With a more rational treatment of empyema the mortality has been 
very appreciably reduced. In this disease it was not so many years ago 

118 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

that the mortality in infants was well over 50 per cent. This now has 
been reduced in this Hospital to 4 per cent and in patients over two years 
of age to 2 per cent. 

A great advance in the results has also been obtained in this Hospi- 
tal in the treatment of chronic infection in the lung. There have been 
14 patients who have had one or more lobes of the lung removed with 
no deaths, and there have been 6 patients in whom one whole lung has 
been removed with 2 deaths. These results compare very favorably 
with reports from other clinics. 

During the last ten years the mortality in children from appendicitis 
and its complications has actually increased in the state of Massachu- 
setts and the United States. It is therefore particularly gratifying to be 
able to report that in The Children's Hospital no death has resulted 
during the year 1938 from appendicitis or its complications. It is also 
gratifying to report that in the blood-borne peritonitis, so-called "idio- 
pathic peritonitis," great advance has been made. This disease has 
heretofore carried an extremely high mortality. During the last two 
years a reduction of nearly 50 per cent in the mortality has been accom- 
plished in this Hospital. This has been made possible by the introduc- 
tion of new therapeutic measures and a close cooperation with the bac- 
teriological department of the Hospital. 

The surgical internship which provides for service at the Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital as well as at The Children's Hospital is proving to 
be of benefit to both hospitals and to the interns. Our present house 
staff are eminently satisfactory and unquestionably one of the factors 
making for improved standards. 

At no time in the history of the hospital has there been a better 
spirit of cooperation between all its departments. This is the "sine qua 
non" of advance and success. 

A list of publications by the Surgical Staff for the years 1938 and 
1939 is appended. 

William E. Ladd, M.D. 



119 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



PUBLICATIONS 



Ladd, W. E.: Immediate or Deferred Surgery for General Peritonitis Associated 
with Appendicitis in Children. Read before the annual meeting of the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society, May 31, 1938. N. E. Jr. Med., 219:10:329-333. 
Sept. 8, 1938. 

Ladd, W. E.: Embryoma of the Kidney (Wilms' Tumor). Annals of Surgery, 108:5: 
885-902. November, 1938. 

Ladd, W. E.: Children's Surgery. N. E. Jr. Med., 220:13:564-567. Mar. 30, 1939. 

Ladd, W. E.: Duplications of the Alimentary Tract. Christopher's Textbook of 
Surgery. Second Edition, pp. 1107-1108. 

Ladd, W. E.: Congenital Obstruction of the Bile Ducts. Christopher's Textbook 
of Surgery. Second Edition, pp. 1273-1275. 

Ladd, W. E., and Lanman, T. H.: Exstrophy of the Bladder and Epispadias. 
Read by title at the annual meeting of the New England Surgical Society. 
September, 1939. 

Ladd, W. E., Botsford, T. W., and Curnen, E. O: Peritonitis in Infants and 
Children: A More Effective Treatment. J. A. M. A., 113:16:1455-1459. 
October 14, 1939. 

Lanman, T. H., and Moore, J. H.: The Surgical Significance of Urinary Inconti- 
nence in Infants and Children. N. E. Jr. Med., 219:30:777-782. Nov. 17, 1938. 

Lanman, T. H.: International Work. Revision of Genito-Urinary Diseases — 
Parson's and Barling's Diseases of Infancy and Childhood. Oxford University 
Press, England. 

Lanman, T. H.: Abdominal Surgery in Infancy and Childhood. J. Medical Soc. 
New Jersey, June, 1939. 

Lanman, T. H. : Discussion of Papers of Drs. Kelly, Neuswanger, Griswold, and 
German. Jr. Conn. State Medical Soc. 15th Clinical Congress, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Lanman, T. H., and Botsford, T. W.: Primary Streptococcal Peritonitis. N. E. Jr. 
Med., 221:651-653, 1939. 

Lanman, T. H. and Heyl, H. L. : Empyema in Children. N. E. Jr. Med., 211: 
1003-1007, 1939. 

Ingraham, F. D.: A Modified Subtemporal Decompression for Use in Infants and 
Children. Surg. Gynec. & ObsL, 67:811-812, Dec. 1938. 

Ingraham, F. D. and Heyl, H. L. : Subdural Hematoma in Infancy and Child- 
hood. J. A. M. A., 112:198-204, January 21, 1939. 

Flake, C. G.: Acute Anterior Poliomyelitis following Tonsillectomy and Adenoid- 
ectomy. With Special reference to the Bulbar Type. (With R. Cannon Eley) 
Jr. Ped., 13:63, July 1938. 

Flake, C. G.: Otolaryngology. N. E. Jr. Med., May 25, 1939. 

MacCollum, D. W.: Wringer Arm. N. E. Jr. Med., 218:13:549-554, March 31, 
1938. 

MacCollum, D. W.: The Lop Ear. J. A. M. A., 110:1427-1430, April 30, 1938. 

MacCollum, D. W.: Congenital Webbing of the Neck. N. E. Jr. Med., 219:8:251- 
254, August 25, 1938. 

Gross, R. E. and Vaughan, W. W.: Plasma Cell Myeloma: Report of 2 Cases with 
Unusual Survivals of 6 and 10 years. Am. Jr. Roentgenology and Radium Therapy, 
39:3, March, 1938. 

Gross, R. E. and Hubbard, John P. : Surgical Ligation of a Patent Ductus Arteri- 
osus: Report of First Successful Case. J. A. M. A., 112:729-731, Feb. 25, 1939. 

120 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Gross R. E.: The Use of Vinyl Ether (Vinethene) in Infancy and Childhood: 
Report of 100 Cases. N. E. Jr. Med., 220:8:324-336, Feb. 23, 1939. 

Gross, R. E.: A Surgical Approach for Ligation of a Patent Ductus Arteriosus. 
N. E. Jr. Med., 220:12:510-514, March 23, 1939. 

Gross, R. E. and Goeringer, C. F.: Cystic Hygroma of the Neck: Report of 27 
Cases. Surg. Gynec. and Obst., 69:48-60, July, 1939. 

Gross, R. E., Emerson, P., and Green, H.: Surgical Exploration and Closure of 
A Patent Ductus Arteriosus. Surgery, 6:2:201-205, Aug. 1939. 

Gross, R. E.: Surgical Management of the Patent Ductus Arteriosus: With Sum- 
mary of Four Surgically Treated Cases. Annals of Surg., 110:3. September, 
1939. 

Hudson, H. W. Jr., and Chamberlain, J. W.: Acute Appendicitis in Childhood. 
Jour. Ped., 15:408-425, September, 1939. 

Thorndike, A. Jr.: Monograph — Athletic Injuries. Lea & Febiger, Phila. 1938. 

Thorndike, A. Jr.: The Organization of a State Fracture Committee. Maine 
Medical Journal, May, 1938. 

Thorndike, A. Jr.: Trauma Incident to Sports and Recreation. N. E. Jr. Med., 
219:13. September 29, 1938. 

Thorndike, A. Jr.: Myositis Ossificans Traumatica. Read before the Boston 
Orthopedic Club. December, 1938. Accepted for publication in Jour. Bone 
and J. Surgery, 1939. 

Thorndike, A. Jr.: Knee Injuries in Sports and Recreation. Read before the 
American Association for Traumatic Surgery, May 8, 1939. Accepted for 
publication in the Transactions of that Society and accepted for publication in 
Amer. Jour. Surgery. 

Thorndike, A. Jr.: Recent Developments in Synthetic Splinting Materials. Read 
by title at the meeting of New England Surgical Society meeting, September, 
1939. 

Chamberlain, J. W. : Modification of Kaufman Syringe for Intravenous Work in 
Infancy. N. E. Jr. Med., 221:5:172. August 3, 1939. 

Botsford, T. W., Hudson, H. W. Jr., and Chamberlain, J. W. : Pinworms and 
Appendicitis. N E. Jr. Med., 221:933-936. 1939. 

Botsford, T. W.: The Use of Silk in Thyroid Surgery. (With J. E. Dunphy) 
Surg. Gynec. & Obst., 69:4:444-445. October, 1939. 

Botsford, T. W. and Lanman, T. H.: Primary Streptococcal Peritonitis: Report 
of A Case which developed while the patient was undergoing Sulfanilamide 
Therapy. N. E. Jr. Med., 221:161-653. 1939. 

Heyl, H. L.: An Observation Suggesting the Presence of a Gonadotropic Hor- 
mone in Royal Jelly. Science, 89:2319:540. June 9, 1939. 

Tobey, H. G. : Care of Mastoid Wounds. Following Operations on Abscess of the 
Brain. Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, 48:3:590. September, 1939. 

Richards, L. : Otogenic Complications. A Resume and Discussion of the Literature 
of 1938. The Laryngoscope, St. Louis, September, 1939. 

Richards, L.: The Surgical Aspects of Otitis Media, Peritonsillar Abscess and 
Retropharyngeal Abscess. Am. Jr. Surg., XL VI. 3:505. December, 1939. 

Richards, L.: Otolaryngology in General Practice. Macmillan. 

Richards, L.: Cuts and Captions: Five Editorial Years in Retrospect. Read before 
Annual Meeting of American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological 
Society. To appear in 1939 Transactions of the same. 

121 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

SURGICAL OUT-PATIENT REPORT 

SURGICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE OUT-PATIENT 

DEPARTMENT— INCLUDING POST OPERATIVE CASES 

DISCHARGED FROM THE HOUSE 

1938 

Diseases of the respiratory system 50 

Diseases of the alimentary system 258 

Diseases of the genito-urinary system 382 

Diseases of the cardio-vascular system 7 

Diseases of the lymphatic system 1 34 

Diseases of the nervous system 84 

Diseases of the skin 1315 

Diseases of the bones and joints 146 

Diseases of the muscles, tendons and fascia ... 312 

Diseases of the eye 26 

Diseases of the ear 18 

Unclassified diseases 162 

Total number of surgical visits 10,156 

Total number of new cases 1938 



SURGICAL OUT-PATIENT REPORT 

SURGICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE OUT-PATIENT 

DEPARTMENT— INCLUDING POST OPERATIVE CASES 

DISCHARGED FROM THE HOUSE 

1939 

Diseases of the respiratory system 93 

Diseases of the alimentary system 344 

Diseases of the genito-urinary system 500 

Diseases of the cardio-vascular system 6 

Diseases of the lymphatic system 148 

Diseases of the ducdess glands 6 

Diseases of the nervous system 156 

Diseases of the skin 1190 

Diseases of the bones and joints 189 

Diseases of the muscles, tendons and fascia . . . 330 

Diseases of the eye 28 

Diseases of the ear 22 

Unclassified diseases 92 

Total number of surgical visits 13,425 

Total number of new cases 2269 

122 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS 

1938 

With Anaesthesia 

Aspiration of cyst 1 

Aspiration of hemotoma . 1 

Cystograms 3 

Circumcision 115 

Debridement 16 

Dilatation of urethra 24 

Dorsal slit for paraphimosis 2 

Endothermy 102 

Exploration of old wound 1 

Extraction of teeth 4 

Frenotomy for tonguetie 6 

Freeing preputial adhesions 3 

Incision and drainage of abscesses and septic wounds 120 

Paracentesis 219 

Proctoscopy .....'., 4 

Reduction of fractures 55 

Reduction of dislocated elbow 1 

Removal of cysts 7 

Removal of foreign body, region unspecified 7 

Removal of digits 1 

Removal of hemangioma 6 

Removal of wen 6 

Removal of warts 3 

Removal of nail for paronychia 24 

Wound sutures 109 

Total 840 

Without Anaesthesia 

Carbon-dioxide snow treatments 540 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS 

1939 

With Anaesthesia 

Circumcision 113 

Debridement 16 

Dilation of Urethra 22 

Dislocation of elbow (reduction of) 1 

Dorsal slit for paraphimosis 5 

Endothermy 137 

123 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Freeing of preputial adhesions 30 

Fractures (reduction of) 65 

Incision and drainage of abscesses and infected wounds 118 

Paracentesis 223 

Removal of cysts 4 

Removal of granuloma of tongue 1 

Removal of hemangioma 5 

Removal of keloid 1 

Removal of nail for paronychia 47 

Removal of neurofibroma 1 

Removal of papilloma 1 

Removal of tab in mouth 1 

Removal of tab in ear 1 

Removal of tabs (region unspecified) 1 

Removal of warts 4 

Removal of wen 9 

Removal of foreign body in bronchus 1 

Removal of foreign body in ear 4 

Removal of foreign body in eye 7 

Removal of foreign body in esophagus 1 

Removal of foreign body in elbow 1 

Removal of foreign body in foot 3 

Removal of foreign body in hand 7 

Removal of foreign body in gastro-intestinal tract 10 

Removal of foreign body in nostril 2 

Removal of foreign body in rectum 1 

Removal of foreign body in throat 1 

Removal of foreign body in trachea 1 

Removal of foreign body in vagina 1 

Removal of foreign body in region unspecified 12 

Wound sutures 104 

Roentgen ray treatments 14 

Total 976 

Without Anaesthesia 

Carbon-dioxide treatments 581 



SURGICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1938 

New Old 
Diseases of the Ductless Glands 10 6 

Respiratory System 

Bronchiectasis 7 3 

Bronchopneumonia 23 6 

Chronic pulmonary suppuration 4 1 

124 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Respiratory System — Continued New Old 

Congenital abnormalities 8 3 

Empyema 20 12 

Hemopneumothorax 3 

Lung abscess 1 2 

Tonsillitis 64 9 

Tumors 4 

Upper respiratory infection 64 7 

Miscellaneous 6 3 

204 46 
Alimentary System 

Abdominal pain, undetermined origin 42 1 

Anomaly of lip (not harelip) 5 

Anomaly of bile ducts 7 9 

Appendicitis, acute 113 4 

Appendicitis, chronic 24 1 

Appendicitis, with generalized peritonitis 21 

Appenditicis, with localized peritonitis 17 

Atresia of small intestine 8 

Atresia of rectum 4 1 

Branchiogenetic cyst 6 

Cleft palate 39 2 

Colitis, ulcerative 4 2 

Congenital anomalies, not listed 16 2 

Dental caries 16 2 

Duodenal obstruction 5 1 

Esophageal stricture, acquired 5 40 

Fecal fistula 5 3 

Fecal impaction 5 1 

Fissure or fistula in ano 8 

Fistula, recto-vaginal 5 1 

Harelip 21 8 

Harelip and cleft palate 52 46 

Imperforate anus 6 3 

Intestinal obstruction due to adhesions 14 7 

Intussusception 22 3 

Malrotation of intestines 5 

Meckel's diverticulum 6 3 

Megacolon 6 7 

Peritonitis, primary 6 1 

Polyposis of colon 3 3 

Pyloric stenosis 60 

Rectal bleeding, undetermined origin 8 

Rectal polyp 6 2 

Stricture, recto-sigmoid 4 

Thyroglossal cyst 9 

125 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Alimentary System — Continued New Old 

Trauma of gastrointestinal tract 6 

Tumors of gastro-intestinal tract 9 

Volvulus 2 

600 153 
Genito-Urinary System 

Anomalies of kidney or ureter 29 11 

Cryptorchidism 22 5 

Embryoma of kidney 7 8 

Exstrophy of bladder 5 9 

Hydrocele 41 2 

Hypospadias 10 4 

Infection of testes, urethra or epididymis 8 

Phimosis 40 

Pyelonephritis 16 

Renal calculi 1 — 

Trauma of genito-urinary tract 6 6 

Urethral obstruction 7 5 

Urethral stricture 5 

1 

197 51 
Cardio Vascular Diseases 

Congenital heart disease 5 3 

Patent ductus arteriosus 5 

Pericarditis 2 

Sinus thrombosis 2 

Systemic disease with abnormality of spleen 6 2 

Varicose veins 2 2 

Miscellaneous 6 2 

28 9 

Lymphatic System 

Lymphadenitis 26 1 

Lymphadenitis due to tubercle bacillus 8 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric 11 

Lymphatic tumor 2 

Lymphangitis 7 

54 1 

Nervous System 

Birth injury 12 5 

Brain abscess 2 3 

Brain tumor 16 4 

Concussion, cerebral 25 2 

Deficiency, cerebral 12 5 

Encephalitis 5 

126 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Nervous System — Continued New Old 

Epilepsy, idiopathic, grand mal 5 2 

Hydrocephalus, idiopathic 13 1 

Meningitis 6 

Meningocele, encephalocele and myelomeningocele 27 8 

Spinal cord tumor 7 

Subdural hematoma 18 1 

Miscellaneous 13 - 1 

161 32 
Diseases of the Skin 

Abscesses 33 4 

Burns 34 

Cellulitis 24 2 

Cicatrix of burn 20 2 

Diffuse infection 7 

Eczema 5 2 

Foreign body 5 

Hemangioma of skin and subcutaneous tissue 48 28 

Hematoma of skin and subcutaneous tissue 14 

Keloid 5 1 

Lacerations 38 

Nevus 24 1 

Tumor 11 

268 40 

Diseases of the Bones and Joints 

Congenital anomaly of bones 14 10 

Fractures 55 2 

Osteomyelitis 18 16 

Talipes equino-varus 4 5 

Tumors 9 

100 33 

Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Congenital defect of tendon or muscle 7 3 

Diastasis recti 10 

Ganglion 5 1 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 2 

Hernia, epigastric 2 

Hernia, incisional 4 

Hernia, inguinal 187 10 

Hernia, umbilical 51 2 

Hernia, ventral 7 2 

275 18 
127 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Eye and Ear New Old 

Anomaly of ear (not lop ear) 6 2 

Anomaly of eye 6 2 

Lop ears 10 1 

Otitis media 12 4 

34 9 

Systemic Diseases and Hospital Complications 

Bacteremia 10 

Contagious diseases 9 1 

Evisceration, post-operative 7 

Infected wound, post-operative 25 

Rickets 5 

56 1 

Number of cases admitted to Surgical Ward 1445 

Number of cases admitted to Private Ward 279 

Total 1724 

New diagnosis 1 927 

Old diagnosis 398 

Total 2325 



SURGICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1939 

New Old 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 36 5 

Respiratory System 

Atelectasis 1 

Bronchiectasis 8 8 

Bronchitis 1 

Congenital anomalies 8 2 

Edema, pulmonary 2 

Epistaxis 1 

Fistula, broncho-pleural 2 

Empyema 20 8 

Gangrene of lung 1 

Pneumothorax 1 

Pneumonia, broncho 37 12 

Sinusitis 1 1 

Tonsillitis ; 19 

Trauma to mucous membrane overlying hard palate 1 

Upper respiratory infection 5 

108 31 
128 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Alimentary System New Old 

Abdominal pain due to gastro-intestinal allergy 1 

Abdominal pain of unexplained origin 83 2 

Adhesions, intestinal 2 

Anomaly of bile ducts 6 

Anomaly of lip (not harelip) 2 

Appendicitis 112 2 

Atresia of intestine 4 

Atrophy of liver 1 

Cardiospasm 1 

Cholecystitis 1 

Cirrhosis, biliary 1 

Cleft palate 29 5 

Colitis, ulcerative 3 

Congenital anomalies 21 11 

Constipation 6 

Cyst, branchiogenic 6 1 

Cyst, buccal 3 

Cyst, thyroglossal 8 1 

Dental caries 4 1 

Disease of lymphoid tissue of nasopharynx 1 

Disease undiagnosed, appendix suspected 1 

Esophageal stricture 5 12 

Esophageal varices 1 

Fecal impaction 2 

Fissure, anus 1 

Fistula, ano 2 

Fistula, esophageal-tracheal 3 

Fistula, fecal 4 

Foreign body in rectum 1 

Gangrene of jejunum 1 

Gastro-enteritis ,....' 7 

Harelip 39 

Harelip and cleft palate 48 27 

Imperforate anus 16 3 

Intestinal obstruction 7 

Intussusception 12 

Incontinence of anal sphincter 2 

Jaundice 2 

Lung abscess 1 

Malrotation of cecum 4 

Meckel's diverticulum 10 

Megacolon 1 

Nasopharyngitis 3 

Peritonitis, idiopathic 2 2 

Phlebitis, mesenteric 1 

Polyposis of colon and ileum 9 6 

Prolapse of ileum ■. 2 

129 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Alimentary System — Continued New Old 

Prolapse of rectum 1 1 

Pyloric stenosis 35 2 

Pylorospasm 1 

Ranula 1 

Retroperitoneal hematoma 1 

Rupture of mesenteric vessels 1 

Situs inversus 2 

Stenosis, anus 1 

Stone in Stenson's duct 1 

Stricture, anus 2 

Tonsillitis 2 

Tumors of gastro-enteric tract 5 4 

Volvulus 8 

541 81 
GenitoUrinary System 

Anomalies of kidney and ureter 28 9 

Anomalies of genitalia 3 

Balanitis 1 

Cysts 2 

Cystitis 2 3 

Diverticulum of bladder 2 

Embryoma of kidney 7 4 

Epispadias 2 

Exstrophy of bladder 4 3 

Fistula, recto-vaginal * 2 4 

Fistula, recto-vesicle 1 

Fistula, recto-urethral 3 1 

Foreign body in genito-urinary tract 4 

Gangrene of appendix testis 1 

Hematuria 1 

Hydrocele 32 3 

Hydronephrosis 16 9 

Hypertrophy of clitoris 2 

Hypospadias 6 3 

Papilloma of penis 1 

Pelvic abscess 2 

Phimosis 14 1 

Pyelonephritis 20 11 

Stone in bladder 1 

Stricture, urethral 2 

Tumor of kidney 3 2 

Thrombosis, gangrene testicle 1 

Undescended testicle 28 2 

Vaginitis 1 

190 57 
130 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Cardio Vascular Diseases 

Coarctation of aortic arch 1 

Congenital heart disease 7 3 

Dilatation of heart 1 

Hemolytic icterus 1 

Hypertensive vascular disease 1 

Myocarditis 1 

Neiman Pick's disease 1 

Pericarditis 1 

Rheumatic heart disease , . . 3 1 

Varicose veins 3 

17 7 

Lymphatic Diseases 

Hodgkin's disease 1 1 

Hygroma '. 2 

Lymphadenitis 14 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric 5 

Lymphangioma 2 3 

24 4 

Nervous System 

Anomaly of the central nervous system 28 6 

Birth injury 7 1 

Brain tumor 21 21 

Chordoma 1 

Chorea 1 

Compression of brain stem 1 

Concussion, cerebral 48 

Convulsions 6 

Cyst formation of brain 1 

Cyst formation in region of cauda equina 1 1 

Disease undiagnosed, brain tumor suspected 11 11 

Encephalitis 4 

Encephalopathy 13 2 

Hematoma, subdural 30 2 

Hydrocephalus, idiopathic 22 3 

Lipoma 3 

Meningitis 4 

Meningocele, encephalocele and myelomeningocele 20 5 

Myeloradiculitis 1 

Palsy 2 2 

Paralysis of bladder, due to injury of cord 1 2 

Paralysis, spastic 2 2 

Poliomyelitis 1 

Thrombosis, cerebral 1 

Von Recklinghausen's disease 1 

227 62 

131 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous Tissues New 

Abscesses 35 

Burns 29 

Cephalohematoma 2 

Cicatrix formation 17 

Cyst of skin 9 

Cellulitis 27 

Dogbite 3 

Eczema 1 

Foreign body 4 

Hemangioma of skin 34 

Hematoma of skin 6 

Herpes simplex 1 

Human bite, finger 1 

Infections 12 

Lacerations 41 

Nevus 7 

Paronychia 1 

Pediculosis capitus 1 

Pemphigus 1 

Tumors 

Ulcers 

Verruca 

Diseases of the Bones and Joints 

Arthritis 

Congenital anomaly of bone 10 

Dystrophy, osseous 1 

Fusion of knee 1 

Fractures 83 

Injury of lower fibular epiphysis 1 

Necrosis 1 

Osteomyelitis 13 

Periostitis 1 

Rickets 1 

Scoliosis, structural 

Sprain 1 

Subluxations 4 

Torticollis 1 

Wound of foot 1 

Wringer arm 3 

123 
Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Division of tendons 1 

Ganglion 5 

132 



Old 
4 
2 



9 
3 



3 
2 
1 


2 
1 


238 


26 


1 


1 



12 



1 
18 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia — Continued New Old 

Hematoma, rectus muscle 1 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 4 2 

Hernia, incisional 6 2 

Hernia, inguinal 158 10 

Hernia, umbilical 23 1 

Hernia, ventral 2 

Severence of tendon of finger 2 

202 16 
Diseases of the Eye and Ear 

Anomaly of ear (not lop ear) 4 1 

Anomaly of eye 12 3 

Lop ears 9 

Mastoiditis 3 

Otitis media 20 1 

48 5 

Systemic Diseases and Hospital Complications 

Anemia 1 1 

Bacteremia 4 3 

Band's disease 1 

Common cold 24 

Contagious diseases 9 

Deferred 9 

Donor of ear cartilage 1 

Dysentery 2 

Exposure to contagion 13 

Furunculosis 14 2 

Hemophilia 1 1 

Hemorrhage 8 

Hemorrhagic disease of newborn 1 

Leukemia 1 

Marasmus 1 

Multiple congenital anomalies 2 3 

No disease 7 

Pancytopenia 1 

Poisoning , . 1 

Purpura 1 1 

Rheumatic fever 1 

Septicemia 2 1 

Serum sickness 1 

Sinus (lumbo-sacral) 1 2 

Smith-Howard syndrome 2 

Splenomegaly 2 

Syphilis 2 2 

Tuberculin reactor 5 

133 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Systemic Diseases and Hospital Complications — Continued New Old 

115 19 

Number of cases admitted to Surgical Ward 1 373 

Number of cases admitted to Private Ward 286 

Total 1659 

New diagnosis 1869 

Secondary diagnosis 331 

Total 2200 



SURGICAL OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

1938 

Operations of the Ductless Glands 

Adrenalectomy 1 

Cystoscopy and pyelograms with exploration 1 

Excision 1 

Exploratory laparotomy 2 

Thyroidectomy 1 

— 6 

Operations of the Respiratory Tract 

Bronchiectasis 

Bronchoscopy 6 

Lobectomy 2 

Congenital abnormalities 

Plastic to nares 3 

Excision of papilloma 1 

Empyema 

Bronchoscopy 1 

Intercostal drainage 8 

Lobectomy 1 

Rib resection 22 

Rib resection and decortication 3 

Pulmonary suppuration 

Bronchoscopy 1 

Exploratory thoracotomy 1 

Pneumonectomy 1 

Tonsillitis 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 19 



Operations of the G astro-Enteric Tract 
Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 

Exploratory laparotomy with appendectomy 11 

Abscesses 

Incision and drainage 2 

134 



69 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Gastro-Enteric Tract — Continued 

Anomaly of lip (not harelip) 

Plastic to lip 7 

Anomaly of bile ducts, congenital 

Exploratory laparotomy 5 

Exploratory laparotomy and hepatogastrostomy 1 

Gastrojejunostomy 1 

Appendicitis, acute 

Appendectomy 84 

Appendicitis, chronic 

Appendectomy 22 

Appendicitis with generalized peritonitis 

Appendectomy with drains 21 

Appendicitis with localized peritonitis 

Appendectomy with drains 13 

Atresia of small intestine 

Anastomosis and lysis of adhesions 8 

Atresia of rectum 

Plastic 3 

Proctoscopy 1 

Cleft palate 

Plastic 33 

Colitis, ulcerative 

Proctoscopy 5 

Dental caries 

Extraction of teeth 11 

Duodenal obstruction 

Lysis of adhesions and jejunostomy 3 

Esophageal stricture, acquired 

Dilatation 50 

Esophagoscopy 1 

Fecal fistula 

Closure of fistula 3 

Excision 1 

Fissure or fistula in ano 

Excision , 3 

Proctoscopy 1 

Fistula, recto-vaginal 

Perineorrhaphy 2 

Harelip 

Plastic 24 

135 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations of the Gastro-Enteric Tract — Continued 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Plastic to lip 37 

Plastic to nose 6 

Plastic to palate 32 

Imperforate anus 

Plastic repair 5 

Sigmoidostomy 1 

Intestinal obstruction due to adhesions 

Exploratory laparotomy with lysis of adhesions 11 

Witzel enterostomy 4 

Intussusception 

Exploratory laparotomy 2 

Ileostomy 1 

Reduction 18 

Malrotation of cecum 

Exploratory laparotomy with lysis of adhesions 3 

Ladd's operation 3 

Meckel's diverticulum 

Excision 5 

Resection and anastomosis 1 

Megacolon, congenital 

Colectomy 3 

Ileosigmoidostomy 2 

Proctoscopy with dilatation 7 

Sympathectomy 1 

Polyposis of colon 

Colectomy and ileostomy 2 

Proctoscopy 9 

Pyloric stenosis 

Pyloromyotomy 49 

Rectal bleeding, undetermined origin 

Exploratory laparotomy 1 

Proctoscopy 4 

Rectal polyp 

Proctoscopy and excision 13 

Stricture, recto-sigmoid 

Exploratory laparotomy and dilatation 1 

Proctoscopy 2 

Thyroglossal cyst 

Excision 5 

Trauma of gastro-intestinal tract 

Exploratory laparotomy with drainage 2 

Witzel enterostomy 2 

136 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Operations of the Gastro-Enteric Tract — Continued 

Tumor of gastro-intestinal tract 

Biopsy of liver 3 

Excision of tumor of tongue 2 

Exploratory laparotomy with resection 1 

Resection 1 

Operations of the Genito-Urinary Tract 

Anomaly of kidney and ureter 

Cystoscopy 19 

Nephrectomy 5 

Suprapubic cystotomy 3 

Cryptorchidism 

Orchidopexy 18 

Embryoma of kidney 

Excision 2 

Nephrectomy 4 

Partial removal 1 

X-ray treatment 1 

Exstrophy of bladder 

Cystectomy and plastic repair 3 

Ureterosigmoidostomy 5 

Hydrocele 

Excision 39 

Hypospadias 

Dilatation 4 

Plastic 3 

Suprapubic cystotomy 1 

Infection of testes, urethra, or epididymis 

Exploration of epididymis 1 

Incision and drainage 3 

Phimosis 

Circumcision 23 

Pyelonephritis 

Cystoscopy 15 

Renal calculi 

Cystoscopy 1 

Ureterolithotomy 1 

Tumor of genito-urinary tract 

Excision of follicular cyst of ovary 1 

Urethral obstruction 

Cystoscopy 5 

137 



555 



161 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations of the Genito-Urinary Tract — Continued 
Urethral stricture 

Dilatation 3 

Operations of the Lymphatic System 

Lymphadenoma 

Excision 1 

Lymphadenitis 

Incision and drainage 26 

Lymphadenitis due to tubercle bacillus 

Incision and drainage 8 

Lymphadentis, mesenteric 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy 5 

Lymphangioma 

Excision 4 

— 44 

Cardio- Vascular Operations 

Gaucher's disease 

Splenectomy 1 

Hemangio-arterio-venous fistula 

Injection of varicose veins 1 

Leukemia 

Appendectomy with biopsy 1 

Patent ductus arteriosus 

Ligation 3 

Pericarditis 

Pericardiostomy with drains 2 

Systemic disease with abnormality of the spleen 

Splenectomy 8 

Varicose veins 

Ligation and excision 1 

— 17 

Operations on Skin and Cellular System 

Abscesses 

Incision and drainage 28 

Amputation, traumatic 

Plastic 1 

Burns 

Debridement and tanning 16 

138 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations on Skin and Cellular System — Continued 

Burn contracture 

Application of graft 20 

Cellulitis 

Incision and drainage 3 

Foreign body 

Removal 5 

Hemangioma of skin and subcutaneous tissue 

Carbon dioxide snow treatment 5 

Endothermy 28 

Exploratory thoracotomy 1 

Excision 18 

Excision and plastic 1 

X-ray therapy 13 

Keloid 

Excision 3 

Excision and Thiersch graft 2 

Lacerations 

Debridement and suturing 27 

Scars 

Excision and application of graft 4 

Tumors of skin 

Amputation 1 

Amputation, excision and Thiersch graft 1 

Excision 15 



192 



Operations on Bones and Joints 

Amputation of finger 

Debridement and sutering 1 

Congenital anomaly of bones 

Excision and plastic to bifid thumb 1 

Excision of supernumerary digits 3 

Laminectomy 1 

Fractures 

Application of cast 6 

Burr holes 1 

Decompression 2 

Gas dressing with manipulation 1 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 4 

Manipulation 6 

Reduction, closed 21 

Reduction, open 3 

139 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations on Bones and Joints — Continued 

Osteomyelitis 

Gas dressing 24 

Incision and drainage 10 

Insertion of Kirschner wire 1 

Sequestrectomy 7 

Tumors 

Curettage of fibrosa cystica 1 

Excision of cyst 1 

Excision of exostosis 2 

— 96 

Operations on Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Congenital defect of tendon or muscle 

Lysis of tendon sheath for snapping thumb 1 

Myotomy for torticollis 1 

Plastic to snapping thumb 2 

Plastic with Thiersch graft to fingers 1 

Separation of web and Thiersch graft to fingers 1 

Diastasis recti 

Repair 6 

Ganglion 

Excision 6 

Hernia, epigastric 

Herniorrhaphy ' 2 

Hernia, incisional 

Repair 3 

Repair and appendectomy 1 

Hernia, inguinal 

Herniorrhaphy 183 

Herniorrhaphy and exploration 3 

Herniorrhaphy and orchidopexy 1 



Hernia, umbilical 

Herniorrhaphy 42 



Operations of the Nervous System 

Birth injury 

Bone flap 2 

Burr holes 3 

Brain abscess 

Burr holes, decompression, incision and drainage 4 

Marsupialization 2 

140 



253 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Operations of the Nervous System — Continued 

Brain tumor 

Bone flap 8 

Burr holes and ventriculography 14 

Cerebellar exploration 12 

Decompression, subtemporal 2 

Concussion, cerebral 

Burr holes 1 

Deficiency, cerebral 

Burr holes . 7 

Encephalograms 8 

Encephalitis 

Burr holes and ventriculography 4 

Epilepsy, idiopathic, grand mal 

Bone flap 5 

Burr holes 2 

Encephalograms 2 

Hydrocephalus, idiopathic 

Cerebellar exploration 3 

Meningocele, encephalocele and myelomeningocele 

Excision 20 

Laminectomy and excision 2 

Spinal cord tumor 

Laminectomy and excision 7 

Subdural hematoma 

Bone flap 14 

Burr holes 22 

Miscellaneous 

Decompression 2 

Encephalograms i 2 

Operations of the Eye and Ear 

Anomaly of ear (not lop ear) 

Plastic 3 

Plastic with Thiersch graft 1 

Transplant and plastic 1 

Anomaly of eye 

Biopsy 1 

Incision and drainage 1 

Plastic 1 

Lop ears 

Plastic 9 

Otitis media 

Myringotomy , 1 



— 148 



— 18 



141 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations of Systemic Diseases and Hospital Complications 

Evisceration 

Resuturing of wound 7 

Infected wound, post-operative 

Exploration and curettage 2 

Incision and drainage 4 

— 13 

Total number of operations 1 572 

Total number of anesthesias in Surgical Ward 1433 

Total number of anesthesias in Private Ward 348 

1781 



SURGICAL OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

1939 

Operations of the Ductless Glands 

Adrenalectomy with adrenal exploration 1 

Excision 2 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy 9 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy with biopsy. . . 1 

Partial thyroidectomy . 2 

— 15 

Operations of the Respiratory System 
Atelectasis 

Exploratory thoracotomy 1 

Bronchiectasis 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol 13 

Lobectomy. . . 7 

Congenital anomalies 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol injection 1 

Plastic 2 

Empyema 

Biopsy 2 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol injection 1 

Decortication and lysis of adhesions 1 

Exploratory thoracotomy 3 

Incision and drainage and sequestrectomy 1 

Intercostal drainage 8 

Rib resection 19 

Rib resection and exploration 2 

Gangrene of lung 

Intercostal drainage 1 

Sinusitis 

Antrum wash and antrum puncture 1 

142 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Respiratory System — Continued 

Tonsillitis 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 6 

— 69 

Operations of the Gastro-Enterig Tract 

Abdominal pain due to gastro-enteric allergy 

Exploratory laparotomy with appendectomy 1 

Abdominal pain of unknown origin 

Cystoscopy 1 

Cystoscopy and pyelograms 1 

Exploratory laparotomy 1 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy 22 

Exploratory laparotomy and resection of intestine 1 

Adhesions, intestinal 

Lysis of adhesions 5 

Anomaly of bile ducts 

Anastomosis 1 

Exploration 7 

Suturing of evisceration 1 

Anomaly of lip (not harelip) 

Plastic 2 

Appendicitis 

Appendectomy 64 

Appendectomy with drains 29 

Incision and drainage 3 

Re-suturing of evisceration 1 

Atresia, intestinal 

Duodenal jejunostomy 2 

Exploratory laparotomy with lysis of adhesions 1 

Resection, anastomosis and lysis of adhesions . 2 

Atrophy of liver 

Exploratory laparotomy and biopsy 1 

Cholecystitis 

Cholecystotomy 2 

Cirrhosis, biliary 

Biopsy 1 

Cleft palate 

Plastic 

Plastic and tonsillectomy 1 

Colitis, ulcerative 

Ileostomy and appendectomy 1 

Proctoscopy 3 

Congenital anomalies 

Plastic 7 

143 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Gastro-Enteric Tract — Continued 

Cyst, branchiogenic 

Debridement and curettage 1 

Endothermy coagulation 2 

Excision 4 

Cyst, buccal 

Excision 3 

Cyst, thyroglossal 

Excision 7 

Repair 1 

Dental caries 

Extraction 2 

Repair 1 

Disease undiagnosed, appendix suspected 

Exploratory laparotomy 1 

Esophageal stricture 

Closure of gastrostomy 1 

Dilatation 30 

Dilatation and Witzel 1 

Esophageal varices 

Ligation of veins 1 

Fecal impaction 

Proctoscopy 2 

Fissure, anus 

Gas dressing 1 

Proctoscopy ' 4 

Fistula, ano 

Sigmoidostomy with excision 1 

Fistula, tracheo-esophageal 

Gastrostomy and ligation 2 

Repair 1 

Fistula, fecal 

Closure 1 

Harelip 

Plastic 30 

Removal of impacted teeth 1 

Removal of sutures 1 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Alveoplasty 1 

Extraction 1 

Plastic 72 

Imperforate anus 

Dilatation 3 

Plastic 8 

144 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Gastro-Enteric Tract — Continued 

Intestinal obstruction 

Cecostomy 1 

Lysis of bands 1 

Witzel enterostomy 5 

Intussusception 

Reduction 7 

Reduction and appendectomy 2 

Lung abscess 

Pneumonectomy 1 

Malrotation of cecum 

Appendectomy 2 

Lysis of adhesions 1 

Suturing of evisceration 1 

Meckel's Diverticulum 

Excision and appendectomy 8 

Megacolon 

Cecostomy 5 

Sympathectomy 5 

Peritonitis, idiopathic 

Incision and drainage 4 

Witzel enterostomy 1 

Polyposis of colon and ileum 

Exploratory laparotomy with excision 1 

Excision 1 

Freeing of ileostomy and anastomosis 2 

Proctoscopy 5 

Proctoscopy with excision 6 

Sigmoidostomy and excision .....' 1 

Prolapse of ileum 

Reduction 1 

Prolapse of rectum 

Proctoscopy 1 

Pyloric stenosis 

Pyloromyotomy 48 

Rupture of mesenteric vessels 

Resection, anastomosis and suturing 1 

Stone in Stenson's duct 

Dilatation 1 

Tumors of gastro-enteric tract 

Excision 4 

Gastrostomy 1 

Tracheotomy 1 

145 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Gastro-Enteric Tract — Continued 

Volvulus 

Exploratory laparotomy with lysis of adhesions 

Explorotory laparotomy and resection 

Reduction 

Reduction and appendicostomy 



1 
3 
3 
1 



493 



Operations of the Genito-Urinary Tract 

Anomalies of kidney and ureter 

Cystoscopy 18 

Cystoscopy with pyelograms 1 

Excision 5 

Anomaly of genitalia 

Excision, partial 1 

Cyst 

Biopsy 1 

Excision 1 

Diverticulum of bladder 

Excision 1 

Suprapubic cystotomy 1 

Embryoma of kidney 

Nephrectomy 5 

Exstrophy of bladder 

Cystectomy '. 3 

Plastic 1 

Secondary suturing 1 

Suturing of evisceration 1 

Ureterosigmoidostomy 3 

Fistula, recto-urethral 

Cystotomy 1 

Exploration 3 

Irrigation 1 

Sigmoidostomy 1 

Foreign body in genitro-urinary tract 

Removal 1 

Gangrene of appendix testis 

Excision 1 

Hematuria 

Cystoscopy 1 

Hydrocele 

Excision 28 

Excision and herniorrhaphy 1 

146 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Operations of the Genito-Urinary Tract — Continued 

Hydronephrosis 

Cystoscopy 10 

Cystotomy 1 

Nephrectomy 10 

Hypospadias 

Circumcision 1 

Dilatation 2 

Plastic 4 

Pelvic abscess 

Incision and drainage and salpingectomy 1 

Nephrectomy 1 

Phimosis 

Circumcision 14 

Secondary dorsal slit . 1 

Separation of adhesions 2 

Pyelonephritis 

Cystoscopy 7 

Exploration 4 

Incision and drainage 2 

Nephrectomy 1 

Stone in bladder 

Suprapubic cystotomy 1 

Stricture, urethral 

Dilatation 1 

Tumor of kidney 

Excision 2 

Thrombosis of gangrene testicle 

Orchidectomy 1 

Undescended testicle 

Exploration 2 

Orchidopexy 20 

Vaginitis 

Ether examination 1 



Cardio- Vascular Operations 

Congenital heart disease 

Ligation 

Withdrawal of fluid 

Hemolytic icterus 

Splenectomy 

Neiman-Pick's disease 

Exploratory laparotomy with dissection and excision. 
Suturing of evisceration 

147 



3 

1 



170 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Cardio Vascular Operations- 

Pericarditis 

Pericardiostomy 

Varicose veins 

Block excision 

Dissection and Thiersch graft . 
Thiersch graft 



-Continued 



Operations of the Lymphatic System 

Hodgkin's disease 

Partial excision 



Hygroma 

Excision . 



Lymphadenitis 

Biopsy 

Incision and drainage 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy . 
Proctoscopy 

Lymphangiectasis 

Biopsy 



Lymphangioma 

Partial excision 

Lymphoblastoma 
Biopsy 



Operations of the Nervous System 

Anomaly of central nervous system 

Encephalogram 

Osteoplastic bone flap and exploration . 
Ventricular tap with encephalograms . . 

Birth injury 

Bone flap 

Encephalogram with burr holes 

Brain tumor 

Bone flap 

Burr holes 

Cerebellar exploration 

Encephalogram and ventriculogram. . . 

Incision and drainage 

Laminectomy and biopsy 

Ventriculogram 



4 

5 

2 
1 



2 
1 

12 



11 



— 17 



3 
5 
2 



148 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Nervous System — Continued 

Chordoma 

Biopsy 1 

Laminectomy, biopsy and exploration 1 

Convulsions 

Burr holes and encephalogram 2 

Encephalograms 6 

Cyst formation in brain 

Bone flap with exploration and biopsy 1 

Burr holes, decompression and aspiration. 1 

Encephalogram 1 

Cyst formation in region of cauda equina 

Closure 1 

Laminectomy and evacuation 1 

Disease undiagnosed, brain tumor suspected 

Bone flap 15 

Burr holes 8 

Encephalogram 5 

Laminectomy . . 1 

Ventriculogram 2 

Encephalitis 

Laminectomy 1 

Encephalopathy 

Bone flap 2 

Burr holes 2 

Burr holes with encephalograms 7 

Encephalograms 6 

Resuturing of wound 1 

Hematoma, subdural 

Bone flap 22 

Burr holes 18 

Encephalogram 8 

Ventriculogram 4 

Hydrocephalus, idiopathic 

Burr holes 1 

Cerebral exploration 3 

Cistern puncture, ventricular puncture and injection of air. 1 

Combined tap 1 

Encephalogram 3 

Ventriculogram 2 

Lipoma 

Excision and repair , 4 

Meningitis 

Burr holes 2 

149 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations of the Nervous System — Continued 

Meningocele and encephalocele 

Excision 13 

Myeloradiculitis 

Burr holes 1 

Neurofibroma 

Partial excision 1 

Palsy 

Burr holes 1 

Encephalograms 2 

Laminectomy 1 

Paralysis, spastic 

Adductor myotomy 1 

Porencephaly 

Exploration 1 

Operations of the Skin 

Abscesses 

Incision and drainage 27 

Burns 

Debridement 10 

Gas dressing 1 

Thiersch graft 8 

Cicatrix formation 

Plastic 26 

Cysts 

Excision 11 

Cellulitis 

Incision and drainage 6 

Dogbite 

Debridement and suturing 1 

Foreign body 

Removal 4 

Furunculosis 

Incision and drainage 1 

Hemangioma of skin 

Biopsy 1 

Endothermy 10 

Excision 12 

X-ray therapy 5 

Infection of finger 

Incision and drainage 1 

Keloid 

Plastic 4 

150 



197 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Skin — Continued 

Lacerations 

Debridement and suturing 7 

Suturing 10 

Thiersch graft 1 

Nevus 

Biopsy 1 

Excision 5 

Tumors 

Currettage 1 

Disarticulation 1 

Excision 2 

Verruca 

Excision 1 

Operations of the Bones and Joints 

Arthritis 

Biopsy 1 

Incision and drainage 5 

Congenital anomalies of bone 

Dressing 1 

Excision 5 

Plastic , 7 

Fractures, including skull 

Burr holes 2 

Decompression 4 

Reduction, closed 26 

Reduction, open 4 

Hemi-amputation of terminal phalanx of finger 

Irrigation, debridement and suturing 1 

Osteomyelitis 

External operation of frontal bone sinus 1 

Incision and drainage 27 

Subluxations 

Manipulation 3 

Reduction 2 

Torticollis 

Myotomy 1 

Wringer arm 

Thiersch graft 2 

Operations of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 
Division of tendons 

Plastic 1 

151 



157 



92 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia — Continued 
Ganglion 

Excision 7 

Hematoma, rectus muscle 

Exploratory laparotomy and evacuation 1 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 

Phrenicectomy and repair 4 

Hernia, incisional 

Laparotomy with lysis of adhesions 1 

Repair 4 

Hernia, inguinal 

Herniorrhaphy 147 

Herniorrhaphy with reduction 4 

Hernia, umbilical 

Herniorrhaphy 14 

Hernia, ventral 

Herniorrhaphy 2 

Severence of tendon of finger 

Suturing 2 

187 

Operations of the Eye and Ear 

Anomaly of ear (not lop ear) 

Plastic 3 

Anomaly of eye 

Plastic ' 6 

Lop ears 

Plastic 7 

Mastoiditis 

Mastoidectomy 2 

Otitis media 

Adenoidectomy 1 

Paracentesis 1 

— 20 

Operations of Systemic Diseases and Hospital Complications 

Anemia 

Splenectomy and biopsy 1 

Deferred 

Burr hole with encephalogram 1 

Cystoscopy 1 

Pyelogram 1 

Donor of ear cartilage 

Excision 1 

Suturing of bleeder 1 

152 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of Systemic Diseases and 

Hospital Complications — Continued 

Leukemia 

Biopsy . . i 1 

Pancytopenia 

Splenectomy 1 

No disease 

Exploratory laparotomy 1 

Exploration of thyroid region 1 

Proctoscopy 1 

Sigmoidoscopy 1 

Rupture of spleen 

Splenectomy 1 

Sinus, cheek 

Excision of sinus tract 2 

Splenomegaly 

Splenectomy 2 

Tuberculosis 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol 1 

Cystoscopy 1 

Excision 1 

Total number of operations 1397 

Total number of anesthesias on Surgical Ward 1273 

Total number of anesthesias on Private Ward 398 



19 



1571 



YEARLY REPORT OF THE EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

SERVICE 

1939 

During the past year, the Ear, Nose and Throat Service has been active 
as usual. Numerous improvements have been made, and others are in 
the process, or will be made in the near future. 

A new ventilating system has been installed in the operating-room 
and has already done much to make working conditions more com- 
fortable for patients and operating team as well. The clinical laboratory 
has been moved to the utility room on Ward VII where it is much 
more accessible and convenient to Ward VI. The present laboratory 
is being made over into a secretary's office. The room next to the 
Throat Out-Patient has been turned over to us for use as an examining 
room. New equipment is to be purchased for the Throat Out-Patient 

153 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

in order to facilitate the work there. It is hoped that we will also be 
able to have a small dark room which will cut down materially on the 
number of sinus X-ray plates being taken. 

During the course of each year, we see a large number of children 
who come in to us with the complaint of impaired hearing. Many are 
brought in directly by their parents, but a large number are referred 
from outside the city for an opinion on their hearing. The problem of 
deafness in childhood is an extremely important and interesting one, 
for if the hearing impairment is of the type which will respond to 
treatment, this should be known, and proper measures begun to bring 
about improvement before irreversible changes have taken place. It is 
one of the chief functions of this service to detect and treat those chil- 
dren who have the type of deafness which is amenable to treatment. In 
order to do this, several things are necessary. 

In the first place, we need a sound-proof room, in which the sub- 
jects are to be tested. If suitable space is found, this can be accomplished 
by a very small outlay. The second necessity is adequate testing equip- 
ment. The original cost of this is relatively high, but the up-keep and 
replacement is almost nil. When one considers the ultimate usefulness 
of such a room with this equipment its cost becomes a negligible factor. 
It is our hope that in the near future, we will have here at the Chil- 
dren's Hospital, adequate facilities for detecting, studying, and treating 
the preventable types of deafness in childhood. 

The personnel of the service has been increased by the addition of 
Dr. J. L. Hill who was appointed as Resident in Otolaryngology from 
January 1, 1940 to January 1, 1941. 

Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 

THROAT OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

1938 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy (Out-patient Department).. 582 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy (Ward) 21 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy (Private) 36 

Tonsillectomy 2 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy with removal of hypertro- 

phied tissue from nose 1 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy and Bronchoscopy with 

Lipiodol Injection 2 

Removal of tonsil tabs 1 

Suture of tonsil bleeder 1 

154 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Suture of tonsil bleeder, post-operatively 4 

Suture in tonsil fossae and Adenoid pack, post-operatively 2 

Adenoidectomy (Out-patient Department) 45 

Adenoidectomy (Wards) 16 

Adenoidectomy (Private) 3 

Adenoidectomy with removal of tonsil tabs 1 

Adenoidectomy with removal of hypertrophied tissue from 

turbinates 1 

Adenoid pack, post-operatively 2 

Examination of pharynx and adenoidectomy 3 

Biopsy of pharynx 1 

Suturing of laceration of palate 1 

Excavation of hard palate 1 

Incision of abscess on uvula 1 

Removal of tumor from pharynx 1 

Extraction of teeth (Private) 1 

Incision and Drainage of retropharyngeal abscess 5 

Submucous resection 11 

Turbinectomy 1 

Partial removal of turbinate. Adenoidectomy and suturing of 

palate 1 

Excision of mucous membrane on turbinates 1 

Antrotomy with irrigation 6 

Antrotomy with irrigation and Adenoidectomy 4 

Antrotomy with irrigation and Tonsillectomy and Adenoidec- 
tomy 3 

Radial Antrotomy. Bronchoscopy 1 

Radical Antrotomy. Intranasal Ethmoidectomy 1 

Excision of tracheal fistula and scar 2 

Simple Mastoidectomy 89 

Simple Mastoidectomy and Adenoidectomy 10 

Secondary Mastoidectomy 5 

Radical Mastoidectomy 7 

Modified radical mastoidectomy 1 

Exploration of mastoid cavity . 1 

Incision and Drainage of post-aural abscess 4 

Skin graft to ear 1 

Trephine frontal sinus exploration of dura 1 

Laryngoscopy (2 Private) 27 

Laryngoscopy and Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy 2 

Laryngoscopy. Bronchoscopy. Esophagoscopy 1 

Laryngoscopy. Bronchoscopy with Lipiodol Injection 1 

Bronchoscopy 16 

Bronchoscopy with removal of Foreign Body (1 Private) 8 

Bronchoscopy with Injection of Lipiodol 80 

Bronchoscopy with Acriflavine Cauterization 1 

Bronchoscopy. Fluoroscopy with removal of foreign body 1 

Bronchoscopy and excision of hypertrophied tissue from nose. . . 1 

155 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Esophagoscopy (1 Private) 3 

Escophagoscopy with removal of Foreign body (1 Private) 6 

Esophageal Dilatation 10 

Tracheotomy (4 Private) 14 



1005 

Out-Patient Department Cases 627 

Ward Cases 329 

Private Cases 49 

Grand Total 1005 



THROAT OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

1939 

Operations of the Nose and Accessory Sinus 

Submucous resection 7 

Antrum puncture 4 

Antrum puncture with adenoidectomy 5 

Antrum puncture with "windows" 3 

Antrum puncture with "windows" and bronchoscopy 1 

Radical antrotomy and ethmoidectomy 1 

Radical frontal ethmoidectomy and sphenoidectomy 1 

Reduction of nasal fracture 2 

— 24 
Operations of the Pharynx and Nasopharynx 

Nasopharyngoscopy 1 

Nasopharyngoscopy and adenoidectomy 1 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectory — Out-patient Depart- 
ment 575 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy — Ward and Private Ward 40 

Tonsillectomy 3 

Adenoidectomy — Out-patient Department 56 

Adenoidectomy — Ward and Private Ward 42 

Adenoidectomy with (bilateral) paracentesis 1 

Suturing of tonsil bleeder (secondary) 3 

Post-operative tonsil bleeding 4 

Post-operative adenoid bleeding 5 

Post-operative tonsil and adenoid bleeding 2 

Incision and drainage of retropharyngeal abscess 2 

Enlargement of post-nasal opening 2 



Operations of the Ear 

Simple mastoidectomy 105 

Modified radical mastoidectomy 1 

Radical mastoidectomy 3 

Secondary mastoidectomy 1 

Excision of mastoid fistula 5 

Excision of granuloma, right ear 1 

156 



737 



116 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Larynx and Trachea 

Laryngoscopy 13 

Laryngoscopy with excision of papilloma 11 

Laryngoscopy with excision of papilloma with tonsillectomy 

and adenoidectomy 1 

Laryngoscopy with removal of foreign body 3 

Laryngoscopy with dilatation 22 

Laryngoscopy with removal of mucuous tab 1 

Laryngoscopy with lipiodol injection 2 

Tracheotomy 27 

Dilatation of trachea and intubation 1 

Plastic to tracheotomy scar 1 

Operations of the Esophagus and Bronchus 

Esophagoscopy 1 

Esophagoscopy and laryngoscopy 1 

Esophagoscopy with removal of foreign body 4 

Esophagoscopy with dilatation of stricture 17 

Bronchoscopy 6 

Bronchoscopy with injection of lipiodol 42 

Bronchoscopy with removal of foreign body 7 



82 



78 



Total number of operations 1037 

Number of anesthesias on Private Ward 716 

Number of anesthesias on Public Ward 883 

Total 1599 



THROAT DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1938 

Abscess, auditory canal 1 

Abscess, laryngeal, pharyngeal 1 

Abscess, parotid gland 1 

Abscess, peri-pharyngeal space 1 

Abscess, peri-sinus 1 

Abscess, post-aural 13 

Abscess, pharyngeal 1 

Abscess, retropharyngeal 6 

Adenoiditis 1 

Anomaly of bronchial tree, congenital 1 

Anomaly of main bronchus, congenital 1 

Anomaly of scapula and ribs, congenital 1 

Atelectasis 2 

Blood clot in tonsillar fossa 1 

Bronchiectasis 3 

Bronchitis 4 

157 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Bronchitis, laryngo-tracheo 5 

Cervical rib 1 

Cocainism 1 

Convulsions 1 

Cord rectum : 1 

Cortical perforation 2 

Cyst of larynx 1 

Cyst, thyroglossal 1 

Dehydration fever 1 

Dental caries 2 

Dermatitis 4 

Deviated septum 13 

Dysentery 2 

Emphysema of chest and neck 1 

Emphysema of lung 1 

Encephalitis, lead 1 

Enlarged thymus 1 

Epistaxis 1 

Esophageal stricture 6 

Fistula, post-aural 1 

Foreign body in bronchus 5 

Foreign body in esophagus 9 

Foreign body in trachea 1 

Fracture, nasal 1 

Froehlick's syndrome 1 

Furuncle of buttock 1 

Furuncle of nose 1 

Furunculosis of ear canal 1 

Harelip and cleft palate 1 

Heart disease, congenital 3 

Hemangioma 3 

Hemorrhage, nasopharynx 1 

Hernia, inguinal 1 

Herniation of pleura 1 

Hydrocele 1 

Hypertrophied adenoids 45 

Hypertrophy of false vocal cords 1 

Hypertrophied laryngeal folds 2 

Hypertrophied nasal mucosa 2 

Hypertrophied tonsils 11 

Hypertrophied tonsils and adenoids 513 

Hypertrophied turbinates 2 

Ichthyosis 1 

Infection, antrum 3 

Infection, ethmoid 1 

Infection, middle turbinates 1 

Laceration 2 

Laryngeal edema 1 

158 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Laryngeal obstruction 1 

Laryngeal stridor 4 

Laryngo-tracheitis 2 

Laryngitis 9 

Lop ears 1 

Lamphadenitis, cervical 10 

Lymphadenitis 1 

Mastoiditis 162 

Meningitis, streptococcus 1 

Meningismus 1 

Nasal septal shelf. 1 

Nasopharyngitis 2 

Nephritis 2 

Nevus , 1 

Optic atrophy 1 

Otitis media 200 

Palate injury 1 

Pan-sinusitis 3 

Papilloma of larynx 7 

Pediculosis 1 

Pharyngitis 14 

Phimosis 2 

Phlebitis 1 

Pneumonia 8 

Polyp in ear 5 

Prontylin rash 1 

Pyrexia 1 

Purpura 1 

Rhinitis 1 

Scarlet fever 1 

Sinusitis 22 

Sinus thrombosis 1 

Sprengel's deformity 1 

Stenosis, choanal 2 

Strabismus 2 

Thrombosis, sigmoid 1 

Tonsillar tab 2 

Tonsillitis 12 

Tracheo-bronchitis 3 

Tracheotomy fistula 1 

Tracheotomy scar 2 

Upper respiratory infection 20 

Vaginitis, non-specific 1 

Web of finger 1 

No disease 1 



159 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

THROAT DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1939 

Diseases of the Nose and Accessory Sinus New Old 

Deformity of nose and nasal bone 1 

Deviated nasal septum 7 

Epistaxis 8 

Ethmoiditis 2 

Fracture of nasal bone 2 

Furuncle of nostril 1 

Hematoma, nasal septum 2 

Infection of turbinates 2 

Nasal polyp 1 

Polyp, maxillary sinus 1 

Rhinitis 1 

Sinusitis 21 5 

Spur of septum 2 

51 5 

Diseases of Pharynx and Nasopharynx 

Adenoid bleeding, post-operative 3 

Atresia, choanal 2 

Disease of lymphoid tissue of nasopharynx 2 

Hypertrophied adenoids 50 

Hypertrophied tonsils 5 

Hypertrophied tonsils and adenoids 568 

Hemorrhage, post-tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 19 

Laceration of tonsil 1 

Nasopharyngitis 7 

Pharyngitis 10 

665 2 

Diseases of the Ear 

Choleasteatoma of mastoid antrum 1 

Deafness 4 

Furuncle of canal 1 

Granuloma of ear 3 

Lop ears 1 

Mastoiditis 137 7 

Otitis externa 4 

Otitis media . 185 25 

Post-aural fistula 2 1 

Polyp, ear 3 

341 33 
160 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Larynx and Trachea New Old 

Anomaly of larynx 1 

Foreign body in larynx 2 

Foreign body in trachea - 4 

Laryngitis 11 

Laryngeal stridor 1 

Laryngismus stridulus 1 

Laryngo-tracheitis 13 

Laryngo-tracheo-bronchitis 6 

Obstruction, laryngeal 2 

Papilledema of larynx 5 8 

Redundant larynx 1 

Stricture, laryngeal 11 4 

Tracheitis 2 

60 12 
Diseases of the Esophagus and Bronchus 

Bronchiectasis 4 5 

Bronchitis 6 2 

Stricture, esophageal 1 17 

Foreign body in esophagus 5 

Foreign body in bronchus 5 

Tracheo-bronchitis 2 1 

23 25 
Diseases, Miscellaneous 

Abscesses 36 4 

Allergic child 1 

Anemia, hypochromic 1 

Anomaly of vertebra 1 

Arthritis 1 

Atelectasis 1 

Bifid uvula 1 

Cellulitis 4 

Cicatrix 1 

Cleft palate 1 

Conjuctivitis 1 

Contusion 1 

Cystic fibroma of lung 2 

Deficiency, mental 3 

Dental caries 1 

Dermatitis 2 

Dislocation of cervical vertebra 1 

Dysentery 1 

Eczema 1 

Edema of hip due to trauma 1 

Emphysema 1 

161 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases, Miscellaneous — Continued New 

Empyema 1 

Erysipelas 2 

Fever 1 

Fibroma of spinal cord 1 

Furnuculosis 1 

Harelip 

Harelip and cleft palate - 1 

Hemangioma, cavernous, abdominal wall 1 

Hemangioma, skin of lip 1 

Hemangioma of vocal cord 1 

Hematuria 2 

Hydrocele 1 

Hernia 3 

Intestinal parasites 2 

Lymphadenitis 11 

Macroglossia 1 

Malnutrition 3 

Megacolon 

Measles 2 

Meningismus 

Meningitis, sterile 

Mouth-breathing 1 

Mumps 2 

Nephroptosis 1 

Palsy, cerebral 

Paralysis , 6 

Paronychia 3 

Pertussis 2 

Phimosis 1 

Pneumonia 8 

Poliomyelitis 

Petrositis 3 

Pyelitis 1 

Redundant prepuce 1 

Rheumatic fever 1 

Rickets 3 

Scurvy 1 

Scarlet fever 2 

Septicemia 1 

Speech defect 1 

Stomatitis 1 

Thyroglossal cyst 1 

Upper respiratory infection 21 

Varicella 1 

Wen 1 



Old 



160 



14 



162 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Appendix 

Deferred 1 

No disease 2 



Number of cases on Throat Ward 890 

Number of cases on Private Ward 731 



Total 1621 

New cases 1 303 

Secondary diagnosis 91 



Total 1394 

THROAT OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT REPORT 

1938 

Abrasions , 3 

Abscess of head 1 

Abscess of mastoid scar 1 

Abscess, pharyngeal 1 

Abscess, post-aural 3 

Abscess, preauricular 1 

Abscess, retropharyngeal 1 

Adenitis, cervical 24 

Adenitis, post-auricular 3 

Adenoids 24 

Anomaly of larynx, congenital 1 

Atresia, Choanel 1 

Bleeding, post-tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 1 

Brachiogenetic sinus 1 

Bronchitis 1 

Cerumen 16 

Cold, common 1 

Contusions 7 

Cyst, sebaceous 1 

Cyst, thyroglossal 1 

Deafness 3 

Deformity of nose, traumatic 1 

Dental caries 2 

Deviated nasal septum 15 

Dilated vessels of septum 1 

Epistaxis . 33 

Erysipelas ." 1 

163 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Feeding, regulation of 1 

Foreign body in ear 3 

Foreign body in esophagus 1 

Foreign body in nose 14 

Foreign body in throat 1 

Fracture of nose 3 

Fungus infection 1 

Furunculosis 8 

Habit spasm 2 

Hay fever 3 

Headache 1 

Hernia, inguinal , 1 

Hypertrophy of tonsils 20 

Hypertrophy of tonsils and adenoids 332 

Hypertrophy of turbinates 1 

Granuloma of ear 1 

Impetigo contagiosa 5 

Laceration 1 

Laryngeal stridor, congenital 5 

Laryngitis 7 

Mastoiditis 32 

Nasal ulcer 2 

Nasopharyngitis 5 

Otalgia 2 

Otitis externa 9 

Otitis media 412 

Papilloma of larynx 3 

Paralysis of uvula 1 

Parotitis 1 

Pediculosis 1 

Pharyngitis 13 

Poison ivy 1 

Preputial adhesions 1 

Rhinitis 20 

Scarletina, post 1 

Septicemia 1 

Tonsillitis 26 

Torticollis, traumatic 1 

Upper respiratory infection 42 

No disease 47 

Diagnosis deferred 3 

Eloped 4 

Not seen 1 

New Cases 322 

Secondary Diagnosis 869 

Total 1191 



164 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 



THROAT OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT REPORT 

1939 

Nose and Accessory Sinuses 

Abrasion, nose 1 

Contusion, nose 10 

Deflected septum 25 

Deformity, nose 1 

Epistaxis 49 

Foreign body, nose 12 

Fracture, nose 5 

Hematoma, nasal septum 3 

Obstruction, nose 3 

Polyp, antrum 1 

Rhinitis 19 

Sinusitis 32 

Turbinates, hypertrophied 1 

162 

Pharynx and Nasopharynx 

Abscess, tonsillar 1 

Adenoids, hypertrophied 35 

Atresia, choanal 2 

Lymphoid hyperplasia, pharynx 1 

Foreign body, tonsil 1 

Laceration, tonsil and palate 1 

Nasopharyngitis 3 

Pharyngitis 10 

Tonsillitis 35 

Tonsils, hypertrophied 30 

Tonsils and adenoids, hypertrophied * . . 312 

Tonsillar tab 3 

434 

Ears 

Abscess, post aural 5 

Blocked eustachian canal 1 

Cerumen 16 

Deafness 7 

Foreign body, ear 4 

Furuncle, ear 12 

Granuloma, auditory canal 1 

Lop ears 1 

Mastoiditis 38 

Otalgia, etiology unknown 3 

Otitis externa 19 

Otitis media 393 

Polyp, ear 1 

Sinus, post aural 1 

502 

165 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Larynx 

Laryngitis 

Laryngeal stridor, congenital . 

Esophagus and Bronchi 

Bronchitis 

Bronchiectasis 

Foreign body, lung 

Stricture, esophageal 



6 
6 
— 12 



2 
2 
1 
1 
— 6 



Miscellaneous Conditions 

Abrasion, tongue and lip 

Abscess, alveolar 

Adenitis, cervical , 

Adenitis, post auricular , 

Allergy 

Asthma 

Conjunctivitis 

Constipation 

Coryza 

Dacrocystitis 

Defective speech 

Dermatitis 

Diphtheria 

Foreign body, gastro-intestinal tract . 

Fungus infection 

Furunculosis 

Habit tic 

Halitosis 

Hay fever 

Hemangioma 

Hematoma, cheek 

Hemiparesis 

Hoarseness 

Hydrocephalus 

Hypertelorism 

Impetigo 

Insect bite 

Measles 



1 

2 

23 



Mongolism 

Pediculosis capitis . 

Pertussis 

Phimosis 

Pneumonia 

Umbilical hernia . 



2 
2 
1 



166 



151 



34 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Upper respiratory infection 81 

Varicella 1 

Appendix 

Eloped 3 

No disease 30 

Referred to other departments 1 

New Cases 286 

Secondary Diagnosis 1015 

Total 1301 



PRIVATE WARD THROAT OPERATING 
ROOM REPORT 

1938 

Tonsillectomy 8 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 480 

Adenoidectomy 31 

Mastoidectomy, bilateral 1 

Mastoidectomy, left 19 

Mastoidectomy, right . 23 

Submucous resection 3 

Turbinectomy 6 

Bronchoscopy 4 

Resuturing of mastoid wound 1 

Esophagoscopy 2 

Laryngoscopy _ 1 

Sinus puncture 1 

Antrotomy 2 

Antrum puncture 1 

Exploration of Eustachian tube 1 

Suturing of palate wound 2 

Tracheotomy 2 

Removal of tonsil tabs 1 

Freeing nasal adhesions 1 

Packing of tonsillar fossae 1 

Plastic to nose 1 

Reduction of fractured nose 1 

Incision and drainage of post-aural abscess 2 

Incision and drainage of retropharyngeal abscess 2 

Incision and drainage of peritonsillar abscess 1 

Incision and drainage of parotid gland abscess 1 

Incision and drainage of cervical adenitis 1 

Total. . 600 

167 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

PRIVATE WARD THROAT OPERATING 
ROOM REPORT 

1939 

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy 376 

Adenoidectomy 38 

Mastoidectomy 50 

Resuturing 4 

Bronchoscopy 8 

Laryngoscopy 4 

Laryngeal dilatation 2 

Esophagoscopy 2 

Antrum puncture 5 

Incision and drainage 7 

Tracheotomy 7 

Turbinectomy 1 

Submucous resection 1 

Radical frontal ethmoidectomy 1 

Resuturing frontal flap 1 



507 



REPORT OF THE ORTHODONTIA AND 
DENTAL DEPARTMENTS 

The orthodontia and dental departments in the fall of 1937 obtained 
a grant of money from one of the funds in Boston. The amount ob- 
tained was sufficient to permit the purchase of considerable new dental 
equipment, including X-ray, speech recording machine, dental chairs 
and many other necessary items, resulting in a thoroughly modern 
dental department. 

The department was granted new quarters on the 6th floor of the 
Bader Building, where we now have three rooms, operating room, 
speech recording room and laboratory. 

For all the above we are most grateful to the donor and the housing 
committee of the hospital. 

This new arrangement has been most beneficial to all concerned, 
permitting closer co-operation, exchange of ideas, consultation for 
cases without special arrangements or loss of time. 

The opportunity for research along dental and orthodontic lines at 
the hospital are unlimited and relatively untouched. The need for re- 
search and especially for funds to carry on research is great and must 

168 



ORTHODONTIA DEPARTMENT 

be obtained soon for this work. Very little money for dental research 
has ever been available, not only in Boston but all over the country. 

However, the hospital is fortunate in having several research minded 
men interested in dental problems, and in spite of meager funds, con- 
siderable and commendable work has been accomplished during the 
past two or three years. 

The Dental Department of the Hospital has grown from a one-man 
affair in 1929 to eight men, one speech correctionist and two dental 
assistants, with the dental interne on twenty-four hour service. 

Orthodontic treatments are limited to children with cleft palate 
and the figures below indicate the number of treatments rendered for 
1938-1939. 

799 .Treatments 

213 Broken appointments 

40 New Cases examined 

12 New cases accepted for treatment 

In addition a large number of children report to the Clinic once or 
twice a year for examination. 

Dr. John C. Brown and Dr. Paul K. Losch prepared a paper on 
dental occlusion in patients with muscular dystrophy, which was pre- 
sented before the New York Society of Orthodontists meeting in 
March, 1939 and published in the American Journal of Ortho- 
dontics and Oral Surgery in the November, 1939 issue. 

Statistics of services rendered in speech training under supervision 
of Miss E. Segal. 

1938 

Cases (active) 20 

Visits 175 

1939 

Cases (active) 27 

Visits 202 

Total visits 377 

Cases closed 7939 

Dismissed as completed 2 

Moved 1 

Inactive 2 

8 
Harry W. Perkins, D.M.D. 

169 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT 
OF STOMATOLOGY 

The work of this department has been greatly expedited since moving 
into quarters in the Bader Building. The newly-provided dental 
laboratory makes possible the construction of artificial appliances 
which are often a necessary complement to the surgical and orthodontic 
treatment of patients. This work has been carried on under the direct 
supervision of Dr. Paul Losch. 

The filling of carious teeth, extraction of teeth, and the treatment of 
inflammatory conditions of the gingivae of hospitalized patients has 
occupied a large part of the time of the house officers, Drs. Brown and 
Legg. This service aspect of the department's activities has been much 
more efficiently carried on since a dental house officer has been in 
residence. 

During the past year the policy was instituted of making a detailed 
examination of the mouths of patients admitted to the Medical De- 
partment. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the relation 
between oral lesions and systemic disease processes will result. This 
work is under the supervision of Dr. David Weisberger. 

With the cooperation of the Department of Pathology an investiga- 
tion of the growth and development of the jaws and teeth of infants has 
been continued. The collection of x-ray photographs and histological 
sections is probably the most extensive in this country. Two papers 
based on a study of this material were prepared for publication during 
1937 by Dr. Ellis Jump. Dr. Jump is at present continuing his studies 
at the University of Chicago. He is one of an increasing number of 
graduates in dentistry who have shown determination to secure train- 
ing in stomatology comparable to that expected of medical graduates 
specializing in otolaryngology and ophthamology. 

During 1939 a report on the relations of the jaws and teeth in 
patients with muscular dystrophy was prepared for publication by 
Dr. John Brown. 

A growing interest in the training available in this department is 
reflected in the increased number of well qualified men who have made 
application for this interneship. 

Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D., Stomatologist 



170 



STOMATOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

STATISTICAL REPORT 

Department of Stomatology 

Formal Consultations 20 

Examination and study 193 

Permanent fillings 318 

Temporary fillings 179 

Treatments 142 

Extractions (permanent teeth) 91 

Extractions (decidous teeth) 180 

Surgical operations 8 

X-ray examinations 

. Patients 156 

Films 706 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY 

Recognition by physicians of the importance of the technical pro- 
cedures involved in the intelligent care of patients is reflected in the 
growth and development of the Department of Bacteriology. New tools 
demand new skills. Chemotherapy, or the use of specific drugs for their 
specific action on certain infections, has in the last three or four years 
surpassed in effectiveness the hopes of even the most sanguine. Sul- 
fanilamide and the related compounds find an ever widening applica- 
tion in the treatment of infants and children ill with serious diseases, 
such as erysipelas, meningitis, pneumonia and peritonitis, and yet 
their employment demands an exact knowledge of the invading organ- 
ism in order that the most effective drug may be selected. This can 
only be accomplished by more frequent and thorough bacteriologic 
examinations. Furthermore, these powerful drugs, although relatively 
safe in intelligent hands, now and then have untoward side-effects. As 
a precaution against these unfavorable developments, additional tests, 
such as blood counts and analyses of the urine, are necessary during the 
course of the disease. 

In the winter of 1938-39 the Infants' and the Children's Hospitals 
were among the few selected throughout the country for advance study 
and evaluation of sulfapyridine in the treatment of pneumonia. This 
careful evaluation was necessary before the government would license 
the drug for general distribution. Sulfapyridine proved to be an ex- 
traordinarily effective agent in the treatment of pneumonia. This year 
newer and possibly better compounds are being introduced for pneu- 

171 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

monia and other infections. The brilliant results with sulfanilamide and 
sulfapyridine, far from leaving physicians and other scientists satisfied, 
have served to bring into striking relief the urgent need for drugs 
against other bacteria, such as the staphylococcus, which frequently 
causes osteomyelitis, abscesses and septicemia. As a teaching hospital, 
as a hospital to which physicians of New England and elsewhere look 
for advice and guidance in the presence of these rapidly advancing 
developments, and above all for the treatment of our own seriously ill 
infants and children, we find it necessary to enlist the aid of the labora- 
tory in our efforts to define quickly and accurately the limitations and 
the potentialities of these new drugs. 

An analysis of the statistical report of the Bacteriology Department 
for 1939, as compiled by Miss Marian Sweet, shows a rapid increase in 
all items (averaging 45 per cent over the previous year), the biggest 
single increase being that of 82 per cent over 1938 in the number of 
blood counts for private patients. These blood counts, together with 
electro-cardiograms, basal metabolism tests, the determination of sedi- 
mentation rates, and blood groupings for private patients, are almost all 
carried out by a special technician. The rest of the work is done by two 
house officers under the direct supervision of Miss Marian Sweet. 

The number of bacteriological examinations increased 36 per cent 
over 1938 (8560 to 11,688) in spite of the fact that routine nose and 
throat cultures, amounting to over 3000, and included in the figures for 
1938, were discontinued in 1939. The clinical-pathological examina- 
tions increased 57 per cent (6024 to 9486) in the same period. 

The total number of examinations has more than doubled in the 
last twelve years: 

1928 10,240 

1931 12,612 

1935 13,020 

1938 14,584 

1939 21,174 

December, 1939, was the busiest month in the history of the labora- 
tory, with a 29 per cent increase in cultures over 1938 and a 63 per cent 
increase in blood counts. 

In addition to the actual rise in the number of examinations 
carried out, new procedures have been added and old ones amplified. 
These add appreciably to the work of the laboratory but are demanded 
for the more precise information they supply. It is the purpose of the 

172 



BACTERIOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

laboratory not only to supply technical information to practising phy- 
sicians concerning their patients but also to be ready with advice re- 
garding the most informative and practical procedures for recognizing 
the presence or absence of an infection, for determining the nature of 
infecting organism found, and for observing the course of the disease, 
whereby therapy may be guided to successful ends. 

John A. V. Davies, M.D. 



COMPARISON OF 1938 AND 1939 

Bacteriological Examinations 

7938 

Blood cultures 1,070 

Spinal fluid cultures 867 

Surgical specimens and miscellaneous cultures . 3,893 

Feces cultures 916 

Urine cultures 1,130 

Guinea pig inoculations 93 

Agglutination tests 99 

Vaccines 20 

Pneumococcus typings (deep throat swabs) .... 472 

Total 8,560 11,688 36% 



Clinical Pathology 

Routine urine examinations 1,870 2,311 23% 

Blood counts .' 2,933 5,341 82% 

Bleeding and clotting times 75 74 

Blood groupings 186 303 62% 

Hinton tests (July-December) 368 

Spinal fluid examinations 47 63 34% 

Feces examinations 20 25 25% 

Electrocardiograms 506 560 10% 

Basal metabolisms 154 178 15% 

Sedimentation rates . 186 238 28% 

Miscellaneous 47 25 



7939 


Increase 


1,406 


31% 


1,205 


39% 


5,414 


39% 


1,372 


49% 


1,295 


14% 


115 


23% 


171 


73% 


28 


40% 


682 


44% 



Total 6,024 9,486 55% 

Total of all Examinations 14,584 21,174 45% 

173 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF THE ROENTGENOLOGICAL 
DEPARTMENT 

1938-1939 

In keeping with the continual progress of Medicine, there has been an 
ever increasing demand for X-Ray examinations and treatments from 
the other hospital services, the out-patient department, the private 
ward, and physicians in private practise. It has been difficult to balance 
this increasing load against the economic necessity for reduction of 
operating costs to the minimum. Such a balance has been maintained 
to the best of our ability. 

Several changes have been made in the mechanical equipment of 
the X-Ray Department. The fluoroscope which was installed in the 
Infant's Hospital in 1937 and put into operation in 1938 has proved of 
great value in following the progress of pneumonia, particularly in 
those patients who were too ill to be transported to the main X-Ray 
Department. It has also afforded valuable training in fluoroscopy to 
the resident members of the medical staff. 

The greatest mechanical improvements were made in 1939 when 
all of the machines were shock-proofed and a new, completely modern 
fluoroscopic and radiographic unit was installed. All of the X-Ray 
equipment throughout the hospital is now completely shock proof and 
the danger of high voltage shocks to patients and personnel has been 
eliminated. The new X-Ray machine is one of the most powerful and 
complete units on the market today. In actual use it has proved to be 
so far superior to the other machines that it has been utilized in about 
sixty-five percent of all examinations done in the Department since its 
installation. Grateful appreciation is accorded the board of managers 
of the Children's Hospital for these improvements. 

Several other physical changes were made among which was the 
addition of a waiting room for private patients and a utility room for 
sterilization of instruments and for pneumoencephalography. This 
additional space was made available when the Department of Stoma- 
tology moved to their new quarters in the Bader Building. 

There has been an increase in the amount of X-Ray therapy due 
largely to the number of malignant tumors in which multiple X-Ray 
treatments have been indicated. There has also been an increase in the 
number of hemangiomas and plastic surgical cases which have been 
treated by X-Ray. The cosmetic results in these patients have been 

174 



ROENTGENOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

very encouraging. Because of the increase in the number of cases 
treated by X-Ray, a brief analysis of the types of disease treated has 
been added to the statistical part of this report. 

Dr. E. C. Vogt, who was Roentgenologist from 1926 to 1938, re- 
signed from that position and is now Roentgenologist at St. Luke's 
Hospital, New Bedford, Mass. Dr. Vogt developed the Department of 
Roentgenology from a small unit handling only a few patients a day 
to its present status, and was responsible for many advances in Pediat- 
ric Roentgenology during his tenure. We are fortunate in having him 
continue his association with the Department as Consulting Roent- 
genologist. 

The technical personel of the Department has been augmented by 
the addition of a graduate nurse whose time is largely devoted to X-Ray 
therapy and the nursing procedures carried out in the Department. 

George M. Wyatt, M.D., Roentgenologist 



CASES TREATED BY X-RAY 

Hemangioma 61 

Infection 12 

Keloid 12 

Keloid Prevention , 28 

Lymphoid hyperplasia of nasopharynx 42 

Tumors 

Brain 14 

Embryoma 9 

Neuroblastoma . 10 

Miscellaneous tumors 20 

Wart (Plantar) 21 

Other Cases 23 

Total 252 



TABULATION OF PATIENTS 

Out Patient Department 1938 1939 

Medical 2348 2348 

Surgical 989 1274 

Orthopedic 1456 1186 

Throat 289 142 



Total 5082 4950 

175 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Ward 

Medical 998 

Surgical 11 93 

Orthopedic 785 

Throat 216 

Total 

Infants 

Private 

Bader Building 

Isolation 

Miscellaneous 

Doctors 

Nurses 

Employees 

Total 2479 

Total cases examined 10,753 

Total treatments 697 

Total exposures (films) 33,616 



1234 

1123 

865 

231 



3192 


3453 


814 


882 


784 


1053 


283 


279 


49 


66 


45 


65 


31 


62 


282 


232 


191 


192 



2831 

11,234 

745 

33,791 



X-RAY REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 1938 
RADIOGRAPHIC CASES 



January. . . 
February. . 
March. . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July...... 

August. . . 
September . 
October. . . 
November . 
December . 



X-Ray 


Old 


New 


Treat- 




Films 


Cases 


Cases 


ments 


Totals 


2672 


518 


354 


70 


942 


2350 


420 


334 


70 


824 


3132 


558 


421 


74 


1053 


3017 


582 


395 


61 


1038 


3046 


565 


406 


65 


1036 


3171 


567 


400 


78 


1045 


2635 


477 


351 


85 


913 


2821 


483 


416 


40 . 


939 


3038 


526 


379 


15 


920 


2733 


518 


389 


41 


948 


2463 


515 


336 


45 


896 


2538 


515 


328 


53 


896 



33,616 



6244 



4509 



697 11,450 



176 



ROENTGENOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Private 
Cases 

January. . . . 96 

February 90 

March 76 

April 74 

May 74 

Jufie 75 

July 35 

August 38 

September 54 

October 60 

November . 45 

December 67 



784 





Bader 


Iso- 


Infants 


Bldg. 


lation 


92 


15 


11 


66 


27 


14 


78 


22 


12 


89 


31 


2 


67 


23 


3 


69 


28 





64 








53 


1 





60 


32 





53 


32 





57 


35 





66 


37 


7 



814 



283 



49 



HOUSE 

Medi- 
cal 

January 90 

February 67 

March 80 

April 86 

May 118 

June 91 

July 67 

August 84 

September 75 

October 73 

November 85 

December 82 

998 



Surgi- 


Ortho- 






cal 


pedic 


Throat 


Total 


94 


66 


25 


275 


70 


28 


11 


176 


131 


59 


26 


296 


103 


76 


13 


278 


110 


88 


24 


340 


100 


' 87 


19 


297 


125 


68 


16 


276 


120 


74 


8 


286 


92 


56 


10 


233 


78 


60 


19 


230 


78 


62 


27 


252 


92 


61 


18 


253 


1193 


785 


216 


3192 



177 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



O. P. D. 



Medi- 
cal 

January 154 

February 147 

March 195 

April 217 

May 226 

June 217 

July 149 

August 189 

September 193 

October 229 

November 240 

December 192 



2348 



Surgi- 


Ortho- 






cal 


pedic 


Throat 


Total 


73 


82 


19 


328 


47 


106 


44 


344 


89 


120 


39 


443 


84 


109 


39 


449 


78 


114 


14 


432 


84 


135 


30 


466 


92 


161 


20 


422 


94 


154 


18 


455 


117 


135 


24 


469 


101 


134 


16 


480 


55 


108 


13 


416 


75 


98 


13 


378 



989 1456 



289 



5082 



EXTRAS 

Em- Miscel- 

Doctors Nurses ployees laneous 

January 2 30 ' 19 4 

February 4 19 9 5 

March 6 20 21 5 

April 32 12 10 

May 3 12 15 2 

June 2 9 18 3 

July 4 22 5 

August 1 32 30 3 

September 2 42 12 1 

October 4 37 9 2 

November 3 27 13 3 

December 4 18 11 2 

31 282 191 45 

Total number of Cases and Treatments 11,450 



178 



ROENTGENOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

X r RAY REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 1939 
RADIOGRAPHIC CASES 



X-Ray 
Films 

January 2554 

February 2688 

March 2992 

April 2703 

May 3144 

June 2878 

July 2484 

August 2574 

September . 2717 

October 2745 

November 3261 

December 3051 



Old 


New 


Treat- 




Cases 


Cases 


ments 


Totals 


517 


371 


83 


971 


486 


399 


43 


928 


598 


422 


25 


1045 


512 


372 


37 


921 


619 


425 


87 


1131 


569 


402 


44 


1015 


464 


334 


49 


847 


497 


434 


79 


1010 


532 


406 


63 


1001 


490 


412 


108 


1010 


610 


397 


67 


1074 


579 


387 


60 


1026 



33,791 6473 4761 745 11,979 



Private 
Cases 

January 90 

February 119 

March 104 

April 81 

May 89 

June 81 

July 49 

August 45 

September 74 

October 87 

November 112 

December 122 

1053 





Bader 


Iso- 


Infants 


Bldg. 


lation 


66 


43 


9 


66 


26 


3 


80 


33 


25 


76 


19 


17 


94 


32 


1 


83 


28 





73 








88 








60 


17 





52 


32 





68 


29 





76 


20 


11 



882 



279 



66 



179 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



HOUSE 



Medi- Surgi- Ortho- 

cal cal pedic 

January 90 74 72 

February 98 96 65 

March 131 81 73 

April 120 94 50 

May Ill 104 85 

June 92 97 77 

July 90 73 72 

August 100 108 77 

September 87 112 71 

October 105 89 62 

November 96 85 93 

December 114 110 68 



180 



hroat 


Total 


14 


250 


19 


278 


24 


309 


21 


285 


20 


320 


23 


289 


19 


254 


15 


300 


14 


284 


22 


278 


20 


294 


20 


312 



1234 1123 865 231 3453 



O. P. D. 

Medi- Surgi- Ortho- 

cal cal pedic 

January 211 63 102 

February 184 72 87 

March 205 107 87 

April 154 127 87 

May 224 118 110 

June 187 140 95 

July 161 110 92 

August 189 147 74 

September 204 112 114 

October 200 83 113 

November 231 92 131 

December 198 103 94 



Throat 


Total 


8 


384 


8 


351 


5 


404 


10 


378 


22 


474 


19 


441 


12 


375 


25 


435 


13 


443 


12 


408 


7 


461 


1 


396 



2348 1274 1186 142 4950 









ROENTGENOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 



EXTRAS 

Em- Miscel- 

Doctors Nurses ployees laneous 

January 2 17 21 6 

February 3 21 14 4 

March 10 24 24 7 

April 5 12 8 3 

May 1 12 20 1 

June 10 12 17 10 

July 2 10 26 9 

August 6 28 17 12 

September 5 42 9 4 

October . : 6 25 10 4 

November 5 15 20 3 

December 7 14 6 2 

62 232 192 65 

Total number of Cases and Treatments 11,979 



REPORT OF PHYSICAL THERAPEUTICS 
DEPARTMENT 

As the Physiotherapy Department is prepared to carry out the instruc- 
tions of the Staff on all services, its work is varied and is a part of the 
general treatment of the patient. All patients are followed and checked 
regularly by the service which has prescribed physical therapy. 

The therapeutic pool room has been in use throughout the year, as 
under water exercises were prescribed for arthritic patients who were 
under treatment during the summer months, using the Hubbard tub 
when the large pool was not available. 

There has been an increasing amount of difficulty with the func- 
tioning of the large pool, which has resulted in its being out of service 
a number of weeks for pipes to be replaced and work done on the 
filters. In spite of this, the figures for the treatment on ward patients 
in the water remained high. 

There were a number of requests by private cases of chronic 
poliomyelitis from outside the hospital and five of these were treated 
at the end of the day. 

The sixth floor Solarium in Bader Building was used each winter 
for a group of orthopedic ward children who had been hospitalized 

181 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

for many months. In addition to the exposure to the carbon arc light, 
they received massage and exercise treatment in the natural sunlight. 
The Solarium would be used regularly throughout the year if it were 
not for the extreme heat from the sun coming through the glass. 

The Orthopedic Service referred the greatest number of House 
patients for physiotherapy, and the largest number were infantile 
paralysis cases referred for early post-operative physiotherapy while 
still in plaster. Many received further intensive care at Wellesley Con- 
valescent Home, after which the same program was continued under 
the clinic and field supervision of the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Com- 
mission. Congenital deformities made up the next largest group, for 
the number of early cases of polio hospitalized was small both years, 
due to the low incidence of the disease in Massachusetts. This also ex- 
plained the smaller number of patients given physiotherapy on the 
Medical Service in 1938 and 1939. 

The Posture and Scoliosis Clinic under the direction of Dr. John 
Kuhns, followed the same program as before, teaching exercises to be 
carried out at home and making simple supporting plaster jackets as 
inexpensively as possible. It is felt that much more could be obtained 
from the treatment, if it were not that many of the patients come from 
too great a distance to be able to afford the time and money to at- 
tend as frequently as necessary. There were 95 cases of structural 
scoliosis seen in the Clinic in 1939 more than half of which were of 
congenital origin. Idiopathic cases accounted for the next largest 
group. 

Both years saw an increase in the number of treatments given to 
adults connected with the hospital. 

The problem of meeting the training of the physiotherapy students 
is becoming increasingly difficult with the necessity of making their 
schedule fit the requirements for the National examination for regis- 
tration as physical therapy technicians. The nine months' course in 
which these students are registered at Harvard Medical School is on 
the list of sixteen courses in the country which are approved by the 
Council of Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical 
Association. They serve as assistants in this hospital and others through- 
out the city to obtain their practical training. Thirty-four students 
have registered in this course in the past two years, coming from as far 
away as Hawaii, Philippine Islands and Greece. Seven are connected 
with State programs for crippled children and students who have 
finished are now working in sixteen different states. 

182 



THERAPEUTICS DEPARTMENT 

It was necessary to terminate the twelve year old arrangement with 
the Bouve Boston School of Physical Education for giving special train- 
ing to the students from that school, as facilities were inadequate for 
the accommodation of the enlarged classes here. 

The summer course was repeated and was still popular in spite of 
the fact that it is too short to be recognized as an approved course. 

The death of Dr. Legg during the 1939 course was felt as a great 
loss, for he had given his time and interest in a generous and kindly 
manner since 1917 when the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission 
sponsored the first courses for training after-care workers in the field 
of infantile paralysis. 

In considering the years totals for the number of treatments given 
in the hospital it should be mentioned that in many places it is cus- 
tomary to count one general treatment consisting of heat, massage and 
therapeutic exercises as three separate treatments. If this method of 
accounting were followed, practically all the figures except those 
specifying pool or light treatment could be multiplied by three. 

Janet B. Merrill, 
Director of Physical Therapeutics 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STATISTICS 

1938 



Physical Light 

General Therapy Therapy 



Total 





Cases 


Treat- 
ments 


Cases 


Treat- 
ments 


Cases 


Treat- 
ments 




108 


3031 


15 


481 


123 


3512 


Sursrical 


15 

7 


302 

77 


10 

2 


195 
46 


25 
9 


497 


Medical 


123 


Neurological 


4 


58 


3 


89 


7 


147 


Private 


7 


39 


5 


71 


12 


110 


Infants' Hospital. . . . 


3 


3 








3 


3 


Staff 


5 


10 


7 


33 


12 


43 


Employees 


8 


273 


3 


122 


11 


395 


School of Nursing. . . . 


9 


50 


3 


70 


12 


120 



166 



3843 



48 



1107 



214 



4950 



183 



27 


1751 






31 


1152 






5 


160 






36 


1312 










152 


1230 






14 


41 






10 


48 






2 


36 






2 


4 






324 


2061 






4 


14 






1 


5 






1071 


5754 






187 


3941 






12 


12 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

House Pool 

Orthopedic 22 1597 

Surgical 3 22 

Private 2 132 



O. P. D. Pool 
H. I. P. C. 

Private. . . 



O. P. D. 

Orthopedic 

Arthritic 

Surgical 

Private 

Medical 

Scoliosis 

Light 

Private 

H. I. P. C 

Neurological 

Miscellaneous 

1779 13,146 

DISEASES RECEIVING PHYSICAL THERAPY TREATMENT 

1938 

I Congenital Malformations O.P.D. House Adult 

Anomalies 4 4 

Clubfeet 3 

Congenital Dislocation of Hip 20 5 

Coxa vara 2 

Scoliosis 34 2 

Spina bifida 6 2 

Sprengel's deformity 1 

Torticollis 8 10 

II Deformities & Disabilities Following 
Injury or Disease 

Cavus 1 

Faulty posture 37 

Fractures 6 1 2 

Functional scoliosis 186 

Injuries 4 7 8 

Scoliosis 71 1 

Myositis 5 1 

184 



THERAPEUTICS DEPARTMENT 



III Non-Tuberculosis Infections 

Arthritis 4 

Osteomyelitis 2 

Septic joints 4 

IV Paralysis & Other Neuro-Muscular 

Conditions 

Amyotonia congenita 2 

Dystrophy 2 

Paralysis — brachial 26 

Poliomyelitis 5 

Poliomyelitis post-operative 3 

Other central nervous system diseases 

Peripheral nerve lesions 1 

Volkmann's paralysis 2 

Tumors 2 

V Miscellaneous 

Asthma 1 

Behavior problem 

Burns 1 

Cellulitis 

Cervical adenitis 

Deferred 1 

Dermatomyositis 

Empyema 

Fistula 

Foreign body 

Hemangioma 2 

Hemophilia 

Mastoidities 

Megacolon 

Muscle examination 40 

Peritonitis 

Pneumonia 

Respiratory infections 

Scurvy 

Septic wounds 4 

Skin , 



25 
7 
1 



2 

7 

9 

17 

22 

10 

3 



1 

5 
1 
2 
7 
1 
3 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

5 



484 



167 



185 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY 
STATISTICS— 1939 



General 
P.T. 
Hospital Wards Cases 

Orthopedic 138 

Surgical 11 

Medical 16 

Neuro-Surgical. ... 2 

Neurological 1 

Private 7 

Infants Hospital ... 2 

Hospital Staff 7 

School of Nursing. . 6 

Employees 17 

207 

0. P. D. Pool 

H. I. P. C 

Private 







General 








Light 




P.T. 


Light 


Pool 




Therapy 


Pool 


Treat- 


Treat- 


Treat 




Cases 


Cases 


ments 


ments 


ments 


Total 


18 


28 


3104 


531 


1844 


5479 


10 





90 


64 





154 





1 


73 





9 


82 


1 





27 








27 








1 








1 


7 


1 


26 


62 


107 


195 








3 








3 


7 





97 


76 





173 


1 





70 


24 





94 


3 





356 


55 





411 


47 


30 

36 
5 


3847 


812 


1960 

980 
231 


6619 



41 



1211 



0. P. D. 

Orthopedic 140 

Arthritic 21 

Surgical 15 

Private 3 

Neuro-Surgical 1 

Scoliosis 397 

Light 1 

H. I. P. C 907 

Respirator 1 

Neurological 186 

Miscellaneous 3 



1010 

58 

117 

104 

45 

2378 

37 

4698 

46 

3384 

8 



1675 



11,885 



186 



THERAPEUTICS DEPARTMENT 

DISEASES RECEIVING PHYSICAL THERAPY 
TREATMENT— 1939 



I Congenital Malformations O.P.D. 

Anomalies 4 

Arthrogryposis 1 

Club Feet 

Dislocation of Hip 22 

Scoliosis 50 

Spina bifida 5 

Sprengel's deformity 

Torticollis 3 

II Deformities & Disabilities Following 
Injury or Disease 

Abductor contracture of hip 1 

Dislocations, Sprains, Injuries 4 

Fractures 11 

Poor Posture 58 

Pronated feet 4 

Scoliosis — functional 236 

Scoliosis — structural 45 

Slipped femoral epiphysis 1 

III Non-Tuberculosis Infections 

Arthritis 22 

Osteomyelitis 3 

Septic joints 6 

IV Paralysis & Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Amyotonia 

Dystrophies . 5 

Morvan's disease 1 

Neuritis 1 

Paralysis — brachial 27 

cord lesion 2 

spastic 5 

peripheral nerve 2 

Paralysis following measles 1 

Paralysis, Volkmann's 2 

Poliomyelitis, anterior 9 

Poliomyelitis, post-operative 1 

Post-encephalitis paralysis 1 

Radiculitis 1 



House Adult 
6 
1 
6 
5 
3 
4 
1 
21 



1 




6 


14 


1 


1 


1 


1 



9 
9 

5 



2 
10 
1 
1 
6 
1 
6 



19 

27 

1 

1 



187 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

V Miscellaneous 

Asthma 5 

Burns 1 

Cardiac Condition 

Cervical myositis 

Dermatomyositis 

Diagnosis deferred 15 

Extrophy bladder 

Fatigue 

Fistula 

Foreign body 1 

Hernia 1 

Orthostatic albuminuria 7 

Pneumonia 2 

Septicemia 1 

Skin lesions 

Streptococcic infection throat 1 

Tuberculosis, knee 

Tumors 2 7 

567 183" 



36 



Cases treated in the Neurological Ward and Out-Patient Clinic, and in the 
Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission Clinic are not included in this list. 



REPORT OF THE MUSCLE TRAINING CLINIC 

For the year ended December 31, 1939, fifty-four new patients were 
admitted to the Muscle Training Clinic for treatment, whereas for the 
year 1938, fifty-one new patients were admitted. 

During the year 1939, three old patients were transferred to other 
hospitals because of age and three were transferred to the State Hospital 
School at Canton. Three new patients were rejected as ineligible for 
treatment. During the year 1938, five new patients were rejected as 
ineligible for treatment. 

The remainder were diagnosed as follows: 



1938 

Brachial Palsy 12 

Cerebral Palsy 30 

Spina Bifida 3 

Facial Palsy 6 

~51 
A total of 3,840 treatments were 
given to patients previously ad- 
mitted. 



1939 

Brachial Palsy 8 

Cerebral Palsy 44 

Hydrocephalus and Injury to 

Spinal Cord 1 

Facial Palsy 1 

~54 
A total of 3,389 treatments were 
given to patients previously ad- 
mitted. 

Randolph K. Byers, M.D. 



188 



HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 

THE HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS 
COMMISSION 

1938 was the twenty-second year of service for the After Care Clinic of 
the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission. Clinics are held each 
Tuesday, Thursday and Friday morning in the Bader Building of the 
Children's Hospital. Pool treatments are given on Monday mornings 
as well as on the regular Clinic mornings. The services of the Clinic 
are free to all sufferers from the disease, regardless of age, color or 
creed. Suspected cases are admitted for diagnosis. 

Field Clinics continue to be held on a regular schedule in Arlington, 
Beverly, Cambridge, Dedham, East Boston, Haverhill, Lawrence, 
Lowell, Maiden, Quincy, Somerville and Waltham. The Lynn Clinic 
was discontinued in December of 1939. More than 11,000 treatments 
were given in these Clinics during 1938 and 1939. 

The following figures which are somewhat lower than in the two 
preceding years — due to the small number of new cases which have 
occurred in the State, portray vividly the extent of the work of the 
Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission during 1938-39. In the 
Hospital and Field Clinics 32,437 treatments and examinations were 
given to approximately 1100 individuals. Of these 2,132 were Pool 
treatments, 8,897 Hospital treatments, 11,141 Field treatments and 
10,267 treatments given by the Community Health Association Nurses 
working under instructions from the Clinic Surgeon. 

The American Physiotherapy Association held its National Con- 
vention in Boston in June of 1938 and more than one hundred and 
fifty of its members visited the Infantile Clinic at the Hospital. The 
names of many distinguished doctors from distant countries have been 
added to the guest register during the past two years. 

1939 will long be remembered by all who have had any association 
with the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission Clinic because it was 
in July of this year that death claimed Dr. Arthur T. Legg, the guiding 
genius of the Clinic from the time of its inception in November of 1916. 
Through this Clinic he had examined and directed the treatment for 
more than six thousand infantile paralysis patients — an enviable 
record. 

A fine spirit of cooperation exists between the Commission workers 
and those of the Hospital, making available to the Commission the 
facilities of the X-ray and Photographic Departments as well as the 

189 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Record Room. A number of Infantile cases are operated upon each 
year in the Children's Hospital and then referred back to the Clinic 
for post-operative care. 

The Clinic continues to serve as a teaching Clinic for House Officers 
of the Children's Hospital, the Harvard Medical School students and 
Physiotherapy students. 

Praise is due the Community Health Association Orthopedic 
Nurses for the large number of treatments given cases in the Boston dis- 
trict, referred from the Clinic, and for their helpful reports. 

The Commission wishes to extend its sincere gratitude to the many 
associations and individuals who have made possible transportation to 
and from the Clinic, warm clothing and the necessary apparatus for 
those patients whose families were unable to supply these needs. 
Special mention should be made of the Volunteer Red Cross drivers, 
the Noemi Club and the Kiwanians. 

John E. Gordon, M.D., Chairman 



1938 

Number of regular Clinics held at the Children's Hos- 
pital 152 

Number of Doctor Clinics held in outside cities and 

towns 6 

Total : 158 

Number of visits made to the Children's Hospital Clinics 5754 

Number of old cases seen at the Doctor Clinics in outside 

cities and towns 244 

Number of visits made in the field by Commission work- 
ers 5618 

Number of visits made in the field by the Community 

Health Association 5609 

Total 17,225 

Number of new cases seen at the Children's Hospital 

Clink: , 72 

Number of new cases seen at Doctor Clinics held in out- 
side cities and towns 5 

Total new cases — 77 

190 



HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 

Total number of visits at all Harvard Infantile Paralysis 

Commission Clinics 17,302 

Average attendance at Hospital Clinics 37 

Pool Treatments 1 152 

Total number of individual cases seen 1,071 

Number of H. I. P. C. cases operated on in the Children's 

Hospital 61 



1939 

Number of regular Clinics held at the Children's Hos- 
pital 137 

Number of Doctor Clinics held in outside cities and 

towns 5 

Total 142 

Number of visits made to the Children's Hospital Clinics 4698 

Number of old cases seen at the Doctor Clinics in out- 
side cities and towns 210 

Number of visits made in the Field by Commission work- 
ers 5523 

Number of visits made in the Field by the Community 

Health Association . 4658 

Total 15,089 

Number of new cases seen at the Children's Hospital 

Clinic 45 

Number of new cases seen at Doctor Clinics held in out- 
side cities and towns 1 

Total new cases — 46 

Total number of visits at all Harvard Infantile Paralysis 

Commission Clinics 15,135 

Average attendance at Hospital Clinics 35 

Pool Treatment 980 

Respirator Treatments 46 

Total number of individual cases seen 1,076 

Number of H. I. P. C. cases operated onin the Children's 

Hospital 50 



191 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

The number of clinical photographs made in 1938 and 1939 were 
nearly the same. The total for two years was 3503 cases and 8322 
photographs. 

The new price scale put into effect in November, 1 937 has materially 
increased the amount of money brought in by the sale of lantern slides, 
duplicate prints, etc. The increase over 1937 amounted to $382.75. 
In 1939 the increase over 1938 was $259.09. Supplies cost less in 1939 
than in the previous year. 

The outstanding event of the year 1939 was in supplying the large 
number of photographs used in the exhibition in connection with the 
70th Anniversary Celebration. There were between 2000 and 3000 
photographs on display, of which about 600 were supplied by this de- 
partment during April and May. The balance had been made previ- 
ously by the department for various original purposes not connected 
with the celebration. At this time, the motion picture, "Care of Prema- 
ture Infants," was shown publicly for the first time. This film is now in 
regular use for teaching purposes. 

A motion picture of a new material for making casts was made in 
1938. 

A new lens and an accurate shutter was secured in October, 1939, 
and this, coupled with a new and faster type of film, has materially in- 
creased the quality of the photographs. As each new film is put on the 
market, it is tested by the department to see if better results may be ob- 
tained. Improved photographs can be obtained only by constantly ex- 
perimenting with lighting and new sensitized materials. An easy 
method of proving this is to compare photographs made in 1929 with 
those made in 1939. 

A new assignment for this department is the manufacture of identi- 
fying signs for use around the hospital. These signs are made by photo- 
graphic methods and present a neat appearance. About 35 were pro- 
duced this year. 

The processing room has been rearranged to provide a more efficient 
grouping of apparatus. All chemicals are now placed in labeled glass 
bottles so that the quantity on hand may be observed at all times. 

Some trouble still occurs in making color photographs. The ma- 
terial being employed is sensitized for a color temperature of 3200 K. 
and the ordinary 1000 watt incandescent lamp burns at a considerably 
lower temperature. This causes a yellow overcast in the transparency. 

192 



PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT 

Lamps developing a 3200 K. temperature do not fit the reflectors now 
in use, and it may become necessary to use photoflash bulbs for color 
work. The photographer has hesitated to do this on account of the 
added cost of the color slides to members of the staff. The matter is still 
being worked upon in collaboration with the Eastman Kodak Company. 

Some attempts have been made to get information about the use of 
fluorescent tubes for photographic lighting. These tubes produce a 
cold light which would be highly desirable for clinical photography. 
Not enough is known at this time about their use in photography, and 
also, they do not function well on direct current, which is the only type 
available in the department at this time. If these tubes could be made 
to work, they would eliminate the heat and glare problem and would 
also save considerable in cost of operation, as they use much less current. 
More inquiries are being made on this problem. 

Clinical photographs were exhibited in the International Salon 
held at the Grand Central Palace in New York. An exhibit was also 
sent to the 1938 Annual Convention of the Biological Photographic 
Association, held in Philadelphia. The photographer attended this 
convention. In September, 1939 the photographer attended the con- 
vention of the Association, held in Pittsburgh, and read a paper, 
"Photography in the Posture and Scoliosis Clinic." Publicity photo- 
graphs from the hospital were exhibited. 

Ferdinand Harding 

Papers written and published in 1938-39 were as follows: 

"The Lighting and Posing of Clinical Photographs." Jour. Biol. Photo. 
Assn., Vol. 6 No. 3. 

"Low Level Focusing by Reflex Mirror." Jour. Biol. Photo. Assn., Vol. 6 
No. 4. 

"Signs by Photography." Jour. Biol. Photo. Assn., Vol. 6 No. 4. 
"Notes on the Processing Room." Jour. Biol. Photo. Assn., Vol. 7 No. 1. 
"Methods of Posing and Holding Infants and Small Children." Jour. 
Biol. Photo. Assn., Vol. 7 No. 2. 

"Processing Room Illumination." Jour. Biol. Photo. Assn., Vol. 7 No. 3. 

"Random Notes on the Production of Silent Medical Motion Pictures." 
Jour. Biol. Photo. Assn., Vol. 7 No. 4. 

"Photographs for Institutional Publicity." Jour. Biol. Photo. Assn., Vol. 8 
No. 1. 

"Photography in the Posture and Scoliosis Clinic." Jour. Biol. Photo. 
Assn., Vol. 8 No. 2. 

"Orthopedic Clinical Photography." Radiography and Clinical Photo- 
graphy, Vol. 15 No. 3. 

193 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



1938 STATISTICS 

Service Cases Views 

Orthopedic 424 1025 

Surgical 662 1 542 

Medical 155 361 

Pathology — Children's Hospital 191 307 

Pathology — Infants' Hospital 82 138 

Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission 74 205 

Infants' Hospital 65 147 

Scoliosis Clinic 63 235 

Ward 9— Neurological 20 40 

Private Ward 13 33 

Director's Office 10 49 

Dental Clinic 5 13 

Ward 1 1 — Isolation 5 9 

Ward 6 — Throat 4 7 

Muscle Training Clinic 4 7 

Follow-up Clinic — Orthopedic 2 4 

School of Nursing 1 2 



Total 1780 4124 



Miscellaneous negatives made • 737 

Miscellaneous prints made 2135 

Lantern Slides made \ 307 

Motion Pictures made 89 

Motion Picture footage 3400 ft. 

Color Plates made 42 

Charge Slips $1133.15 

Scoliosis Clinic — 34 packs developed, 345 prints made 

Inventory, unbroken pkgs $34. 1 6 

Cost of Supplies 806.91 

Total negatives made 4861 

Total prints made 6604 



194 



PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT 



1939 STATISTICS 

Service Cases Views 

Orthopedic 433 1055 

Surgical 631 1606 

Medical 136 313 

Infants' Hospital 57 128 

Pathology — Infants' Hospital 62 102 

Pathology— Children's Hospital 175 297 

Scoliosis Clinic 70 264 

Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission 79 224 

Private Ward 30 83 

Dental Clinic 18 45 

Director's Office (Publicity) 9 34 

Ward 6 8 16 

Ward 9 7 14 

Ward 11 5 9 

Muscle Training Clinic 1 1 

School of Nursing 2 5 

Total 1723 4196 



Miscellaneous negatives made 1053 

Miscellaneous prints made 3357 

Lantern slides made 537 

Motion pictures made 46 

Motion picture footage 1800 ft. 

Color Plates made 19 

Charge Slips $1329.24 

Scoliosis Clinic — 49 packs developed, 563 prints made 

Inventory, unbroken packages $55.30 

Cost of Supplies 772.32 

Total negatives made 5249 

Total prints made 8116 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY REPORT 

The children continue to greet their Occupational Therapy periods 
with enthusiasm. It is said that every child is born into equal oppor- 
tunity but not into equal physical fitness. Occupational Therapy is one 
of the mediums which is helping put into the little ones the spirit and 
desire to conquer their illness. Marie Montessori has said, "Joy is 
equivalent to an injection of health." Music and stories are provided 
for those unable to have activity. 

195 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

During 1938-1939 

2,627 children were given Occupational Therapy 

2,375 projects were made. Each child was allowed to take his work 

home. He says, "To show I've been in the hospital." 

Cost of Supplies — $256.23 

Average cost per child over the two-year period — 9% cents 

Students 

30 affiliated from the Boston School of Occupational Therapy. 
These are students in their second year of training. 

Volunteers 

148 volunteers have contributed — 

6,313 hours in assisting in project preparation, in work on the wards 
with the children, in story-telling, reading, and recreation. This group 
has been most faithful in their attendance and splendid in their co- 
operation. Two members have given their services for a period of four 
years. This group represents — 

Wheelock Kindergarten School 
Junior League 
Garland School 
and individuals interested in philanthropic work. The Wheelock 
seniors, two in number, conduct an activity program with children who 
are waiting for their doctor's appointment in the Medical Out-Patient 
Department. This phase of work was begun in 1938. 

2,610 children were kept busy. 

2,239 articles were completed and taken home. These activities 
have been a great boon in keeping the children contented while waiting. 

Student Nurses 

As in years past each affiliating group received a one-hour lecture 
on Occupational Therapy and its relation to child growth and the 
normal child. 

Second-year Children's Hospital students receive 12 hours — 1 hour 
lecture, 6 hours' craft, 1 hour on library service, 3 hours' ward assign- 
ment, and 1 hour on general preparation. 



Children's Library 

Increasing interest and popularity are shown in this phase of work 
with the children. The volumes in the library number about two 
thousand. The library service is in charge of an Occupational Therapy 

196 






SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

student who is assisted by volunteers who help the children with intel- 
ligent book selection. There was a circulation during 1938-1939 of 
5,086 volumes. 

The Occupational Therapy Committee consists of members who 
have given their whole-hearted support. The Department wishes to 
extend its thanks of them, to the Welfare Committee and members of 
the Staff for their co-operation. 

Jessie Ness, O.T.R. 
Feb. 15, 1940 Director of Occupational Therapy 



REPORT OF THE SOCIAL SERVICE COMMITTEE 

The past year has been one of difficulties and adjustments in this de- 
partment. The end of January Miss Amy W. Greene who had been 
Director for six years, received a call from The Johns Hopkins Hospital 
in Baltimore to be the Director of its Social Service Department. The 
position seemed to offer a greater chance for progressive development 
than she felt would be possible at The Children's Hospital, also an in- 
crease in salary. She accepted the position and asked to be released the 
first of April. 

A Sub Committee was at once formed from the Social Service Com- 
mittee consisting of Doctors Crothers, Green and Lanman (the last 
two having been added to the Committee by vote of its members) to 
take the necessary steps to secure a successor to Miss Greene. They con- 
scientiously and ably secured the names of possibly desirable persons 
both in the United States and Canada, and informed themselves as to 
their qualifications for the position. 

The Sub Committee recommended the appointment of Miss 
Mildred Hearsey as Director. Miss Hearsey had in the past worked at 
The Children's Hospital under Miss Mabel Wilson and was then con- 
nected with the Social Service Department of the Presbyterian Hospital 
in New York. She came to Boston two or three times to acquaint her- 
self with the present situation at the Children's, and accepted the posi- 
tion with the understanding that she could not come to Boston till 
July 1st. She proved to be a wise leader, meeting her responsibilities 
with intelligence and tact. She inaugurated constructive plans for the 
future of the Department and made a definite impress during her few 
months of service. It was therefore a great disappointment to the Com- 
mittee when an urgent call came to her from the Children's Federal 

197 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Bureau at Washington to join it the 1st of January. A person trained in 
the work of a Children's Hospital was needed to join a group making a 
survey of, and in establishing, centers for Child Health and Welfare in 
five of the Southern States, and she was considered the most desirable 
person for the position. No one knowing the proposition could with 
fairness criticize her decision to undertake this new work even though 
she had held her position with us for so short a time, and was deeply 
interested in the Hospital. 

Once again the Sub Committee was called into action to find a 
suitable Director for the Department and are now making contacts, 
but as yet there is nothing definite to report. At present Miss McGinnis 
is "Acting Director," and she and the workers are showing fine spirit. 

To the Social Service Workers, to Mr. Meyer and to members of 
the Medical Staff much credit and gratitude are due for their helpful- 
ness and patience during these unsettled months. They have seen to 
it that the work for the children should suffer as little as possible. Faith 
in the value and need of Social Service is undiminished, and the Com- 
mittee look forward with hope and confidence to a less disrupted 
future. 

Olga E. Monks, Chairman 



REPORT OF SCHOOL OF NURSING AND 
NURSING SERVICE 

In a very modest way fifty years ago The Children's Hospital began its 
School of Nursing. During these years it has graduated 868 persons. 
Of this number 42 are deceased and the addresses for 17 are unknown; 
the remainder are scattered in all parts of the world and in all types of 
nursing service. The celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
School in conjunction with the Seventieth Anniversary of the Hospital 
in June, 1939 brought together 294 graduates or 36% of our living 
alumnae. 

During the year 1938, 292 students, representing sixteen schools, 
completed the affiliating course; 2 graduate nurses completed the sup- 
plementary course; 3 students came from Simmons College for ex- 
perience in ward administration; and we gave four weeks' instruction 
to 6 public health nurses taking the Course in Orthopedic Nursing 
given by Simmons College in conjunction with the Harvard Physio- 
therapy Department and the Community Health Association. During 

198 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1939 we admitted 45 students and removed from the roll 10, in addi- 
tion to 26 who received the diploma. During the year 313 students 
completed the affiliating course; 2 students had the experience in ward 
administration; 1 person had experience in anesthesia for children; a 
graduate nurse from the Hamilton General Hospital, Canada, had two 
months' observation; and we gave four weeks' instruction to 3 public 
health nurses taking the Course in Orthopedic Nursing. At the end of 
1939 we have 112 students, the highest enrollment in our own School 
of Nursing in five years. The number of students to whom we have 
given the affiliating course in pediatrics is indicative of the constant 
turnover on our wards and emphasizes anew the necessity for stabiliz- 
ing the nursing service by the use of graduate nurses. 

One of the problems which has given us concern for a long time is 
the illness record, both from the standpoint of health of students and 
the economic loss to the hospital. As a national study was made in 
1938 we had some figures with which to make comparisons, and the 
illness for our own students exceeded the average in children's hospitals, 
but the figure for our affiliating students was approximately the same 
as the average for the country. One cannot take the figures entirely at 
face value as one school may send students off duty more readily than 
another. A study of our own situation shows that most of our illness is 
due to the respiratory infections and that the illness tends to decrease 
with the length of time that the student is within the institution. 

In 1939 we had 231 3^2 more infirmary days for Children's Hospital 
students in residence than in 1938, increasing our daily average number 
per student for the year by 2.59 days. 220 days of this illness can be 
accounted for by an epidemic of Sonne Dysentery which was confined 
largely to our own group of students. While the total number of in- 
firmary days for affiliates in 1939 was about the same as for the previous 
year, the average infirmary days per affiliate has decreased .4 day for 
1939, since the daily average of students in residence was higher than 
in 1938. The illness record for our Children's Hospital students in 
residence has fluctuated; it is worse in 1939 than in 1938 but better 
than in 1937. We had hoped to better our record for illness in 1939 and 
might have done so had it not been for the Sonne Dysentery. 

While the hours for our student nurses on day duty are not ideal, 
we have made some progress in establishing right conditions for stu- 
dents. This does not apply, however, to our night nurses who still 
continue to work eight hours each night seven nights a week, in addi- 
tion to attending classes. One of our pressing problems is to find some 

199 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

plan for avoiding having night nurses get up at two or three o'clock for 
classes a number of times a week. We should be moving faster toward 
a change in the night duty schedule for students. 

All who are concerned with nursing education in our good schools 
of nursing are conscious of certain needed changes, namely, more recog- 
nition of the student nurse as a student; the need for more mature and 
better prepared students; sufficient faculty to provide guidance for 
students and better ward teaching; experience in psychiatric or mental 
nursing for all students; provision for public health nursing; and an in- 
crease in the number of graduate staff nurses in order that students' 
experience may be based on educational needs rather than hospital 
needs. We have made some progress with them all, but we should de- 
velop them further. 

An affiliation was made in 1938 for a limited number of students 
at the McLean Hospital. During 1939 12 students received the affilia- 
tion in psychiatric nursing and 7 students received the affiliation in 
public health nursing. Our goal should be to give all students one or 
the other of these affiliations. 

As we have indicated, the tendency in schools of nursing is to admit 
more mature students and to give preference to applicants with more 
education than four years of high school. For the 45 students we en- 
tered in 1939, the average age was 19. 22 of the group had some school 
work following the receipt of their diploma in high school; 9 had post 
graduate courses in high school, 7 had one year of college, and 6 had 
two years of college. 

In accordance with a vote of the Executive Committee of the Board 
of Managers a study was made of the School of Nursing in 1939 to 
consider the type of school which we should conduct or whether we 
should conduct any school, supplying the nursing needs with graduates. 
The School of Nursing Committee passed the following vote: 

"Whereas, the members of the School of Nursing Committee have 
made a careful analysis of the Study of the School both as to ex- 
penses and educational factors, as they are analyzed in the Report 
of the Principal, and, whereas, they believe the prestige of the Hospi- 
tal and the service which it renders to the community is enhanced 
by conducting a high-grade School of Nursing — The Committee 
respectfully recommends to the Board of Managers that the School 
of Nursing be continued as it is now organized." 

We are happy to report that the Board of Managers approved the 
recommendation of the School of Nursing Committee. This School 

200 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

has been in the forefront among nursing schools and should continue 
to maintain its position of leadership. 

On the recommendation of the School of Nursing Committee the 
Board of Managers also approved of the application of the School to the 
national Committee on Accrediting for a survey. It will be helpful to 
have an objective survey of the School, and we are of the belief that 
this School will be placed on the accredited list. 

The first addition to the full-time teaching staff since 1921 was made 
in September, 1939 when Elizabeth Romine, a graduate of the Cook 
County Hospital and holding a degree in nursing education from the 
University of Chicago, was appointed as instructor. She has had con- 
siderable experience in pediatrics, has attended the Merrill-Palmer 
School in Detroit, and has worked in the Orthogenic Clinic of the 
University of Chicago Clinics. 

Nursing Service 

On the basis of studies the American Hospital Association and the 
National League of Nursing Education advocate that the number of 
hours of bedside nursing to be allotted for infants is 6 hours in each 24; 
for children two to five years, 4^ hours; and for children five years 
and over, 4 hours. From a study which included 14 hospitals selected 
on the basis that good nursing care prevailed (12 of them general 
hospitals and 2 children's hospitals, one being ourselves), we find that 
The Children's Hospital furnished 4.6 hours of care for ward patients 
of all ages, 5.5 hours for pediatric infants, and 4.2 hours for older ward 
patients. The median figures for the hospitals studied were 4.4 for 
pediatric ward patients of all ages, 5.5 for pediatric infants, and 4.3 for 
older ward patients. This study was based on six sampling periods of 
one week each every other month throughout the year. In evaluating 
these findings it should be remembered that all of these general hos- 
pitals were not teaching hospitals, nor does the other children's hospital 
have the teaching or research program that goes on in this hospital 
nor do they have the specialized children's cases such as we have. The 
evidence seems to show that we are not over-staffed, as our average 
hours approximately meet the medians for the group studied, but on 
the basis of our special problems it would be more to the point if we 
were above the median. 

For the last three months of 1939 Ward II has been reserved for 
neurosurgical patients. This has meant the addition of a graduate 
nurse at night. While it has made considerable difficulty in the plan- 

201 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

ning of the experience for student nurses, it has reduced the amount of 
special care necessary for patients and is conducive to the better care 
of patients. 

We reached the highest point in the history of the hospital for the 
Main Operating Room in 1938, there having been 1862 cases, an in- 
crease of 280 cases over the previous year. There is a decrease in 1939 
of 152 operations, but this has been in general surgical and orthopedic 
cases as there has been an increase of 51 neurosurgical operations. 
There has also been an increase of 52 cases in the Private Ward Operat- 
ing Room for 1939 as compared with 1938. With the change of sur- 
gery to specialized, our surgery tends to become much more compli- 
cated. Such skilled and life-saving operations as the new operation on 
the heart, lobectomies, and the increasing number of plastic operations 
(which though not life-saving are equally important to the person who 
is saved from going through life with deformities which affect his 
economic and social standing) are time-consuming from the standpoint 
of our Operating Room Staff. 

There are many indications of the expansion of the hospital, not so 
much in numbers but in the type of work which is done, necessitating 
a larger and more stable staff. Scientific means are being developed 
for the saving of life, but every new treatment introduced seems to 
bring with it an increase in the amount of nursing service necessary, 
because many of these treatments are potentially dangerous and entail 
constant vigilance. 

The tendency today in hospitals everywhere is for patients to expect 
the hospital to give better nursing service with the hospital staff, mak- 
ing it less necessary for them to require special nurses. With the ex- 
pansion of the hospital insurance plans now in operation, this tendency 
will increase. If we are to render the kind of service which the public 
expects we may expect to increase the nursing personnel in the Private 
Ward. 

There is a decided tendency in hospitals to reduce the hours of 
general staff nurses, especially on night duty. General duty nurses on 
day duty in this institution work a 51 -hour week, and those on night 
duty 57 hours. No nurses have been added to the general nursing staff 
during the last two years except one graduate to the Smith Ward Staff 
in 1938 to care for the special treatments and special care during the 
hours from 2 to 11 P.M. and the graduate for the new Neurosurgical 
Unit. 

We had a relatively stable year in 1938 with regard to the personnel 

202 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

in the supervisory and head nurse group, but 1939 brought a number of 
changes. Among the supervisors, Miss Dorothy Grant who served as 
Medical Supervisor for four years resigned, and Miss Helen Riedel 
who has been a head nurse for a number of years was appointed to the 
position. Miss Harriet Ziegler who has been employed in the Out- 
Patient Department for ten years resigned, and Miss Maud Gillespie 
has been appointed to take charge of the Medical Clinic. Miss Anne 
Baillie who served in the Private Ward for many years resigned as 
Supervisor. At the present time the supervision of the Private Ward is 
being carried by an Assistant in the School of Nursing Office. 

The members of the Welfare Committee of the hospital have con- 
tinued to show their interest in the School and Nursing Staff by teas 
which have been arranged in Gardner House. The School appreciates 
their interest. 

Stella Goostray, 
Superintendent of Nurses 



1938 


1939 


98 


101 


41 


45 


4 


2 



C. H. students enrolled, Jan. 1st! 

Admissions — C. H. students 

Re-entered — C. H. students 

143 148 

Completed course during year 29 26 

Temporarily off enrollment 

Junior students 2 

Second-year student 1 

Resignations — ill health 

Simmons student 1 

Junior students 1 2 

First-year students 1 1 

Second-year student 1 

Third-year student 1 

Resignations — miscellaneous reasons 

Simmons students 2 

Junior student 1 

Dismissals 

Students in pre-clinical course 4 2 

Junior student 1 

First-year students 2 42 36 



C. H. students enrolled, Dec. 31 101 112 

203 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Affiliating students enrolled 

Graduate student 

C. H. students on affiliation 24 

C. H. students in residence but attending 

Pre-clinical course (Simmons) 30 

Public health course (Simmons) 2 

Total number of students assigned to Wards and 

Special Departments 

Children's Hospital 102 

Infants' Hospital 21 

Affiliating students completing course during 

year 292 

Graduate students completing supplementary 

course during year 2 

Days of Illness 

Average of C. H. students in residence daily 

Infirmary days 

Average days of illness per C. H. student in 
residence for the year 

Average of affiliates in residence daily .... 

Infirmary days 

Average days of illness per affiliate in resi- 
dence for the year 

Graduate Staff (Permanent), December 31 

School of Nursing Office 

Children's Hospital 

Night Supervisors 3 

Day Supervisors 5 

Head Nurses 10 

General Duty Nurses 

Days 9 

Nights 7 

Operating Room and Anesthesia 

Out-Patient Department 

Infants' Hospital 

Private Ward (3 floors open) 

Total 



78 



179 



56 



123 



9.93 



1938 



34 

9 

5 

7 

19 

79 



32 

29 
3 



100 
23 



313 



74 
1 

187 



64 



123 



68.856 


73 


710 


941.5 


10.31 


12.9 


78.094 


81 


777 


771 



9.5 



1939 



3 

5 

10 

9 
8 



35 

9 

5 

7 

22 

84 



204 



WELFARE COMMITTEE 

REPORT OF THE WELFARE COMMITTEE 

The various activities of the Committee have been carried on during 
the last two years with the usual interest and enthusiasm. The Avery 
Lectures moved to the Copley- Plaza Hotel in January, 1939, and the 
subscription list was then increased. It has again increased for the 
season of 1939-40, with a total of 689 course tickets. Part of the pro- 
ceeds was designated as usual for the entire support of Occupational 
Therapy at the hospital and the remainder was used for new equipment 
in the X-ray department. We are indeed grateful to Mrs. Stewart, 
Mrs. Lanman and their committee for their splendid work in behalf 
of the hospital. 

Since Miss Ness, herself, reports specifically on the work of the Oc- 
cupational Therapy Department, all that I need say here is that during 
the past two years, the interest of the Occupational Therapy Com- 
mittee has been keen with one member on duty each month to assist 
in any way possible in the department and to report on the work the 
following month at the Welfare Committee meeting. 

A competition in 1938 increased the membership in the Birthday 
Club to one thousand. Under Mrs. Theopold's able direction, the 
number of members and the receipts both continue to be satisfactory. 

There were two new C. H. Clubs in 1938. Although the amount 
raised in 1939 was slightly lower, the number of clubs varies somewhat 
from year to year and it is hoped that in 1940 the number may again 
increase. 

The Girl Scouts continue to send valuable donations of toys, scrap- 
books, magazines and other articles of interest to the children. This is 
due to the efforts of Mrs. Clapp who gives much time to keeping alive 
the interest of the various Girl Scout groups. 

Contributions to the Holiday Committee have come from twelve 
churches. During the last year, we have received contributions from 
two new sources. 

The Knitting Committee provided 157 articles in 1938 and 176 in 
1939. A fund of fifty dollars per year, appropriated by the Welfare 
Committee, buys yarn wholesale for volunteer knitters. 

The receipts from the Thrift Shop were less in 1939 than in 1938 
but we are making a great effort to secure a larger number of saleable 
articles from members of the Welfare Committee and their friends. 

In April, 1939, a special committee, with Mrs. Howell as chairman, 
was formed to discuss the best method of disposing of The Children's 

205 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Hospital pencils the purchase of which was approved in 1938. To date, 
the receipts from them have been $222.50. Plans are being made to 
sell the pencils through schools next year. 

The Speakers' Bureau is now incorporated with the Tea Committee 
as our plan since 1938 has been to invite groups to the hospital for tea 
and a talk and a tour of the wards. Only in special cases, when it is 
impossible for a group to come here, does the Speakers' Bureau send 
someone out. There were three such occasions in 1939. 

Two large teas for the doctors and nurses were given in 1938 as well 
as three other nurses' teas and five teas with speakers for different 
women's clubs. In 1939, besides the Open House, the tea dance in con- 
nection with the Seventieth Anniversary and the Christmas Tea Dance 
for the doctors and nurses, there were three teas for women's clubs. 
Thanks to Mrs. Pratt, the chairman of the tea committee, they were all 
very successful. 

On Donation Day, both in 1938 and in 1939, the "Old Woman Who 
Lived in a Shoe" was on hand to entertain former patients and their 
parents and to receive donations. Ruby Newman gave his services each 
year and added greatly to the gaiety of the occasions. 

During 1938, Miss Amy Greene and Dr. Ladd spoke at two of the 
Welfare Committee meetings and, in 1939, Dr. Blackfan was a speaker. 
The Welfare Committee appreciates such opportunities as they keep us 
in touch with the important work of the hospital. 

Through the generosity of a friend, we were given space at the 
Eastern States Exposition in Springfield the week of September 18th, 
1938. This brought valuable publicity to the hospital. 

The hospital's usual exhibit at the annual meeting of the Massa- 
chusetts State Federation of Women's Clubs at Swampscott in May 
took place each year. Last year, the exhibit was enlarged to show the 
extensive service rendered by the hospital. The medical, surgical, 
orthopedic and laboratory departments were represented as well as the 
Occupational Therapy. Because of the splendid reception of this latter 
exhibit, we were invited to repeat it for one week in September at the 
Family Information Center at Jordan Marsh Company. 

The entire Welfare Committee was most eager to avail themselves 
of the opportunity to do whatever they could toward the success of the 
hospital's seventieth anniversary. A tea dance was given at Gardner 
House for the anniversary guests and the Pop Concert, on June 8th, 
was taken over by us with Mrs. William C. Cox in charge. The profit 
of $714.55 was turned over to the Managers to help defray the reunion 

206 



WELFARE COMMITTEE 

expenses. Although these two occasions were the only specific duties 
of the Welfare Committee, the members attended many of the other 
events with great enthusiasm. Mrs. Edwin S. Webster, a member of 
our committee, gave a tea in her beautiful garden for the anniversary 
guests, a great many of whom availed themselves of this privilege. 

This March marks the end of my first year as Chairman of the Wel- 
fare Committee. The only important change which has been made 
during this period is the adoption of a set of Policies for the use of the 
Welfare Committee which are to serve as a working basis for two years 
and adopted formally at the end of that time if they prove satisfactory. 
The purpose of these Policies is to clarify the aims of the Welfare Com- 
mittee for the benefit of all of the members and particularly the new 
ones; and to create a closer contact between the members and the 
executive committee. 

I should like to take this opportunity to express my great apprecia- 
tion of the kindness and consideration of my predecessor, Mrs. William 
C. Cox, in helping me to become acquainted with all of the varied ac- 
tivities of the Welfare Committee and of the hospital. It is difficult to 
succeed anyone as efficient as she was but I want to thank the Board of 
Managers, the Welfare Committee, and Miss Hudson, our Secretary, 
for their patience and support and unflagging interest. It is a privilege 
to work with such a group of people for such a cause. 

Josephine D. Russell, Chairman 

MEMBERS OF THE WELFARE COMMITTEE 

January, 1938 to January, 1940 

Mrs. William C. Cox, Chairman 

Mrs. William De Ford Beal, Vice Chairman Officers up until 

Mrs. John G. Palfrey, Corresponding Secretary March, 1939. 

Mrs. Dudley P. Rogers, Treasurer — Died February 25, 1939 

Mrs. William E. Russell, Chairman 

Mrs. Edwin F. Cave, Vice Chairman Officers since 

Mrs. Carl H. Ernlund, Vice Chairman March, 1939. 

Mrs. John G. Palfrey, Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence, Treasurer — New December, 1938 

Mrs. Gordon Abbott 

Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Allen 

Mrs. Joel M. Barnes 

Miss Betty A. Bartlett 

207 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Mrs. C. Stewart Black 

Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 

Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 

Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 

Mrs. Albert Bradley Carter — Resigned December, 1938 

Mrs. George A. Clapp 

Miss Louise Coburn 

Mrs. Eliot Codman 

Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 

Mrs. Channing H. Cox 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles Devens 

Mrs. Ralph H. Doane 

Miss Catherine Donnelly — New May, 1938 

Mrs. Edward C. Donnelly 

Mrs. Hamilton P. Edwards — New April, 1938 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

Mrs. H. Wendell Endicott — Resigned December, 1939 

Mrs. Donald Falvey 

Mrs. Charles Feehan 

Mrs. John W. Hallowell 

Mrs. Bartlett Harwood 

Mrs. Stephen Heard 

Mrs. Henry W. Hildreth — New June, 1938 

Mrs. Harold D. Hodgkinson — New April, 1938 

Mrs. Russell Howell — New March, 1939 

Mrs. John H. Johnson 

Mrs. Alfred Kidder, II — New January, 1938 

Mrs. John H. Kimball — Resigned June, 1938 

Mrs. Louis E. Kirstein 

Mrs. William E. Ladd 

Mrs. Thomas H. Lanman 

Miss Constance B. Learned 

Miss Elizabeth C. Leland 

Mrs. Francis B. Lothrop 

Mrs. Frederic W. Mattheis — New January, 1939 

Miss Mary Meehan 

Mrs. George H. Monks 

Mrs. John W. Myers 

Mrs. Harris J. Nelson — New October, 1938 

Mrs. Charles L. Peirson — New June, 1938; resigned February, 1939 

Mrs. William Brace Pratt 

Mrs. William L. Shearer, III 

Miss Ida C. Smith 

Mrs. Frank H. Stewart 

Mrs. Philip Stockton 

Mrs. George P. Sturgis — New May, 1938; resigned January, 1939 

Mrs. William Sutton 

208 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Mrs. Robert C. Terry 

Mrs. Philip H. Theopold 

Mrs. Richard H. Thompson — New August, 1939 

Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 

Mrs. Richard P. Waters 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster 

Mrs. Alexander Wheeler — New June, 1 939 

Mrs. Nehemiah H. Whitman 

Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 

Mrs. L. A. Winchester — Resigned March, 1938 

Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott 

Honorary Members 
Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 
Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 



1938 FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Receipts 

Welfare Committee $7,498.73 

Avery Lectures 6,300.00 

Campaign proceeds through Welfare Com- 
mittee 950.00 



Gross receipts $14,748.73 

Deduct Special Donations 

Holiday Committee $ 105.00 

Expenses 1,834.18 

Balance towards current expenses 12,809.55 



$14,748.73 



1939 FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Receipts 

Welfare Committee $5,772.18 

Avery Lectures 5,500.00 

Campaign proceeds through Welfare Com- 
mittee 585.00 



Gross Receipts $11,857.18 

209 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Deduct Special Donations 

Avery Lectures proceeds for the following pur- 
poses: 
(in accordance with the recommendation of 
the Committee and the approval of the Board 
of Managers) 

Completion of installing new x-ray equip- 
ment $3,700.00 

Support of Occupational Therapy for one 

year 1,800.00 

Holiday Committee 135.00 

Expenses 2,389.63 

Balance towards current expenses 3,832.55 



$11,857.18 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence, 

Assistant Treasurer 



210 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Former House Officers and Residents 

Abbott, F. B. 1915 

Adams, John D 1902 43 Bay State Road, Boston, Mass. 

Adams, Wm.B 1920 20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

Adelman, Maurice 1922 209 Angel St., Providence, R. I. 

Allison, Nathaniel 1901 950 East 59th St., Chicago, 111. 

Ames, Frederick D 1934 1204 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

Amiral, Hiram H 1916 9 Walnut St., Worcester, Mass. 

Anderson, Arthur .1923 122 East 76th St., New York, N. Y. 

Anderson, Randolph L. . . .1926 1023 Quarier St., Richmond, Va. 

Anderson, Samuel A., Jr. . . 1925 2326 W. Grace St., Richmond, Va. 

*Andrews, Edward A 1896 

Andrews, Sumner C .1916 1374 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

Atsatt, Rodney F 1927 1421 State St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Aufranc, Otto E 1938 264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Austen, George 1937 Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

Ayer, J. B., Jr 1907 319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Bailey, Orville T 1935 Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 

*Bailey, Walter C 1898 

*Baker, Frederick H 1892 

Baker, Horace M 1917 Lumberton, N. C. 

♦Baldwin, Herman T. ...... 1895 

Ball, John D 1923 414 Spurgeon Bldg., Santa Ana, Cal. 

Barber, Carol Glenn 1921 606 Hanna Bldg., Cleveland, O. 

Barnes, Frederick W., Jr. . . 1937 Columbia Univ. Med. Sch., New York, N.Y. 

Barr, Joseph S 1928 234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Barrett, M. F 1903 231 Main St., Brockton, Mass. 

Bartlett, Daniel E 1905 

Bardett, Fred A 1908 308 Beale St., Wollaston, Mass. 

Baty, James M 1929 1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

Beekel, W. Fred 1907 7039 Superior Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

Bell, Donald 1921 Tryon, North Carolina 

Bender, Norman 1921 115 Saranac Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Benjamin, James D., U.S.N.1914 Naval Air Station, San Diego, Cal. 

Bennett, Charles B 1923 1122 University Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 

Berkley, Hugh K 1916 1136 West 6th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Binns, J. Frazier 1929 706 Church St., Nashville, Tenn. 

Biorkman, Gustav 1918 660 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Billig, Harvey F., Jr 1936 226 Union Oil Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Blair, Montgomery 1929 2222 Q St. N.W., Washington, D. C. 

Blodgett, William H 1939 Mass. Gen. Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

Bolowtow, Nathan A 1917 126 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 

Bost, Frederick C 1929 384 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Botsford, Thomas W 1937 323 Calhoun St., Chillicothe, Mo. 

♦Deceased 



211 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Boutwell, Horace K 1905 

*Bowditch, Henry 1 1902 

Boyd, Robert T 1939 

Bressler-Pettis, Chas. W. . . . 1917 

Briggs, Maurice T 1917 

Brines, John K 1939 

Bromer, Ralph 1915 

Brooks, Glidden L 1939 

Brostrom, Frank 1929 

Brown, Charles L 1923 

*Brown, David R 1918 

Brown, F.Bert 1938 

Brown, John C., D.M.D.. ..1939 

Brown, John E., Jr 1933 

Brown, Lloyd T 1908 

Brown, Percy 1900 

Browne, Trevor S 1924 

*Bryant, Charles S 1899 

Bryant, Clarence E 1906 

Burpee, Benjamin P 1916 

Byers, Randolph K 1924 

Byrne, Harry V 1929 

Calder, Harold G 1908 

Campbell, James B 1937 

Canada, Charles C 1934 

Canaday, John W 1934 

Carey, Benjamin W 1935 

Carpenter, George 1 920 

Carson, Paul C 1921 

Carter, Marshall A 1935 

Catterson, L. F 1926 

Cave, Edwin 1927 

Chamberlain, John W 1935 

Chapin, William E 1926 

Churney, Otto 1929 

Clarke, George W 1904 

Clarke, M. Melvin 1927 

Clement, David H 1939 

Clifford, Stewart 1929 

Cochrane, J. Joseph 1925 

Coe, Herbert E 1907 

Cogswell, William, Jr 1892 

Cole, Walter F 1920 

Connerley, Marion L 1940 

Cook, Robert J 1916 



2254 North Talbot St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Lynn Shore Drive, Lynn, Mass. 
1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
629 Pembroke Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
3439 Prytania St., New Orleans, La. 
2401 North Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

612 Drayton St., Savannah, Ga. 

Andover, Mass. 

270 E. Town St., Columbus, Ohio 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Egypt, Mass. 

711 Professional Bldg., Phoenix, Arizona 

101 Highland St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
814 Elm St., Manchester, N. H. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

301 Essex St., Lawrence, Mass. 

224 Thayer St., Providence, R. I. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

2015 N. Kenmore St., Arlington, Va. 

191 Glen St., Glenns Falls, N. Y. 

Wayne Medical School, Detroit, Mich. 

1205 Behnie Dillon Bldg., Nashville, Tenn. 

401 North Emporia, Wichita, Kan. 

Box DD, Carmel, Calif. 

107 Yi High Ave., W., Oskaloosa, Iowa 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

3103 W. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 

Zamboanga, P. L, Canada 

Defiance, Ohio 

315 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 

786 Delaware Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

15 W. Central St., Natick, Mass. 

830 Medical & Dental Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

Capitol Bldg., Helena, Mont. 

101 N. Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

85 Whitney Ave., New Haven, Conn. 



*Deceased 



212 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 






Coonse, G. Kenneth 1927 

♦Corson, Carl C 1936 

Cozen, Lewis 1938 

*Crandall, Arthur R 1896 

Cravener, Edward K 1929 

Crawford, Henry B 1930 

*Creesy, Everett L 1900 

Crothers, Bronson 1912 

Cudney, Ethan B 1925 

Cunningham, Allen 1915 

Curnen, Edward C, Jr .1938 

Cutler, Charles H 1939 

Daniels, George F 1923 

Darrah, Rufus .1887 

Davidson, William D 1933 

David, S.D 1923 

Davis, Arthur G 1922 

Dawson, Clyde W 1938 

Deering, Charles F 1911 

Derby, Joseph C 1924 

Dexter, Smith 1936 

Diamond, Louis K .1929 

Dietrich, Harry F 1936 

Dillon, Victor M 1931 

Dimmler, Charles L., Jr. ... 1939 

Divers, Douglas 1 924 

DoddJ.E 1912 

Domser, Benjamin M 1911 

Doolittle, Leroy 1917 

Dresel, Rudolph L 1919 

Drissen, Edward 1931 

Dubois, Robert 1923 

*Dunn, C. H 1902 

Dwan, PaulF 1931 

Dye, Paul J 1926 

Duckett,J. Warner 1929 

*Eastman, Alexander 1900 

*Eaton, Percival J 1885 

Eckles, Lucius E 1935 

Eley,R. C 1929 

Ellis, Richard W. B 1929 

*Ely,T.W... 1910 

Emerson, George E 1 905 

Emerson, Paul 1915 



370 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
2007 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

146 Barrett St., Schenectady, N. Y. 

35 Chestnut St., Rochester, N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
527 W. Iroquois Rd., Pontiac, Mich. 
76 Church St., Winchester, Mass. 
Rockefeller Institute, New York, N. Y. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

129 E. 69th St., New York, N. Y. 

810 E. Powell Ave., Evansville, Ind. 

911 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 

1374 Ida Ave., Columbus, Ohio 

38 Elm St., Danvers, Mass. 

20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

36 Follen St., Cambridge, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
9615 Brighton Way, Beverley Hills, Calif. 
490 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

73 3rd St. N.W., Pulaski, Va. 

259 Union Ave., Framingham, Mass. 

506 Prospect Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

908 Medical Arts Bldg., Duluth, Minn. 

490 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

Briton, So. Dakota 

122 East 76th St., New York, N. Y. 

4509 Dupont, So., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Sewall Rd., Wolfeboro, N. H. 
4105 Live Oak St., Dallas, Texas 



715 Fillmore St., Topeka, Kan. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Rearsby, Leicestershire, Eng. 

52 Columbia St., South Weymouth, Mass. 
Cheyenne, Wyoming 



*Deceased 



213 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Emidy, Herman L 1926 

Eveleth, Charles W 1904 

Ewer, Edward G 1937 

Farber, Sidney 1928 

Fay, William E 1887 

Ferguson, Charles F 1937 

Fisher, James T 1895 

Fisher, William H 1929 

Fiske, EbenW 1912 

*Fiske, William B 1885 

Fitch, Ralph R 1904 

FittsJohnB 1916 

Fitz, George W 1890 

*FitzSimmons, H.J 1910 

Flake, Carlyle G 1937 

♦Fletcher, A. S 1909 

Fletcher, F.L 1928 

Flint, Carlton P 1898 

Flook, Samuel E 1939 

Floyd, Cleveland 1905 

Fort, F.L 1923 

Fortune, Clayton W 1930 

Foshee, Clyde H 1931 

Foster, Joseph B 1929 

Foster, Thomas 1919 

Fothergill, Leroy 1930 

Fowler, Charles B 1929 

Frawley,W.T 1910 

Frazee, John W 1930 

Freeman, Don W 1938 

*Fregeau, Wheaton 1933 

Freiburg, Joseph A 1 927 

Friedman, Eli 1918 

Fuldner, Russell V 1940 

*Gage, Homer 1885 

Gallo, James F. 1925 

Gallup, Henry E 1928 

Gamble, James L 1912 

Ganz, Robert N 1927 

Gates, R. E 1908 

(Not in practice) 

Gear, Patrick 1919 

George, A. W 1904 

Giddings, Paul D 1937 

♦Deceased 



193 Gaskill St., Woonsocket, R. I. 
1 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 
181 Brookside Drive, Berkeley, Calif. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Melrose, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1151 No. Madison Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

755 Salem St., Maiden, Mass. 

701 Westinghouse Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

277 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 
917 W. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 
Peconic, L. I., N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Milford, N. H. 

Mass. General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

246 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

1022 Park St., Jackson ville, Fla. 

716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 

Citizens Bank Bldg., Madison ville, Ky. 

1028 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

131 State St., Portland, Me. 

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 

411 30th St., Oakland, Calif. ' 

184 North St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

311 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

931 West Bond St., Denison, Texas 

707 Race St., Cincinnati, O. 

416 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Mass. General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 



Alvero Bldg., Herkimer, N. Y. 
1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
19 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 
144 Walnut St., East Dedham, Mass. 

188 Chestnut St., Holyoke, Mass. 
45 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 
Augusta, Maine 



214 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Gill,MacLean 1935 

Gillespie, Elmer H 1930 

Gillespie, Norman 1917 

Glover, Donald M 1921 

Goeringer, C. Fred 1937 

Goldloom, Alton 1917 

Goldman, Ahbrum 1918 

Goldthwaite, Joel E 1888 

Goodale, Robert L 1924 

Goodwin, Edward S 1928 

Gordon, John K 1921 

Graham, W. T . ..1910 

Green, Hyman 1916 

Green, William T 4931 

Greene, D. Crosby, Jr 1898 

Griffin, Charles H 1923 

Griffith, Jesse B 1919 

Gross, Harold G 1890 

Gross, Herman W 1896 

Gross, Robert 1932 

Grover, Joseph I. . . . 1913 

Guest, George M 1926 

Guy, Percy F 1926 

Haig, RayT ..1924 

Haight, Harry W 1911 

*Hall, Herbert J 1894 

Hall, Robert G 1910 

Hand, Delbert W 1935 

Hanflig, Samuel 1931 

Hansell, W. Whitfield 1917 

Harbin, Maxwell 1923 

Harper, Edwin A 1934 

Harris, Albert H 1931 

Harris, Herbert E 1936 

Harris, Jerome S 1936 

Harral, Pinckney 1935 

Hartman, Frederick B 1935 

Harvey, Campbell 1921 

Hass, George 1931 

Hassman, David M 1915 

*Haven, George 1882 

Helmick, Arthur G 1913 

Henry, Myron 1922 

Herrick, Theodore P 1920 

Hertig,A. T 1932 



14 North State St., Concord, N. H. 
101 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 
632 Columbia Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 
10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, O. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
1543 Crescent St., Montreal, Que. 
121 E. 60th St., New York, N. Y. 
372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
258 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
304 State St., Albany, N. Y. 
1538 Sherbrooke St., W. Montreal, Que. 
116 E. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 
483 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
85 Dudley Rd., Newton Center, Mass. 
404 County St., New Bedford, Mass. 
Willinsburg, Pa. 
Eureka, Cal. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
281 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 
Cincinnati Children's Hosp., Cincinnati, O. 
618 2nd Ave., Seattle, Wash. 

1026 Medico Dental Bldg., Sacramento, Cal. 
Highland Park, N.J. 

812 S. W. Washington St., Portland, Ore. 
450 Sutter St., San Francisco, Calif. 
371 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
901 So. Surety Bldg., Des Moines, la. 
10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, O. 
2205 Link Rd., Lynchburg, Va. 
Loudonville, N. Y. 
219 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 
270 West End Ave., New York, N. Y. 
5920 Julian Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
241 No. Main St., Liberty, N. Y. 
Orchard Lake, Mich. 
Cornell Medical School, New York, N. Y. 
1738 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

78 South Fifth St., Columbus, Ohio 
401 Medical Arts Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 
10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 
Boston Lying-in Hospital, Boston, Mass. 



*Deceased 



215 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Heyl, Henry L 1935 

Hibben, F. H 1914 

*Higgins, Frank A 1891 

Hight, Donald 1935 

Hightower, Robert A 1936 

Hill, Allen M 1939 

Hill, A. Morgan 1928 

Hill, Lewis W 1915 

Hitchcock, Harold H 1922 

Hockwalt, Wm. Richard .. 1929 

Hodgen,JohnT 1915 

Hodges, Richard G 1938 

♦Hogarth, Walter P 1921 

Hoover, Harold R 1940 

Hopkins, Frank Read 1930 

Horner, Albert A 1913 

Hosley, Walter A 1906 

♦Howard, A. A 1910 

Howard, Philip 1927 

Howard, Rutledge W 1939 

Howe, Walter C 1897 

Howell, William W 1899 

Hubbard, Elliot, Jr 1918 

Hubbard, John P 1931 

Huddlestonjohn .1899 

Hudson, Henry W., Jr 1927 

Hugenberger, Paul W 1934 

Hughes, Grey C 1936 

Hughes, Harry C 1937 

Humphreys, Storer P 1936 

Hunt, Fred C 1925 

Hunt, George P 1919 

♦Hunting, Nathaniel S 1886 

Huntington, Frederick .... 1 926 

Hurd, Arthur H 1936 

Huston, Lewis L 1937 

Hyatt, Gilbert T 1933 

Ilfeld, Frederic W 1936 

Jackson, George H 1918 

Jacobus, Lawrence 1 928 

Jeans, Philip 1910 

Jenks, Harrison D 1893 

Jennings, Robert E 1934 

Jennings, Percy H., Jr 1937 



Mass. General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 



Univ. of Virginia, Charlotteville, Va. 
2651 16th St. N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 
1810 Wealthy St., S. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
1624 Franklin St., Oakland, Cal. 
560 Fidelity Bldg., Dayton, Ohio 
1810 Wealthy St., S. E. Grand Rapids, Mich. 
26 Walker St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
1112 Church St., Lynchburg, Va. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
46 Waban Ave., Waban, Mass. 

Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

330 Dartmouth St., Boston, Mass. 
29 Highland St., Cambridge, Mass. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

1101 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Shackleford Hospital, Martinsville, Va. 

Axton, Va. 

3801 University St., Montreal, Canada 

784 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

34 Fenn St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

333 Quincy Ave., Scranton, Pa. 
1432 North Hayworth Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 
117 12th St., N.E. Cedar Rapids, Iowa 
151 Rock St., Fall River, Mass. 

15 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

840 Forest Ave., Evanston, 111. 
2940 Summit St., Oakland, Calif. 
Children's Hospital, Iowa City, Iowa 

143 Park St., E. Orange, N.J. 

Cold Spring Harbor, L. I., New York 



♦Deceased 



216 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Johann,A. E 1910 

Johnson, Erick St. John 1904 

Johnson, Harold N 1937 

Johnston, Joseph A 1926 

Jones, FrankS 1932 

Jones, Harold W 1901 

Jones, J. Lawrence 1921 

Joplin, Robert J 1934 

Judy, J. A 1926 

Jump, Ellis B., D.M.D 1938 

Karp, MeirG 1935 

Keane, Clarence . .1905 

Keever, Henry F 1909 

Kendrick, James 1 1932 

Kennard, John H 1938 

Key, John A 1920 

Key, William A 1928 

King, Donald 1917 

King, Edward 1917 

King, James M 1926 

*Knowles, W.F 1882 

Koplik, Louis 1931 

Krakower, Cecil A 1936 

KuhnsJohnG ...1927 

Kyle, Bernard 1921 

Lanman, Thomas H 1 920 

*Larned, F. J 1914 

Larson, Carol B 1937 

*Legg, Arthur T 1900 

Legge, Robert F 1936 

Levine, S. Z 1923 

Linde, Frederick G 1925 

Lindemann, E. E 1911 

Logan, George B 1937 

Lonergan, Robert C 1925 

Lord, Robert M 1920 

Low, Harry C 1896 

Low, Merritt B 1934 

Lucas, William P 1906 

Luther, Elliott H 1926 

MacCollum, Donald W 1932 

McDermott, Leo J 1939 

McDonald, Francis Chas. . . 1930 



685 Harwood Drive, Des Moines, Iowa 

18 Fallen St., Cambridge, Mass. 

106 2nd St., Cloverdale, Montgomery, Ala. 

1937 Boston Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

179 Allyn St., Hartford, Conn. 

7610 17th St., Washington, D. C. 

401 Argyle Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

414 Harris Bldg., Dayton, Ohio 

University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Silverton, Ore. 

69 Maple Rd., Auburndale, Mass. 

2020 East 93rd St., Cleveland, Ohio 

52A Eliot St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Wash. Univ. Medical School, St. Louis, Mo. 

23 2nd Ave., San Mateo, Calif. 

1101 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Hayward Bldg., Asheville, N. C. 

Wellsville, Ohio 

311 East 72d St., New York, N. Y. 
Dept. Tropical Medicine, San Juan, P. R. 
372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
1011 Church St., Lynchburg, Va. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

3135 Webster St., Oakland, Cal. 
525 East 68th St., New York, N. Y. 
384 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

503 Ninth Ave., S.W., Rochester, Minn. 

636 Church St., Evanston, 111. 

122 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 

Hanover, Mass. 

31 Federal St., Greenfield, Mass. 

490 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

State Sanatorium, Westfield, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
203 Park St., Stoneham, Mass. 



*Deceased 



217 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



McElroy, William D 1933 

McGoverney, Richard B. . . 1930 

McGuire, Joseph H 1917 

McKeever, Francis M 1930 

McKhann, Charles F 1923 

McLaughlin, William . . . .1931 

McNeil, Donald 1930 

Mahoney, P.J 1930 

♦Manning, J. B 1908 

Maraldi, Carl F 1927 

Marion, J. W.J 1911 

Marr, Myron W 1908 

Martin, James W 1924 

Mardng, Frank L 1937 

Matchet, Foster 1935 

Mathews, Samuel 1928 

Maxwell, Cyrus 1928 

May, Charles D 1938 

Meade, T. Stanley 1934 

Merriam, Joseph C 1925 

Metzer, Butler 1897 

Mewburn, F. H. H 1922 

Meyers, Robert S 1938 

Miller, H. L 1918 

*Miller, Harold F 1929 

Miller, J. Fleek 1934 

Miller, Ralph T 1927 

Milleken, Ralph A 1926 

Miner, Henry R 1920 

Moore, Beveridge H 1918 

Moore, Chester B 1912 

Moore, George C 1905 

Moore, John M 1939 

Moore, Stephen H 1938 

Morris, Harry D 1937 

Morrissey, E. James 1 935 

Morse, William R 1916 

Moulton, Robert T 1937 

Mueller, Harry L 1937 

Mumford, Eugene B 1905 

Muro, Felipe 1920 

Murphy, John P 1933 

Myers, A. E 1913 

Myers, Ernest E 1932 

Myers, Samuel W 1902 



318 St. Louis Ave., Youngstown, Ohio 
1515 State St., Santa Barbara, Cal. 
1719 Pacific Ave., Dallas, Texas 

680 So. Bronson Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
500 Penn. Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
1127 11th St., Sacramento, Calif. 

319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

276 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Pinehurst, N. C. 

107 S. Linden Rd., Omaha, Neb. 

1476 Glenwood Blvd., Schenectady, N. Y. 

Shriners' Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

617 So. Olive St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

6 William St., Auburn, N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

913 Floyd Ave., Richmond, Va. 

198 Union Ave., Framingham, Mass. 

41 Ocean St., Lynn, Mass. 

416 McLeod Bldg., Edmonton, Alberta, Can. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

163 High St., Taunton, Mass. 

482 Hudson Ave., Newark, Ohio 

89 Main St., Ware, Mass. 

404 Hume-Mansur Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

108 W. 17th St., Falls City, Neb. 
8 S. Michigan Blvd., Chicago, 111. 
384 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

475 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

384 Post St., San Francisco, Cal. 

3328 Daniel St., Dallas, Texas 

700 S. Kings Highway Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 

329 So. Front St., Milton, Pa. 

Chengtu, China 

28 y% Broad St., Salem, Mass. 

31 Church St., Winchester, Mass. 

320 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Farmington, Mich. 

634 N. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 

321 E. 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 
84 Hutchins St., Roxbury, Mass. 



*Deceased 



218 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Naive, Jesse B 1921 

Nathan, Louis 1930 

Neff, Richard S 1939 

Nelson, Richard L 1932 

Newsam, A. Roland 1922 

Nichols, Wallace J 1933 

*Nichols, E. H 1889 

Norton, Paul L 1934 

Norton, Rupert 1891 

Nutter, John A. . . 1906 

Ober, Frank R 1914 

O'Connor, Dennis 1926 

O'MearaJohn W 1919 

O'Neil, Frank C 1937 

Osgood, Rudolph 1930 

Otis, Henry S 1882 

Overlander, Charles L 1906 

Packard, Robert G 1915 

Page, Calvin G 1893 

Painter, Charles F 1893 

Palfrey, F. W 1903 

Parker, Willard S .1912 

Parnall, Edward . 1932 

Patchen, Paul J 1931 

Patrick, William F 1917 

Patterson, Robert L 1934 

*Peckham, Frank E 1888 

Pelkan,KarlF 1925 

*Pegram, John C, Jr 1896 

Percy, Karlton G 1913 

Perkins, John W 1884 

Perry, Sherman 1909 

Peters, William C 1904 

Phelps, Winthrop 1924 

Pierce, F. Richard 1935 

Pike, Maurice 1928 

Pinckny,F.H 1914 

Pinkerton, Henry 1 926 

Pitkin, Horace C 1927 

PohlJohnF 1933 

Pokorny, Norman A 1933 

Politzer, Richard M 1926 

*Porter, Donald W 1914 

Porter, Robert B 1901 



Beverly Hills Sanatorium, Knoxville, Tenn. 

68 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

1300 8th St., Wichita Falls, Texas 

1644 Broad St., Providence, R. I. 

102 Forest St., Medford, Mass. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

48 Chesterfield Ave., Westmount, P.E.I. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
158 Whitney Ave., New Haven, Conn. 
390 Main St., Worcester, Mass. 
216 So. Main St., Middletown, Ohio 
Monson State Hospital, Palmer, Mass. 

443 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

711 Marion St., Denver, Col. 

128 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

25 Lime St., Boston, Mass. 

270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

247 Culver Road, Rochester, N. Y. 

8480 Commercial Ave., Chicago, 111. 

1020 S.W. Taylor St., Portland, Ore. 

135 E. 65th St., New York, N. Y. 

241 E. Santa Clara St., San Jose, Calif. 

520 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

22 Walnut St., Winchester, Mass. 

45 State St., Bangor, Me. 

3038 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

14 Main St., Gardner, Mass. 

179 Allyn St., Hartford, Conn. 

186 South St., Morristown, N.J. 

25 Shattuck St., Boston, Mass. 

909 Hyde St., San Francisco, Calif. 

1945 Medical Arts Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

103 E. North St., Greenville, S. C. 

North Easton, Mass. 



•Deceased 



219 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Pratt, Henry 1933 

Prescott, H. D 1903 

(Retired) 
Pyle, Henry D 1929 

Radcliffe, Ernest J 1925 

Ramsay, Robert E 1918 

Ramsey, W. S 1914 

Rawlings, Junius Mott .... 1 929 

Rector, John M 1933 

Rector, Lewis E 1 939 

Reed, Carson R 1935 

Reese, C. A 1907 

Regan, John W 1937 

Register, John F 1935 

Reidy, John A., Jr 1938 

Rew, Willard B 1934 

Rhinelander, Frederic W. . .1939 
Rizer, Dean K 1939 

*Robb, William A 1931 

Roberts, Madison Hines . . .1921 

*Roberts, Sumner 1 929 

Roberts, Wyatt 1916 

Robertson, L. B 1913 

Rogers, William 1 923 

Ross, Alan S 1931 

Ross, Fred E 1912 

Ross, Ralph A 1939 

Rowe, Carter R 1938 

Rowland, Russell S 1904 

Rowley, Howard F 1923 

Rubin, Gabriel J 1926 

Rue, Homer A 1920 

Rutherford, Frederick H. . . 1937 
Ryerson, Edwin W 1897 

♦Sadler, Roy A 1909 

Saeger, Ernest T 1919 

Sander, John F 1926 

Sandmeyer, John A 1 938 

Sanford, Charles H 1913 

Schlesinger, W. F 1927 

Schott, Harry J 1921 

Schultz, Reuben 1929 

Schultz, Robert V 1931 

Schwartz, Eugene 1934 



319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
26 Grove St., New Bedford, Mass. 

105 E. Jefferson Blvd., South Bend, Ind. 

67 Butterfield Terrace, Amherst, Mass. 
65 N. Madison Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 
407 E. Kingsley St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
116 Mills St., El Paso, Texas 
2000 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
1560 Line Ave., Shreveport, La. 
Beaumont du Perigord, Dordogne, France 
So. Carolina Medical Col., Charleston, S. C. 
101 No. Elm St., Greensboro, No. Carolina 
372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
507 Larson Bldg., Yakima, Wash. 
Shriners' Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

104 Ponce de Leon Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 

3838 9th St., Birmingham, Ala. 

University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

1414Drummond St., Montreal, Can. 

501 W. Ninth St., Erie, Pa. , 

Yale Medical School, New Haven, Conn. 

1108 Princess Ann St., Fredericksburg, Va. 

5140 Second Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

176 S. Goodman St., Rochester, N. Y. 

483 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

625 S. Lorena St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

417 E. Union St., Seatde, Wash. 

122 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



70 Oldham Road, West Newton, Mass. 
320 Townsend St., Lansing, Mich. 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
923 Walton Ave., New York, N. Y. 
Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
727 W. 7th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
375 Walnut St., Wellesley, Mass. 
Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek, Mich. 
200 E. Pershing St., Springfield, Mo. 



"Deceased 



220 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Schwartz, R. Plato 1920 

Scudder, Charles 1886 

Seabold, William W 1935 

Seelye, Walter B 1929 

Segar, Louis 1914 

Selleseth, Iver F 1920 

*Selva Julio 1892 

Sever, James W 1901 

Shannon, James 1933 

Shannon, Paul W 1934 

Sheldon, Walter S 1939 

Sherwood, David W 1929 

Shortell, Joseph '. . . .1918 

Shu garman, Wilson G. . . .1940 

Shwachman, Harry .1938 

Simon, Royal 1931 

Skinner, Marcus 1913 

Smith, Clement A 1931 

Smith, Edward T 1936 

Smith, F. R. 1921 

Smith, L. D 1924 

Smith, Richard M 1909 

Smyth, Francis Scott 1923 

Snedeker, Lendon 1932 

Soule, Herbert C, Jr. ..... 1922 

*Soutter, Robert 1898 

Spalding, Roger 1903 

Spaulding, Charles L 1899 

Spencer, Harvey 1 928 

*Spencer,J. B 1908 

Spicer, Charles M 1915 

Spring, C. W 1883 

Stanton, James T 1938 

Staples, O. Sherwin 1938 

Steinberg, Alfred 1920 

Stetson, Frank E 1897 

Stevenson, Edward 1 927 

Stewart, Steele F 1920 

Stickney, Edwin P 1891 

*Stickney, William 1906 

Stiefel, D. M 1924 

Stoeffler, Walter 1928 

Storey, Carroll L 1916 

Storey, Thomas A 1905 

Stratford, Eldredge W 1931 

Strayer, Luther B 1939 



260 Crittendon Blvd., Rochester, N. Y. 
374 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
5012 Edmondson Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
1305 4th Ave., Seattle, Wash. 
266 Hume-Mansur Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 
621 W. Lake St., Minneapolis, Minn. 

321 Dartmouth St., Boston, Mass. 
1414 Drummond St., Montreal, Can. 
1927 1st Ave., Birmingham, Ala. 
Women's Free Hospital, Brookline, Mass. 
66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
478 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
3706 No. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
515 Oakland Ave., Williamsport, Penn. 
Marcus Skinner Clinic, Selma, Ala. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
1228 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

107 E. 67th St., New York, N. Y. 
2454 Kilborn Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 
66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
3dSt.andParnassus Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 
66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

122 Rutgers St., Rochester, N. Y. 

Duxbury, Mass. 

79 Hundreds Road, Wellesley, Mass. 

1106 Republic Bldg., Denver, Colo. 

319 Bakersfield Bldg., Bakersfield, Calif. 
262 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
4214 16th St. N.W., Washington, D. C. 
South Dartmouth, Mass. 

108 So. Vine St. North Platte, Kans. 

3780 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif. 
58 Pleasant St., Arlington, Mass. 

1553 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
3419 E. 10th St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Stanford University, San Francisco, Calif. 
833 S. W. 11 Ave., Portland, Oregon 
935 Main St., Bridgeport, Conn. 



"Deceased 



221 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Sweet, Lewis K 1931 

Sylvester, Philip H 1907 

Talbot, Fritz B 1905 

Talbot, Nathan B 1938 

Tanner, Dean W 1938 

Tefft, Richard C 1922 

Thiery,R. 1924 

Thompson, Milton S., Jr. . . 1935 

Thompson, Vernon P 1 926 

Thornton, Andrew 1919 

Thurber, D. Packard 1918 

Tobin, William J 1940 

Tomkies, James S 1910 

Treanor, John P., Jr 1925 

Tso, Ernest 1919 

Tucker, James 1929 

Tucker, J. F 1883 

Turner, Arthur R 1929 

Turtle, William J 1936 

Ulrich, Joseph M 1920 

Van Meter, Agram L 1915 

Van Ornum, Earl N 1928 

Vincent, Beth 1903 

Virkler, Stanley, D.M.D. . . 1935 
Vogel, Harold T 1926 

Wachter, Harry E 1936 

Walthal, Damon 1916 

Walker, John H 1933 

*Warren, Henry S 1899 

Washburn, Alfred 1924 

Washburn, Frederic A 1894 

Watson, Richard G 1924 

Webster, Fred P 1903 

Weigel, Edgar W 1927 

Weigele, Carl E 1923 

Weir, Dwight 1932 

Weiler, Howard G 1930 

Wheeler, Warren E 1937 

White, Robert S 1939 

Whitford, Warren 1930 

Whittemore, Frank S 1890 



Gallanger Hospital, 19 St. and Mass. Ave., 

Washington, D. C. 
25 Bay State Road, Boston, Mass. 

270 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
10 Cottage Farm Road, Brookline, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
12 Bay State Road, Boston, Mass. 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
2007 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 
3235 Fourth Ave., San Diego, Calif. 
417 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Boston City Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
5831 Margerita St., Dallas, Texas 
1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
c/o American Mission, Ichann, China 
116 E. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 

5744 Drexel Ave., Chicago, 111. 

66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

193 W. Market St., Akron, Ohio 

427 Bank of America Bldg., Stockton, Calif. 

1709 W. 8th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

925 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

572 Washington St., Wellesley, Mass. 

3420 86th St., Jackson Hts., L. I., N. Y. 

203 Beaumont Medical Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 
315 Alameda Road, Kansas City, Mo. 
1620 Oklahoma Ave., Guthrie, Oklahoma 

1950 Forest Parkway, Denver, Colo. 

190 Bay State Road, Boston, Mass. 

1624 Franklin St., Oakland, Calif. 

10 Congress Sq., Portland, Me. 

970 Park Ave., Elizabeth, N.J. 

25 Gifford Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

53 N. Mulberry St., Mansfield, Ohio 

40 14th St., Wheeling, W. Va. 

State Dept. of Health, Lansing, Mich. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, Boston, Mass. 

Windsor Locks, Conn. 



*Deceased 



222 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Wilcox, John C 1936 

Wilens, Gustav 1926 

Williams, McChord 1938 

Wilson, Edward H 1923 

Wilson, Franklin D 1919 

Wilson, James L 1929 

Wilson, James 1920 

♦Wilson, Louis T 1902 

Wing, Wilson M 1939 

Woo, Lan Sing 1919 

Wood, Benjamin E .1907 

Woodberry, H. S 1914 

Woodbury, William P 1906 

Wooley, Paul V.Jr .1938 

Work, Henry M 1939 

Wormelle, Charles B 1901 

Wylie, Eugene C 1894 

Wyman, Edwin T 1912 

Wysor, Frank L 1916 

*Young, Ernest B 1895 

Young, J. H 1909 

Zuelzer, Wolfgang 1938 



2349 W. 21st St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
40 Main St., Torrington, Conn. 
Boston City Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
395 E. Broad St., Columbus, Ohio 
5352 Studeley Ave., Norfolk, Va. 
Wayne Medical School, Detroit, Mich. 
216 W. 137th St., New York, N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
St. Luke's Hospital, Shanghai, China 
Canton, Mass. 



Boem Becher Hospital, University of Oregon, 

Medical School, Portland, Oregon 
Bradley Home, E. Providence, R. I. 
75 Gardner St., Allston, Mass. 
556 Washington St., Dorchester, Mass. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
501 Ridgeway St., Clifton Forge, Va. 



66 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 111. 



^Deceased 



2i>3 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

300 LONGWOOD AVENUE, BOSTON 

Telephone: Aspinwall 5930 



THE OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT CLINICS 



NOT OPEN TO PERSONS ABLE TO PAY A DOCTOR'S FEE 
AGE LIMIT — 12 YEARS 

Medical (By Appointment) — Every Morning — Tel.: Aspinwall 5930 

Medical Clinic Branches. (By Appointment from Medical Clinic Only.) 

Heart Thursday, 2.00 p.m. 

Eczema Thursday, 9.00 a.m. 

Luetic ■ Monday, 2.00 p.m. 

Diabetic Monday, 2.00 p.m. 

Boston Lying-in Discharged Baby Clinic Wednesday, 2.00 p.m. 

Children's Hospital Medical Discharge Clinic. . .Wednesday, 2.00 p.m. 

Infant's Hospital Discharge Clinic Wednesday, 2,00 p.m. 

Rheumatic Fever Clinic Thursday, 2.00 p.m. 

Anaphylaxis Clinic Tuesday — Friday, 2 p.m. 

Muscle Training Clinic (Bader Bldg.) Mon., Wed., Fri., 2 p.m. 

New Cases, Friday 2.00 p.m. 

Surgical — Every Morning — $.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Carbon Dioxide Treatment Friday, 10.45 a.m. 

Surgical-Neurological Wednesday, 8.30 a.m. 

Plastic-Surgery '. Friday, 8.30 a.m. 

Ear, Nose, Throat — Tuesday and Thursday 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 
(By Appointment) 

Orthopedic — Every Morning, 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Arthritis Clinic — Alternate Thursdays at 2.00 p.m. (By Appointment) 

Infantile Paralysis (Bader Bldg.) Tues., Thurs., Fri., 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 

Physiotherapy — (Bader Bldg.) 

Scoliosis-Posture — Tues., and Thurs., 2.00 to 3.30 p.m. — Sat 8.30 a.m. 
Med. Surg. Orth. Physiotherapy — Mon., Wed., Fri., 8.30 to 10.00 a.m. 
Light Therapy — Mon., Wed., Fri. By appointment from clinics only. 

New cases, Monday 9.00 a.m. 
Exercises — Pool — By appointment only. 

Orthodontia — Wednesday 9.00 a.m. For children who have been operated 
on for Hare Lip or Cleft Palate. By appointment only. 

Dental Clinic — Thursday 10.00 a.m. By appointment from Orthodontia. 

No Clinics on Sundays or Holidays 




71st 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



1940 



BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
Form of Bequest 

I give, devise, and bequeath to 
The Children's Hospital, in the 
City of Boston, and Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, incorpo- 
rated in the year 1869, the sum 
of 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

1869 



ANNUAL REPORT 
for the Year 1940 



BOSTON - MASSACHUSETTS 

MCMXLI 



OFFICERS OF THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

1941 

President Vice President 

Samuel H. Wolcott F. Murray Forbes 

Treasurer Secretary 

Edward L. Bigelow John S. Ames, Jr. 

State Street Trust Co., Boston 

Counsel for the Corporation 

James Garfield 

of 

Choate, Hall & Stewart 

30 State Street, Boston 

Committee on Investments 
Edward L. Bigelow (Ex-officio) William Arthur Dupee 

Harvey H. Bundy Samuel H. Wolcott 

Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr. 

Executive Committee 
Alexander Wheeler, Chairman 
Edward L. Bigelow Samuel H. Wolcott 

F. Murray Forbes, Jr., Secretary F. Murray Forbes 
Arthur G. Rotch Mrs. William E. Russell 

and such other members of the Board of Managers as the President may select 
from time to time, to serve for a period of approximately three months each. 

Social Service Committee 

Mrs. George H. Monks, Chairman Dr. Robert B. Osgood 

Mrs. John S. Ames, Jr. Dr. William E. Ladd 

Mrs. Francis B. Lothrop Dr. Bronson Crothers 

G. Peabody Gardner Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan 
Dr. Frank R. Ober Dr. William T. Green 
Mrs. Howard Turner Dr. Thomas H. Lanman 
Mrs. Amory Thorndike Mrs. Lendon Snedeker 

Committee on the School of Nursing 
Gordon Abbott, Chairman Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan 

Mrs. Charles A. Newhall Dr. Thomas H. Lanman 

Mrs. George H. Monks Miss Stella Goostray, R.N. 

John S. Ames, Jr. Miss Sophie Nelson 

Bancroft Beatley, LL.D. 

Private Ward Committee 
Alexander Whiteside, Chairman Dr. Richard M. Smith 

Mrs. Nathaniel Winthrop Dr. Harold G. Tobey 

Dr. William E. Ladd Dr. R. Cannon Ely 

Dr. Donald W. MacCollum 

Publicity Committee 
Donald T. Carlisle. Chairman John C. Kiley 

F. Murray Forbes Mrs. Carl Ernlund 

Budget Committee 
Samuel H. Wolcott George v. L. Meyer {Ex-officio) 

Arthur G. Rotch Amory Coolidge Edward L. Bigelow 

Endowment Fund Committee 

Alexander Whiteside, Chairman Mrs. William E. Russell 

Edward L. Bigelow Dr. Kenneth D. Blackfan 

Mrs. George H. Monks Dr. William E. Ladd 

G. Peabody Gardner Dr. Frank R. Ober 
Frank D. Comerford Dr. S. Burt Wolbach 
Arthur G. Rotch Dr. Sidney Farber 
Lawrence Foster Dr. Patrick J. Mahoney 
Donald T. Carlisle Miss Stella Goostray 
John C. Kiley Sherwin Badger 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 
1941 

Alexander Whiteside 1914 

Samuel H. Wolcott (Ex-Officio) 1915 

George v. L. Meyer 1915 

F. Murray Forbes (Ex-Officio) 1918 

Mrs. George H. Monks 1921 

Louis E. Kirstein 1921 

G. Peabody Gardner., 1921 

William Arthur Dupee 1922 

Pliny Jewell . . 1922 

Henry W. Palmer 1923 

Arthur G. Rotch 1923 

Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 1927 

Harvey H. Bundy 1927 

Louis F. S. Bader 1930 

James Garfield 1931 

Gordon Abbott 1932 

F. Murray Forbes, Jr 1932 

Lawrence Foster 1932 

Edward L. Bigelow (Ex-Officio) 1933 

Miss Ida C. Smith 1933 

Alexander Wheeler 1934 

Frank D. Comerford 1935 

Mrs. Nelson S. Bartlett 1936 

John C. Kiley 1936 

Lawrence Coolidge 1936 

Samuel H. Wolcott, Jr 1936 

John S. Ames, Jr 1937 

Charles Stockton 1937 

Donald T. Carlisle 1938 

Hermann F. Clarke 1939 

Mrs. William E. Russell (Ex-Officio) 1939 

John J. Burns 1940 

Amory Coolidge 1940 

Brinley M. Hall 1941 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



FORMER MEMBERS OF THE 
BOARD OF MANAGERS 



*Abbott, Gordon 1896-1937 

*Abbott, Jere 1871-1895 

*Ames, F. L 1886-1893 

*Ames, Oliver 1894-1920 

Ames, Mrs. F. L 1926-1929 

*Baylies, Walter C 1908-1910 

*Bigelow, Alanson 1876-1884 

*Bigelow, George T 1870-1877 

*Blake, Clarence J 1895-1918 

*Blake, J. A. Lowell 1911-1938 

*Bremer, S. Parker 1923-1925 

*Brooks, Phillips 1884-1885 

*Browne, Dr. Francis H. . . . 1870-1915 
Caswell, Mrs. William W. . 1924-1925 

Cox, Mrs. William C 1936-1939 

*Dana, S. B 1899-1901 

Eliot, Mrs. Samuel 1934-1935 

*Emmons, Nathaniel 1870-1885 

*Emmons, Robert W. 2nd . 1903-1928 

Endicott, William 1904-1928 

*Faulkner, Charles 1870-1885 

*Fearing, Albert 1870-1875 

*Fiske, Charles H 1870-1898 

*Gardner, George P 1885-1939 

*Green, Samuel A 1870-1883 

*Hallowell, John W 1925-1926 

Hardwick, Huntington R. . 1930-1933 

Herrick, Robert F., Jr 1921-1925 

Hollister, Paul M 1926-1926 

*Howe, George D 1871-1880 

*Hunnewell, F. W 1895-1917 

Hunnewell, F. W., 2nd.. . .1915-1924 

*Hunnewell, H. H 1886-1901 

*Ingalls, William 1870-1902 

*Johnson, Samuel 1870-1871 

*Joy, Charles H 1887-1887 

*Kuhn, W. P 1877-1880 

*Lawrence, John 1908-1914 

*Lincoln, Roland C 1884-1885 



*Manning, J. M 1881- 

Mead, Mrs. Frederick S. . .1921- 

*Mudge, E. R 1874- 

*Peabody, Oliver W 1884- 

*Perkins, Thomas N 1904- 

*Phelan, James J 1921- 

*Phillips, John C. 1881- 

Phillips, William 1931- 

*Pickering, H. G 1879- 

Pickman, Dudley L., Jr.. .1916- 

*Pierce, Wallace L 1901- 

*Robbins, Chandler 1870- 

*Rogers, Mrs. Dudley P.. . . 1928- 
*Sargent, F. W 1918- 

Seabury, William H 1902- 

*Sears, J. Montgomery 1883- 

Sears, Philip S 1916- 

Seymour, Robert W 1923- 

*Shattuck, Dr. F. P 1888- 

*Shaw, Louis A 1934- 

*Spaulding, J. P 1879- 

*Stearns, Frank W 1916- 

*Stockton, Howard 1897- 

*Stockton, Philip 1924- 

Stone, Albert, Jr 1930- 

*Stone, Dr. James A 1928- 

*Strong, Edward A 1870- 

*Sturgis, Russell, Jr 1870- 

*Thacher, George 1886- 

*Thacher, Isaac '. . 1870- 

*Thayer, E. V. R 1886- 

*Thayer, Nathaniel 1870- 

*Thomas W. B 1897- 

Tuckerman, John A 1919- 

*Wetherell, John G 1887- 

Wheeler, Henry 1898- 

*Winthrop, Robert C 1870- 

*Young, Charles L 1884- 

*Deceased. 



1882 
1940 
1878 
1896 
1916 
1934 
1883 
1935 
1886 
1925 
1920 
1882 
1939 
1919 
1933 
1905 
1925 
1925 
1919 
1940 
1896 
1925 
1902 
1925 
1933 
1929 
1873 
1871 
1896 
1883 
1907 
1883 
1902 
1920 
1897 
1926 
1894 
1901 



STAFF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D Physician-in-Chief 

William E. Ladd, M.D. Surgeon-in-Chief 

Frank R. Ober, M.D Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief 

S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. Pathologist-in-Chief 

George v. L. Meyer Director 

Sidney Farber, M.D. . . . . . Secretary 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Director 
George v. L. Meyer 



Assistants to the Director 
Miss Madeline S. Gibbs, R.N. Miss Fanny C. Knapp, R.N. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Admitting Officers Accountant 

Miss Katherine W. Nelson, R.N., Super. Chester E. Budden 
Miss Muriel J. Seff, R.N. 
Miss Edith V. Bell, R.N. Dietitian 

Mrs. Martha H. Stuart, B.S. 

Admitting Officer, 0. P. D. 
Miss Priscilla E. Hedley Housekeeper 

Mrs. Isabel Hall 

Admitting Officers, Private Ward 
Mrs. Elizabeth Avery, R.N. Photographer 

H. Louise Moulton, R.N. Ferdinand Harding 

Rate Adjuster Purchasing Agent 

Miss Ethel Preble Miss Elizabeth C. Fitzgerald 

Record Librarians 
Mrs. Daisy J. Jacobs Mrs. Elida M. Sprissler 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D., Physician-in-Chief 

Visiting Physicians 

Bronson, Crothers, M.D. Lewis W. Hill, M.D. 

Louis K. Diamond, M.D. Richard M. Smith, M.D. 

James L. Gamble, M.D. **Harold C. Stuart, M.D. 

Edwin T. Wyman, M.D. 

Associate Visiting Physicians 
Allan M. Butler, M.D. R. Cannon Eley, M.D. 

Randolph K. Byers, M.D. Charles D. May, M.D. 

John A. V. Da vies, M.D. Clement A. Smith, M.D. 

Philip H. Sylvester, M.D. 

Associate Physicians 
Stewart H. Clifford, M.D. Eliot Hubbard, Jr., M.D. 

Henry E. Gallup, M.D. John P. Hubbard, M.D. 

Stanton Garfield, M.D. Dorothea M. Moore, M.D. 

Nathan Gorin, M.D. Henry N. Pratt, M.D. 

*Hyman Green, M.D. Abraham S. Small, M.D. 

*Gerald N. Hoeffel, M.D. *Sidney H. Weiner, M.D. 

Assistant Physicians 

John K. Brines, M.D. Harry Shwachman, M.D. 

Albert A. Frank, M.D. Lendon Snedeker, M.D. 

John F. McCreary, M.D. Nathan B. Talbot, M.D. 

Charlotte L. Maddock, M.D. Edward L. Tuohy, M.D. 

Robert T. Moulton, M.D. William J. Turtle, M.D. 

Ralph A. Ross, M.D. Lucille Williamson,M.D. 

*Special Clinics 
**On leave of absence. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE— Continued 



Resident Physicians 

Glidden L. Brooks, M.D. Donald L. Thurston, M.D. 

Ernest M. Worden, M.D. Clifford Grulee, Jr., M.D. 

Winthrop I. Franke, M.D. 



House Officers 



Fred H. Allen, Jr., M.D. 
McLemore Birdsong, M.D. 
Beach M. Chenoweth, Jr., M.D. 
Edward C. Dyer, M.D. 
Charles G. Jennings, M.D. 



Cornelius M. Meeker, M.D. 
Eugene Kaplan, M.D. 
William L. Rumsey, Jr., M.D. 
George W. Starbuck, M.D. 
Conrad M. Riley, M.D. 



DEPARTMENT OF ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

Frank R. Ober, M.D., Orthopedic Surgeon-in-Chief 



Surgeon 
James W. Sever, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons 

A. H. Brewster, M.D. 
William T. Green, M.D. 
Robert H. Morris, M.D. 

Resident Orthopedic Surgeon 
Charles L. Sturdevant, M.D. 



Assistant Visiting Surgeons 

William Elliston, M.D. 
Paul W. Hugenberger, M.D. 
Meier G. Karp, M.D. 
Miriam Katzeff, M.D- 
John G. Kuhns, M.D. 



Junior Assistant Surgeon 
Leo J. McDermott, M.D. 



House Officers 

William G. Breckenridge, M.D. Nicholas S. Pickard, M.D. 

Gordon M. Morrison, M.D. Carl E. Horn, M.D. 

T. Wiley Hodges, M.D. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

S. Burt Wolbach, M.D., Pathologist-in-Chief 

Pathologist 
Sidney Farber, M.D. 

Resident in Pathology 
Dr. Henry W. Edmonds 

HOUSE OFFICERS 

Pathology 
Dr. Lawrence C. Kingsland 



Surgery 

Dr. John J. Lowrey 
Dr. Tague C. Chisholm 



Orthopedic Surgery 

Dr. John F. Bell 

Dr. Eulyss R. Troxler 



Medicine 
Dr. Eugene Kaplan 

Stomatology 

Dr. Robert T. Legg 
Dr. Maurice Dinnerman 



Research Appointments in Pathology 

Dr. J. Leory Conel, Research Associate in Pathology 

Dr. Charlotte L. Maddock, Research Fellow in Pathology 

Dr. Nathan Rudo, Research Fellow in Orthopedic Pathology 



Voluntary Assistants 

Dr. Samuel Selby 

Dr. Nicholas L. Santacross 

Dr. Margaret O. Huntington 



Student Voluntary Assistants 

Ernest Sachs, Jr. 
Richard Webb 
Frederick S. Bigelow 
Theodore G. Erler, Jr. 
Arthur Gorman Hills 
Herbert Lipofski 
Eugene A. Wmf e 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

William E. Ladd, Surgeon-in-Chiej 

Visiting Surgeons 

Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 
Franc D. Ingraham, M.D. 

(Neurosurgery) 

Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 

(Otolaryngology) 

Associate Visiting Surgeons 

George D. Cutler, M.D. 

Donald W. MacCollum, M.D. 

Robert E. Gross, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons 

Henry W. Hudson, M.D. 
**Patrick J. Mahoney, M.D. 
Augustus Thorndike, Jr., M.D. 

Assistant Surgeon 
**John W. Chamberlain, M.D. 



Visiting Otolaryngoloist 
Harold G. Tobey, M.D. 

Research Associate in Otolaryngology 
Lyman G. Richards, M.D. 

Associate Visiting Otolaryngologist 
Charles I. Johnson, M.D. 



Associate Otolaryngologist 
Charles F. Ferguson, M.D. 

Orthodontist 
Harry W. Perkins, D.M.D. 

Associate Orthodontist 
Edward L. Silver, D.D.M. 



Resident Surgeons 

Robert R. White, M.D. Charles L. Dimler, Jr., M.D. 

Hannibal Hamlin, M.D. 
(Fellow in Neurosurgery) 

**On leave of absence. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Resident Otolaryngologist 
Wayne H. Ho, M.D. 

Surgical House Officers 

Edward V. Ferguson, M.D. Henry Swan, M.D. 

Frederick P. Ross, M.D. Arnold Porter, M.D. 

John E. Adams, M.D. William B. Bacon, M.D. 

John J. Lowrey, M.D. 

Dental House Officer 
Maurice Dinnerman, D.M.D. 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS 

Visiting Bacteriologist 
Hans Zinsser, M.D.* 

Associate Visiting Bacteriologist 
**Leroy D. Fothergill 

Bacteriologist 
John A. V. Da vies, M.D. . 

Associate Bacteriologist 
**Miss Marion Sweet, A.B., M.S. 

Resident in Bacteriology 
Fred C. Robbins, M.D. 

House Officers Bacteriology 
Edward L. Pratt, M.D. Thomas H. Weller, M.D. 

*Deceased. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



SPECIAL DEPARTMENTS— Continued 



Roentgenologist 

George M. Wyatt, M.D. 

Associate Roentgenologist 

L. Alexander Vance, M.D. 

Volunteer Assistant in Roentgenology 
Wallace C. Miller, M.D. 

Opthalmologist 

J. Herbert Waite, M.D. 

Assistant Opthalmologists 

Paul A. Chandler, M.D. 
E. B. Goodall, M.D. 
Trygve Gunderson, M.D. 

Director of Physical Therapeutics 
Miss Janet Merrill 

Director of Paralytic Clinic 
Miss Mary E. Trainor, R.N. 

Occupational Therapist 
Miss Jessie Ness 

Dermatologist 

E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 



Dermatologist 

E. Lawrence Oliver, M.D. 

Assistant Dermatologist 
Austin W. Cheever, M.D. 

Stomatologist 

Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 

Associate Stomatologists 
Paul K. Losch, D.M.D. 
David Weisberger, D.M.D. 

Assistant Stomatologist 
Volunteer Assistant in Stomatology 
John C. Brown, D.M.D. 
Paul H. Gilpatrick, D.M.D. 

Research Associate in Psychology 
Elizabeth Lord, Ph.D. 

Director of Social Service 
Miss Marion W. Hall 

Assistant Chemist 

Miss Elsie A. MacLachlan, B.S. 



Visiting Pharmacologists 

Reid Hunt, M.D. 

Otto Krayer, M.D. 

Visiting Physiologist 
Hallowell Davis, M.D. 

Visiting Biological Chemist 
A. Baird Hastings, M.D. 

Consulting Staff 
Fred R. Blumenthal, D.M.D. Charles G. Mixter, M.D. 

J. Lewis Bremer, M.D. F. B. Mallory, M.D. 

T. Duckett Jones, M.D. Robert B. Osgood, M.D. 

L. M. S. Miner, M.D. Merrill C. Sosman, M.D. 

Albert B. Ferguson, M.D. 



10 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



SCHOOL OF NURSING AND NURSING SERVICE 

Superintendent of Nurses and Principal of School of Nursing 
Stella Goostray, R.N. 

Assistant Principal of School of Nursing Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
Mary E. Norcross, R.N. Isabelle M. Jordan, R.N. 



Second Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses 

Muriel B. Vesey, R.N. 

Instructors 

Emily G. Pearson, R.N. 

Elizabeth Romine, R.N. 

Medical Service 

Helen E. Riedel, R.N., Supervisor 
Marjorie Parsons, R.N., Head Nurse 
Theresa Hurley, R.N., Head Nurse 

Surgical Service 

Frances E. Leary, R.N., Supervisor 
Edith M. Ahrens, R.N., Head Nurse 
Phyllis B. Belair, R.N., Head Nurse 
Barbara T. Lanigan, R.N., Head 
Nurse 

Orthopedic Service 

Dorothy F. Pratt, R.N., Supervisor 

Agnes O. Broadland, R.N., Head 

Nurse 
Margaret Regan, R.N., Head Nurse 

Ear, Nose and Throat Ward 

D. Louise Dickens, R.N., Head Nurse 

Neurological Service 

Elizabeth C. Logan, R.N., Supervisor 

Isolation Service 

Ethel M. Trafton, R.N., Supervisor 

Infants' Medical Service 
Harriet B. Russell, R.N., Supervisor 
Serene Berg, R.N., Head Nurse 
Thelma M. Reynolds, R.N., Head 
Nurse 



Assistant Superintendent of Nurses at 
Night 

Mary G. Chapman, R.N. 

Night Supervisors 

Marjorie S. Lovell, R.N. 
Elizabeth F. Webster, R.N. 

Operating Rooms 

Edith C. Jenkins, R.N., Supervisor 

Rosamond H. Noyes, R.N., Assistant 

Out-Patient Department 

Maud Gillespie, R.N., Head Nurse 

and Instructor, Medical Clinic 
Helen C. Harding, R.N., Head Nurse, 

Orthopedic Clinic. 
Dorothy E. Fitzgerald, R.N., Head 

Nurse, Surgical Clinic 
Marian G. Perkins, R.N., Head 

Nurse, Isolation Clinic 

Private Ward 

Sarah J. Vickery, R.N., Supervisor 

M. Roberta Bentley, R.N., Head 

Nurse 
Alice M. Fleming, R.N., Head Nurse 
Lydia B. Smith, R.N., Head Nurse 



Nurses' Infirmary 

Harriet Houghton, 
Nurse 



R.N., Head 



Anesthetists 

B. Elaine Lank, R.N., Chief 
Sara A. Metzler, R.N. 
Helen E. Fitzgerald, R.N. 
Ruth Hodgdon, R.N. 



11 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS 

The Children's Hospital, like all hospitals so situated throughout 
the country, is obviously affected by the economic conditions of the 
day. At home We contend with the general trend toward decrease 
in income from invested funds. There is furthermore the probability 
of continuous decline in the sources of new gifts and legacies. From 
abroad the appeals for help to European and Asiatic sufferers must 
divert some incalculable amount of money which might otherwise 
be dedicated to our Hospital's use. 

Considering these influences outside our control, the Board of 
Managers is gratified with the results for 1940 on which this report 
is based. 

Skillful administration within the Hospital has likewise con- 
tributed to the continued careful control of expense, and we can re- 
port a definite improvement in the ratio between collections from, 
patients and the general increase in operating costs. 

These factors enable the Board of Managers to report a sub- 
stantial reduction in the operating deficit of the Hospital for 1940 
over that of 1939. We are again grateful to the Greater Boston 
Community Fund for their aid in the past year. 

Some progress can be reported by the Committee of the Board 
appointed in April, 1940 to consider the means of raising the $150,000 
endowment for the William E. Ladd Chair of Child Surgery at The 
Children's Hospital. A number of meetings have been held, and 
the committee has also been in consultation with outside authorities 
on such projects. Due to the conditions beyond its control the 
committee has not been able to work continuously, but at this time 
it can be reported that we have in hand $43,000 — nearly one-third 
of the needed sum. The Fund Committee is most appreciative of 
the work of the Welfare Committee whose "Yankee Trading Post" 
made the largest contribution to the Fund thus far, as we are for 
the cooperation of all those who took part in the lecture and tea given 
at the Hospital on November 15th, for the purpose of introducing 
the problem to a number of our old and our potential friends. 

From our direct contacts with many of them we are doubtful of 
any help by the various Funds and Foundations normally interested 

13 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



in such undertakings. However, a number of other projects are in 
progress, and the committee is still hopeful of being able to raise the 
necessary amount. 

Since the William E. Ladd Professorship is the first Chair of 
Child Surgery in the world, it is vital that the Fund have the sup- 
port of everyone interested in the Hospital. 

With the death of Professor Louis Agassiz Shaw on August 27th, 
1940, the Hospital lost a valued friend and Manager. The Children's 
Hospital was first to support vigorously the work of Professor Shaw 
and Professor Drinker in the development of the "Iron Lung." 

The defense preparations of the nation are already affecting the 
operation of the Hospital. Thus far three Staff members have been 
given leaves of absence to join the service. The ultimate effects of 
the defense program on the Hospital are of course unpredictable. 

Considering the character of the times, the Board of Managers 
feels that the Hospital has by no means stood still in the year 1940, 
but has shown strong ability to adapt itself to these rapidly shifting 
conditions. Naturally this could not be possible were it not for the 
loyalty of the Hospital's older friends, and its capacity for making 
new ones. The loyalty of the Staff and employees remains one of 
the Hospital's greatest assets. 

Board of Managers 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

The year 1940 marks another progressive step in the life of your 
hospital. 

The earnest intensity with which every one carries on their 
intramural medical activities acts as a protective armour against 
the distractions of the outside world, and the social turmoils that 
surround us. 

World conflicts seem to be intermittent. Most countries have 
eras of peace, comfort and prosperity. Only when an invasion is 
threatened do they seriously prepare to defend themselves against 
this invasion. 

In medicine, the fight is constant. No sooner is one invader 
controlled than another one is already in our midst, and this new 
invader probably has to be attacked in a new way and with new 
weapons. 

No attempt will have to be made to mention what we have 
accomplished in the way of defensive weapons against the invaders 
of 1940. These will appear in medical journals, and in some measure 
in another portion of this report over the signatures of members of 
the Staff. 

Suffice to say that progress was made in various fields and other 
studies are being conducted which show promise of being valuable 
contributions to medical science. 

We all bemoan the fact that world conditions prevented us from 
proceeding with plans to raise funds for new buildings, most sorely 
needed for many of our activities. 

On the other hand, we rejoice that the committee appointed to 
raise funds for hospital purposes, has been able to obtain a sub- 
stantial amount towards the endowment of a Chair of Child Surgery 
at The Children's Hospital. 

The year 1940, therefore, is momentous in that it marks in the 
medical world the acknowledgment of surgery among children as a 
specialized field, and it is noteworthy that this recognition comes as 
a result of the vision and untiring devotion of Dr. William E. Ladd 
to this particular field of medicine. 

It is only fitting, therefore, that this Chair of Child Surgery 
should be the first of its kind in the country, and that it should be 
established by the Harvard Medical School at The Children's Hos- 

15 



pital, and that it should be named the "William E. Ladd Chair of 
Child Surgery." 

If this endowment can be carried to a successful conclusion, it 
will strengthen the Surgical Department at its weakest point and 
enable it to progress with greater strength, and enable it to spread 
its influence to greater advantage. 

It must be remembered that as the hospital grows, as it matures, 
as its accomplishments become more widely known, its tasks of 
living up to its reputation becomes progressively more difficult. 
More and more is it noticeable that the particularly intricate and 
bewildering cases are recommended for admission to our hospital. 
The trend is a challenge to the wits and ability of our Staff, and it 
is our duty to see that the equipment with which they have to work 
be kept at the highest possible efficiency. 

Every unit of the hospital is a vital cog in the wheel, and if one 
cog were to be allowed to wear down, it would impair the efficiency 
of the unit. The success of the hospital as a whole is due to the 
coordination of all units, the success of any one unit is due to the 
cooperation of all the other units. 

Expenses increase each year and over a period of twenty-five 
years, one can readily see in retrospect that this is the price of 
success. Constant effort on the part of the management and ad- 
ministration can merely keep this cost of success down to as low a 
level as possible. One cannot aspire to obtaining success for -nothing. 

In looking ahead, therefore, we must be prepared for a definite 
annual increase in costs, and these increases will be due to — 

1. New equipment. 

2. Replacement of old equipment. 

3. Cost of maintenance as the buildings get older. 

4. Cost of nursing service. 

The Hospital ran a heavy census in 1940, particularly in the 
Private Ward where the hospital days totalled 12,887, an increase 
of 2,290 or 18% over 1939. On Public, the total was 60,352, an 
increase of 3,311, or 5% over 1939. 

It required an average of 377 employees on the payroll to operate 
the Hospital. This does not give, however, a true picture of the 
facts, as there are many, many volunteers and staff members who 
give valuable and indispensable services gratis. 

Improvements have been numerous. The top floor of Bader 
Building is in process of reconstruction. This was a job of consid- 
erable magnitude and was let out to a contractor — as was the elevator 
job in the Main Building. 

16 



Otherwise, we handle our own alterations through our main- 
tenance department now composed of 15 men. 

Many useful and valuable gifts are gratefully acknowledged, 
particularly many works of art from the Gardner family. These 
have embellished Gardner House and our main lobby. 

We face the eventualities of 1941 with vigorous determination, 
and some trepidation, but with the firm conviction that the loyalty 
of the staff and personnel will rise to any occasion. 

G. v. L. Meyer, Director 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

DIRECTOR'S STATISTICAL REPORT 
IN-PATIENT 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

For the year ended December 31, 1940 







Pri. 


Pub. 


T 








Remaining E 


•ecember 31, 1939 


26 


159 


185 






Admitted 




1,972 


3,836 


5,808 






Treated 




1,998 


3,995 


5,993 






Discharged 




1,948 


3,858 


5,806 






Remaining E 


•ecember 31, 1940 


50 


137 


187 


Daily, 


















Admissions 




Bed Capacity 


Bed Occupancy 




Pri. Pub. 


T. 


Pri. 


Pub. 


T. . 


Pri. Pub. 


T. 


Medical 


890 824 


1,714 


10 


44 


54 


17 35 


52 


Surgical 


303 1,423 


1,726 


10 


66 


76 


7 61 


68 


Orthopedic 


67 380 


447 


10 


47 


57 


3 39 


42 


Throat 


667 921 


1,588 


12 


31 


43 


9 ' 16 


25 


Neurological 


24 204 


228 


— 


*15 


15 


8 


8 


Isolation 


21 84 


105 


— 


*38 


38 


1 4 


5 




1,972 3,836 


5,808 


42 


241 


283 


37 163 


200 










Deaths and 
















Autopsies 






Hospital Days 


Operations 


Pri 


Pub. Total 




Pri. Pub. T. 


Pri. 


Pub. 


T. 


D A 


DAD 


A 


Medical 


6,221 12,883 19,104 


— 


— 


— 


13 6 


42 33 55 


39 


Surgical 


2,455 22,475 24,930 


315 


1,377 


1,692 


3 - 


41 32 44 


32 


Orthopedic 


935 14,294 15,229 


68 


391 


459 


- - 


1 - 1 


- 


Throat 


3,276 5,965 9,241 


687 


870 


1,557 


1 - 


4 1 5 


1 


Neurological 


193 2,767 2,960 


— 


— 


— 


- - 


2 1 2 


1 


Isolation 


339 1,436 1,775 
















13,419 59,820 73,239 


1,070 


2,638 3,708 


17 6 


90 67 107 


73 



Percentage of Autopsies 35% 74% 68% 



""Interchangeable — Public and Private 

Isolation closed May 10th 

Bader Ward closed June 30th to September 4th. 



18 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Remaining December 31, 1939 
Admitted 



THE INFANTS' HOSPITAL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

For the year ended December 31, 1940 

Operations 



32 
792 



DIRECTOR'S STATISTICAL REPORT 
OUT-PATIENT 

THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

For the year ended December 31, 1940 



Clinics 

Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature. 
Infantile Paralysis. 

Throat 

Muscle Training. . 

Lamp 

Dental 



Medical 

Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Lateral Curvature. 
Infantile Paralysis. 

Throat 

Muscle Training . . 

Lamp 

Dental 



Treated 824 
Discharged 781 


Surgical 

Orthopedic 

Throat 


14 

3 

48 


Remaining December 31, 1940 43 




65 


Capacity 60 
Daily Occupancy 43 
Hospital Days 15,646 


Deaths 

Autopsies 

Percentage of Autopsies 


121 

104 

86% 









Total 


Free 


Part Rate 


Full Rate 


Visits 


6,909 


2,696 


15,868 


25,473 


3,704 


1,171 


8,337 


13,212 


3,015 


953 


7,202 


11,170 


767 


136 


1,321 


2,224 


4,206 


-0- 


-0- 


4,206 


1,021 


361 


2,076 


3,458 


1,570 


272 


1,554 


3,396 


4 


-Or- 


2 


6 


159 


-0- 


70 


229 


21,355 


5,589 


36,430 


63,374 




Total 


Vew Cases 


Transfers 


Old Cases 


Visits 


3,923 


628 


20,922 


25,473 


2,339 


789 


10,084 


13,212 


944 


469 


9,757 


11,170 


11 


96 


2,117 


2,224 


35 


-0- 


4,171 


4,206 


299 


933 


2,226 


3,458 


8 


42 


3,346 


3,396 


-0- 


1 


5 


6 


-0- 


13 


216 


229 


7,559 


2,971 


52,844 


63,374 



19 







THE 


CHILDREN'S 


HOSPITAL 




Em 


ERGENCIES 














Medical 


493 


Total Number 


of Individuals 


16,480 




Surgical 


1,034 


Daily Av. 


No. 


of New Cases 


25 




Orthopedic 


100 


Daily Av. 


No. 


of Total Visits 


209 




Throat 


254 


Minor Op 


erations 


749 




1,881 





REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Balance Sheet as of December 31, 1940 



ASSETS 

Current Assets: 

Cash in bank and on hand $ 130,547.24 

Accounts receivable, patients 14,598.16 

Accounts receivable, other 6,105.87 

Infants' Hospital, balance of share of 

operating costs 10,722.56 

Accrued interest and dividends 40,659.78 

Materials and supplies on hand 26,364.77 

Prepaid expenses 686.72 



Investment Securities: . 

General fund investments $2,682,007.28 

Restricted fund investments 1,582,619.42 



Other Investment Property: 

Real estate $ 458,750.00 

Mortgage receivable 60,000.00 



Plant and Equipment: 

Land $ 211,128.03 

Hospital buildings 1,813,332.35 

Dormitory property 883,116.19 

Furniture, equipment and improvements 

(depreciated value) 32,277.43 



$ 229,685.10 



4,264,626.70 



518,750.00 



2,939,854.00 



Total Assets £7,952,915.80 

20 



THE CHILDRENS HOSPITAL 

LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Liabilities: 

Accounts payable (current bills) $ 21,218.96 

Credit balances, accounts receivable. . . 1,227.74 

School of Nursing, tuitions unearned.. . 3,639.12 

$ 26,085.82 

Capital: 

General fund $6,324,993.24 

Restricted investment funds 1,578,735.81 

Temporary special funds. 23,100.93 

7,926,829.98 

Total Liabilities and Capital. . $7,952,915.80 



STATEMENT OF INCOME AND EXPENSE 
For the Year 1940 

Income: 

Hospital revenue $311,363.27 

Income from investments 204,853.24 

Donations and subscriptions 81,068.71 

Subscriptions through Welfare Com- 
mittee (net) 9,636.47 

Miscellaneous Income 18,500.85 

Total Income $625,422.54 

Expenses: 

Operation of Hospital $625,026.69 

Taxes 81.20 

Publicity 2,248.52 

Treasurer's office (financial matters) . . . 6,144.70 

Miscellaneous 3,207.32 

Total Expenses 636,708.43 



Operating Deficit $ 11,285.89 



21 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

LEGACIES AND GIFTS FOR INVESTMENT 

Received during 1940 

FOR GENERAL FUND 

LEGACIES 

Estate of 

James Henry Anderson (add'l) $ 62.25 

Eleanor H. Beebe 3,000.00 

Alice F. Cochran (add'l) 100.00 

Jennie L. Cox 1,000.00 

Ella P. Cummings "In memory of her father Nathaniel Cum- 

mings) 800.00 

Edith C. W. Cutler 500.00 

Helen Dana 3,750.00 

Lucy H. Eaton (add'l) 600.00 

Grace M. Edwards (add'l) 25,000.00 

Frederick L. Ellis 4,596.79 

Daniel Sumner Farrington 71.36 

Anna C. Frothingham 5,000.00 

George P. Gardner , 40,000.00 

Charles H. Huerth 250.00 

Charles R. Hurd 500.00 

Mary N. Hurd 2,000.00 

Emma S. Ide 2,421.25 

Ira L. Moore 390.00 

Frederick Strong Moseley 10,000.00 

Silas Peavy (towards a free bed) 1,000.00 

Joseph West Sherman 1,245.60 

Anna Spooner (add'l) 3,396.13 

Emma B. Swasey 4,500.00 

Maude C. Valentine 1,866.64 

John L. Warren 500.00 

Zabdiel Adams Willard 3,377.20 



$115,927.22 



FOR RESTRICTED INVESTMENT FUND 

Estate of 

Helen Sewall Briggs Fund (add'l) $ 10.20 

Mabelle C. Davis "Clara S. Davis Fund" (add'l) 12,500.00 

William E. Ladd Fund (add'l) 29,017.43 

Clara N. Marshall Fund 2,500.00 

Georgie T. Patten Fund 18,885.42 

362,913.05 

22 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



OTHER SPECIAL PURPOSE GIFTS 1940 

Previous 

Unexpended Received Expended 

Balance 1940 1940 

Angiocardiography Fund $ 250.00 $ 121.50 

Apparatus (special) Neurolog- 
ical Dept. . $ 287.21 100.69 

Boston Council of Social Agen- 
cies— Medical Relief Fund.. . 65.10 172.89 197.33 
Committee of the Permanent 

Charity Fund 135.76 600.00 653.57 

Dental Research Fund... 107.93 

Dickens' Fellowship Fund 78.18 25.00 3.95 

Earhart Foundation Fund 3,500.00 2,453.35 

Harwood, Mary Louise Fund.. 44.72 164.47 195.01 

Infantile Paralysis President's 

Birthday Ball 307.35 1,000.00 743.51 

Legg Memorial Fund 500.00 — 

Library Fund 708.24 382.00 332.41 

McKhann, Emily Priest Fund. 28.42 — 28.42 

Occupational Therapy Fund . . . 54.00 - — ■ — ■ — 

Orthodontia Equipment Fund. 63.66 

Orthopedic Department Fund. 50.00 

Orthopedic Infantile Research 

Fund 4,125.00 788.35 

Pathological Apparatus Fund. . 500.00 

Pathology Fund 373.57 188.22 

Physiotherapy Fund 50.00 

Pierce, Henrietta M. Pleasure 

Fund 353.01 215.82 203.89 

Pleasure Fund 4.75 122.59 86.30 

Prouty, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis I. 

Gift 11,250.00 

Research in Children's Surgery, 

Godfrey M. Hyams Fund. . . 3,592.13 5,000.00 5,320.60 

Rollins, Adelaide H. Splint 

Fund 45.32 46.58 

Shuman Clothing Fund 61.10 43.16 91.74 

Kartharine E. Silsbee Fund for 

Splints 349.96 1,079.08 1,275.06 

Social Service Sundries 40.00 48.00 60.10 

Solby, Esther Andrews Taxi 

Fund 44.96 200.00 197.50 

Special Nursing Fund 31.50 

Surgical Dept. Fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Weeks, Nelson E. Fund 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Wheel Chair Fund 3.15 

Zonta Club for Occupational 

Therapy 114.75 160.00 244.03 

Total $19,163.27 $19,716.09 $15,785.53 



Jan. 1, 1941 
Unexpended 
Balance 
$ 128.50 

186.52 

40.66 

82.19 

107.93 

99.23 

1,046.65 

14.18 

563.84 

500.00 

757.83 

Transferred 

54.00 

63.66 

50.00 

3,336.65 

500.00 

185.35 

50.00 

364.94 
41.04 

11,250.00 

3,271.53 

91.90 

12.52 

153.98 
27.90 

47.46 

31.50 

Transferred 

3.15 

30.72 

$23,093.83 



23 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Income of Funds Added to Principal of Said Funds 
In Accordance with Wording of Deed of Gift 

Charles Tidd Baker Fund $ 

Horace A. Latimer Fund 

Esther Andrews Solby Fund $262.03 

(Portion of income transferred to temporary 

fund for cost of transportation of patients) 200.00 

Elizabeth C. Ware Fund 



331.47 
880.34 



62.03 

324.82 



$1,598.66 



GIFTS TOWARDS CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL DAYS 

A donation of $1,000 carries with it the privilege of dedicating the 
services of the whole Hospital for one day. 

A donation of $100 gives the same privilege for one Ward for 
one day. 



Inscription 

December 23rd 

The service of this Ward is given 

in loving memory of 

Arthur T. Bradlee 



Donor 



Mrs. Arthur T. Bradlee 



January 1st 

The service of this Ward is given 

in loving memory of 

A. F. R. 



Mrs. F. B. Crowninshield 



DONATIONS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS 

The Hospital is deeply and sincerely indebted to the 1,428 in- 
dividuals and 274 organizations and clubs who contributed $90,705.18 
towards the running expenses in 1940, some making their contribu- 
tions direct to this Hospital and many kindly designating for the 
benefit of this Hospital whole or part of their contributions to the 
Greater Boston Community Fund of which this Hospital is one of 
the participating charities. 

24 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

RESTRICTED INVESTMENT FUNDS 

1869 to December 31, 1940 

Bader Building, Third Floor Completion $ 3,208.17 

Charles Tidd Baker 15,681.13 

Ida Chase Baker 60,000.00 

Ann Barnet 5,000.00 

Alanson Bigelow 5,000.00 

Helen Sewall Briggs 63,889.13 

Laura A. Brown 9,957.05 

Helen G. Coburn 49,900.50 

Costello C. Converse 25,000.00 

Mary A. Coombs 17,844.04 

Marian Frances and Sarah Winter Coppenhagen 5,000.00 

Susie Dodge Crawford 5,000.00 

Harriet Otis Cruft 20,000.00 

Lilla Sargent Cunningham 5,000.00 

Clara S. Davis 25,000.00 

Caroline T. Downes 51,314.00 

Charles H. Draper 23,934.12 

Eliza J. Bell Draper 1,000.00 

Eugene F. Farnham 5,104.00 

Temple R. Fay 69,532.50 

Marjorie Forbes 5,000.00 

Thomas A. Forsyth 2,000.00 

Amelia Greenbaum 48,175.97 

Robert Millholland Hanna, Jr 5,000.00 

Henry C. Haven 5,000.00 

Charles Hayden Foundation 3,000.00 

William H. Hervey 11,821.97 

William Hilton 10,000.00 

Mary S. Holbrook , 15,465.42 

Charles W. Holzer 41,666.67 

George S. Hyde 8,625.88 

Henry Clay Jackson 35,000.00 

Charles P. Jaynes 11,447.00 

Mrs. Jerome Jones 9,935.95 

John D. W. Joy 5,000.00 

Claude L. Kettle 5,000.00 

Kate Andrea Knowlton 2,245.00 

William E. Ladd Chair of Pediatric Surgery 32,617.43 

Horace A. Latimer 41,671.87 

Madeleine Lee, In memory of 5,000.00 

Joseph W. Leighton 12,000.00 

Maria D. Lockwood Trust 5,109.27 

Clara N. Marshall 2,500.00 

Mrs. Edythe Marshall 2,250.00 

James C. Melvin 49,251.25 

25 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

James C. Melvin, Jr 5,000.00 

Margaret A. and John Merriam 6,000.00 

Alice Appleton Meyer 1,500.00 

Kate M. Morse 15,000.00 

Mary E. Moseley 4,250.00 

Albert H. and Margaret Ann Munsell 21,105.32 

Albert N. Parlin 50,000.00 

Georgie T. Patten 18,885.42 

Amy Peabody 50,000.00 

Henry G. Pickering 4,969.56 

Henrietta M. Pierce 5,000.00 

Grace Winthrop Rives, In memory of 50,000.00 

Adelaide H. Rollins, Splint Fund 1,079.11 

Frank Davison Rust, Memorial No. 1 6,200.00 

Frank Davison Rust, Memorial No. 2 4,000.00 

Sarah Gardner Sears 5,000.00 

Elizabeth G. Shepard 3,100.00 

A. Shuman, Clothing Fund 1,000.00 

Katharine E. Silsbee 25,000.00 

Esther Andrews Solby 6,132.70 

Harriet W. Taber 2,584.48 

Helen Hallett Thompson 10,810.45 

John Parker Townsend 3,000.00 

Elizabeth C. Ware 30,426.62 

Elizabeth White 100,000.00 

Mabel Wilbur 5,000.00 

Edwin A. Wyeth 50,000.00 

Charles Loring Young 5,000.00 

Unnamed restricted funds 247,543.83 

Total $1,578,735.81 



GIFTS TO ESTABLISH MEMORIALS 

Endowed Beds 

By vote of the Board of Managers, and until further action by the 
Board, a gift of $25,000 will endow a bed. 

MEMORIALS 

Following a recommendation of the Staff, the Managers decided 
to remove all memorial tablets from the walls of the Wards, and 
place them in the future on a panel over the nurses' station of each 
ward, or elsewhere, and, accordingly, it was voted that in the future 
a donor of not less than $1,000 has a right to place a memorial for a 
five-year period on the memorial panel. 

26 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

One Memorial 

Lotta M. Crabtree Bed 

From the Trustees, Lotta M. Crabtree Estate 

One Memorial 
"Clara S. Davis Memorial Bed" 
From Estate of Mabelle C. Davis 
A complete list of memorials follows : 

MEMORIALS 
To December 31, 1940 



WARD 1, LOWER A 

Prouty Ward 
In memory of Anne and Olivia Prouty, 1917 



1921 



WARD 1, LOWER B 



Henry Augustus Turner Memorial Bed 

Mabel C. Chester, Brookline, Mass. 
She filled her niche, laughed often 
and loved much. 1865-1921 

Donated by Caroline Shapera. In lov- 
ing memory of her son, H. Clarence' 
Shapera, Quebec, Canada, 1881-1891 

In memory of Charles Henry Peirce 

Abigail M. Curran, 1924 

Ellen L. Doe 

Gertrude Gouverneur Hunnewell. Born 
February 3, 1862. Died March 15, 
1890 

George F. Kimball Cot 

Francis Welles Hunnewell. Born No- 
vember 3, 1838. Died September 30, 
1917. President of The Children's 
Hospital,1901-1917 



In loving Memory of Ruth Faxon 
In Loving Memory of Wallace L. Pierce 
In Memory of Sullivan Amory, Febru- 
ary 22, 1878-May 5, 1881 
In Loving Memory of Philip Leverett 

Saltonstall, Jr., April 17, 1922- 

April 8, 1925 
James Henry Williams, 1843-1908 
Harriett M. Lothrop 

Presented by the Massachusetts Chil- 
' dren of the American Revolution in 

Memory of their National Founder, 
In Loving Memory, Robert Pearce 

Williams, Aetat. 13 years, 1907 
Annie Louise Richards Bed 
In Memory of Mrs. Ida Chase Baker, 

Benefactress of this Institution 
Robert Louis Stevenson 
Carrie Elizabeth Tyer, 1883-1885 

(Sun Parlor) 



WARD 1, UPPER 



Maria Frances Coppenhagen 
Sarah Winter Coppenhagen 
Florence Dean Curtis 
Jessie Preston Draper 
Margaret Constance Ellis 
In Loving Memory of 

Alice M. C. Matthews 
Susan Wells Preston 
Sara P. Lowell Blake 
Florence Cobb Brooks, 1912-1918 
Rosamond Freeman 
Theresa Pierce 
Bertha F. Taylor 
Harriet Elizabeth Pierce Wood 



Ellen Richards Slater 
In Loving Memory of 

Hazel Mills Angevine 
Madeleine Rich Bed 
From the Ethel Maud Clapp Memorial 

Fund 
Massachusetts State Federation 

of Women's Clubs 
Irene Wood Memorial Bed 
In Memory of Clara 
Elizabeth G. Shepard 
Maria P. Bowen Memorial Bed 
In Memory of Hope Clement, 1875- 

1899 (Sun Parlor) 



27 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



IDA C. SMITH WARD 

MEMORIAL CUBICLES 



In Memory of Robert C. Morse 

In Memory of Alice Mary Longfellow 

1850-1928 
Gift of Gloria Grant Brown 
In Memory of Catherine A. Fairbanks, 
In Loving Memory of Janet Dyas 

Shearer 
In Memory of Harriet Atherton 

Bubier Bergman 



Brookline Womans Club— 1929 
Given in Memory of Her Father 

William H. Sands by his daughter 

Ethel 
In Loving Memory of James Woolsen 

Hurlbut 
In Memory of Marie Agassiz Felton 

(2 cubicles) 



MEMORIAL ROOM 
In Loving Memory Mary Pauline Du Pont 

WARD 2 



In Tender Memory of Lois Dorman 

Russell A Beloved Little Child 
Abigaill P. Banchor 
Boston Section Council of Jewish 

Women 
Women of Somerville, 1922 
Donated by The Ladies' Dog Club, 

1924 
Gift of Dorchester Club Women, 1921 
In Loving Memory of Ralph Hudson 

Crocker, 1916 
In Memory of Kate Lucy Walsh, 

Benefactress of this Hospital 
In Loving Memory of Gail Gorham 

Whitcomb, May 2, 1920 
Children of Eliza James Bell Draper 
Cora Belle Towle Room, 

K. T. A., E. A. G. A. (Sun Porch) 
In Memory of Adelaide Augusta 

Thomas 
Clara S. Davis Memorial Bed 



Charles A. Chapman 

In Memory of Annie T. Auerbach. 
Born in Philadelphia, Pa., May 3, 
1851. Died in Brookline, Mass., 
August 1, 1916 

Ruth E. Martin 

Herbert Billings Rose. Born January 
21,1912. Died June 26, 1917. Aged 
5 years, 5 months and 5 days 

Carlos Wilson Bed 

Chestnut Hill, 1923 

In Memory of Willard Smith Curtis, 
1920 

The Amaranth Literary Circle 

Martha Higginson Barbour 

Gift of Dorchester Club Women, 1922 

Catherine Smith Bed. In Memory of 
My Mother 

Caleb James Nichols, Maria A. 

Nichols, Eunice B. Nichols, Charles 
Nichols, Benjamin F. Nichols 



WARD 4 



Brookline Woman's Club 

Kent Pettingill 

Livingston Wadsworth 

Brookline, 1923 

In Loving Memory of Charles Dalton, 

April 18, 1905-April 2, 1910 
In Loving Memory of William Grav, 

May 2, 1906, September 22, 1909' 
Donated by the Swedish Women 

of Greater Boston, 1922 
Catholic Women of Boston 
In Memory of Charlotte Lowell 

August 23, 1918-March 5, 1927 
In Memory of 

Bessie Rochester Edwards 
Bessie Rochester Edwards 

First President Past President Parley 



Massachusetts Maine Daughters, 

February, 1922 
Dorothy Quincy Cot 
Rachel Tower Tarbell 
Wellesley Hills Woman's Club Bed, 1921 
Brookline Aid 
In Memory of Edward Jerome 

Hitchings 
Lotta M. Crabtree Bed 
In Loving Memory of Dorothy Win- 

throp, July 17 1878-July 23, 1907 
Sarah W T yman Whitman — Lily Bed 
In Memory of Mary Devlin, born in 

Ireland, 1831, died in Salem, 1894 
In Memory of 

Bessie Porter Edwards 
Southborough Woman's Club, 1934 
In Memory of Marjorie Forbes 



28 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



WARD 5, LOWER A 

This Ward is named in memory of Elizabeth White, beloved mother 01 
George Robert White, A Public Spirited Citizen of Boston, who died January 
27, 1922, and by his will, among other generous bequests for the welfare of 
the City, gave liberally towards the support of this Hospital. 

WARD 5, LOWER B 

To the Memory of Stephen Wheatland Robert Millholland Hanna, Jr. 

In Memory of Edward Ellery In Loving Memory of Agnes Hosmer, 

Knowlton November 17, 1901-August 15, 1914 

In Loving Memory of In Memory of William F. Resor 

Herman John Huidekoper Given in Memory of her mother, 

James C. Melvin, Jr. F. Josephine Sands, by her daughter 

Francis Skinner Ethel 

Harriet M. Billings Memorial Bed In Memory of John White Hallowell, 

Charles Dickens, 1812-1870 1878-1927, Manager of this Hospital, 

Albert H. Munsell . 1924-1927 

Charles Loring Young, President of Mary E. Moseley 

the Children's Hospital, 1896-1901. Hattie Adele Close 

Frances Adele Close Richardson Bed in Memory of Fred- 

In Memory of Mary Hutchins Taft erick and Arthur Richardson 

from her son, Charles, September, 

1938 

WARD 5, UPPER 

Julia H. Appleton Memorial Bed A Free Bed established under the will 

Frances Todd Baldwin of Albert Norton Parlin 

Selina Jarvie Fletcher In Loving Memory of Lothrop 

Ellen Maria Pierce Melcher, in the interest of Neurology 

Mary Ellen Putnam, Sarah Wyman Whitman — Lily Bed 

July 21, 1862-May 21, 1866 Margaret Ann Munsell 

Sarah Eliza Thacher Cot In Memory of Anna Goodwin Tuttle 

Louise Julia Tucker, In Loving In Memory of Louise Shearer Butler 

Memory, April 25, 1882 In Memory of Jack Marvin 

Neurological Bed, 1924, donated Frank Seaver Billings Memorial Bed 

through Mary £. Trainor Louis Bridgman Memorial Bed 

Albert N. Parlin Free Bed In Very Loving Memory of 

A Free Bed established under the will S. Parker Bremer 

of Albert Norton Parlin 

DONATIONS TOWARDS SUBSCRIPTION BEDS 
AND C. H. CLUB BEDS 

A donation of $100.00 towards a Subscription Bed or a C. H. Club 
Bed gives for one year to the donor the right to nominate one person 
at a time to one of such Beds, subject to the rules and regulations 
of the Hospital. 

Number 
of Beds 
Ames, Mrs. John S. and Mrs. Hobart (for use of North Easton Dis- 
trict Nursing Association) 1 

Bradley, Mrs. J. D. Cameron 1 

Buzzards Bay C. H. Club 7 

Daffodill C. H. Club 2 

Donald, Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm 1 

Duxbury C. H. Club 1 

Hunnewell, Mrs. Henry S 2 

29 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Hunnewell, James M 

Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. James 

Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. George H., Jr., 

"In memory of M. C. Cunningham" 

Lothrop, Mr. and Mrs. Francis B., "Cora Belle Towle Bed". 

Marblehead C. H. Club 

Ratchesky, A. C. Charity Foundation 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Robert 

Sewing Circle of 1919 

Swampscott C. H. Club 

Thorp, Miss Alice A 

Warren, Mr. and Mrs. Bayard 



Total Number of Beds 35 



CERTIFICATE OF AUDITORS 

To the Officers and Board of Managers 
o/The Children's Hospital: 

We have made an examination of the financial accounts and 
records of The Children's Hospital for the year ended December 
31, 1940. 

We have satisfied ourselves that all recorded cash receipts were 
deposited in banks and that all disbursements were properly auth- 
orized and supported by cancelled checks and/or by vouchers or 
other evidence of payment. We have verified the balances of cash 
on hand by certificates from the bank and by actual count. 

We have inspected the securities held in the general and restricted 
funds and have seen that all transactions during the year pertaining 
thereto were properly recorded and that all collectible income there- 
from was properly accounted for. The securities are generally 
carried at cost, or in the case of bequests, at market or assigned 
values at the date of acquisition. 

In our opinion, based upon such examination and subject to the 
qualification that securities are shown at book value which is higher 
than market value, the accompanying statements of assets and lia- 
bilities and of income and expense present fairly the financial con- 
dition of the Hospital at December 31, 1940, and the results of its 
operations for the year then ended, in conformity with generally 
accepted accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with 
that of the preceding year. 

{Signed) Charles F. Rittenhouse & Co. 
Boston, Massachusetts Certified Public Accountants 

February 21, 1941 

30 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SERVICE 

The year 1940 has been one in which real progress can be reported 
with respect to the care of sick children, the teaching of under- 
graduate and graduate medical students and advances along varied 
lines of clinical investigation. A total number of 2,047 patients were 
admitted to the Medical wards, of these 824 were admitted to the 
Public ward, 890 to the Private ward, 228 to the division of Mental 
Hygiene, and 105 to the Isolation Unit. Three thousand, nine 
hundred and twenty-three new patients were seen in the Medical 
Out-Patient Department, and a total number of 25,473 visits were 
made to this clinic. These figures reflect great credit upon the med- 
ical and nursing staff as they indicate the confidence which parents 
in greater Boston as well as those from far away, have in the services 
rendered to their children. 

At this time it is appropriate to re-emphasize the fact that the 
members of the resident staff are in effect post-graduate students. 
Each one, after graduating from a class A medical school has spent 
a year or more as an intern either in a general hospital or in some 
broadening field of medicine before being accepted as a house officer 
on the Medical Service here. After sixteen and a half months as 
house officers some of these men stay here as assistant residents and 
others seek positions elsewhere. After two years of practice they 
are eligible for an examination given by the American Board of 
Pediatrics which, if successfully passed, entitles them to certification 
as qualified pediatricians. In order that we may continue to attract 
men of as high calibre, as in the past, by offering them adequate 
training, it is essential that the service be maintained at a high 
standard. This objective is constantly before us and from time to 
time necessitates changes in the rotation of service. For example, 
in order to increase the experience of members of the staff in the 
care of newly born infants, the house officers in rotation now live 
at the Boston Lying-in Hospital for a period of two months, spending 
their whole time in enlarging their knowledge of the diseases of the 
newly born infant. As mentioned last year, the innovation of a 
resident assigned to the Private Ward was so enthusiastically 
received by the members of the Courtesy Staff that a continuation of 
this service seemed desirable. Now each house officer in rotation 
carries this responsibility for two months of his service. This new 
arrangement is meeting with satisfaction. It enables the house 

31 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

officer to gain, while interning, some idea as to the many and diversi- 
fied problems which he will encounter in private practice and 
provides the additional benefit of contact with the Courtesy Staff. 

During the past year, the number of chemical analyses performed 
by the clinical Chemistry Laboratory for the public and private 
patients in the Hospital has again increased. This has been largely 
due to the determinations necessitated by the great increase in the 
use of sulfonamide drugs. The laboratory has continued its usual 
activities in modifying chemical procedures to adapt them to the 
small samples of material obtained from infants. 

In the Chemical Research Laboratory work has been continued 
along two lines, namely the chemistry of vitamins and the chemistry 
of the substances produced by the endocrine glands, with the purpose 
of applying such chemical knowledge to the treatment of patients in 
the Hospital. Vitamin C has been identified as an important con- 
stituent of platelets and white blood cells and the presence of vitamin 
C has been observed in abnormal amounts in the white cells of certain 
types of malignant diseases of the blood. Chemical methods for the 
determination of vitamin K have been worked out which permit the 
study of the internal metabolism of this newly discovered vitamin. 
The application of the chemical method of determining vitamin A 
which was worked out in the Hospital a few years ago has permitted 
an extensive study of certain types of nutritional disturbances in 
infancy and childhood, and has already provided much added in- 
formation concerning such disturbances. New chemical methods 
have been developed for studying the excretion of endocrine sub- 
stances in the urine of patients and this has already been applied 
to the differential diagnosis of diseases of the endocrine glands 
and such general metabolic disturbances as Mongolism. The care- 
ful studies on the effectiveness of amino acids in the treatment of 
nutritional disturbances have been extended during the past year. 
The information so obtained has definitely shown the beneficial 
effect of such therapy, and gives promise of becoming a part of the 
treatment of our infants and children with acute nutritional dis- 
turbances. 

Meningitis has always been one of the most serious illnesses with 
which we have had to deal on the wards of the Children's Hospital. 
Although no cure for tuberculous meningitis has been developed, 
this type of infection has fortunately been on the wane since public 
health measures have been taken to control exposure of children to 

32 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

this disease. Meningococcus or "epidemic" meningitis now responds 
remarkably well in most instances to treatment with sulfanilamide, 
even when no specific serum is administered. This chemical drug 
is likewise most effective in hemolytic streptococcus meningitis, so 
common after ear infections. The mortality from pneumococcus 
meningitis was formerly one hundred per cent. During the past 
year, by combining specific rabbit serum with derivatives of sulfanil- 
amide, we were able to bring about the recovery of several children 
with this type of infection. Finally, our commonest form of men- 
ingitis, influenzal meningitis, has shown promise of responding to 
special rabbit serum produced in the bacteriological research labora- 
tories. The development of these powerful drugs and serums has 
placed an added responsibility on our staff for the skillful employ- 
ment of these therapeutic aids in order that the gratifying results so 
far attained may be further extended. 

The Isolation Unit opened December 1, 1939 and closed May 10, 
1940. Fifty-four patients were admitted and fifty-five were trans- 
ferred from other wards of the Hospital to this unit, making a total 
of 109 admissions during this period of time. Of this group nineteen 
were under the supervision of their private physicians who were 
assisted by the house staff whenever such aid was requested. Seven- 
teen operations were performed and there was one death. This pa- 
tient was suffering from hemorrhagic measles and died within a few 
hours after admission. Thirty-two patients were transferred from 
the Isolation unit back to their respective wards in the Hospital. 
As compared to the previous year, this report shows an increase of 
twenty-two patients over a corresponding time in the previous year. 
This unit continues as a most important part of the hospital facilities 
particularly as it lessens the quarantine necessary for the Hospital 
wards during that period of the year when contagious diseases are 
most prevalent. Quarantine of the wards brings about a marked 
decrease in the number of Hospital admissions and reduces the 
service of the Hospital to the community. Under the present system, 
patients who develop a contagious disease while on the wards are 
immediately transferred to the Unit. Likewise all non-immune 
patients are removed, thus allowing the Ward to function in an 
uninterrupted manner. The necessity of the Isolation Unit to the 
Hospital is readily shown by the fact that there is rarely an empty 
bed in this Unit and it is seldom necessary to quarantine other wards 
in the Hospital while it is in operation. 

33 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

As regards the Mental Hygiene and Neurological Unit, the per- 
sonnel in charge, under the direction of Dr. Bronson Crothers and 
Dr. Elizabeth E. Lord, devote their entire time to the study and 
development of plans for the management of problem children. 
Sometimes observation under relatively normal conditions may re- 
veal difficulties which are not evident when the child must be con- 
fined to bed. In other cases the groundwork for prolonged treatment 
in other clinics may be established in the ward. Frequently puzzling 
irregularities of the process of convalescence can be understood and 
plans for supervision elaborated. 

Close cooperation with the orthopedic and neurosurgical services 
makes it possible to conduct preliminary studies in the special ward, 
transfer patients for operation and resume observation during con- 
valescence. It is increasingly clear that this procedure enables the 
Hospital to define problems of great social importance. For in- 
stance, every social agency recognizes the difficulties which some- 
times follow injuries and infection of the central nervous system. 
Certain of these children are almost unmanageable. It seems clear 
that social and psychological, as well as physical supervision may 
reveal irregularities which demand adjustment. This type of super- 
vision may require recurrent appraisal in the ward as well as con- 
tinuing observation in the out-patient department. 

The morning flock of mothers and children that stream into an 
Out-Patient Department may sometimes assume the proportions 
of an exasperating crowd to the eye of the tired physician attempting 
to deal rapidly and wisely with their many problems. It is our 
constant care to avoid situations in which the doctor feels himself 
driven by the demands of too many patients to be seen in too little 
time. Medicine practiced under such circumstances brings neither 
the most complete examination to the sick child, nor the most use- 
ful advice to his mother, nor the best education for the attending 
medical students and graduate physicians. We believe that "the 
greatest good to the greatest number" lies in the direction of a prop- 
erly administered appointment system under which the staff is 
encouraged to take sufficient time for all problems. That this plan 
has been increasingly successful is shown by the appreciative com- 
ments of pediatricians coming to work with us from other institu- 
tions. They find that the clinic can be run by the doctors rather 
than the doctors harried by the clinic. The staff thus has more 
opportunity to concentrate on the most seriously ill children. There 

34 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

is also less crowding and confusion of weary and often fretful little 
patients on waiting room benches. Improvement is also being 
wrought in the waiting room situation in other ways. For several 
months the Wheelock School has sent us two senior students, who 
under the direction of the Occupational Therapy Supervisor, have 
afforded opportunity for the energies of these children to be quietly 
and happily expended in supervised activity. No longer can mis- 
guided parents get quite such dire significance into the threat: "If 
you aren't a good boy I'll take you to the Hospital!" In the near 
future we are to educate these very parents also. A handsome dis- 
play cabinet has been built across half the front wall of the waiting 
room. In this can be set ou,t all sorts of interesting posters, charts, 
and other visual material by which we hope to increase our effective- 
ness in producing wiser parents of healthier families. Members of 
our nursing service are joining with us in anticipation of preparing 
displays. Their cooperation and helpfulness in the daily functioning 
of the Out-Patient Department has never been more skillfully and 
freely given. 

It has also been possible to enlarge the usefulness of this Depart- 
ment to the members of the medical staff. A small reference library 
of the latest texts has been installed in the Secretary's room, so that 
points of discussion and doubt can be settled at once and from 
authoritative sources. 

Mention should here be made concerning certain changes which 
have taken place in the clinics providing special care and treatment 
for children with specific diseases. During the latter part of the year 
the out-patient clinic for children with disorders of the blood was 
re-established and the clinic for children suffering from endocrine 
disturbances has been enlarged. 

The Rheumatic Fever Clinic continues to serve a purpose which 
may be described as threefold. It acts in a consultation capacity 
for the diagnosis and specialized care of patients suspected of having 
or known to have rheumatic fever or rheumatic heart disease. 
Secondly, it offers the rheumatic child consistent medical supervision 
from year to year. This is of the greatest importance in view of the 
tendency of rheumatic fever to recur, thereby increasing the risk of 
heart damage. For this reason a rheumatic child is urged to continue 
coming to the clinic for periodic examinations until the age of twelve 
years, at which time he is referred to an adult hospital. In the third 
place it offers an excellent opportunity for teaching medical students, 

35 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

post-graduate students, and house officers the special problems of this 
important disease of childhood. During 1940, the average case load 
was 150 children. There were 522 clinic visits giving an average 
clinic attendance of 10.8. 

Facilities for the placement of children with rhuematic fever, 
for the long period of care necessary, have been inadequate in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The physician in charge of the 
clinic here has become interested in this problem and under his 
leadership a unique experiment is being conducted at the Sharon 
Sanatorium, to determine whether or not rheumatic fever patients 
may benefit from the same open air regime which has proved to be so 
effective in the treatment of patients with tuberculosis. This ex- 
periment is now in its third year and judging from results to date is 
very promising. 

Eczema is one of the commonest disorders of infants, and there 
is much about it that is obscure. About one hundred new patients 
are seen each year in this clinic, a considerable number of these 
coming from outside Boston. The purposes of the Eczema Clinic 
are to try to relieve difficult cases referred from the general clinic, 
and to learn as much about the disease as possible. During the last 
two years a particular subject of study has been a new synthetic 
milk substitute in which the nitrogen is furnished by non T allergenic 
amino acids, and it has been found possible to keep infants in a good 
state of nutrition for several months while taking this food. Al- 
though it is by no means a "cure all" for infantile eczema, some ex- 
cellent results have been obtained. 

With increasing knowledge, the greater effectiveness of the treat- 
ment of bronchial asthma and hay fever has drawn an ever larger 
number of patients to the Asthma Clinic. This has necessitated an 
alteration in the management of the clinic, so that children needing 
perennial pollen therapy who previously came once a week through- 
out the spring months now come to the clinic once a month through- 
out the year. The clinic routine has also changed so that the train- 
ing of house officers and special students in this field has become 
more effective. 

In addition to the actual care of patients, special studies of molds 
and more recently yeasts as causes of asthma and hay fever are 
continuing and promise better results for the patients in the future. 

During the past few years there has been a steady decrease in 

36 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

the number of patients attending the syphilis clinic. This has been 
due, undoubtedly, to the Public Health program in Massachusetts. 
During the year 1940 the average number of patients receiving ther- 
apy was nineteen. Six new patients were admitted to the clinic for 
treatment and five were discharged as completely well. Nine pa- 
tients were transferred to other hospitals for treatment or observa- 
tion because they reached the age of twelve years and seven patients, 
at their own request were transferred to other institutions or physi- 
cians for further treatment. Thirty-seven patients were seen one or 
more times during the year as routine check-up following completion 
of full courses of therapy. 

The Out-Patient Department has been forced to lose the services 
of Mrs. Simmons whose years as clinic executive in charge of problems 
in tuberculosis have resulted in a wealth of statistical material among 
other advantages to the Hospital. In the present year it is hoped 
that this material can be put into published form as a guide to us in 
our future approach to these important questions. 

The teaching of undergraduate and graduate students has 
continued as in the past. Graduate teaching is becoming more and 
more recognized in the training of pediatricians and the problems 
which it offers must be kept constantly in mind in our endeavor to 
provide a valuable experience for the physicians seeking instruction 
here. Under the auspices of the Courses for Graduates of the Har- 
vard Medical School, a new course (Course C) has been arranged 
whereby a limited number of men who have already had training in 
pediatrics are given an opportunity to further their education in 
this field. An individual curriculum is prepared for each of these 
students. Mornings are spent in the medical out-patient department 
where, under instruction, the student takes charge of patients and 
assumes the functions of a staff member. The remaining time is 
spent attending rounds on the children's and infants' wards and par- 
ticipating in such special clinical and laboratory work as meets the 
particular needs of the student. Their attendance is expected at 
the clinical-pathological conference and X-ray conferences, as Well 
as at other staff exercises. 

In the fall of 1940, Dr. Charles F. McKhann left Boston to accept 
an appointment as Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable 
Diseases at the University of Michigan. Dr. McKhann has been 
active in the development of the work of the Children's Hospital 
since 1923 and his leaving to fill this post of greater responsibility 

37 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

has been keenly felt by the medical and nursing staffs and the many 
friends he made during his sojourn here. 

Appreciation is expressed to the Director of the Hospital, his 
Associates, the members of the Nursing Staff and the Social Service 
workers, for their understanding cooperation and tireless devotion to 
the best interests of the children and the Hospital. Special acknowl- 
edgment should be given to the members of the Medical Staff who 
have played such an important part in the accomplishments of this 
year. 

Kenneth D. Blackfan, M.D. 



38 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE 
OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Newborn 

Granuloma of umbilicus 2 

Hemorrhagic disease of the newborn 1 

Hypertonicity 2 

Kernicterus 2 

Marasmus 2 

Prematurity 9 

Diseases of the Breast 

Hypertrophy of breast 2 



Diseases of Nutrition 

Aerophagia 11 

Avitaminosis 1 

Calcinosis 1 

Celiac disease 2 

Food capriciousness 29 

Improper feeding 3o7 

Ketosis 3 

Malnutrition ; 119 

Nutritional disturbance, acute and chronic 56 

Pica 2 

Rickets 44 

Scurvy 19 

Tetany , 4 

Vomiting, non specific 33 



Diseases of the Respiratory System 

Abscess, nose 1 

Deviated septum 8 

Epistaxis. 22 

Foreign body in nose 2 

Hay fever 26 

Nasal obstruction 3 

Nasal polyp 1 

Small nares 1 

Rhinitis 110 

Sinusitis 93 

Asthma 166 

Bronchiectasis 8 

Bronchiolitis 2 

39 



18 



621 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Respiratory System — Continued 

Bronchitis 180 

Tracheitis 3 

Hoarseness, cause unknown 3 

Laryngeal stridor, congenital 32 

Laryngitis 25 

Atelectasis 1 

Empyema 1 

Pleural effusion 1 

Pneumonia 51 

Upper respiratory infection 718 



Diseases of the Alimentary System 

Abscess, alveolar 3 

Abscess, gingival 2 

Caries, teeth 89 

Cleft palate 1 

Difficult dentition 3 

Malocclusion of teeth 1 

Geographical tongue 2 

Gingivitis 6 

Harelip 2 

Macroglossia 1 

Micrognathia 1 

Stomatitis 38 

Thrush 5 

Ulcer of tongue 1 

Vincent's angina 26 

Abscess, peritonsillar 1 

Adenoiditis 12 

Adenoids, hypertrophied 37 

Tonsillitis 207 

Tonsillar tab 2 

Tonsils, hypertrophied 61 

Tonsils, infected 14 

Tonsils and adenoids, hypertrophied 212 

Tonsils and adenoids, infected 9 

Pharyngitis 165 

Pylorospasm 8 

Pyloric stenosis, congenital 2 

Abdominal pain, etiology unknown 33 

Appendicitis, chronic 1 

Enteritis 12 

Indigestion 9 

Intestinal parasites 64 

Tapeworm 1 

Malrotation of caecum 2 

40 



1,458 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Alimentary System — Continued 

Colic 2 

Colitis 2 

Constipation 87 

Diarrhea, non specific 28 

Fecal impaction 4 

Fecal incontinence 2 

Foreign body in gastro-intestinal tract 1 

Flatulence 1 

Gastritis 1 

Meckel's diverticulum . 1 

Melena 1 

Megacolon 1 

Visceroptosis '■ 1 

Jaundice, catarrhal. 14 

Hepatitis 1 

Obliteration of bile ducts, congenital 1 

Diastasis recti 5 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 1 

Hernia, inguinal 17 

Hernia, umbilical 33 

Prolapse of rectum 2 

Rectal polyp 1 

Fissure in ano 1 

Fistula in ano 1 

Spastic anal sphincter 2 

Hemorrhoids 2 



Diseases of the Genito-Urinary System 

Nephritis 11 

Nephrosis 2 

Pyelonephritis 46 

Enuresis Ill 

Diuresis 2 

Dysuria 1 

Albuminuria 26 

Bacilluria 2 

Glycosuria 1 

Hematuria 3 

Cord bladder 1 

Balanitis 1 

Hydrocele 4 

Hypospadias , 3 

Phimosis 60 

Preputial adhesions 13 

Redundant prepuce 4 

Ulcer of prepuce 1 

41 



1,246 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Genito-Urinary System — Continued 

Ulceration of penis 

Atrophy of testes 

Undescended testicle 

Interlabial adhesions 

Caruncle, vaginal orifice 

Inflamation of labia 

Foreign body in vagina 

Vulvovaginitis 

Diseases of the Circulatory System 

Arrhythmia, cardiac 

Arrhythmia, sinus 

Congenital heart disease 

Dextro cardia 

Functional heart murmur 

Heart block 

Hypertension 

Patent ductus arteriosus 

Rheumatic heart disease 

Tachycardia, paroxysmal 

Tachycardia, sino-auricular 

Telangiectasis 



1 
1 

13 
1 
1 
1 
3 

47 



1 
2 

61 
1 

18 
1 
1 
2 

22 
4 
1 
1 



360 



115 



Diseases of the Blood and Blood Forming 

Organs and Lymphatic System 

Anemia, erythroblastic 2 

Anemia, hypochromic 10 

Anemia, nutritional 36 

Anemia, secondary . 64 

Anemia, unclassified 12 

Erythroblastosis 3 

Hemophilia 2 

Leukemia 1 

Purpura 3 

Splenomegaly 4 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 159 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Cretinism 4 

Diabetes 1 

Frohlich's Syndrome 1 

Hyperthyroidism 6 

Obesity 78 

Pituitary disfunction 2 

42 



296 



93 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Nervous System 

Anxiety state 2 

Behavior problem 258 

Birth injury to the brain 25 

Brain tumor 1 

Cerebral agenesis 7 

Cerebral atrophy 1 

Cerebral deficiency 9 

Cerebral degeneration 2 

Chorea 29 

Convulsions, cause undetermined 40 

Defective speech 22 

Delayed speech 3 

Dystrophy, muscular 2 

Edema, angioneurotic 8 

Encephalitis 8 

Encephalomyelopathy 1 

Epilepsy 42 

Habit spasm 37 

Headaches 6 

Hemiplegia 10 

Hemorrhage, intracranial 1 

Hydrocephalus 6 

Idiocy, amaurotic familial 1 

Injury to spinal cord, obstetrical 1 

Insomnia 1 

Lethargy 1 

Meniere's disease 1 

Meningismus » , . 2 

Meningitis 1 

Mental retardation 110 

Microcephalus 16 

Migrane 5 

Mongolism 32 

Neurasthenia 2 

Neuritis, peripheral 1 

Neurosis 2 

Night terrors 5 

Palsy, Bell's 4 

Palsy, brachial 2 

Palsy, cerebral 24 

Palsy, Erb's 2 

Paralysis, facial 3 

Poliomyelitis, old 1 

Somnambulism 2 

Syncope 2 

43 



738 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Specific Infectious Diseases 

Abscess, head 

Abscess, trunk 

Cellulitis 

Dysentery, bacillary 

Influenza 

Measles 

Measles, German 

Mononucleosis, infectious 

Mumps 

Mycosis 

Pertussis 

Poliomyelitis 

Rhuematic fever 

Roseola infantum 

Salmonella suipestifer carrier 

Scarlet fever 

Syphilis 

Vaccinia 

Varicella 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis, bone 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 

Tuberculosis, skin 

Tuberculin reactor 

Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion 

Diseases of the Musculo-Skeletal System 

Anomaly of spine, congenital 

Asymmetry of chest 

Asymmetry of skull 

Arachnodactylia 

Arthralgia 

Arthritis 

Bowlegs 

Club feet 

Contracture, heel cords 

Contracture, plantar fascia 

Deformity of chest, congenital 

Deformity of ear, congenital 

Deformity of hands and arms, congenital. . 

Deformity of sternum, congenital 

Foot strain 

Fracture, clavicle 

Fracture, femur 

Fracture, radius 

44 



2 
1 
5 
9 
3 

20 
6 
1 

24 
1 

86 
1 

26 
2 
1 

10 
2 
1 

36 



1 
11 

1 
27 

1- 



1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
2 
3 



41 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Musculo-Skeletal System — Continued 

Fracture, skull 2 

Fracture, tibia 2 

Funnel chest 3 

Hematoma, head 1 

Hypoplasia, scrotum 1 

Knock knees 5 

Legg's disease 1 

Lop ears 1 

Lordosis 1 

Multiple congenital anomalies 3 

Polydactylism 1 

Poor posture 13 

Pronated feet. . 62 

Scoliosis 3 

Spina bifida 1 

Sprain, ankle 1 

Sprain, leg 1 

Still's disease 1 

Syndactylism, toes 1 

Synovitis, hip 1 

Strain, muscle 1 

Torticollis, post infectional 1 

Wrist drop 1 



Diseases of the Skin 

Acne vulgaris 1 

Alopecia 7 

Burn 6 

Chloasma 1 

Comedones 1 

Dermatitis 160 

Ecchymosis 2 

Eczema 385 

Epidermophytosis 52 

Erysipelas 3 

Erythema 2 

Erythema multiforme 4 

Erythema nodosum 4 

Erythrodermia 1 

Furunculosis 26 

Herpes, simplex 13 

Impetigo contagiosa 193 

Insect bite 18 

Intertrigo 9 

Lentigo 1 

Lichen planus 1 

45 



135 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Skin — Continued 

Miliaria 15 

Mole 1 

Molluscum contagiosum 1 

Paronychia 2 

Pediculosis capitis 11 

Pityriasis rosea 5 

Poison ivy 13 

Pruritis 1 

Psoriasis 3 

Ringworm 23 

Scabies 22 

Seborrhea 26 

Staphylococcal infection 3 

Ulcer, lip 1 

Urticaria 45 



1,062 



Diseases of the Eye 

Astigmatism 1 

Blepharitis 5 

Chalazion 

Coloboma 

Conjunctivitis 23 

Cyst, meibomian 

Dacryocystitis 

Edema, cause unknown 

Entropion 

Esophoria 

Granulation of eyelids 

Hemorrhage, sub conjunctiva 

Hordeolum 

Mirror vision 

Myopia 

Nystagmus 

Ophthalmia 

Optic atrophy 

Photopobia 

Poor vision 

Ptosis of eyelid 3 

Reading difficulty 5 

Refractive error 3 

Strabismus 22 



46 



92 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Ear 

^ Cerumen, impacted 6 

Deaf mutism 1 

'£■ Deafness 4 

Hfj Furunculosis, ear 2 

j^ Infected auricle 1 

jk Mastoiditis 5 

| Myringitis. 1 

^ & Otitis externa 1 

j&< Otitis media 393 

jy 414 

Tumors 

Cyst, cervical 1 

Cyst, retention 1 

Cyst, tendon of hand 1 

Cyst, thyroglossal . 1 

Hemangioma 15 

Nevus 7 

Papilloma 1 

Wart 13 

Wart, plantar 2 

Xanthoma cutis 1 



Unclassified 

Abrasion 9 

Allergy 11 

Bite, dog 1 

Concussion 1 

Contusion 5 

Fever, unexplained ' 3 

Foreign body, buttock 1 

Hypoglycemia 2 

Idiosyncrasy to phenobarbital 1 

Infected finger 2 

Ingestion, pills 1 

Ingestion, range oil 1 

Ingestion, sulphonapthol 1 

Ingestion, thyroid tablets 1 

Laceration 4 

Overfatigue 6 

Pilonidal sinus 4 

Poisoning, food 2 

Poisoning, lead 3 

Poor hygiene 3 

Serum reaction 1 

Serum sickness 1 

47 



43 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Unclassified — Continued 

Tongue tie 3 

Vitamin deficiency 2 

68 

Dead 3 

Deferred 89 

Left clinic before seeing doctor 9 

No disease 346 

447 

New cases 3,923 

Secondary 3,668 

Total 7,591 



MEDICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

1940 

Diseases of the Newborn New Old 

Anemia of the newborn 1 

Prematurity ' 1 

Tetany of newborn 2 

4 

Diseases of Nutrition 

Celiac disease 14 21 

Nutritional disturbance 65 6 

Rickets 9 I 

Scurvy 1 

89 28 

Diseases of the Respiratory System 

Abscess, chest wall 1 

Abscess, lung 1 

Asthma 52 8 

Atelectasis, pulmonary 9 1 

Atresia of choanae, congenital 1 

Bronchiectasis 9 1 

Bronchitis 54 

Empyema 6 1 

48 



8 


2 


245 


5 


3 




1 




42 


1 


3 


1 


1 




475 


22 


New 


Old 


11 


3 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Respiratory System — Continued 

Epistaxis 7 

Ethmoiditis 4 

Foreign body in bronchus 1 

Foreign body in lung 1 

Hematoma of nasal septum 1 

Labyrinthitis 1 

Laryngitis 16 

Laryngo-tracheitis 8 

Neoplasm, mediastinal 1 

Pleurisy 

Pneumonia 

Rhinitis 

Septal defect 

Sinusitis ; 

Stenosis, laryngeal 

Stenosis, tracheal 



Diseases of the Alimentary System 

Abdominal pain of unexplained origin 

Abscess, alveolar 4 

Abscess, perineal 1 

Abscess, peri-ton sill ar 2 

Abscess, pharyngeal 1 

Appendicitis 7 

Atresia of anal sphincter 1 

Carious teeth 5 2 

Cirrhosis of liver 1 2 

Colitis, ulcerative 7 2 

Constipation 6 

Diarrhoea 6 

Fissure, anus . 1 

Gastro-enteritis 38 1 

Gingivitis 1 

Hemolytic icterus 2 1 

Hepatitis 1 

Hernia, inguinal 1 

Hernia, umbilical 2 

Herpes of mouth 1 

Idiopathic pancreatic fibrosis 1 

Impaction, fecal 3 

Incomplete rotation of cecum 1 1 

Incontinence of sphincter ani 1 

Intussusception 1 

Jaundice 4 

Malformation of bile ducts 1 

49 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Alimentary System — Continued 

Malformation of cecum 

Malformation of gall bladder 

Meckel's diverticulum . . .' 

Obstruction, intestinal 

Peritonitis 

Pharyngitis 

Pin worms 

Pyloric stenosis 

Pylorospasm 

Rectal polyp 

Regulation of feeding 

Stomatitis 

Tonsillitis 

Varices, esophageal 

Vincent's angina. 

Volvulus of intestine 



Diseases of the Genito-Urinary Tract 

Absence of kidney 

Adhesions, to clitoris 

Albuminuria 

Bacteriuria 

Bifurcation of renal pelvis 

Calculus, renal. 

Calculus, ureteral 

Contracture of bladder 

Deformity of urinary tract 

Dilatation of renal calyx 

Dilatation of ureter 

Double ureter 

Double ureter and pelvis 

Enuresis 

Epispadias 

Foreign body in vagina 

Glomerulo-nephritis 

Hematuria 

Hydrocele 

Hydronephrosis 

Hypoplasia, kidney 

Incontinence of urine 

Nephritis 

Nephrosis 

Obstruction, ureteral 

Phimosis 

Pyelonephritis 

50 



1 




1 




1 




2 




5 




74 


4 


1 




4 




2 




1 




13 




4 


1 


130 


8 


2 


3 


3 


1 


2 




356 


30 


New 


Old 


2 




1 




7 




1 




2 




' 2 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




2 




4 




1 




1 




8 


3 


4 


2 


3 




2 




1 






1 


14 




8 


1 


1 




20 




. 83 


19 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Diseases of the Genito-Urinary — Continued 

Renal colic 1 

Strangulated ovary 1 

Stricture, uretero-pelvic junction 

Undiagnosed disease of genito-urinary system 1 

Undiagnosed disease of kidney 2 

Vaginitis 7 

Valve formation of urethra 1 

186 
Diseases of the Circulatory System 

Coarctation of aorta 1 

Congenital heart disease 28 

Endocarditis 1 

Heart block, partial, congenital 1 

Hypertension 4 

Patent ductus arteriosus 1 

Pulmonic cardiac failure 1 

Tachycardia, paroxysmal, auricular 1 

Thrombosis 1 



Diseases of the blood and Blood Forming 
Organs and Lymphatic System 

Anemia, aplastic 

Anemia, erythroblastic 

Anemia, hemolytic 

Anemia, hypochromic 

Anemia, macrocytic 

Anemia, nutritional 

Anemia, secondary to infection 

Bacteremia 

Banti's syndrome 

Eosinophilia 

Erythroblastosis fetalis 

Granulocytopenia 

Hemophilia 

Hepatomegaly 

Leukemia 

Lymphadenitis, unclassified 

Lymphoma 

Methemoglobinemia 

Pancytopenia 

Purpura 

Smith-Howard Syndrome 

Splenomegaly 



51 



27 



39 


6 


New 


Old 


2 




2 


10 


4 


1 


3 






2 


2 




4 


2 


12 


1 




1 


1 




1 




1 


1 


2 


9 


4 


1 


12 


3 


82 


2 


1 




1 




4 


6 


8 


6 




4 


5 





151 



49 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Adrenal insufficiency 

Atrophy of thyroid gland 

Congenital dwarfism 

Cretinism 

Diabetes, maternal 

Diabetes mellitus 

Goitre 

Hypothyroidism 

Hypoplasia of adrenal gland 

Laurence-Moon-Biedl syndrome 

Lipodystrophy 

Premature puberty 

Undiagnosed disease of endocrine system. 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
10 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



22 



1 
9 



Diseases of the Nervous System 

Abscess, brain 

Abscess, septum pellucidum 

Anomaly of brain 

Anxiety state 

Arachnoiditis 

Ataxia 

Atrophy, cortical 

Auditory aphasia 

Behavior problem 

Birth injury 

Brachycephaly 

Brain tumor 

Brain tumor suspect 

Calcification of brain 

Cerebral agenesis 

Cerebral degeneration 

Chorea 

Choreo-meningitis 

Concussion, cerebral 

Convulsions 

Defect, speech 

Deficiency, cerebral 

Developmental aphasia 

Developmental word deafness 

Disease undiagnosed with convulsions . 
Dystonia musculorum deformans 

52 



1 




1 




6 




2 




3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 




22 


8 


3 




1 




3 




3 


1 


1 




4 




1 




9 


1 


1 




10 




44 


4 


6 




78 


5 


1 




1 




1 




1 





MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Nervous System — Continued New Old 

Disturbance, habit 14 1 

Encephalitis 11 1 

Encephalo-myelo-radiculitis 1 

Encephalopathy 75 7 

Epilepsy 33 3 

Feeble-mindedness 1 

Habit spasm 3 

Hematoma, subdural 1 

Hemiplegia 3 

Hemorrhage, intracranial 1 

Hemorrhage, meningeal 1 

Hydrocephalus 3 1 

Hysteria 1 

Idiopathic convulsive disorder 3 

Idiopathic diencephalic anatomic discharge 1 

Intracranial endarteritis 1 

Intracranial hemorrhage 2 

Meningismus 2 

Meningitis, aseptic 1 

Meningitis, influenzal 12 2 

Meningitis, meningococcus 1 

Meningitis, pneumococcus 6 

Meningitis, staphylococcus aureus 1 

Meningitis, streptococcus 5 

Meningocele 2 

Microcephaly 3 

Multiple anomalies of brain 1 

Mumps lepto-meningitis 1 

Myelitis 3 

Myelo-meningocele 1 

Myelopathy, cervical cord 1 

Neoplasm, cervical spinal cord 1 

Neurotic state 4 

Palsy, brachial 3 

Palsy, cerebral 49 10 

Poliomyelitis 9 

Porencephaly 3 

Psychosis 1 

Spina bifida occulta 1 

Undiagnosed disease of central nervous system 6 3 

477 52 

53 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Specific Infectious Diseases 

Cellulitis 

Common cold 

Diphtheria 

Diphtheria carrier state. . . 

Dysentery, bacillary 

Exanthem subitum 

Furunculosis 

Influenza 

Measles 

Mumps 

Pertussis 

Rhuematic fever 

Scarlet fever 

Syphilis 

Tetanus , 

Undulant fever 

Varicella 



Tuberculosis 

Abscess, psoas 

Tuberculin reactor 

Tuberculosis, mesenteric lymphnodes 

Tuberculosis, miliary 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary, childhood type. 

Tuberculosis, renal 

Tuberculous arthritis 

Tuberculous meningitis 



6 




146 


1 


1 




5 


3 


4 


1 


10 




10 




1 




5 




5 


1 


11 




24 


5 


21 


6 


2 


4 


2 




1 


1 


11 


1 


265 


23 


New 


Old 


1 




12 


1 


2 




5 




'4 




1 






1 


6 





31 



Diseases of the Musculo-Skeletal System 

Abscess, hand 1 

Abscess, leg 1 

Abscess, thumb 1 

Amyotonia congenita 3 

Anomaly of thumbs 1 

Arthritis 7 

Dyschondroplasia 1 

Dystrophy, muscular 2 

Elevation of scapula (Sprengel's deformity) 1 

Failure of segmentation of toes 1 

Foreign body in knee 1 

Fracture, humerus 2 

Fracture, multiple 1 

54 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System — Continued 

Fracture, nose 1 

Fracture, p\ibic bone 1 

Fracture, skull 2 

Funnel chest 2 

Hemarthrosis 1 2 

Myxosarcoma of sphenoid bone 1 

Osteogenesis imperfecta 1 

Osteosclerosis 1 

Poor postural mechanics 2 

Pronated feet. 1 

Osteomyelitis 7 

Scoliosis, structural 2 1 

Talipes calcaneo-cavus 1 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus 1 

Talipes equino-varus 1 

Talipes equinus 1 

Tenosynovitis 1 

Torticollis 1 

Wringer arm 1 

50 9 

Diseases of the Skin New Old 

Abrasions 1 

Alopecia totalis 1 

Burns 6 

Cicatrix 1 

Contusions 1 

Dermatitis 9 

Eczema 30 3 

Erythema nodosum 5 2 

Erythroderma desquamata 1 

Erysipelas 4 1 

Hemangioma 5 

Icthyosis 1 

Impetigo 12 

Insect bites 1 

Neurofibroma 1 

Paronychia 2 

Pediculosis capitis 2 

Psoriasis 1 

Pyoderma 1 

Scleroderma 1 2 

Urticaria 3 

Verruca vulgaris 1 



88 10 



55 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Eye New Old 

Anisocoria 1 

Atrophy of optic nerve 3 2 

Cataract 2 1 

Chalazion 2 

Coloboma of retina and choroid 1 

Conjunctivitis 3 1 

Ocular hypertelorism 1 

Retinitis 1 

Scars of cornea 1 

Strabismus 5 1 

Tumor of orbit 1 

Ulcer of cornea 1 



21 6 

Diseases of the Ear 

Abscess, pre-auricular 1 

Deafness 7 1 

Impacted cerumen in ears 1 

Mastoiditis 36 3 

Otitis media 322 11 



367 15 

unclassified 

Abscesses, multiple 1 

Acrodynia 1 

Allergic state, unclassified '2 

Chemical burn of mouth 1 

Deferred 51 5 

Edema, angio-neurotic 1 

Exposure to contagion 18 7 

Hemorrhage, unspecified 3 2 

Hinton reaction positive 1 

Hypoglycemia 1 

Infection, unclassified 2 1 

Ingestion of fuel oil 1 

Intestinal parasites 2 

Mongolism 5 

Multiple congenital anomalies 2 

Neoplasm of unkown primary site 1 

No disease 15 

Pilonidal sinus 1 

Poisoning, drug 5 

Pyrexia, unknown etiology 13 

Regulation of habits 2 

Scabies 3 

132 15 
56 



MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 



Number of cases treated on Medical Ward 1,072 

Number of cases treated on Private Ward 935 

Total 2,007 



New cases 2,753 

Secondary diagnosis 303 

Total 3,056 



57 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

The treatment of the crippled child has a special appeal to the gen- 
eral public and justly so. Therefore, it is incumbent on the Ortho- 
pedic Department to use all its resources to the end that a generous 
public will continue to respond to the hospital care of these children. 
Every effort of the members of the Department from the youngest 
interne up is spent in giving of his best to our children. 

The whole aspect of orthopedic surgery, during the past twenty- 
eight years has changed. In 1913, the beds for the most part were 
filled with cases of rickets and bone tuberculosis. Now these diseases 
are rarely seen in the orthopedic wards. Thirty-five years ago all 
children in the Orthopedic Department who were suffering from 
deformities due to rickets were treated with cod liver oil. A medical 
visiting staff doctor said then, "that the giving of cod liver oil was 
absurd." That man lived to see a great and amazing decrease in the 
incidence of rickets due to the fact that science had proved that cod 
liver oil was a specific in the treatment of this disease. The decrease 
in bone tuberculosis is largely attributable to two factors: the pas- 
teurization of milk, and the education of the tuberculous patient to 
the danger of infecting his family. 

Twenty-five years ago many conditions which produced crippling 
were not understood, and after consultation these children were sent 
home untreated. Today, thanks to what has been learned about 
rehabilitation over the past twenty-five years, there is scarcely a 
crippled child who cannot be benefited in our Out-Patient Depart- 
ment or wards. Finally, parents are not so superstitious about hav- 
ing deformities treated in their children by necessary surgical pro- 
cedures. 

There have been some fundamental changes made in the Ortho- 
pedic Department during the past year. The most noteworthy are 
those in The Infantile Paralysis Clinic and in the Department of 
Pathology. The Harvard Infantile Paralysis Clinic has been con- 
ducted at the Children's Hospital by one or more of our staff mem- 
bers since its institution in 1916 by the late Dr. Lovett. Dr. Albert 
H. Brewster became the acting head of the Infantile Clinic until 
May, 1940, when Dr. Legg's successor, Dr. William T. Green, was 
appointed. The Infantile Paralysis Commission working together 
with the Chief of the Orthopedic Department made the nomination 

58 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

to the Board of Managers. At the same time it was agreed that the 
head of the clinic be given an assistant. Dr. Leo McDermott was 
selected for this position on completion of his term as Chief Resident 
Orthopedic Surgeon. Dr. Green has been promoted to the rank of 
Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery in the Harvard Medical 
School. 

A sum of $4,125 was obtained from the National Foundation 
for Infantile Paralysis to be used in studies on bone growth in 
poliomyelitis. 

The present clinic, as now organized, will be able to do more in 
the future for those children affected with infantile paralysis; and 
at the same time by changing the assistants, there will slowly grow 
a nucleus of men better trained in the management of these cases. 

On nomination by Dr. Wolbach, the chief pathologist, and by the 
orthopedic chief to the Board of Managers, a full-time research 
worker in the field of orthopedic pathology, Dr. Nathan Rudo, was 
appointed to the Hospital Department of Pathology. Dr. Rudo is 
devoting his time to the study of bone and joint diseases and is 
assisting Dr. Farber in the instruction of internes and medical 
students. Dr. Rudo also has an appointment in the Harvard Medical 
School. This new position, an innovation at the hospital, should 
have been done years ago. As a result, this department is in an 
excellent position to produce more in fundamental orthopedic re- 
search problems than has been done in the past. 

Teaching 

The intimate connection of the Children's Hospital with the 
Harvard Medical School means that the bulk of instruction in ortho- 
pedic surgery is carried on in the Out-Patient Department, wards 
and special allied clinics. The whole third-year class come to the 
hospital in sections of twenty-four for a period of five weeks. There 
are always a few fourth-year men who take elective orthopedics and 
come in small groups remaining for a month. In addition to under- 
graduates, there are courses in postgraduate work arranged for a 
large group or for single men who wish to have the contact with the 
hospital work and members of our staff. 

One of the most valuable teaching functions at the Hospital is in 
physical therapy training for technicians under the able direction of 
Miss Merrill and her assistants. In the near future it is highly 

59 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



probable that this effort may have to be increased in order to meet 
demands of the defense needs of the Army and Navy. 



Internes 

We still secure excellent men for the interne service. There are 
two who work in the Department of Pathology for eight months each. 
At the end of this period they go on with the clinical part of their 
internship which continues for eight months at our hospital and eight 
additional months at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Three of 
the more recent graduates are in the Medical Department of the 
United States Army. 

It is possible that some of the members of the Orthopedic Staff 
may be called into the Army service. If this happens the Depart- 
ment will be somewhat cramped since we are now short handed. 
The situation will become more serious if prospective internes are 
drafted or ordered to duty. It is difficult to obtain a substitute once 
an appointment has been made to the house staff, especially if the 
man is ordered to duty in the Army as he is about to assume his 
duties at the hospital. 

Chief Resident 

The responsibilities of our chief resident are many and varied. 
The creation of this position nearly thirty years ago has more than 
justified itself. Dr. Leo McDermott finished his service as chief 
resident last September, and Dr. Charles Sturtevant became his 
successor. Dr. Eugene Record has accepted the next appointment for 
1941-1942. The functions of the Orthopedic Department have been in- 
creased this past year by a check of one-thousand five-hundred dol- 
lars from an anonymous donor, and also by a legacy of twenty-thou- 
sand dollars, to be expanded by your chief for the care and study of 
crippled children. This sum was turned over to the Hospital managers 
to be invested by them, and the income used according to the terms 
of the will. 

I wish to take this opportunity to thank all those departments in 
the hospital for their splendid help and cooperation with us during 
this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank R. Ober 

60 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

ORTHOPEDIC OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

REPORT 

1940 

Congenital Malformations 
Head, neck and trunk 

Deformity of chest 4 

Depression of sternum 1 

Funnel chest 1 

Klippel Feil syndrome 3 

Torticollis 39 

Spine 

Anomaly of spine 5 

Meningocele 1 

Myelomeningocele with spasticity 1 

Scoliosis 5 

Spina bifida 6 

Upper extremities 

Contracture, flexion, wrists 1 

Deformity, arm 1 

Deformity, flexion, thumb 1 

Deformity, hands 3 

Sprengel's deformity 1 

Lower Extremities 

Absence, part of femur 1 

Absence, forefoot : 1 

Accessory scaphoids 5 

Anomaly, foot 2 

Anomaly, toes (Deformity) 15 

Deformity, extension, knees 1 

Deformity, flexion, knees 1 

Dislocation, hip 8 

Dislocation, peroneal tendon 1 

Elevation of toes 1 

Flat feet 2 

Hallux valgus 1 

Hemihypertrophy, leg . 1 

Hypertrophy, leg 1 

Metatarsus varus 6 

Overlapping toe 1 

Shortening of femur 2 

Syndactylism, toes 2 

Talipes calcaneo valgus 14 

61 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Talipes cavo-varus feet 2 

Talipes cavus feet 1 

Talipes equino varus 31 

Talipes valgus feet 4 

Talipes varus feet 7 

Miscellaneous 

Anomalies, multiple 3 

Dsychondroplasia 1 

Pilonidal sinus 3 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 

Head, neck and 

Fracture, pelvis 1 

Pectus carinatum 2 

Pectus excavatum 2 

Strain, abdominal 1 

Strain, lumbar region 1 

Torticollis, acquired 9 

Spine 

Lordosis 1 

Poor posture 63 

Scoliosis, functional 20 

Scoliosis, structural 4 

Upper extremities 

Contracture, Volkmann's 1 

Deformity, flexion, elbow 1 

Fracture, clavicle 22 

Fracture, finger 3 

Fracture, humerus 21 

Fracture, metacarpal 1 

Fracture, phalanx, finger 3 

Fracture, radius 11 

Fracture, radius and ulna 9 

Fracture, ulna 1 

Hematoma, arm 1 

Sprain, arm 2 

Sprain, elbow 4 

Sprain, wrist 4 

Strain, wrist 2 

Subluxation, head of radius 1 

Trauma to elbow 1 

Trigger finger 1 

62 



191 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease — Continued 

Lower extremities 

Adduction, forefoot 17 

Cavus feet 6 

Contracture, hamstrings 4 

Contracture, hamstrings and heel cords 9 

Contracture, heel cords 11 

Contracture, hips and knees 1 

Contracture, ilio tibial band 2 

Contracture, posterior structure 11 

Contracture, tendon achilles 2 

Deformity, flexion, hip 2 

Dislocation, hip, 1 

Equino varus feet, paralytic 1 

Eversion, os calcis. 2 

Fascitis, plantar 1 

Foot strain 14 

Fracture, astragalus 1 

Fracture, femur 4 

Fracture, fibula 1 

Fracture, malleolus 1 

Fracture, tibia 10 

Fracture, tibia and fibula 2 

Fracture, toe 2 

Hallux valgus 4 

Hallux varus 1 

Hematoma, muscular leg 1 

Hyperextended knees 1 

Overlapping toe 1 

Pronated feet 671 

Retroversion, femoral neck , 3 

Sever's Disease 1 

Slipped epiphysis, femur 1 

Sprain, ankle 14 

Sprain, foot 3 

Sprain, leg 2 

Strain, knee 1 

Strain, tendon achilles 1 

Tenosynovitis, hip 2 

Tenosynovitis, toe 2 

Tibial torsion 8 

Trauma to foot 1 

1,008 

Tuberculosis 

Arthritis, tuberculosis, knee 1 

Tuberculosis, knee 1 

2 

63 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Non-Tuberculous Arthritis 

Arthritis, suppurative, leg and hip 1 

Arthritis, toxic, knee 1 

Arthritis, toxic, knee and ankle 2 

Arthritis, toxic, hip 3 

Still's disease . 2 



Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System 

Osteomyelitis, femur 2 

Osteomyelitis, hip 1 

Osteomyelitis, humerus 3 

Osteomyelitis, jaw . 1 



Paralysis and Other Neuromuscular Diseases 

Dystrophy, pseudo hypertrophic 5 

Brachial palsy 15 

Paralysis, temporary 1 

Palsy, cerebral 22 

Poliomyelitis, old 3 



46 



Rickets and Its Deformities 

Deformity, rachitic, chest 1 

Rickets (under 2 years) 32 

Rickets (over 2 years) 13 

Rickets with bow legs 68 

Rickets with knock knees 146 



260 



Tumors 

Cyst, knee 

Exostosis, humerus 

Exostosis, popliteal 

Exostosis, os calcis 

Exostosis, radius 

Hemangioma, scapula. . 
Hemangioma, shoulder. . 
Hemangioma, umbilicus. 

Lipoma, abdomen 

Wart, plantar 



64 



10 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 
Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Apophysitis, os calcis 

Coccygodynia 

Deformed finger and toe nails 

Dermatomyositis 

Effusion, elbow 

Hemarthrosis 

Hypertonia 

Koehler's disease 

Legg's disease 

Multiple joint deformity with Lupus erythematous 

desseminatus 

Osgood Schlatter's disease 

Osteochondritis of femur 

Osteochondritis of patella 

Scleroderma 

Phlebitis, thigh 

Tendinitis 

Unclassified 

Abdominal pain 

Abrasion 

Anemia 

Ascaris 

Axillary adenitis 

Behavior problem 

Cicatrix, knee 

Contusion 

Diffuse abnormalities of Central Nervous System 

Endocrine Dysfunction 

Foreign body, gum 

Hernia, scrotal 

Infection, toe 

Ingrown toe-nail 

Malnutrition 

Mental retardation 

Mongolism 

Mumps 

Obesity 

Paronychia 

Phimosis 

Retarded development 

Strabismus 

Umbilical hernia 

Scurvy 



6 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
11 

1 

3 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 



1 
3 



23 



4 

1 
2 
2 
3 
1 
2 



35 



59 



65 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Unclassified — Continued 

Deferred 32 

Eloped 3 

No disease 51 

Not seen 17 



103 



New cases 944 

Secondary diagnosis 786 

Total 1,730 



ORTHOPEDIC DISEASES TREATED IN 

THE WARDS 

1940 

Congenital Malformations New Old 
Head, neck and trunk 

Ankylosis, temporal-mandibular joint 1 

Cervical rib 1 

Malformation of thoracic cage 1 

Torticollis 32 3 

Spine 

Defect of spine 1 

Hemi-vertebrae • 1 

Klippel-Fiel syndrome 1 

Meningocele with spina bifida 7 6 

Scoliosis due to hemi-vertebrae 2 

Scoliosis, structural 4 3 

Spondylolisthesis 1 

Upper extremities 

Absence of bone of thumb 2 

Absence, finger 1 

Absence, radius 2 

Bifid metacarpal 1 

Deformity of forearm 1 

Elevation of scapula (Sprengel's Deformity) 2 2 

Exostosis, scapula 1 

Lower extremities 

Absence of femur 1 

Absence of foot 1 

Absence of lower leg 1 

Absence of tibia 

Accessory tarsal scaphoid 1 

66 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Lower extremities — Continued New Old 

Ankylosis and fibrosis of hip 1 

Anomalies of pelvis 1 

Contracture, both hips, paralytic 1 

Coxa vara 1 1 

Deformity of toe 1 1 

Deformity of knee, flexion 1 

Deformity, lower extremity, multiple 1 

Dislocation of hip 24 14 

Flexion contracture of knees 1 

Hallux valgus 1 

Hammer toes. 1 

Hypertrophy of lower extremity 1 

Metatarsus varus 1 

Overlapping deformity of toe 2 

Pes con vexus 1 

Polydactylism 2 

Rudimentary foot 1 

Short leg 1 2 

Subluxation of hip 1 

Subluxation of toe 2 

Syndactylism 2 

Talipes cavus 1 1 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus 6 3 

Talipes equino-valgus 3 2 

Talipes equino-varus 33 32 

Talipes equinus 1 

Talipes plano-valgus 1 

Miscellaneous 

Anomalies of fingers and toes 1 

Arachnodactylia 2 

Multiple congenital anomalies. 6 9 



149 100 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 
or Disease 

Head, neck and trunk 
Torticollis, post-traumatic. 2 

Spine 

Dislocation of cervical vertebrae 1 

Scoliosis, due to rachitic changes 1 

Scoliosis, etiology unknown 1 

Scoliosis, functional 3 

Scoliosis, idiopathic 1 

Scoliosis, structural 4 

67 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 
or Disease — Continued 

Upper extremities 

Dislocation, head of radius 

Dislocation, radius 

Dislocation, shoulder 

Fracture, clavicle 

Fracture, forearm 

Fracture, humerus 

Fracture, radius 

Fracture, shoulder 

Fracture, ulna 

Subluxation of shoulder 

Lower extremities 

Compression, peroneal nerve, following fracture. . . 

Deformity of knee, post-infectious 

Dislocation of hip, post-infectional 

Flexion deformity, hip and knee, post-infectional. 

Fracture, femur 

Fracture, fibula 

Fracture, tibia : 

Fracture, tibial spine 

Fracture, tibia and fibula 

Subluxation of hip 



New Old 

1 

1 
1 
2 
2 
13 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
1 

9 

2 
3 
1 

1 

1 



56 



Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis, arthritis 

Tuberculosis, femur 

Tuberculosis, lumbar vertebrae 

Tuberculosis, lung 

Tuberculosis, sheath, flexor pollicis longus. 

Tuberculosis, spine 

Tuberculosis, thoracic vertebrae 



2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Arthritis 

Arthritis, atrophic 10 

Arthritis, suppurative 

hip 4 

knee 1 

Arthritis, toxic, hip 1 

16 



68 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Infections, Non-Tuberculous, of Osseous System 

Osteomyelitis, femur 

Osteomyelitis, fibula 

Osteomyelitis, humerus 

Osteomyelitis, metatarsal 

Osteomyelitis, multiple 

Osteomyelitis, os calcis 

Osteomyelitis, pelvis 

Osteomyelitis, tibia 

Osteomyelitis, vertebrae 



6 


3 


1 




1 


1 


1 






2 


1 






2 


1 


3 


1 





12 11 



Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 

Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia New Old 

Amyotonia congenita 1 

Arrest of growth of femur, due to unknown organism . . 1 

Bursitis 2 

Cavus deformity of feet, unknown etiology 1 

Contracture, flexion, of knee 1 

Contracture, pronator, of wrist 5 

Coxa plana 4 

Cyst, meniscus of knee 2 

Dyschondroplasia 2 

Endemic idiopathic limp, etiology unknown 1 

Epiphysiolysis, tibia 1 

Foreign body in knee 1 

Gangrene of foot 1 1 

Gangrene of leg 1 1 

Necrosis of vertebrae 1 

Osteitis, sclerosing of femur 2 

Osteo-cartilaginous bodies, knee joint, etiology unknown 1 

Osteochondritis of spine 2 

Osteochondritis dissecans, femur 1 

Osteochondrosis, femur 3 

Osteogenesis imperfecta . 2 

Periostitis 1 

Pressure necrosis, dorsum of foot 1 

Progressive curvature of tibia 1 

Relaxation of ligamentous structures 2 

Tenosynovitis 3 

Tibio-fibular synostosis 1 

Torticollis, cause unknown 2 

Undiagnosed condition of hip 2 

Undiagnosed disease of hip joint 2 

Undiagnosed disease of lower extremity 1 

Undiagnosed condition of wrist 1 

Undiagnosed lesion of knee joint 1 

69 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 
Muscles, Tendons, and Fascia — Continued 

Undiagnosed lesion of rib 1 

Undiagnosed lesion of tibia and fibula 1 

Undiagnosed lesion, transverse process, 2nd and 3rd 

lumbar vertebrae 

Weakness, lower extremity 1 



Tumors 

Angioma, lower extremity 

Benign giant cell tumor of tibia. 

Cyst, humerus 

Exostosis, fibula 

Ganglion, popliteal 

Neuroblastoma, lumbar region. . 

Neurofibroma, radial nerve 

Neurofibroma, tendon sheath. . . 
Neurofibromatosis, leg 



Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Aplasia of ventral horn cells 

Athetosis of facial and lingual muscles 

Atrophy of lower extremity, post-poliomyelitis. . 

Behavior problem 

Cock-up of great toe, post-poliomyelitis 

Concussion, cerebral 

Cortical atrophy 

Deficiency, mental ' 

Encephalomyelitis 

Genu-valgum, post-poliomyelitis 

Hallux valgus, post-poliomyelitis 

Horner syndrome 

Hydrocephalus 

Mongolism 

Multiple anomalies of brain 

Muscular dystrophy 

Myeloradiculitis 

Palsy, cerebral 

Palsy, sciatic nerve 

Paralysis, obstetrical 

Paralysis, post-poliomyelitis 

Paralysis, spastic 

Paralysis, unknown etiology 

Poliomyelitis, anterior, acute 

70 



50 


10 


New 


Old 




1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




2 




1 




1 




1 




2 




10 


2 


1 




1 


1 


' 4 


1 


4 


5 


2 




1 




1 




3 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


2 




1 






2 


1 




1 




5 


1 


1 




5 


2 


1 




6 


4 


26 


9 


17 


9 


1 




2 





ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases — Continued 

Scoliosis, post-poliomyelitis 

Short leg, post-poliomyelitis 

Spasm, peroneal 

Talipes calcaneo-cavus, post-poliomyelitis 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus, post-poliomyelitis 

Talipes calcaneo-varus, post-poliomyelitis 

Talipes calcaneus, post-poliomyelitis 

Talipes cavus, post-poliomyelitis 

Talipes equino-cavus, post-poliomyelitis 

Talipes equino-cavus, varus, post-poliomyelitis 

Talipes equino-valgus, post-poliomyelitis 

Talipes equino-varus, post-poliomyelitis 

Talipes equinus, post-poliomyelitis 

Talipes flaccid, post-poliomyelitis 

Valgus deformity, post-poliomyelitis 



Rachitic Deformities 

Rickets, active 

Rickets with bow legs. . . . 
Rickets with knock-knees. 



Unclassified 

Abscess, subcutaneous 

Appendicitis 

Cataract of eye 

Cellulitis 

Common cold 

Conjunctivitis 

Cryptorchidism 

Cystitis 

Deferred 

Dental caries 

Exstrophy of bladder 

Furunculosis 

Hernia 

Hypertrophy of tonsils and adenoids. 

Hypospadias 

Imperforate anus 

Incontinence of sphincter ani 

Incontinence of urine 

Infection, wound 

Infectious mononucleosis 

Mastoiditis 

71 





1 


3 


3 




1 


1 


1 


1 


7 




1 


1 


2 


3 


2 


3 


2 


1 


1 


3 


2 


4 


5 


4 




1 


1 


1 




115 


66 


New 


Old 




1 


2 


3 


3 


1 


5 


5 


5 




1 




1 




1 




1 




1 




2 






1 


1 






1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


4 




1 


2 


1 


1 


2 




1 




4 




1 




2 


2 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Unclassified — Continued 

Measles 

Otitis media 

Paralysis, urinary bladder 

Pharyngitis 

Phimosis 

Pneumonia 

Ptosis of eyelid 

Rheumatic fever 

Sinus, buttock and hip 

Strabismus 

Sulphanilamide reaction 

Undiagnosed kidney disease 

Varicella 

Number of cases treated on Orthopedic Ward. 
Number of cases treated on Private Ward. . . . 

Total 

New cases 

Secondary diagnosis 

Total 



2 
4 



2 
2 



49 

380 

67 



470 

223 



3 
1 



14 



447 



693 



ORTHOPEDIC OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

Congenital Malformations 
Head, neck and trunk 

Ankylosis, temporo-mandibular joint 

Arthroplasty with Vitalium cup 1 

Torticollis 

Myotomy 29 

Spine 

Scoliosis, structural 

Application of jacket 1 

Spinal fusion 2 

Upper extremities 
Absence of radius 

Osteotomy 1 

Elevation of scapula 

Erector spinae transplant 3 

Ober operation 3 

Exostosis, scapula 

Excision 1 

72 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 

Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Lower extremities 
Absence of lower leg 

Plastic amputation to stump 1 

Absence of tibia 

Epiphyseodesis 2 

Accessory tarsal scaphoid 

Excision 1 

Coxa vara 

Osteotomy 1 

Deformity of knee, flexion 

Osteotomy 2 

Dislocation of hip 

Application of spica 4 

Adductor myotomy 2 

Reduction, closed 

Reduction, open 

Osteotomy 

Hallux valgus 

Manipulation 

Osteotomy 

Short leg 

Epiphyseodesis 

Wedge resection 

Subluxation of hip 

Manipulation and application of plaster 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus 

Manipulation 

Muscle and tendon transplant 

Osteotomy 

Repositioning 

Triple arthrodesis 

Talipes equino-cavo-varus 

Triple arthrodesis 

Talipes equino-valgus 

Muscle and tendon transplant 

Removal of sutures and manipulation 

Triple arthrodesis 

Talipes cavus 

Manipulation and plantar fasciotomy 

Talipes equino-varus 

Application of cast 

Application of wire traction 3 

Capsulotomy 14 

Debridement, manipulation and application of plaster 

Insertion of wires 2 

Manipulation 9 

Manipulation and application of plaster 20 

73 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Congenital Malformations — Continued 

Muscle and tendon transplant 

Ober ligamentous 

Removal of sutures, manipulation and application of 
cast 

Removal of wires 

Revision of arthrodesis 

Revision of arthrodesis and muscle and tendon trans- 
plant 

Revision of position 

Tenotomy 

Triple arthrodesis 

Talipes equinus 

Triple arthrodesis 

Toe, fifth, varus, congenital 

Plastic 

Miscellaneous 

Multiple congenital anomalies 

Insertion of wires 

Manipulation and application of cast 

Posterior capsulotomy 



6 
6 

1 
5 
1 

1 
1 
2 
9 



1 
3 
2 



186 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury or Disease 
Head, neck and trunk 
Torticollis 

Myotomy 

Spine 

Scoliosis, structural 

Fasciotomy 

Spinal fusion 

Upper extremities 

Dislocation, head of radius 

Excision 

Dislocation of shoulder 

Reduction and application of cast 

Fracture, forearm 

Manipulation 

Reduction, closed 

Fracture, humerus 

Excision of bone block 

Manipulation 

Reduction, fluoroscopic 

Fracture, shoulder 

Manipulation 

Subluxation of shoulder 

Arthrodesis 

74 



1 

2 



1 
1 

1 
1 

5 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Deformities and Disabilities Following Injury 
or Disease — Continued 
Lower extremities 

Dislocation of hip, post-infectional 

Attempted open reduction 

Insertion of Kirschner wires 

Insertion of Kirschner wires and application of trac- 
tion 

Flexion deformity of hip and knee, post-infectional 

Insertion of Kirschner wires 

Revision of osteotomy 

Fracture, femur 

Application of spica 

Reduction 

Fracture, tibia 

Reduction, closed 

Fracture, tibial spine 

Exploration 

Arthritis 

Arthritis, atrophic 

Knee aspiration 

Arthritis, suppurative 

Hip — Aspiration only 

Incision and drainage 

Leg — Incision and drainage 

Knee — Aspiration 

Infections, Non-Specific, of Osseous System 
Osteomyelitis, femur 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis, metatarsal 

Incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis, multiple 

Sequestrectomy 

Osteomyelitis, os calcis 

Excision of sinus tract with incision and drainage 

Osteomyelitis, tibia 

Incision and drainage 

Tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis, arthritis 

Arthrodesis, knee 

Aspiration, hip 

Tuberculosis, femur 

Aspiration, hip 

Tuberculosis, sheath flexor pollicis longus 

Excision 

75 



1 
5 
1 
1 



3 
1 
1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 

1 



26 



10 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Miscellaneous Conditions of the Bones, Joints, 
Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Arrest of growth of femur, due to unknown organism 

Epiphyseodesis 

Bursitis 

Incision and drainage of knee 

Amputation of stump 

Cavus deformity of feet, unknown etiology 

Plantar fasciotomy and application of traction 

Removal of wires 

Contracture, pronator of wrist 

Muscle and tendon transplant 

Cyst, meniscus of knee 

Excision 

Dyschondroplasia 

Biopsy 

Epiphyseodesis 

Foreign body in knee 

Excision 

Gangrene of leg 

Debridement 

Osteitis, sclerosing of femur 

Biopsy 

Osteo-cartilaginous bodies, knee joint, etiology unknown 

Exploration with removal 

Osteochondritis dissecans, femur 

Arthrotomy of knee , 

Progressive curvature of tibia 

Biopsy 

Tenosynovitis 

Arthrotomy 

Undiagnosed condition of hip 

Aspiration 

Undiagnosed disease, lower extremity 

Drilling of burr holes 

Undiagnosed lesion of knee joint 

Aspiration 

Tumors 

Benign giant cell tumor of tibia 

Biopsy 

Ganglion, popliteal 

Excision . . . 

Neurofibroma, radial nerve 

Excision 

Neurofibroma, tendon sheath 

Excision 

76 



20 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Tumors — Continued 

Neurofibromatosis, leg 
Excision 

Cyst, humerus 

Decompression 



Rachitic Deformities 
Rickets with bow legs 

Osteoclasis 

Osteotomy 

Removal of bone plate. 

Repositioning , 

Rickets with knock knees 

Osteotomy 



2 
2 
1 

1 



Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Atrophy of lower extremity, post-poliomyelitis 

Epiphyseodesis 

Muscle and tendon transplant 

Encephalomyelitis (Talipes equino-cavus) 

Triple arthrodesis 

Muscular dystrophy 

Change of cast and heel cord stretching 

Biopsy 

Myeloradiculi tis 

Encephalogram 

Myelogram 

Paralysis, obstetrical 

Fascia lata sling 1 

Muscle and tendon transplant 4 

Severe operation 4 

Paralysis, post-poliomyelitis 

Arthrodesis, triple 5 

Brewster counter-sinking 2 

Epiphyseodiaphyseal fusion 1 

Exploration 1 

Erector spinae transplant 1 

Manipulation and application of plaster 1 

Muscle and tendon transplant 6 

Revision of triple arthrodesis . 1 

Paralysis, spastic 

Lengthening, heel cord 1 

Lengthening, tendon 3 

Muscle and tendon transplant 6 

Myotomy and neurectomy 6 

Neurectomy 2 

77 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases — Continued 

Stoffel operation 1 

Triple arthrodesis 5 

Short leg, post-poliomyelitis 

Epiphyseodesis 2 

Lengthening, right leg 2 

Removal of pins and application of cast 1 

Spasm, peroneal 

Novocain injection 1 

Talipes calcaneo-cavus 

Arthrodesis with muscle and tendon transplant 1 

Manipulation 1 

Talipes calcaneo-valgus 

Arthrodesis, triple 1 

Arthrodesis, triple, with muscle and tendon transplant. 1 

Muscle and tendon transplant 2 

Plantar fasciotomy with muscle and tendon transplant. 1 

Revision of triple arthrodesis 1 

Talipes calcaneo-varus, post-poliomyelitis 

Muscle and tendon transplant 1 

Talipes calcaneus, post-poliomyelitis 

Muscle and tendon transplant 1 

Muscle and tendon transplant with triple arthrodesis. . 1 

Plantar fasciotomy with Steindler stripping 1 

Talipes cavus, post-poliomyelitis 

Muscle and tendon transplant with triple arthrodesis . . 1 

Talipes equino-cavo-varus, post-poliomyelitis 

Counter-sinking 1 

Talipes equino-cavus, post-poliomyelitis 

Triple arthrodesis with muscle and tendon transplant. . 3 

Talipes equino-valgus, post-poliomyelitis 

Brewster counter-sinking 1 

Insertion of wires and application of traction 1 

Manipulation and application of traction 1 

Insertion of wires and application of traction 1 

Manipulation and application of traction 1 

Pan-arthrodesis 1 

Talipes equino-varus, post-poliomyelitis 

Brewster counter-sinking with muscle and tendon trans- 
plant 1 

Manipulation with application of plaster 1 

Plantar fasciotomy and manipulation 1 

Triple arthrodesis 1 

Triple arthrodesis and plantar fasciotomy 3 

Talipes equinus, post-poliomyelitis 

Triple arthrodesis with muscle and tendon transplant. . 2 

78 



ORTHOPEDIC DEPARTMENT 



Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases; — Continued 

Talipes flaccid, post-poliomyelitis 

Brewster counter-sinking 1 

Valgus deformity, post-poliomyelitis 

Triple arthrodesis and tendon transplant 1 

Unclassified 

Abscesses, subcutaneous 

Incision and drainage 4 

Dermatomyositis 

Fasciotomy and biopsy 1 

Infection, wound 

Incision and drainage 2 

Sinus, buttock and hip 

Excision 1 

Total 

Application of plaster 7 

Total number of operations 377 

Total number of anesthesias on Orthopedic Ward 391 

Total number of anesthesias on Private Ward 68 

Total Anesthesias 



99 



8 

377 



459 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

There has been very little change in the postmortem and surgical 
routine of the department during the past year. Routine examina- 
tions are conducted with the thoroughness consistent with the 
standards of the department of pathology. The laboratory staff 
continues to play an important role in both undergraduate and post- 
graduate teaching. In addition to participation in regular teaching 
exercises of the second, third and fourth years, it has long been the 
custom of the laboratory to extend hospitality to qualified under- 
graduates or postgraduate workers to the limit of the capacity of the 
laboratory. During the summer of 1940, sixteen medical workers, 
including six students who had just finished the second year, spent 
their full time in the department of pathology. The regularly 
appointed house officers and the graduate voluntary assistants who 
are given the opportunity to work in the laboratory are representa- 
tives of the fields of pathology, surgery, orthopedic surgery and 
pediatrics. It is a stimulating atmosphere which results from the 
confluence of such diversified interests and purposes in one labora- 
tory. The permanent staff is forced to maintain a wide range of 
interests in order properly to guide these men. That these graduate 
workers derive great benefit from intimate contact with men in other 
specialities of medicine is evident to all who pass through the labora- 
tory. Apart from what is learned in the field of pathology and the 
pathologic basis of disease in early life, one valuable result of the 
period of training in this laboratory is the opportunity they are given 
to orient themselves in a critical manner toward their future medical 
work. A smaller number of men who intend to remain in the field 
of pathology utilize the training here as part of a broad plan of study 
in this specialty. The teaching function of the pathology department 
must always remain an important one. The stimulus furnished by a 
teaching atmosphere is responsible in great part for the constant 
elevation of standards of work and for the investigation of contro- 
versial issues by experimental as well as descriptive means. 

The research activities of the department of pathology have been 
increasing steadily in recent years. The past year was perhaps the 
most active in the history of the department. A detailed descrip- 
tion of the results of many of the studies recently completed or reach- 
ing completion in the near future will be made in the next annual 
report. 

80 



PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

Three important alterations in the department deserve special 
mention. With the cooperation of Dr. Ober, Dr. Nathan Rudo was 
appointed research fellow in orthopedic pathology. Dr. Rudo has 
just completed two years of research work as a member of the Lovett 
Fund group under Dr. Granville Bennett's direction. His main 
problem here is aseptic bone necrosis. He is also assisting Dr. 
William Green in studies of bone growth. For the first time a full 
time experienced worker in the field of bone pathology is able to de- 
vote his full energies to pathologic problems of interest to the ortho- 
pedic surgeon. It is hoped that it will be possible to have a permanent 
arrangement between the departments of orthopedic surgery and 
pathology for research and study in this very important division of 
pathology. 

As a part of Dr. Farber's research program concerning the 
pathology and pathogenesis of the disease states grouped under the 
term celiac syndrome laboratory equipment was assembled in March 
1940 for the determination of the levels of pancreatic enzymes in the 
duodenal contents of infants and children. The direction of these 
studies was suggested by an interpretation of the nature of the lesion 
in the pancreas in one variant of the celiac syndrome, which Dr. 
Wolbach made almost twenty years ago. Specimens for analysis 
have been obtained with the cooperation of Dr. Blackfan and his 
associates, Dr. May and Dr. McCreary, whose own studies in this 
field have run parallel to those conducted in the department of path- 
ology. The actual obtaining of the duodenal juice and the enzyme 
studies have been made by Dr. Charlotte Maddock, who is equipped 
by special training and interest to carry out studies of this nature. 
Important results have already been achieved which make possible 
the differential diagnosis between the almost identical syndrome of 
incurable pancreatic fibrosis and curable "celiac disease." 

Research under Dr. Farber, with the aid of the methods in use in 
pathologic physiology, has been carried out in the laboratory of 
pathology for many years. With the cooperation of the Executive 
Committee of the Staff it has been possible to equip properly a 
laboratory room for that purpose. The department of pathology is 
now better prepared than ever to investigate some of the many 
problems which present themselves in one of the most fascinating 
and rewarding divisions of medicine. 

As has been mentioned in previous reports, no attempt is made 

81 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

to separate routine from research. It is the function particularly of 
a laboratory such as this to maintain such a point of view. 

The second volume of Dr. Conel's long-term work on the post- 
natal development of the human cerebral cortex will appear soon. 
The third volume is well under way. The first volume has been 
received with great enthusiasm by psychiatrists, pathologists, 
physiologists and pediatricians interested in the development of the 
central nervous system of the infant. 

In the dental pathology room, under the direction of Dr. Paul 
Boyle, Dr. Maurice Dinnerman has made some findings of consid- 
erable interest concerning the deposits of bile and other pigments 
in the teeth of infants and children. A large and valuable collection 
of pathologic material in the field of dental pathology is now available 
for interested workers. 

Cooperation with members of other departments of the hospital 
continues as in past years. Certain research projects are being investi- 
gated jointly by clinicians and pathologists. Increasing numbers of 
clinical investigations appear to demand pathologic support. Dur- 
ing the past year two books published by members of the clinical 
staffs received particularly large amounts of aid from the depart- 
ment of pathology. Unless conditions necessitate a change in the 
policies or character of the department of pathology, the laboratory 
will continue to merge its three great functions of routine, teaching, 
and research. 

S. Burt Wolbach, M.D. 



82 



PATHOLOGY DEPARTMENT 



AUTOPSIES 



Deaths Autopsies 

Infants' Hospital 121 104 

Children's Hospital* 107 67 

Private Ward 16 6 



244 177** 

Autopsies Performed 

Year Children's Infants' Combined 

1937 61*** 86 147 

1938 , 73*** 81 154 

1939 84*** 98 182 

1940 73*** 104 177 

Total Deaths 

Year Children's Infants' Combined 

1937 110*** 113 223 

1938 125** 107 232 

1939 126*** 118 234 

1940 123*** 121 244 



Percentage of Autopsies Obtained 

Year Children's Infants' Combined 

1937 55.5 76.1 65.9 

1938 64.0 75.7 69.7 

1939 73.6 83.0 77.7 

1940 62.6 85.1 75. 

*Includes all services but Infants' and Private Ward 
**12 Outside Autopsies not included 
***Includes Private Ward 

Surgical Specimens 

Year Number 

1937 526 

1938 716 

1939 678 

1940 708 



83 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



THE REPORT OF THE SURGICAL SERVICE 

The international situation is showing its effect on The Children's 
Hospital. That the situation will get worse and become a very grave 
problem in the next few years regardless of the outcome of the war, 
there is little doubt. A decreased income is perhaps more the con- 
cern of the administration than the professional staff, though both 
must share the effort in meeting the problem. But the economic 
phase is by no means the only problem. The Staff faces the prob- 
ability of being obliged to carry on with a very much reduced person- 
nel. Two members of the active Visiting Staff are now in the service 
and three more members are subject to call. Among the resident 
staff, the problem is even more acute, as these men are all in the 
selective service age group, and it may be necessary to make radical 
changes in the intern and resident services. It is not possible at 
present to exempt men from the selective service for more than a 
year of intern service after they have graduated from the medical 
school. As the length of service of our interns and residents is from 
four to five years, it may be necessary to make some compromise 
with the Selective Service Board so that we can keep enough interns 
to run an efficient service. It will be hard to do this but rather than 
have a large per cent of men suddenly called to duty before they 
have completed even two years of training, it may be necessary to 
shorten their term of hospital training from five years to perhaps 
three years. 

In spite of the uncertain times, one most important event has 
taken place — the establishment at Harvard University Medical 
School of the William E. Ladd Professorship of Child Surgery. The 
funds for this Chair were made possible by the generosity of the 
friends and colleagues of the man for whom the Chair is named. 
The first holder of this Professorship is the present Chief of the 
Surgical Service at The Children's Hospital. It is particularly 
fitting that he should be so recognized as it is largely due to his 
efforts in advancing this field of surgery that the Chair has been 
created. It is the first Professorship of Child Surgery to be estab- 
lished in this country. That this was done under the present economic 
conditions is evidence that the value of the contributions made from 
the Surgical Service of this Hospital is recognized. 

While the primary purpose of the Hospital is to give the best 

84 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

possible care to its patients, the Surgical Service continues its activity 
in the teaching of its students, interns, and graduates. A third im- 
portant function is the contribution to surgical research. This work 
is going on all the time, althought the current problems being studied 
are not yet ready for publication. 

One change has been made in the Resident Service. The Assistant 
Resident now serves for six months and then serves as Resident for 
six months, thereby shortening the period of service from two years 
to one year. 

A list of publications by the Surgical Staff is appended. 

Thomas H. Lanman, M.D. 



85 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



PUBLICATIONS 

Ladd, W. E. and Lanman, T. H.: Exstrophy of the Bladder and Epispadias. 

N. E. Jr. Med., 222:130-134, 1940. 
Ladd, W. E. and Gross, R. E.: Surgical Treatment of Duplications of the Ali- 
mentary Tract. (Enterogenous Cysts, Enteric Cysts, or Ileum Duplex). 

Surg. Gynec. £5? Obst., 70:305-307, Feb. 15, 1940. 
Ladd, W. E.: Children's Surgery. N. E. Jr. Med., 222:349-353, 1940. 
Ladd, W. E. and Gross, R. E.: Surgical Anastomoses Between the Biliary and 

Intestinal Tracts of Children. (Follow up Studies). Annals of Surg., 

112:1:51-63, July, 1940. 
Ladd, W. E. and Gross, R. E.: Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia. N. E. Jr. 

Med., 223:917-925, December, 1940. 
Wyatt, G. M. and Lanman, T. H.: Calculus in a Urachus. Report of a Case 

with Enuresis. Am. Jr. Roentgenology and Radium Therapy. Vol. XLIII: 

5. May, 1940. 
Lanman, T. H.: Congenital Atresia of the Esophagus. A Study of Thirty-two 

Cases. Arch. Surg., 41:1060-1083. November, 1940. 
Ingraham, F. D. and Campbell, J. B.: A New Catheter for Administration of 

Avertin Anesthesia to Infants and Children. Annals of Surg., 3:3:501-502. 

March, 1940. 
Flake, C. G.: Otolaryngology. N. E. Jr. Med., 222:796-801, 1940. 
MacCollum, D. W.: A Modified Operative Field. Am. Jr. Surg., 29:3:528-530, 

September, 1940. 
MacCollum, D. W.: Webbed Fingers. Surg. Gynec. & Obst., 7:782-789, Decem- 
ber, 1940. 
Gross, R. E., Emerson, P. and Green, H.: A Surgical Obliteration of a Patent 

Ductus Arteriosus in a 7 Year Old Girl. Am. Jr. Bis. Child., 99:554, 1940. 
Burwell, C. S., Eppinger, E. C. and Gross, R. E. : The Signs of Patent Ductus 

Arteriosus Considered in Relation to Measurements of Circulation. Tr. A. 

Am. Physicians, 55:71, 1940. 
Gross, R. E.: Neoplasms Producing Endocrine Disturbances in Childhood. 

Am. Jr. Bis. Child., 59:579, 1940. 
Gross, R. E.: Experiences with Surgical Treatment in Ten Cases of Patent 

Ductus Arteriosus. J. A. M. A., 115:1257, 1940. 
Gross, R. E. and Connerly, M. L.: Thyroglossal Cysts and Sinuses. A Study 

and Report of 198 Cases. N. E. J. Med., 223:616, 1940. 
Gross, R. E. and Blodgett, J. B.: Omphalocele (Umbilical Eventration) in the 

Newly Born. Surg. Gynec. and Obst., 7:520, 1940. 
Gross, R. E.: Surgical Closure of the Patent Ductus Arteriosus. J. Pediat., 

17:716, 1940. 
Gross, R. E.: The Surgical Treatment of Patent Ductus Arteriosus. "Practi- 
tioners Library of Medicine and Surgery.' 1 Chapter LVIII, p. 661, 1940. 
Mahoney, P. J. and Chamberlain, J. W.: Hydrometrocolpos in Infancy. 

J. Pediatrics., 17:6:772-780, December, 1940. 
Garry, W. E. and Thorndike, A. Jr.: Fractures of the Carpal Scaphoid. N. 

E. J. Med., 222:827-830, 1940. 
Thorndike, A. Jr.: Progress Reports- — Athletic and Related Injuries. N. E. J. 

Med., 223:180-185, 1940. 
Richards, L.: Treatment of Diseases of the Throat. J. A. M. A. 501-506, 

August, 1940. 
Richards, L.: Presidential Address for the American Broncho-Esophagological 

Society. Annals of Otology, Rhinology & Laryngology., 776-782, September, 

1940. 
Johnson, C. I., Palmer, R. S. and Vance, L. A.: The Effect of X-Radiation on 

Tonsillar Tissue. Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology., 49:3:755, 

September, 1940. 

86 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



SURGICAL OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT REPORT 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands 

Goitre . 1 

Frohlich's syndrome 1 



Respiratory System 

Asthma 1 

Bronchiectasis 2 

Bronchitis '. . 3 

Congenital abnormalities, nose 1 

Laryngitis 1 

Empyema 3 

Sinusitis 4 

Tonsils and adenoids, hypertrophied 3 

Tonsillitis 16 

Upper respiratory infection 47 



Alimentary System 

Abdominal pain, undetermined origin 92 

Abscess, alveolar 7 

Abscess, pharyngeal 1 

Acidosis 1 

Anal tab 4 

Appendicial abscess 1 

Appendicitis, acute and chronic 7 

Branchiogenetic cyst 2 

Branchiogenetic sinus , 4 

Broken tooth 1 

Cleft palate 20 

Colic 1 

Constipation 38 

Dental caries 4 

Dysentery 1 

Ectopic anus 1 

Enteritis 24 

Fecal impaction 3 

Fissure in ano 2 

Foreign body in gastro-intestinal tract 26 

Hare lip 13 

Hare lip and cleft palate 10 

Hematemesis 1 

Hematoma, sublinguinal 1 

Hemorrhoids 1 

87 



81 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Alimentary System — Continued 

Imperforate anus 1 

Intestinal hemorrhage 1 

Intestinal obstruction 1 

Intestinal parasites 6 

Intussusception 1 

Ischiorectal abscess 3 

Jaundice 2 

Leukoplakia of tongue 1 

Micrognathia 2 

Nutritional disturbance 14 

Peritonitis 1 

Pharyngitis 33 

Polyp, rectal 8 

Polyposis 1 

Prolapse of rectum 17 

Pyloric stenosis 5 

Rectal bleeding 2 

Recto-perineal fistula 1 

Rupture of abdominal viscus 1 

Skin tab, perineum 1 

Split uvula 1 

Stenosis, anal 1 

Stricture, anal 1 

Thyroglossal cyst 6 

Tongue tie 34 

Vomiting, cause undetermined 4 



Gentto-Urinary System 

Adhesions, hymen 1 

Adhesions between labia 2 

Albuminuria 1 

Atresia, pseudo-vulvar 1 

Balanitis 14 

Bifid scrotum 1 

Bifid vagina 1 

Cystitis 2 

Edema of prepuce 1 

Enuresis 5 

Epispadias 2 

Exstrophy of bladder 2 

Foreign body in vagina 1 

Hydrocele 36 

Hypertrophy, breast 5 

Hypoplasia, genital 1 

Hypospadias 23 

Mastitis 3 

88 



415 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Genito-Urinary System — Continued 

Meatal ulcer 11 

Phimosis 254 

Posthitis 2 

Precocity, physiological 1 

Preputial adhesions 53 

Pyelitis 4 

Pyuria 1 

Redundant prepuce 9 

Undescended testicle 36 

Urethral stricture 3 

Urethral ulcer 1 

Urinary incontinence . . . ; 1 

Urinary retention 1 

Vaginal adhesions. 1 

Vaginitis 1 

Ulcer, prepuce 1 



Cardio-Vascular Diseases 

Circulatory disturbance leg 1 

Hypertension. 1 

Patent ductus arteriosus 3 

Rhuematic heart disease 1 



Lymphatic System 

Adenitis, axillary ; 15 

Adenitis, cervical 110 

Adenitis, epitrochlear 4 

Adenitis, femoral 6 

Adenitis, generalized 1 

Adenitis, inguinal 15 

Adenitis, mesenteric 2 

Adenitis, occipital . 4 

Adenitis, preauricular 1 

Adenitis, saphenous 1 

Adenitis, submaxillary 2 

Adenitis, submental 6 

Adenitis, suppurative 1 

Lymphangiectasis, leg 1 

Lymphangitis, arm 1 

Lymphangitis, leg 1 



89 



482 



171 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Nervous System 

Behavior problem 2 

Birth injury 1 

Chorea 1 

Concussion 12 

Convulsions 3 

Edema, angioneurotic 1 

Encephalitis 2 

Encephalocele 1 

Epilepsy 3 

Head injury 3 

Hematoma, subdural 6 

Hemiplegia 3 

Hemorrhage, cerebral 1 

Hydrocephalus 15 

Injury to spinal cord 1 

Meningocele 10 

Mental deficiency 2 

Mongolism 1 

Myelomeningocele 8 

Palsy, brachial 1 

Palsy, cerebral 1 

Paralysis, facial 2 

Quadriplegia, spastic 2 

Retarded development 2 

Spina bifida 23 

Syringomyelocele 1 



Diseases of the Skin 

Abrasions 47 

Abscesses 24 

Bite, dog 28 

Bite, human 1 

Bite, insect 11 

Blister 8 

Burns 46 

Carbuncle 1 

Cellulitis 16 

Cephalohematoma 3 

Contusions 76 

Dermatitis 28 

Eczema 3 

Epidermophytosis 5 

Eponychia 5 

Foreign body 21 

Furunculosis 63 

Granuloma 2 

90 



108 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases of the Skin — Continued 

Granuloma of umbilicus 13 

Hemangioma 304 

Hemangioma with hemorrhage 1 

Hematoma 14 

Impetigo 16 

Infection, vaccination 1 

Ingrown toe-nail 8 

Lacerations 231 

Lacerations, infected 35 

Nevus 21 

Omphalitis 1 

Paronychia 32 

Pediculosis capitis 1 

Poison ivy 1 

Puncture wound 27 

Scar, forehead, knee, arm 13 

Scabies 1 

Sunburn 1 

Ulcer, leg 1 

Vaccination reaction 2 

Warts 33 

Warts, plantar 15 

Wringer arm . 9 

1,172 

Diseases of the Bones and Joints 

Absence of bones and muscles, congenital 2 

Amputation, finger 2 

Anomalies of spine 1 

Anomaly of skull 1 

Asymmetry of j aw .' 1 

Asymmetry of head 2 

Deformity, fingers, congenital 2 

Deformity, hand, congenital 2 

Deformity, toes, congenital 2 

Dislocations 7 

Elevator door arm 1 

Exostosis 3 

Fractures 100 

Hemarthrosis 1 

Hydrarthrosis 1 

Knock knees 1 

Multiple congenital anomalies 2 

Pilonidal sinus 6 

Polydactylism 7 

Pronated feet 3 

Rickets 2 

91 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Bones and Joints — Continued 

Slipped epiphysis, femur 1 

Snapping thumb 2 

Sprengel's deformity 1 

Syndactylism 9 

Talipes equino varus 3 



165 



Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Apophysitis 1 

Congenital weakening of abdominal wall 1 

Contusion, muscle 1 

Contractures 2 

Diastasis recti 1 

Flexion deformity, finger 1 

Ganglion 4 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 1 

Hernia, epigastric 3 

Hernia, inguinal 146 

Hernia, incisional 1 

Hernia, umbilical 105 

Hernia, scrotal 4 

Muscle strain, hand 1 

Rupture of extensor tendon, finger 1 

Sprain 31 

Strain 6 

Subluxation of cervical vertebra 1 , 

Subluxation of radius 1 

Torticollis, congenital 1 

313 

Diseases of Eye and Ear 

Chalazion 2 

Conjunctivitis 5 

Deformity of ear 6 

Foreign body, eye 8 

Hordeolum 8 

Inflamed eye 1 

Lop ears 8 

Microtia 1 

Otitis externa 1 

Otitis media 24 

Preauricular sinus 2 

Preauricular tab 2 

Ruptured iris 1 

Supernumerary auricle 1 

Torn retina 1 

71 

92 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Miscellaneous 

Aerophagia 1 

Anemia, cause undetermined 1 

Avulsion, finger nail 2 

Avulsion, toe nail 1 

Chicken pox 2 

Emphysema, traumatic 1 

Feeding, regulation of 12 

Frenum of lip 2 

Frenum of tongue, 1 

Habits, regulation of 2 

Hemorrhage, umbilical cord 1 

Malnutrition 3 

Measles 1 

Mumps 4 

Poisoning, lead 1 

Poliomyelitis, acute 1 

Scarlet fever 2 

Serum reaction 3 

Staphylococcal infection, hand 1 

Tetany 1 

Thrush 1 



44 



Deferred 35 

Eloped 12 

No disease 77 

Not seen 3 



127 



Surgical Out-Patient Department New Cases. 2,339 

Surgical Out-Patient Department Total Visits 13,212 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS 

With Anaesthesia 

Aspiration of cyst 1 

Aspiration of hematoma 1 

Circumcisions 138 

Debridement 6 

Endothermy for hemangioma 168 

Extraction of teeth 5 

Fractures, reduction of 39 

93 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Incision and drainage of abscesses and septic wounds. . 82 

Laryngoscopy 2 

Paracentesis 218 

Proctoscopy 5 

Removal of cysts 9 

Removal of digits 1 

Removal of hemangioma 13 

Removal of keloid 1 

Removal of lipoma 1 

Removal of mole 1 

Removal of mucocele 1 

Removal of nail 6 

Removal of polyp from ear 1 

Removal of scar 2 

Removal of warts 2 

Roentgen ray treatment with anaesthesia 2 

Urethral dilatation 9 

Wound sutures 35 

Total 749 

Without Anaesthesia 
Carbon-dioxide snow treatments 510 



SURGICAL DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

Diseases of the Ductless Glands New Old 

Adenoma 2 

Cretinism 1 

Failure of involution of thymus 1 

Gastro-enteric disturbance 3 

Hyperplasia of adrenal gland 1 

Hypoadrenalism 1 

Hypothyroidism 1 

Ketosis . 1 

Malnutrition 3 1 

Obesity 1 

Over-development of breasts 1 

Premature puberty 1 

Scurvy 1 

Sexual immaturity 1 

Undiagnosed disease of endocrine system 1 

Vomiting 12 

30 3 

94 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Respiratory System 

Asthma 

Atelectasis 

Bronchiectasis 

Bronchitis 

Fistula, broncho-cutaneous. 
Fistula, broncho-pleural. . . . 

Empyema 

Foreign body, pleural space. 

Laryngeal stridor. 

Nasopharyngitis 

Neoplasm, mediastinal 

Pneumothorax 

Pneumonia, broncho 

Sinusitis 

Tonsillitis 

Tumor of lung 

Upper respiratory infection. 
Miscellaneous 



2 
4 
5 
2 



19 



33 



2 
3 



3 

1 
1 



114 



14 



Alimentary System 

Abdominal pain, undetermined etiology 

Abdominal pain, associated with hemorrhage . 

Adhesions, intestinal 

Alveolar defect 

Anomaly of lip (not harelip) 

Anomaly of bile ducts 

Appendicitis 

Atresia of intestine 

Cardiospasm 

Cholelithiasis 

Cirrhosis of liver 

Cleft palate 

Colitis, ulcerative 

Congenital anomalies, not listed 

Constipation 

Cysts and tumors of the gastro-enteric tract. 

Dental caries 

Diarrhea, non-specific 

Dysentery 

Esophageal stricture 

Esophageal varices 

Fecal impaction 

Fistula, tracheo-esophageal 

Fistula, anal 

Fistula, recto- perineal 

95 



66 


7 


1 




5 




10 


2 


1 




6 


1 


116 


4 


4 


1 


1 




1 




1 




23 


11 


2 


3 


16 


2 


7 




28 


4 


16 


2 


1 




1 




4 


6 




1 


3 




5 




6 




3 





THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Alimentary System — Continued 

Foreign body in gastro-enteric tract. 

Gastro-enteritis 

Harelip 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Hepatitis 

Hernia, retromesocolic 

Imperforate anus 

Incontinence of feces 

Injury to palate 

Intestinal hypomotility by X-ray . . . 

Intestinal obstruction 

Intussusception 

Jaundice 

Lye burn, esophagus 

Malrotation of intestines 

Meckel's diverticulum 

Megacolon 

Melena 

Oxyuriasis of appendix 

Paralytic ileus 

Peritonitis, idiopathic 

Polyposis of intestine 

Proctitis 

Pyloric stenosis 

Pylorospasm 

Ranula 

Relaxation of sphincter ani 

Rupture of small intestine 

Stab wound of abdomen 

Stenosis, anus 

Stricture, anus 

Stricture, recto-sigmoid 

Thyroglossal sinus 

Torsion of mesentery 

Ulcer, duodenal 

Visceroptosis 

Volvulus of intestine 



New Old 



4 




8 




28 


5 


54 


22 


2 




1 




12 


4 


4 


2 


1 




2 




12 


1 


9 




1 




1 


1 


3 


1 


5 




3 


1 


12 




10 




2 




7 


1 


2 


3 


1 




68 


1 


3 




3 





1 

2 



599 



1 
90 



Genito-Urinary System 

Albuminuria, cause undetermined. 
Anomalies of kidney and ureter. . . 

Anomalies of genitalia 

Calculus, renal 

Calculus, stag horn, renal pelvis. . . 

96 



2 

47 

6 



17 
2 
1 
1 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Calculus, ureteral 

Cryptorchidism 

Cystitis. , 

Cyst, Fallopian tube 

Cyst, uretero-vesicle orifice 

Cyst, uterus 

Cyst, vaginal 

Disease undiagnosed, genito-urinary tract suspected 

Diverticulum of bladder 

Enuresis 

Epispadias 

Exstrophy of bladder 

Fistula, bladder 

Fistula, recto-urethral 

Fistula, recto-vaginal 

Fistula, recto-vesicle 

Hematuria, cause undetermined 

Hemoglobinuria 

Hydrocele 

Hydronephrosis 

Hypospadias 

Incontinence of urine 

Phimosis 

Pyelonephritis 

Pyoureter 

Pyuria 

Structure, uretero-pelvic junction 

Stricture, urethral 

Tumors of genito-urinary tract 

Urethritis ...-..-- 

Vaginitis 



Cardio-Vascular Diseases 

Congenital heart disease 

Hypertensive vascular disease 

Ostium secondum 

Paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia. 

Patent ductus arteriosus 

Phlebitis 

Thrombosis 

Varicose veins 



97 



1 


1 


31 


8 


7 




1 




1 




2 




1 




1 




1 


2 


5 




2 


1 


2 


13 


1 




2 


4 


4 


1 


1 




2 




1 




36 




17 


4 


5 




2 


1 


17 




13 


5 


1 




1 




3 


1 




1 


9 


12 


1 




2 




228 


75 


New 


Old 


4 


3 


1 


2 


1 




1 




4 


6 


2 




6 




2 


; 



21 11 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Lymphatic Diseases 

Calcification of lymph nodes . . 

Hygroma 

Lymphadenitis 

Lymphadenitis, mesenteric. . . 

Lymphangioma 

Lymphoma 

Toxic reaction of lymphnodes. 



Nervous System 

Abscess, subdural 

Abscesses 

Anomaly of central nervous system 

Arachnoiditis 

Arnold-Chiari syndrome 

Atrophy, cerebral 

Atrophy, cortical 

Behavior problem 

Birth injury 

Brain tumor 

Cephalohematoma 

Concussion, cerebral 

Contusion, cerebral 

Convulsions 

Cyst, spinal cord , 

Deficiency, mental 

Disease undiagnosed, brain tumor suspected 

Encephalitis 

Encephalopathy 

Epilepsy 

Fibrosarcoma of spinal cord 

Ganglio-neuroma of neck 

Hemangioma 

Hematoma, extra-dural 

Hematoma, subdural 

Hematomyelia, cervical cord 

Hemiparesis 

Hydrocephalus 

Hydromyelia, cervical cord 

Hysteria 

Lipoma, epidural 

Lipoma, intrathecal 

Meningitis. 

Meningocele, encephalocele and myelomeningocele . 

Myelitis 

Myxosarcoma, sphenoid bone 

Neuroblastoma 

98 



1 




3 


1 


11 


3 


1 




9 


3 


2 




1 




28 


7 


2 




3 


1 


47 


5 


16 


4 


1 




8 


2 


17 


3 


21 


1 


18 


1 


8 


4 


4 




35 




7 




9 


2 


1 




'3 




11 


6 


6 




13 


6 


14 


6 


2 




1 






3 


3 




17 


2 


1 




2 




26 


8 


1 




1 




1 




1 




9 


1 


11 


2 


1 






1 




1 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Nervous System — Continued New Old 

Neurofibromatosis 3 

Neuroma 1 

Palsy, brachial 2 

Paralysis, bladder sphincter 1 

Paralysis, diaphragm 1 

Paralysis, cervical, sympathetic 1 

Paralysis, post-poliomyelitis 1 

Paralysis, spastic 8 5 

Paralysis, urinary bladder 3 3 

Scar formation of dura 1 

Spj.na bifida occulta 7 5 

Spina bifida with meningocele 3 1 

Spina bifida with meningomyelocele 13 2 

Subdural hematoma of spinal cord 1 

Talipes cavus, post-poliomyelitis 2 

Talipes equino-varus, post-poliomyelitis 3 1 

Tumor, cord 2 

Tumor, lumbar vertebrae 1 



Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue 

Abscesses 

Anomaly of skin, congenital 

Burns 

Cellulitis 

Cicatrix formation 

Cyst of skin 

Eczema 

Epidermophytosis 

Erysipelas 

Erythema nodosum 

Foreign body 

Furunculosis 

Gangrene 

Hemangioma of skin 

Hematoma of skin 

Infections 

Lacerations 

Tumors of skin 

Ulcers 

Urticaria 

Verruca 

Wringer arm 

Xanthomatosis 



374 77 



31 


1 


1 




22 


2 


8 


1 


12 


8 


10 




2 




1 




1 




2 




4 




3 




4 




26 


5 


4 




13 




36 




35 


5 


4 




1 




1 


1 


8 




1 





230 23 

99 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases of the Bones and Joints 

Amputation of finger 1 

Arthritis 2 2 

Brodie's abscess 2 

Bullet in pelvis 1 

Bursitis 2 

Congenital anomaly of bone 46 9 

Crushed fingers , . 1 

Dactylitis, tuberculous 1 

Fractures 75 1 

Gunshot wound 1 

Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy 1 

Osteogenesis imperfecta 1 

Osteomyelitis 10 8 

Periostitis 2 

Rickets 3 

Scoliosis, structural 2 

Torticollis 1 

Wound of foot 1 



151 22 

Diseases of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 

Diastasis recti 4 

Dystrophy, muscular 1 1 

Ganglion 7 1 

Injury to tendon of finger 1 

Hernia, chest wall 1 1 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 5 

Hernia, femoral 3 

Hernia, incisional 4 

Hernia, inguinal 312 11 

Hernia, suprapubic 1 

Hernia, umbilical 34 3 

Hernia, ventral 2 

Sprain 1 

Tenosynovitis 1 



Diseases of the Eye and Ear 
Anomaly of ear (not lop ear) 

Anomaly of eye 

Lop ears 

Mastoiditis 

Otitis media 



377 


17 


New 


Old 


8 


8 


10 


2 


9 


1 


4 




45 


3 



76 14 

100 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Systemic Diseases, Hospital Complications and 
Miscellaneous 

Anemia . 

Bacteremia 

Branchial rest 

Branchial sinus 

Deferred 

Erythroblastosis 

Exposure to contagion 

Hemolytic icterus 

Hemophilia 

Hemorrhages 

Hemorrhagic disease of newborn 

Hemothorax.^ 

Hypoprotanemia. 

Measles 

Mumps 

Neiman-Pick's Disease 

No disease 

Prematurity 

Purpura 

Pyrexia, unknown etiology 

Rheumatic fever 

Sarcoid, Boeck's 

Scarlet fever 

Septicemia 

Shock associated with gallop rhythm 

Shock, post-operative 

Sinus, pilonidal 

Sinus tract, axillary line 

Splenomegaly 

Sulphanilamide reaction 

Syncopy 

Syphilis 

Tuberculin reactor positive 

Tuberculosis 

Wassermann reaction positive 



65 
3 
1 

2 
4 
1 
5 
1 

19 

3 
1 
1 

2 
3 
2 
1 
3 
2 
4 
2 



14 
9 

2 



2 
1 



3 

1 



164 



1 
3 



13 



Number of cases admitted to Surgical Ward 1,423 

Number of cases admitted to Private Ward 303 

New diagnosis 2,392 

Secondary diagnosis 366 

101 



1,726 



2,758 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



SURGICAL OPERATING ROOM REPORT 



Operations of the Ductless Glands 

Encephalogram 1 

Excision of tumor of neck 1 

Exploration of adrenals 1 

Subtotal thyroidectomy 1 



Operations of the Respiratory System 

Bronchiectasis 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol 5 

Lobectomy 2 

Pneumonectomy 1 

Rib resection 1 

Thoracotomy 1 

Empyema 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol 2 

Closed thoracotomy 3 

Exploration of chest 1 

Intercostal drainage 10 

Rib resection 7 

Tapping of chest 1 

Fistula, broncho-pleural 

Closure 1 

Foreign body in pleural space 

Removal 1 

Laryngeal stridor 

Laryngoscopy 1 

Tumors 

Biopsy 1 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol 2 

Exploration 1 

Laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy 1 

Partial lobectomy 1 

Tonsillitis 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 

Miscellaneous 
Bronchoscopy with lipiodol 1 

102 



51 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Gastro-Enteric Tract 

Abdominal pain, undetermined etiology 

Appendectomy 2 

Cystoscopy and retrograde pyelography 2 

Exploratory laparotomy 6 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy 12 

Adhesions, intestinal 

Exploratory laparotomy with appendectomy 1 

Freeing of adhesions with incidental appendectomy. ... 2 

Anomaly of bile ducts 

Choledochoduodenostomy 2 

Exploration 2 

Appendicitis 

Appendectomy. 129 

Appendectomy with drains 16 

Appendectomy with exploratory laparotomy 

Incision and drainage 

Suprapubic cystotomy, incidental 

Atresia of intestine 

Anterior gastro-enterostomy 

Colostomy 

Duodenojejunostomy 

Exploration and ileo-colostomy 

Lysis of adhesions 

Cardiospasm 
Cardio-dilatation 

Cholelithiasis 

Cholecystectomy with exploration 

Cirrhosis of liver 

Cholecystoduodenostomy 

Cleft palate 

Plastic 

Colitis, ulcerative 

Ileostomy 2 

Proctoscopy 2 

Congenital anomalies, not listed 

Colostomy 1 

Duodeno-jejun ostomy 1 

Excision 1 

Exploratory laparotomy with gastrojejunostomy 1 

Plastic 3 

Proctoscopy 1 

Resection 1 

Cysts and tumor of gasrto-enteric tract 

Excision 14 

Exploratory laparotomy 1 

Proctoscopy 4 

Proctoscopy with excision 4 

103 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations of the Gastro-Enteric Tract — Continued 

Suprapubic cystotomy and excision 

Dental caries 

Extraction of teeth 

Esophageal stricture 

Dilatation 

Fissure, ano 

Proctoscopy 

Fistula, anal 

Excision 

Plastic 

Fistula, recto-perineal 

Excision 

Fistula, tracheo-esophageal 

Gastric division and gastrostomy 

Ligation 

Foreign body in gastro-enteric tract 

Removal 

Harelip 

Plastic 26 

Removal of sutures 

Harelip and cleft palate 

Endothermy 

Extraction of teeth 

Inlay graft to buccal mucous membrane 

Plastic 

Submucous resection 

Hepatitis 

Exploratory laparotomy with biopsy 

Hernia, retromesocolic 

Division of adhesions, closure of fossa and appendectomy 
Imperforate anus 

Colostomy 

Exploratory laparotomy 

Plastic 

Sigmoidostomy 

Incontinence of anal sphincter 

Sigmoidostomy 

Injury to palate 

Repair 

Intestinal hypomotility 

Dilatation 

Intestinal obstruction 

Abdominal exploration 

Double-barrel enterostomy 

Exploratory laparotomy 

Freeing of bands 

Ladd's operation 

104 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Operations of the Gastro-Enteric Tract — Continued 

Lysis of adhesions 

Secondary enterostomy 

Witzel enterostomy 

Intussusception 

Reduction 

Resection with anastomosis 

Lye burn of esophagus 

Witzel gastrostomy 

Malrotation of intestines 

Exploratory laparotomy 

Exploratory laparotomy, appendectomy and Ladd's op- 
eration 

Meckel's diverticulum 

Excision 

Resection . . . 

Megacolon 

Excision 

Rectal dilatation 

Melena 

Exploratory laparotomy, appendectomy and biopsy. . . 

Proctoscopy 

Oxyuriasis of appendix 

Appendectomy 

Appendectomy with exploratory laparotomy 

Peritonitis, idiopathic 

Abdominal paracentesis 

Appendectomy with drainage 

Freeing of adhesions 

Incision and drainage 

Polyposis, intestine 

Colectomy and colostomy 

Lysis of adhesions and excision 

Proctoscopy and electro-cautery 

Proctoscopy with excision 

Pyloric stenosis 

Pyloromyotomy 

Ranula 

Excision 

Rupture of small intestine 

Repair 

Stab wound of abdomen 

Abdominal exploration with suturing 

Volvulus of intestine 

Freeing of duodenal bands 

Reduction 

Reduction with abdominal exploration 



68 



525 



105 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations of the Genito-Urinary Tract 

Albuminuria, cause undetermined 

Cystoscopy 1 

Anomaly of kidney and ureter 

Appendectomy and rotation of kidney 1 

Cystoscopy 9 

Cystoscopy with excision of urethral valves 2 

Cystoscopy with pyelograms 2 

Excision of ureterocele 3 

Exploration 3 

Exploratory laparotomy with reimplantation of ureters 1 

Hemi-nephrectomy 1 

Ligation and cutting aberrant renal vessel 1 

Lysis of adhesions and nephropexy 1 

Lysis of adhesions, kinking ureter 1 

Nephrectomy 2 

Nephrectomy and appendectomy 1 

Nephropexy 1 

Removal of catheter 1 

Reopening of suprapubic cystotomy 3 

Suprapubic cystotomy 4 

Ureterectomy 3 

Ureterostomy 1 

Anomaly of genitalia 

Exploration 1 

Freeing of adhesions 1- 

Orchidopexy 1 

Calculus, stag horn, renal pelvis 

Removal 1 

Calculus, ureteral 

Cystoscopy 2 

Ureteral lithotomy and suprapubic cystotomy 1 

Ureterotomy 1 

Uretero-lithotomy 1 

Cryptorchidism 

Exploration of inguinal canal 2 

Exploratory laparotomy 1 

Orchidopexy 31 

Cystitis 

Suprapubic cystotomy 1 

Cyst, vaginal 

Drainage of hydrocolpos 1 

Diverticulum of bladder 

Suprapubic cystotomy 2 

Epispadias 

Plastic. . 2 

106 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Genito-Urinary Tract — Continued 

Exstrophy of bladder 

Cystectomy and plastic 2 

Exploration and dilatation 1 

Plastic 1 

Ureterosigmoidostomy 7 

Fistula, recto-urethral 

Closure 1 

Dilatation 3 

Excision 1 

Insertion of catheter 1 

Plastic 1 

Sigmoidostomy 1 

Suprapubic cystotomy 2 

Fistula, recto-vaginal 

Proctoscopy 1 

Fistula, recto-vesicle 

Sigmoidostomy 1 

Hematuria, cause undetermined 

Cystoscopy and retrograde pyelograms 4 

Hydrocele 

Excision 34 

Incision and drainage 1 

Hypospadias 

Dilatation 4 

Plastic 2 

Suprapubic cystectomy 1 

Incontinence of urine 

Ureterosigmoidostomy 2 

Phimosis 

Circumcision 28 

Pyelonephritis 

Cystoscopy 6 

Cystoscopy with pyelograms 3 

Nephrolithotomy 1 

Suprapubic cystotomy 1 

Strangulated ovary 

Oophorectomy and appendectomy 1 

Stricture, urethral 

Exploratory laparotomy and reimplantation of ureter. . 1 

Tumors of genito-urinary tract 

Abdominal exploration with excision 1 

Biopsy 1 

Exploratory laparotomy with biopsy 1 

Nephrectomy 1 

Nephrotomy and excision 2 

Orchidectomy 1 

107 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Genito-Urinary Tract — Continued 
Urethritis 

Cystoscopy and retrograde pyelograms 1 

Ureterectomy 1 

Cardio-Vascular Operations 

Hypertensive vascular disease 

Renal exploration 2 

Patent ductus arteriosus 

Angiocardiogram 1 

Ligation 4 

Thrombosis 

Burr holes 1 

Burr holes and encephalogram 1 

Encephalogram 1 

Varicose veins 
Ligation 2 

Operations of the Lymphatic System 

Hygroma 

Excision 2 

Excision, partial 1 

Lymphadenitis 

Biopsy 1 

Excision 2 

Incision and drainage 11 

Lymphangioma 

Excision 10 

Plastic 1 

Resuturing 1 

Lymphoma 

Excision 1 

Exploration and tracheotomy 1 

Toxic reaction of lymphnodes 

Excision 1 

Operations of the Nervous System 

Abscess, subdural 

Burr hole with drainage 1 

Re-exploration of abscess 1 

Abscesses 

Burr holes : 3 

Burr holes with drainage 3 

Burr holes, ventriculogram and decompression 1 

Encephalogram and plastic 1 

Re-exploration of abscess 1 

108 



212 



12 



32 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Nervous System — Continued 

Anomaly of central nervous system 

Application of Sayre head sling 1 

Bone flap 1 

Burr holes 3 

Cerebellar exploration 1 

Encephalogram 3 

Encephalogram with burr holes 1 

Exploration with burr holes 1 

Exploration with lysis of adhesions 2 

Laminectomy 2 

Manufacture of coronal suture 1 

Revision of bone flap 1 

Subtemporal decompression 7 

Ventricular exploration 1 

Ventriculogram 5 

Arachnoiditis 

Burr holes 1 

Atrophy, cortical 

Burr holes 4 

Encephalogram 8 

Birth injury 

Encephalogram 3 

Burr holes 2 

Brain tumor 

Burr holes 1 

Bone flap 7 

Cerebellar exploration 1 

Encephalogram 3 

Re-exploration of bone flap .• 1 

Removal of hematoma 1 

Revision of wound 1 

Ventriculogram 1 

Cephalhematoma 

Incision and drainage 1 

Concussion 

Burr holes 1 

Convulsions 

Bone flap with freeing of scar tissue 1 

Burr holes 1 

Encephalogram 4 

Encephalogram with X-ray and burr holes 1 

Ventriculogram 2 

Cyst, spinal cord 

Laminectomy 1 

Burr holes 2 

Encephalogram 3 

109 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations of the Nervous System — Continued 

Disease undiagnosed, brain tumor suspected 

Bone flap 1 

Burr holes 5 

Burr holes with encephalogram 1 

Encephalogram 6 

Encephalogram and bone flap 1 

Exploration with Torkildsen procedure 1 

Torkildsen procedure 1 

Ventriculogram and encephalogram 2 

Encephalitis 

Ventriculogram 1 

Encephalo-myelo-radiculitis 

Encephalogram 1 

Encephalopathy 

Bone flap 2 

Burr holes 10 

Encephalogram 29 

Epilepsy 

Bone flap 5 

Burr holes 4 

Encephalogram 13 

Ganglio-neuroma of neck 

Excision 1 

Hemangioma 

Burr holes i 

Hematoma 

Bone flap 12 

Burr holes 9 

Exploration 1 

Incision and drainage 1 

Laminectomy 1 

Hematomyelia, cervical cord 

Ligation 1 

Hydrocephalus 

Combined tap 1 

Exploration with burr holes 4 

Exploration and lysis of adhesions 2 

Ventriculostomy 2 

Lipoma, epidural 

Excision and exploration 1 

Meningitis 

Burr holes 3 

Encephalogram 2 

Meningocele, encephalocele and myelomeningocele 

Burr holes 1 

Excision 6 

110 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Nervous System — Continued 

Myxosarcoma 

Subtemporal decompression 

Neurofibromatosis 

Excision 

Palsy, brachial 

Exploration 

Paralysis, spastic 

Encephalogram 

Spina bifida, occulta 

Exploration and freeing of adhesions 

Laminectomy 

Spina bifida with meningocele 

Excision 

Exploration with excision 

Laminectomy with excision 

Spina bifida with meningomyelocele 

Burr holes 

Excision 

Resuturing of wound 

Revision of wound 



1 

2 

1 
1 
1 

2 
11 

1 
1 



258 



Operations of the Skin 
Abscess, alveolar 

Extraction of teeth 

Abscess, arm 

Incision and drainage 

Abscess, cheek 

Incision and drainage 

Abscess, chest wall 

Incision and drainage 

Abscess, foot 

Incision and drainage 

Abscess, hand 

Incision and drainage 

Abscess, multiple 

Incision and drainage 

Abscess, neck 

Incision and drainage 

Abscess, parotid gland 

Incision and drainage 

Abscess, peri-anal 

Incision and drainage 

Abscess, subphrenic 

Incision and drainage 

Burns 

Debridement 

Ill 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Operations of the Skin — Continued 

Debridement and tanning 7 

Gas dressing 1 

Thiersch graft 5 

Cellulitis 

Debridement and suturing of wound 1 

Incision and drainage 1 

Cicatrix 

Excision 4 

Excision with graft 1 

Plastic 10 

Raising of rope graft 1 

Transferring of rope graft 2 

Cyst of skin 

Encephalogram 1 

Incision 17 

Foreign body 

Incision and drainage 1 

Removal 3 

Furunculosis 

Incision and drainage 1 

Gangrene 

Thiersch graft 2 

Hemangioma of skin 

Biopsy and excision 1 

Endothermy coagulation 5 

Excision 1'3 

Ligation 1 

Snow treatment 1 

X-ray therapy 1 

Hematoma 

Incision and drainage 1 

Infections 

Incision and drainage 3 

Lacerations 

Debridement 1 

Debridement and suturing 1 

Plastic repair 1 

Thiersch graft 1 

Suturing of tendons 8 

Tumors 

Excision 26 

Plastic 3 

Verruca 

Excision 2 

Wringer arm 

Excision and evacuation 1 

Incision and drainage 1 

112 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Skin — Continued 

Suturing of wound * 1 

Thiersch graft ,2 

Wound of foot 

Excision and Thiersch graft 1 

150 

Operations of the Bones and Joints 

Amputation of fingers 

Suturing 1 

Bursitis 

Excision of Baker's cyst 1 

Congenital anomalies of bone 

Excision 7 

Exploration 1 

Plastic . ... 12 

Fractures 

Application of cast 4 

Burr holes 2 

Elevation 2 

Exploration and reduction 1 

Manipulation 1 

Manipulation and reduction 2 

Reduction, closed 7 

Reduction and debridement 1 

Removal of fragments 1 

Replacement of bone fragments 1 

Subtemporal decompression 1 

Wiring of teeth and tapping 1 

Osteomyelitis 

Exploration . . 1 

Gas dressing 2 

Incision and drainage 14 

Saucerization 1 

Sequestrectomy 2 

Periostitis 

Irrigation and debridement 1 



Operations of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia 
Division of tendons 

Suturing of tendons 4 

Ganglion 

Excision 7 

Hernia, diaphragmatic 

Herniorrhaphy 6 

Hernia, femoral 

Herniorrhaphy 3 

113 



67 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Operations of the Muscles, Tendons and Fascia — Continued 

Hernia, incisional 

Exploratory laparotomy with herniorrhaphy 1 

Herniorrhaphy 2 

Hernia, inguinal 

Exploratory laparotomy 3 

Herniorrhaphy and appendectomy 3 

Herniorrhaphy 201 

Hernia, suprapubic 

Repair 1 

Hernia, umbilical 

Herniorrhaphy 39 

Hernia, ventral 

Herniorrhaphy 2 

Tenosynovitis 

Freeing of adhesions 1 



Operations of the Eye and Ear 

Anomaly of ear (not lop ear) 

Excision 


3 


Plastic 


8 


Anomaly of eye 

Plastic 


1 


Lop ears 

Plastic 


t 

7 


Mastoiditis 

Mastoidectomy 


2 







273 



21 



Operations of Systemic Diseases, Hospital 
Complications and Miscellaneous 

Anemia 

Splenectomy 2 

Branchial rest 

Excision of rest 1 

Branchial sinus 

Excision 2 

Hemolytic icterus 

Splenectomy 3 

Hemorrhages 

Exploratory laparotomy and appendectomy 1 

Exploratory laparotomy with freeing of duodenal bands 1 

Nasopharyngoscopy, esophagoscopy and bronchoscopy 1 

Neiman-Pick's disease 

Splenectomy with biopsy 1 

114 



SURGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of Systemic Diseases, Hospital 

Complications and Miscellaneous — Continued 

Purpura 

Proctoscopy 1 

Splenectomy 3 

Sarcoid, Boeck's 

Excision 2 

Sinus, pilonidal 

Excision 1 

Sinus tract, axillary line 

Excision 1 

Splenomegaly 

Splenectomy 2 

Tuberculosis 

Excision 1 

Splenectomy 1 

24 

Total number of operations 1,629 

Total number of anesthesias on Surgical Ward 1,377 

Total number of anesthesias on Private Ward 315 

Total Anesthesias 1,692 

Operations of the Nose and Accessary Sinus 

Reduction of fracture of nasal bone 2 

Ethmoidectomy 6 

Plastic to forehead 1 

Antrum puncture and lavage 2 

Antrum puncture with windows 1 

Radical antrotomy and ethmoidectomy 3 

Removal of foreign body of nose 1 

Evacuation of septal hematoma 2 

Lysis of choanal atresia 1 

Submucous resection 7 

26 



EAR, NOSE AND THROAT DEPARTMENT 

During the past year, this Service has functioned as usual, the large 
bulk of its work being confined to removal of diseased tonsils and 
adenoids and operations of various types on infected ears and mas- 
toids. 

Changes in the arrangement of the operating suite, which would 
facilitate the work of the nursing staff, are contemplated and, it is 
hoped, will be carried out in the coming year. 

115 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

It has been gratifying to all concerned that Dr. Charles Ferguson 
is confining his work to Otolaryngology and is now a member of the 
staff of this Department. This addition will greatly increase the 
working efficiency of our group. 

The Residency of Dr. John Hill ended January 1, 1941. From 
that date until July 1, 1941, Dr. Wayne Ho of Shanghai, China, was 
Resident. Dr. Ho is now Resident in Otolaryngology at the Presby- 
terian Hospital in Chicago, Illinois. On July 1, 1941, Dr. Charles 
Tucker, who is now Resident at The Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 
will begin his Residency here, to end July 1, 1942. 

In September and October, 1941, Dr. Charles Cutler, who had 
finished his training in pediatric medicine, worked and observed on 
our Service before leaving for San Francisco, where he is now en- 
gaged in the practice of pediatrics. 

Carlyle G. Flake, M.D. 



THROAT OPERATING ROOM REPORT 

Operations of the Pharynx and Nasopharynx 

Adenoidectomy (Private and Ward) 43 

Adenoidectomy (Out-Patient Department) 66 

Adenoidectomy with laryngoscopy 1 

Packing adenoid bleeder (post-operative) 5 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (Private and Ward) 146 
Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (Out-Patient De- 
partment) 524 

Suturing tonsil bleeder (post-operative) 9 

Incision and drainage retropharyngeal abscess 6 

Plastic to nasopharynx 1 

Exploration of nose, throat and palate 1 

802 

Operations of the Larynx and Trachea 

Laryngoscopy 27 

Laryngoscopy with excision of papilloma of mucosal 

folds 18 

Laryngoscopy with removal of tracheotomy tube 1 

Laryngoscopy with removal of tracheotomy tube and 

plastic 2 

Laryngoscopy with removal of foreign body 1 

Tracheotomy 8 

57 

116 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Operations of the Esophagus and Bronchus 

Bronchoscopy 21 

Bronchoscopy with lipiodol injection 46 

Bronchoscopy with removal of foreign body 5 

Esophagoscopy 6 

Esophagoscopy with dilatation 4 

Esophagoscopy with injection of varices 5 

Esophagoscopy with removal of foreign body 8 

94 

Operations on the Ear 

Mastoidectomy, simple 140 

Mastoidectomy, secondary 1 

Mastoidectomy, radical . 1 

Incision and drainage of post-aural abscess 2 

Paracentesis 1 

Plastic to ear 2 

Exploration of petrous apex 1 

148 

Total number of operations 1,127 

Number of anesthesias on Private Ward 870 

Number of anesthesias on Public Ward 687 

1,557 

THROAT DISEASES TREATED IN THE WARDS 

Diseases of the Nose and Accessory Sinuses New Old 

Deflection of septum 7 

Ethmoiditis 7 1 

Fracture, maxillary antrum 1 

Fracture, nasal bone 1 1 

Hematoma, nasal septum 2 

Rhinitis 5 

Sinusitis 12 

34 3 

Diseases of Pharynx and Nasopharynx 

Atresia, choanal 1 

Hemorrhage, post-adenoidectomy 5 

Hemorrhage, post-tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. . . 3 

Hypertrophied adenoids 56 1 

Hypertrophied tonsils 8 1 

Hypertrophied tonsils and adenoids 514 2 

Pharyngitis 15 

Stenosis, nasopharyngeal 1 

603 4 

117 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Diseases of the Ear 

Deafness 

Furuncle of auditory canal 
Granuloma of ear drum. . . 

Mastoiditis 

Otitis media 

Petrositis 



Diseases of the Larynx and Trachea 

Anomaly of the aryteno-epiglottic fold. 

Cyst of larynx, congenital 

Edema of epiglottis 

Foreign body in larynx 

Laryngitis 

Laryngoptosis 

Laryngo-tracheitis .' 

Laryngo-tracheo-bronchitis 

Papilloma of larynx 

Stenosis, laryngeal 

Stenosis, tracheal 

Stridor, tracheal 

Tracheitis 



New 


Old 


4 




1 




1 




117 




166 


10 


1 


15 



290 



1 



13 

4 
4 

1 

5 
2 



25 



8 
1 



44 



10 



Diseases of the Esophagus and Bronchus 

Bronchiectasis 

Bronchitis 

Deformity of bronchus, congenital 

Foreign body in bronchus 

Foreign body in esophagus 

Stricture, esophageal 

Undiagnosed disease, neoplasm of bronchus suspected 
Varices, esophageal 



6 


3 


4 




1 


1 


4 




11 




1 


4 




1 


1 


1 



28 



10 



Diseases, Miscellaneous 

Abscesses 

Allergic child 

Appendicitis 

Asthma 

Behavior problem 

Burns , 

Dacrocystitis , 

118 



32 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Diseases, Miscellaneous — Continued 

Deferred 1 

Deficiency, mental 2 2 

Empyema 1 

Encephalitis 1 

Encephalopathy 2 

Erysipelas 1 

Exposure to contagion 1 

Fracture of orbit 1 

Gastro-enteric disturbance 2 

Heart disease, congenital 2 

Hepatitis 1 

Hernia, inguinal 1 

Laceration 1 

Lymphadenitis 17 1 

Malformation of hands 1 

Measles 1 

Microcephaly 1 

No disease 5 

Osteomyelitis 2 1 

Paralysis, facial 4 

Parotitis 1 

Pneumonia 3 

Positive tuberculin reactor 1 

Pulmonary suppuration 1 

Pyrexia 4 

Scarlet fever 1 

Smith-Howard syndrome 2 

Talipes equino-varus 1 

Tuberculosis 3 

Upper respiratory infection 5 



i 



99 17 



Number of cases on Throat Ward 921 

Number of cases on Private Ward 667 

Total 1,558 



New Cases 1,098 

Secondary Diagnosis 69 



Total 1,167 

119 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

THROAT OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT REPORT 

Diseases of Nose and Accessory Sinuses 

Abrasion, nose 1 

Contusion, nose 5 

Deviated septum 32 

Deformity, nose 1 

Displaced nasal bone 1 

Epistaxis 31 

Ethmoiditis 2 

Foreign body, nose 16 

Fracture, nose 15 

Furuncle, nose 1 

Hematoma, nose 1 

Polyp, nasal 1 

Rhinitis 18 

Sinusitis 48 

Small nares 1 

Spur of nasal septum 1 

Tumor, nose 1 

Turbinates, hypertrophied 2 

Wart, nose 2 

177 

Diseases of Pharynx and Nasopharynx 

Abscess, peritonsillar 1 

Abscess, pharyngeal 1 

Adenoiditis '2 

Adenoids, hypertrophied 61 

Bleeding, post tonsillectomy 2 

Cyst, Thornwaldt's 1 

Foreign body, pharynx 2 

Laceration, tonsil 1 

Nasopharyngitis 21 

Tonsillitis 44 

Tonsils, hypertrophied 9 

Tonsils and adenoids, hypertrophied 391 

Tonsil tab 3 

539 

Diseases of the Ear 

Abrasion, ear 2 

Abscess, post aural 9 

Adenitis, pre auricular . 1 

Adenitis, post aural 

Cerumen 25 

Contusion, ear. 1 

Deafness 13 

Foreign body, ear 8 

120 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 



Diseases of the Ear — Continued 

Furunculosis, ear 

Granuloma, ear 

Laceration, auditory canal 

Mastoiditis 

Otalgia 

Otitis externa 

Otitis media 

Perforated ear drum 

Retracted drum. 

Diseases of the Larynx and Trachea 

Anomaly of larynx 

Foreign body, trachea 

Laryngitis (croup) 

Papilloma, larynx 

Tracheitis 

Diseases of the Esophagus and Bronchus 

Bronchitis 

Bronchiectasis 

Foreign body, esophagus 

Diseases, Miscellaneous 

Adenitis, cervical 

Adenitis, submental 

Asthma 

Carious teeth 

Cellulitis, eyelid 

Cleft palate 

Conjunctivitis 

Contusion, cheek 

Defective speech 

Diphtheria 

Eczema 

Foreign body, gastro-intestinal tract 

Foreign body, stomach 

Fungus infection of skin 

Furunculosis 

Hemangioma, cheek 

Hemangioma, scalp 

Hoarseness 

Impetigo 

Insect bite 

121 



13 
1 
1 

33 
1 

11 

441 

1 

1 



1 
1 

12 
3 

1 



6 
3 

1 



40 

1 
2 
4 



569 



18 



10 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Diseases, Miscellaneous — Continued 

Laceration, palate 1 

Mental deficiency 4 

Mental retardation 3 

Nevus, cheek 1 

Obstruction, parotoid duct 1 

Parotitis 1 

Pneumonia 2 

Purpura, idiopathic 1 

Refractive error 3 

Scarlet fever 1 

Torticollis, acquired 1 

Tuberculosis, pulmonary 1 

Ulcer, meatal 1 

Upper respiratory infection 43 



Diagnosis deferred 11 

Eloped 6 

No disease 40 



135 



57 



New Cases 299 

Secondary Diagnosis 1,206 

Total 1,505 



PRIVATE WARD THROAT OPERATING 
ROOM REPORT 

Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy 539 

Adenoidectomy with laryngoscopy 1 

Ethmoidectomy 1 

Tonsillectomy 2 

Reduction, fractured nose 2 

Incision and drainage retropharyngeal abscess 2 

Incision and drainage post-aural abscess 2 

Incision and drainage of nose 1 

Adenoidectomy 51 

Mastoidectomy 52 

Bronchoscopy 7 

Post-operative suturing tonsils and adenoids 4 

Post-operative suturing mastoid 1 

Tracheotomy 5 

Removal tracheotomy tube 1 

122 



OTOLARYNGOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Removal post adenoid pack 1 

Esophagoseopy 2 

Laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy 1 

Antrum puncture 2 

Laryngoscopy 6 

Submucous resection 2 

Foreign body in nose 1 

Nasopharyngoscopy 1 



Total 687 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ORTHODONTIA 
AND DENTAL DEPARTMENTS 

The Orthodontia Department shows very satisfactory and expand- 
ing progress, due in no small part to the closer co-operation that is 
possible in the new quarters in the Bader Building. 

Consultations are now an every day occurrence resulting in a 
greatly improved service rendered the children. 

Most of the children with a cleft palate do not have a full com- 
pliment of teeth and many of them have various size openings in 
their palate, which interferes with the normal functions of the oral 
cavity, i.e., speaking, eating, etc. 

During the past year the Orthodontia Service has been expanded 
to include the construction of dentures which close the opening in the 
palate, supply missing teeth, thus restoring more nearly normal oral 
functions, facial contours and to a large degree eliminates the in- 
feriority complex, which is a great handicap to these children. 

The training in speech correction given to all the children by 
Miss Segal completes the process of restoring the self respect so 
necessary to this type of patients. 

Dr. Paul Gilpatrick has recently joined the staff to care for the 
caries, extractions, etc., and in the next report we intend to report a 
clean bill of health of the oral cavities for all children receiving 
orthodontic treatment. 

The Children's Hospital is a "Gold Mine" for dental research 
and adequate funds must be obtained from some source to provide a 
trained research investigator to take full advantage of the material 
available in the Hospital. 

123 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Treatments 400 

Failed to keep appointments 135 

New patients examined 23 

New patients accepted for treatment 10 

Between forty and fifty patients on the average receive active 
treatment, with a varying number on the observation list. 

Harry W. Perkins, D.M.D. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT 
OF STOMATOLOGY 

This hospital offers an extraordinary opportunity for the study of 
dental disease in conjunction with metabolic and other systemic 
disturbances. The correlation between defective tooth formation, 
nutritional deficiencies, and endocrine disturbances has been es- 
tablished by workers in many parts of the world including members 
of this department. The application of this knowledge to the 
problem of diseases of the soft tissues of the mouth has proven most 
effective in clinical practice. The situation with regard to dental 
caries is quite different. This disease is almost universal in its oc- 
currence. Its importance to the public health is emphasized by the 
high percentage of rejections under the Selective Service Act for 
dental defects, almost entirely due to tooth decay and its sequellae. 
While considerable evidence indicates a correlation between meta- 
bolic disease and susceptibility to tooth decay, systematic studies by 
competent medical and dental clinicians with adequate technical 
facilities and assistance are almost entirely lacking. Because of the 
nature of the problem, such studies require a carefully planned 
program extending over a period of several years. The patients, the 
clinical staff, and the laboratory facilities are available here and 
adequate financial support would make it possible to attack a problem 
of great importance to the public welfare. 

During the past year, Drs. Robert Legg and Maurice Dinnerman 
have served as dental house officers. Dr. Legg is at present a lieu- 
tenant in the Dental Corps and is stationed at Fort Devens. 

The dental house officers have cared for the teeth of the patients 
who remain in the hospital for long periods, especially those in the 
Orthopedic Wards. Cleanings, fillings and extractions are among 
the operations performed for these patients. In addition, they have 

124 



STOMATOLOGY DEPARTMENT 

taken care of emergency toothaches and have assisted at surgical 
operations on the face and jaws. Under supervision they have 
answered consultations concerning various oral lesions and abnormal 
development of the masticatory apparatus. They have also con- 
structed appliances to be used in reconstruction of the teeth and jaws 
as an adjunct to oral and plastic surgical operations. Finally, with 
the assistance of the Pathology Department, they have continued 
the study of the mandibles of patients examined post-mortem to 
which previous reports have referred. 

STATISTICAL REPORT 

Department of Stomatology 

Consultations 15 

Examination for special studies 67 

Permanent fillings 77 

Temporary fillings , 86 

Extractions, permanent teeth 9 

Extractions, deciduous teeth 43 

X-ray examinations 

Patients 57 

Films. 227 

Paul E. Boyle, D.M.D. 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT 
OF BACTERIOLOGY 

The Bacteriology Department of the Hospital looks in three direc- 
tions: — (1) toward the clinicians who supply material for analysis; 
(2) toward the research laboratories of the world and of Boston and 
Harvard in particular for fundamental advances in bacteriology and 
immunology; and (3) toward the Hospital administration to provide 
ways and means for applying scientific knowledge to the problems of 
patients. In recent years clinicians have become noticeably more 
and more aware of the value of the exact information which may be 
obtained by cultures and other technical procedures of the labora- 
tory, both for diagnosis and for observation of the course of disease. 
In turn the laboratory attempts to adopt the most helpful new 
developments which are constantly pouring from research labora- 
tories. Our proximity to the Harvard Medical School is a fortunate 

125 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

circumstance, for its bacteriologists and immunologists are extra- 
ordinarily willing to discuss problems arising from patients ill with 
diseases difficult to diagnose or treat. The position of the Infants' 
and the Children's Hospitals in the community tends to draw these 
difficult cases to its wards. Among them are many of bacteriologic 
interest. Now and then our problems serve to inspire a definite 
line of research in the laboratories of the Medical School, thus 
providing a double, two-way bond. 

The recent, rapid growth of this department continued through- 
out 1940. The increase in the total number of analyses over the 
previous year was twenty-two per cent, in spite of the fact that in 
the second half of 1940 routine pneumococcus typings of the sputum 
of patients ill with pneumonia were discontinued. This simplifica- 
tion resulted in a great saving of time in the laboratory and 
was made possible by the evidence of previous years that infants and 
children ill with pneumonia now rarely need specific serum, for which 
typing of the sputum is a prerequisite. Chemotherapy, which has 
revolutionized the treatment of infectious diseases, has been sub- 
stituted largely for serum and thus has reduced to a considerable 
extent the need for painstaking typings. 

As specific therapy increases, the demand for specific determina- 
tion of the causative agent increases. The laboratory attempts to be 
of assistance here. One item in the statistical report is significant. 
The number of cultures of specimens of spinal fluid almost equalled 
the number of blood cultures. This parity may in large part be due 
to the extraordinary increase in interest in infections of the central 
nervous system. These infections are far commoner in infants and 
children than in adults and for them new serums and drugs, such as 
the sulfonamides, are being devised. For example, anti-influenzal 
rabbit serum produced in our own laboratory (by benefit of research 
funds) has brought about a higher percentage of cures of this form 
of meningitis (our commonest) than ever before. 

Although the treatment of bacterial meningitis has advanced 
over a broad front, the application in our laboratory of the tre- 
mendous recent increase in the knowledge of virus diseases, particu- 
larly of the nervous system, falls short of what is essential, because 
of lack of funds and space for the special procedures required for 
work in this field. It is hoped that, in one way or another, means 
will soon be found to extend our usefulness in this important di- 
rection. 

126 



BACTERIOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Our report would be incomplete without some mention of the 

great loss to the laboratory and the Hospital through the illness of 
Miss Marian Sweet, who was in charge of the work of the laboratory 
through so many years of its expansion. She obtained a leave of 
absence early in February, 1941. Already encouraging reports have 
been received of her progress in convalescence. 

John A. V. Davies, M.D. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BACTERIOLOGY LABORATORY 

For the year ending December 31, 1940 

Bacteriological Examinations 
Cultures from 

Blood. 1,508 

Spinal fluid : 1,430 

Surgical specimens and miscellaneous cultures 6,554 

Feces 696 

Urine 1,743 

Guinea pig inoculations 124 

Agglutinations 152 

Vaccines prepared 35 

Pneumococcus typings 462 

12,704 

Clinical Pathology 

Routine urine examinations 3,272 

Blood 

Hemoglobin estimations 1,798 

Red cell counts 1,729 

White cell counts 2,781 

Differential counts 1,501 

Bleeding time estimations 18 

Clotting time estimations 19 

Blood groupings 336 

Hinton tests 705 

Spinal fluid examinations 100 

Feces examinations 34 

Electrocardiograms 472 

Basal metabolism tests 117 

Sedimentation rates 307 

Miscellaneous 38 

Total 13,227 

Bacteriological Examinations 12,704 

Total 25,931 

1939 Total 21,174 

Increase 1940 = 4757 = +22% 

1939 

127 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF THE ROENTGENOLOGICAL 
DEPARTMENT 

The year 1940 sets a new record for the Department of Roent- 
genology. During this year the Department has had more than 
double the number of patient visits recorded for 1926 when the 
position of Roentgenologist was first placed on a full time basis. 
Part of this increase is undoubtedly due to the growth of the hospital 
as a whole. We believe that it is also a reflection of the increased 
value of Roentgenology in the diagnosis and treatment of disease 
during early life. 

An unfortunate corollary of medical progress is the fact that most 
advances result in complication of the procedures involved. Never- 
theless, all other considerations are of secondary importance when- 
ever the accuracy of diagnosis and consequent treatment can be 
improved. This may sometimes involve a loss of efficiency because 
mass production methods cannot be applied to the practice of med- 
icine. An example of this principle was seen during the past year 
when a change was made in the method of roentgenological examina- 
tions of the urinary tract. This type of examination had become 
standardized almost to the point of mechanical routine with the 
result that many of the examinations had to be repeated because a 
standard procedure could not allow sufficient leeway for individual 
variations. Study of the situation resulted in a complete change in 
the method of approach — a change which involved prompt develop- 
ment of each film and step by step guidance of each examination by 
the Roentgenologist. That this additional effort was well expended 
is shown by the fact that the words "unsatisfactory" and "incom- 
plete" have practically disappeared from the X-ray reports of uro- 
graphic studies. The change in this type of examination is only one 
example of the possibility for future development and improvement 
in the accuracy of roentgenological procedures. 

The X-ray dark room has sometimes been termed the "heart" of 

a roentgenological department. A great improvement in this phase 

of our radiographic work was made when the old processing tank 

was replaced by a tank with greater film capacity and accurate 

thermostatic control. This change will in future years minimize the 

film deterioration which takes place when processing is hurried. It 

has already brought about a noticeable improvement in the uniformity 

of results. 

128 



ROENTGENOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

Statistical analysis may occasionally be misleading. The num- 
ber of patient visits does not necessarily indicate the amount of work 
performed in this department because many patients are referred for 
examination of two or more parts of the body. A single patient visit 
may thus entail several examinations in so far as time and material 
are concerned. For this reason, both the number of patient visits 
and the total number of examinations have been included in the 
statistical part of this report for 1940. 

Respectfully submitted, 
George M. Wyatt, M.D., Roentgenologist 

TABULATION OF PATIENTS 

Out-Patient Department 

1939 J 940 
Medical 2,348 2,243 

Surgical 1,274 1,291 

Orthopedic 1,186 1,429 

Throat 142 171 



Total 4,950 5,134 

Ward 

Medical 1,234 1,134 

Surgical 1,123 1,212 

Orthopedic 865 831 

Throat 231 252 



Total 3,453 3,429 

Infants 882 999 

Private 1,053 1,324 

Bader Building 279 229 

Isolation 66 59 

Miscellaneous 65 138 

Doctors 62 50 

Nurses 232 277 

Employees 192 223 



Total 2,831 3,299 

Total patient visits 11,979 12,470 

Total treatments 745 608 

Total diagnostic visits 1 1,234 1 1,862 

Total diagnostic exminations 14,647 

Total diagnostic exposures (films) 33,791 35,990 

129 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF PHYSICAL THERAPEUTICS 
DEPARTMENT 

At the present time, considerable attention is being paid throughout 
the country to the organization of hospital physical therapy depart- 
ments. Emphasis is being placed on the necessity for adequate 
medical supervision of the patients and technicians. Therefore, it 
seems timely to outline the routine in use at this Hospital. 

Patients on the wards and in the out-patient are referred for 
physical therapy either by members of the Visiting Staff, usually 
through the senior house officer of the service, or by the staff 
directly. Written orders are given and the physical therapy charts 
become part of the permanent record of the patient. Progress of the 
case is watched by the house officer on duty in the special clinics. 

The physical therapy technicians attend orthopedic ward rounds 
and are present at the examination of patients in the orthopedic 
out-patient clinic, the posture and scoliosis clinic, and the Infantile 
Paralysis Clinics. On the other services, they consult the doctor in 
charge before starting treatment on cases referred and report to him 
for further information. 

The technicians are members of the American Physiotherapy 
Association, the Massachusetts Physiotherapy Association, and are 
registered in the American Registry of Physical Therapy Technicians. 

The equipment consists of a gymnasium with stretching apparatus 
and mirrors, Hubbard tub, therapeutic exercise pool and whirlpool 
bath, infra red and radiant light bakers for thermotherapy, ultra 
violet lamps with quartz burners, faradic and galvanic current 
machines, and a long wave diathermy. On account of the effect of 
alternating current appliances on the electroencephalograph machine 
on the fourth floor of Bader, it is not practical to use short wave 
diathermy or portable carbon arc lamps in the building. 

The large carbon arc lamp and the solarium have been removed 
to make possible a new functional training room for the handicapped 
on the sixth floor. 

The 1940 summary of the diagnosis of cases referred shows a 
wide variety. 

There has been a definite increase in the number of treatments 
given on the Orthopedic Service and some decrease in the number 
of light treatments ordered on the other services. 

The department is able to carry on the amount of work done 

130 



THERAPEUTICS DEPARTMENT 

only because of the help of the physiotherapy students from Harvard 
Medical School. These women, who are either graduate nurses or 
graduate physical education teachers, obtain much of their clinical 
experience with childien at this Hospital. 

We have continued the system of counting as one treatment a 
physiotherapy appointment during which three or even four dif- 
ferent types of physiotherapy are used. 

The figures for the Neurological Muscle Training Clinic and for 
the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Clinic are given in the reports of 
those clinics. 

Janet B. Merrill, 
Director of Physical Therapeutics 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY STATISTICS 



General Light 

P.T. Therapy Pool 

Hospital Wards Cases Cases Cases 

Orthopedic 128 17 30 

Surgical 9 5 3 

Medical 18 1 

Neuro-Surgical. . . . 12 3 
Neurological (pri- 
vate) 1 

Private 5 3 2 

Infants' Hospital. .010 

Staff 3 2 

Isolation 1 

Throat 5 1 

Training School. . . 11 2 

Employees 12 1 

205 35 36 



General 








P.T. 


Light 


Pool 




Treat- 


Treat- 


Treat- 




ments 


ments 


ments 


Total 


3,760 


570 


2,043 


6,373 


27 


47 


21 


95 


51 





23 


74 


149 


25 





174 


1 








1 


27 


23 


213 


263 





2 





2 


2 


7 





9 


1 








1 


53 


7 





60 


25 


11 





36 


45 


37 





82 



4,141 729 2,300 7,170 



0. P. D. Pool 
H.I. P. C... 

Private 



37 
6 



1,227 
192 



43 
131 



1,419 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



O. P. D. 

Orthopedic 194 1,712 

Arthritic 33 114 

Surgical 10 102 

Private 1 2 

Neuro-Surgical. . 3 111 

Medical 3 9 

Throat 2 2 

Scoliosis 397 2,612 

Light 1 13 

H. I. P. C 1,013 4,320 

Respirator 1 37 

Neurological 194 3,429 



1,852 12,463 



DISEASES RECEIVING PHYSICAL THERAPY 

I. Congenital Malformations 0. P. D. House Adult 

Anomalies 5 9 

Arthrogryposis 2 

Chest deformity 1 

Club feet 3 3 

Dislocation of hip 31 9 

Ligamentous relaxation 1 

Multiple contractures 1 

Scoliosis 42 4 

Spina bifida 7 2 

Sprengle's deformity 3 

Torticollis 30 15 

II. Deformities and Disabilities Following 
Injury or Disease 

Bursitis 4 

Burn 6 

Coxa plana 1 1 

Dislocations, sprains, injuries 8 2 5 

Fractures 2 3 1 

Poor posture 29 2 

Pronated feet 4 

Rickets 1 

Scaleni syndrome 1 

Scoliosis — functional 261 

Scoliosis — structural 48 1 

Slipped femoral epiphysis 2 1 

Tight posterior structures 3 

132 



THERAPEUTICS DEPARTMENT 

III. Non-Tuberculous Infections 

Arthritis 39 12 

Osteomyelitis 4 5 

Septic joints 4 4 



IV. Paralysis and Other Neuro-Muscular Diseases 

Amyotonia 1 

Brain tumor 5 

Dystrophies 10 8 

Hydrocephalus . 1 

Paralysis — athetoid 1 

Paralysis — brachial 35 9 

Paralysis — cord lesion 5 7 

Paralysis — peripheral nerve 8 7 

Paralysis — spastic 7 10 

Paralysis, Volkmann's 2 

Poliomyelitis, anterior 8 26 

Poliomyelitis, anterior, post-operative 1 16 

Post-encephalitis paralysis 1 4 

Pneumococcus Meningitis 1 



V. Miscellaneous 0. P. D. House Adult 

Asthma 6 2 

Cyst 1 1 

Dermatomyositis 1 

Diagnosis deferred . 19 4 1 

Fatigue 3 

Leiner's disease 1 

Malnutrition 1 

Mastoid 2 

Orthostatic albuminuria 8 

Osteochondritis 1 

Pneumonia 1 

Sinusitis 1 

Skin lesions 1 2 2 

Bronchiectasis 1 

Intestinal Obstruction 1 

Megacolon 1 

Pyloric stenosis 1 

Ulcerative colon 1 



642 198 20 
133 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



REPORT OF THE MUSCLE TRAINING CLINIC 

FOR THE YEAR 

For the year ended December 31, 1940, fifty-seven new patients were 
admitted to the Muscle Training Clinic for treatment. Three old 
patients were discharged either because of age or because of change 
of residence, and one new patient was regarded as ineligible for treat- 
ment. The remainder were diagnosed as follows: 

Brachial Palsy 8 

Cerebral Palsy 39 

Hydrocephalus 2 

Miscellaneous 8 

57 



A total of 3,371 treatments were given to patients previously 
admitted. 

Randolph K. Byers, M.D. 



134 



HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 

THE HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS 

COMMISSION 

This year rounded out the twenty-fourth year of service of the 
After Care Clinic of the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission. 
Despite the fact that there were fewer new cases of infantile paralysis 
in Massachusetts during the year than usual, there was no lessening 
in the activity of the organization or the demands upon it, both in 
the Central Clinic at the Children's Hospital and in the Field Clinics. 

Field Clinics continue to be held according to a regular schedule 
in Arlington, Bevetly, Dedham, East Boston, Haverhill, Lawrence, 
Lowell, Maiden, Quincy, Somerville and Waltham. The activity of 
the Central Clinic makes up the greater bulk of the work, although 
4,500 treatments were given in the Field Clinics in 1940. 

The Orthopedic Nurses of the Community Health Association 
have assisted greatly in the care of patients in the Boston area; 
nearly 3,000 treatments were given by them during the year under 
the direction of the Clinic Surgeon. A plan has been established 
whereby the member nurses visit the Clinic with their patients for 
supervised direction. As this is worked out in more detail, it should 
allow a more direct continuity of supervision and care. 

There has been considerable change in the personnel of the 
clinic organization during the year, which was necessitated by the 
death, the previous year, of Dr. Arthur T. Legg the former Director. 
The Commission was fortunate to have Dr. Albert Brewster as act- 
ing Surgeon-in-Charge until the appointment on June 1, 1940 of 
Dr. William Thomas Green as Director of the After Care Clinic. 
The Director has had as his most capable assistant, Dr. Leo J. 
McDermott, who finished the Residency on the Orthopedic Service 
at Children's on September 1, 194,0. 

Functional Training is assuming a larger position in the work of the 
Clinic. We all appreciate that there are many patients who are 
severely handicapped after all possible gains have been made in the 
return of power to their muscles, and after function has been aided 
by operative procedures and the use of appliances. 

In such badly crippled individuals, the result as far as they are 
concerned depends upon the degree of their social and economic in- 
dependence. Functional Training has as its purpose teaching such 

135 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

individuals to make the best of what they have — to do those every- 
day things which would be excluded from them without such training. 
A local organization, Noemi No. 11, U. O. T. S., has been of 
great assistance to the Clinic over the years. They have provided 
shoes, braces, transportation for patients, and many things which 
have been most helpful. They have been interested in establishing 
a memorial to the late Dr. Arthur T. Legg, the former Director, who 
was beloved by them as by all of us. It has seemed to the members 
of the Commission that a room properly equipped for Functional 
Training would be a useful and most fitting Memorial. With the 
very large assistance of the Children's Hospital, a room on the sixth 
floor of the Bader Building has been remodeled and will soon be 
available for this work. It should be of great aid to the Commission 
and we are most thankful to the Children's Hospital and the Sponsor- 
ing Organization, which has established a sizable Memorial Fund. 

During the year, investigative interest has been directed to many 
problems in the Clinic. The largest project under way at this time 
is a study of the affectations of growth by infantile paralysis, which 
has as its object, practical considerations in equalization of the 
length of the lower extremities, as well as the basic factors involved 
in growth disturbances. In this work, we have been assisted by a 
Grant from the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, 

The Clinic has always served as a teaching unit for undergraduate 
and graduate medical students, as well as physiotherapists, but it is 
desired to increase such activities. A closer relationship with the 
Harvard School of Public Health has been established. Tentative 
plans have been made for the association with the Clinic of a graduate 
student of the School of Public Health to carry out a survey under 
the combined direction of the School and the Director of the Clinic. 

The Commission appreciates greatly the support of those com- 
munities in which Field Clinics are held and takes this opportunity 
to express its gratitude to the individuals, organizations, and asso- 
ciations who through their generosity in time and money make pos- 
sible transportation, shoes, and the necessary apparatus for those 
patients whose families are unable to provide for these needs. 

The fine spirit of cooperation which has always existed between 
the Children's Hospital and the Commission continues to be an 
important part of the daily routine of the Clinic. 

William T. Green, M.D. 
136 



HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 

HARVARD INFANTILE PARALYSIS COMMISSION 

1940 

Number of regular Clinics held at the Children's Hospital. . 139 

Number of Doctor Clinics held in outside cities 4 

Total 143 



Number of visits made to the Children's Hospital Clinics. . 5,720 
Number of old cases seen at the Doctor Clinics in outside 

cities 178 

Number of visits made in the Field by Commission workers 4,578 

Number of new cases seen at the Children's Hospital Clinics 35 

Number of new cases seen at Doctor Clinics in outside cities 

Total 10,511 

Number of visits, cooperative therapy, Community Health Asso- 
ciation 2,836 

Average attendance at Hospital Clinics 41 

Pool treatments 1,227 

Respirator treatments 37 

Total number of individual cases seen 1,013 

Total number of individual cases seen at the Children's Hospital. . . 920 

Number of individual cases treated in the Pool 37 

Number of H. I. P. C. cases operated on in the Children's Hospital 52 



DEPARTMENT OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

This year the Department of Photography again reports an increased 
number of patients photographed. The increase was 7% over 1939. 
The Departments of Surgery and Pathology showed an increase over 
last year, other departments were about the same. There was a 
considerable increase in the number of lantern slides made, also, a 
large increase in color photography. 

This department has taken on the added task of producing 
photostatic copies of records for the Administration and the School 
of Nursing. The copying done by the Photostat machine relieves 
some of the pressure on the stenographers in the Record Library, as 
they had hitherto been required to type copies of records to go out 
of the Hospital. 

A new development in orthopedic photography is photographing 
the plantar aspect of the feet with complete weight bearing. The 

137 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

method of doing this was worked out by this department. The 
apparatus involved is very simple, comprising a metal stand, a sheet 
of heavy plate glass and a plane surfaced mirror. The results have 
been very good so far. 

The problem of producing sufficient light for photographic pur- 
poses without great heat and glare, and without unduly alarming the 
patient, continues to be a disturbing factor to the department. 
Information is now being gathered in regard to the Edgerton high- 
speed technique. Commercial adaptations of this method are too 
expensive to consider, but it is believed at this time that two of 
these units might be built in the Hospital shops at comparatively 
small expense. Basically, this method produces, with the aid of a 
special lamp, a low intensity light for focussing purposes, and 
synchronized with the shutter, a very short, very high intensity 
flash. The time of the flash is in the vicinity of 1-50,000 of a second. 
Two lamps of this type would solve various problems for the de- 
partment. This method is not to be confused with flash bulbs, as 
this tube is used over and over. It amounts to a glass enclosed arc. 
The lamps in present use would continue to be employed for certain 
special routines. 

In September the Photographer attended the convention of the 
Biological Photographic Association at Milwaukee, Wiscorisin and 
showed a few experimental pictures made with the previously men- 
tioned plantar view foot apparatus. He was honored by being elected 
Vice President of the Association. 

Negative storage is becoming a problem, not of lack of space, 
but of proper storage. At present the negative envelopes are stored 
on edge on open shelves. A large quantity of dirt works into and 
onto the envelopes and causes much trouble. Re-prints are fre- 
quently requested from old negatives and the negatives must be 
cleaned before they can be printed, all of which is time consuming. 

Charge slips turned in to Book-keeping for sale of lantern slides, 
extra prints, etc., totaled $1,535.37 in 1940. This is the highest that 
this item has ever been and coupled with a supply cost of $816.95 
for all photo supplies, minus an inventory of $64.86 on unused sup- 
plies, leaves a balance in favor of the department of $783.28 to be 
applied on salaries, overhead, etc. 

In conclusion, the photographer wishes to thank the Administra- 

138 



PHOTOGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT 



tion and the Staff for their fine cooperation with this department in 
the many situations which arise each year. 

Ferdinand Harding 



Papers written and published in 1940 were as follows: 

"Lens Hoods." Jour. Biol. Photo. Assn., Vol. 8 No. 3. 

"Photographing Colored Drawings with Kodachrome Film," Jour. Biol. 
Photo. Assn., Vol. 8 No. 4. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHOTOGRAPHY ANNUAL REPORT 

1940 STATISTICS 

Service Cases Views 

Orthopedic 407 981 

Surgical 755 1,836 

Medical 104 226 

Infants' Hospital 55 130 

Pathology — Infants' Hospital 121 211 

Pathology— Children's Hospital 229 414 

Scoliosis Clinic. 54 225 

Harvard Infantile Paralysis Commission 76 225 

Dental Clinic 5 14 

Director's Office (Publicity) 5 18 

Ward 9 2 3 

Ward 6 7 13 

Private Ward 19 43 

Muscle Training Clinic 2 5 

School of Nursing 1 2 

Total 1,842 4,346 

Miscellaneous negatives made 1,536 

Miscellaneous prints made 3,290 

Lantern slides made 894 

Color slides made 68 

Motion pictures made 35 

Motion picture footage 1,700 ft. 

Photostats made (2 months) 173 

For scoliosis clinic — 30 packs developed, 342 prints made 

Charge slips $1,535.37 

Inventory, unbroken packages $64.86 

Cost of supplies and apparatus $816.95 

Total negatives made 5,597 

Total prints made 7,549 

139 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY REPORT 1940 

The usual greeting as the Occupational Therapist enters the ward 
is, "Toy Lady, did you bring my work?" A child does not distinguish 
between work and play, but between that which he does or does not 
want to do. Adults often think of this phase of Occupational Ther- 
apy as play, but to the child this play is a serious business. Day by 
day, by lifting, pulling and pushing, each child is strengthening his 
body, and his whole response to life becomes more vivid. 

The number of children given Occupational Therapy in 1940 
were 1,467. The number of projects completed in 1940 were 1,558. 
The number of contacts made, or Occupational Therapy treatments 
given, not including recreation of any kind was 9,333. 

Departmental cost, exclusive of salary was $398.18. This in- 
cludes light, heat, laundry, cleaning, telephone and Occupational 
Therapy supplies. This means a cost of 27 cents per child, per year. 

Twenty-two students affiliated from the Boston School of Oc- 
cupational Therapy in 1940. The length of time spent by each 
student at the hospital was six weeks. This represents a total of 
5,000 hours of service. 

Eighty-four volunteers have contributed 3,411 hours in assisting 
in various Occupational Therapy proceedures with the children. 
This group represents Wheelock School of Kindergarten, Junior 
League, Garland School, and individuals personally interested in 
philanthropic work. 

Two Wheelock seniors conduct an activity program with chil- 
dren who are waiting for their doctor's appointment in the Medical 
Out-Patient. This work is done under the direction of the Occupa- 
tional Therapy Department. 3,259 children were kept busy in 1940. 
2,582 articles were completed and taken home. This phase of work 
has been a great boon in keeping the children quiet while waiting. 
Cost of these supplies is also included in the figure quoted for de- 
partmental expense. 

As in past years, each affiliating group of nurses received a one- 
hour lecture on Occupational Therapy and its relation to "Child 
growth and the Normal Child." This lecture was given every six 
weeks and the total number attending was 296. Second-year 
Children's Hospital nurses received twelve hours, consisting of 
lecture, craft, library service and ward assignments in Occupational 

140 



SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

Therapy with the children. This course is repeated four times a 
year. Total number of nurses attending was fifty. The total 
number of hours devoted to lecture and instructions of nurses by 
the director of Occupational Therapy was fifty-six. 

The library service is in charge of Occupational Therapy students 
assisted by volunteers. There was in 1940 a circulation of over 2,000 
books. The children are helped with intelligent book selection. 

The Occupational Therapy Committee consists of members who 
have given their whole-hearted assistance. The department wishes 
to extend its thanks to them, to the Welfare Committee and to the 
members of the staff for their cooperation. 

Jessie A. Ness, O.T.R., 
Director Occupational Therapy Department 



REPORT OF THE SOCIAL SERVICE 
DEPARTMENT 

In December 1939 the former Director, Miss Mildred Hearsey, re- 
signed to take a new position and in July 1940 the present Director 
took up her duties. In the interim period, the Social Service De- 
partment functioned under Miss Manon McGinnis, Neurological 
worker and senior member of the Staff. Before her departure Miss 
Hearsey filled three vacancies with the following well trained social 
workers; Miss Emily Marsh who came to the Infants' Hospital and 
the medical wards of The Children's Hospital from the Presbyterian 
Hospital in New York; Miss Elizabeth Bryant from the Hospital of 
the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia to the Medical Out- 
Patient Department, and Miss Eunice Usher, a recent graduate of 
the Simmons School of Social Work, to the Surgical Service. Miss 
Elizabeth Peirce continued on the Orthopedic Service and in March 
1940, Mrs. Evelyn Karp left the Wellesley Convalescent Home of The 
Children's Hospital to work with the Cardiac and Rheumatic Fever 
patients of this hospital. This same Staff has continued throughout 
the past year. 

Mrs. Simmons, after five and one-half years of service carrying 
some of the non casework duties and obligations of the Department, 
resigned in December 1940 to enter private life. Her loss will be 
felt, not only in the Social Service Department, but in the several 
other hospital groups where her duties extended. 

141 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

In October two students, one from the Simmons School of Social 
Work and one from Boston University School of Social Work came 
to us for training and practical experience. For two months this 
last summer, a volunteer gave us almost full time service, helping 
with clerical routines and follow up visiting. 

Consistent volunteer aid, not necessarily full time, but lasting 
throughout the year would be a useful asset to the Department. 
It would be especially valuable to have help in doing some of the 
home visiting involved in getting children back under medical 
treatment. This work is important; its bulk is large and it takes 
a great deal of time. An intelligent, tactful person with some skill 
in dealing with people, does not need social service training to 
assist in this service and can thus release the social workers for 
other obligations which require more special training. 

The teaching program for student nurses worked out with the 
School of Nursing has continued, temporarily curtailed, but similar 
to that of other years. Ten classroom lectures were given by the 
Social Service Staff. Student nurses, chiefly under the supervision 
of the Orthopedic worker, have come to the Department for a ten 
day period of observation and practical experience. 

The index files, the financial accounting and the social records 
have been changed to correspond more uniformly with similar 
hospital systems. 

The growing problem of transportation for our children has been 
taken care of by the generous efforts of the Red Cross who are 
bringing to and from clinics increasing numbers; by the income from 
the Esther Andrews Solby Fund for taxi service and through the 
interest of several people who have given of their time and money 
to meet emergency and special calls. The Permanent Charity Fund 
Incorporated, the Boston Council of Social Agencies and friends of 
the Department have given money to meet special needs arising out 
of illness. The Zonta Club of Boston has continued for the seventh 
year to finance an occupational therapist one day a week to work with 
a few of our children in their own homes. 

Social casework treatment has been given to 1730 different pa- 
tients during the year, plus a number of others, not counted statis- 
tically, who have received other types of service. 

Having come recently from doing social work with sick adults, 
I find the emphasis in relation to the problems of sick children is 
new and striking. There are still environmental situations to be 

142 



SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

considered in relation to illness, social problems contributing to and 
arising from it and emotional reactions. However, when the child 
is the patient, these factors all have to be considered in a double 
relationship. There is the child on one hand with his needs physical, 
social and emotional, and on the other, the parents, responsible for 
him and vitally a part of his life. The other major difference in social 
work with children comes in relation to responsibility for a person 
not yet mature enough to make his own decisions or to guide his own 
destiny. For this reason one feels obligated to make every effort to 
see that the child gets what he needs. Although parents are prim- 
arily responsible, society as represented by the doctor and social 
worker is also concerned. The community resources for children are 
more extensive than for adults; the possibilities for constructive work 
greater and the outlook for satisfactory results more hopeful. 

During this unsettled period of changing personnel and the 
orientation of the new Director, the Social Service Department has 
managed to carry on successfully, chiefly because of the consistent 
support and loyalty of the Administration, the Medical Staff and 
other hospital groups. 

Marion W. Hall 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING AND 
NURSING SERVICE 

The Children's Hospital School of Nursing at the end of the year 
numbers 107 students and 77 affiliating students who come from 
fifteen different schools. During the year 38 students were gradu- 
ated and 42 students were admitted. The geographical distribution 
of the entering group showed that all the New England States, New 
York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Montana were repre- 
sented. Thirteen of these students had from one to four years of 
college, three had one semester of college and three had post graduate 
work in high school. On the basis of the scholastic aptitude and other 
tests, these candidates were all recommended and were graded as 
follows as to their chance of success in nursing: 

Excellent 11 

Very good 18 

Reasonably good 13 

42 

143 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

Nine students were removed from the roll for the following 
reasons: 

Physical condition — Preclinical 1 

Family conditions — Preclinical 1 

Unsatisfactory record — 1st year 2 

Return to college — 1st year 1 

Married — 2nd year 2 

Did not like nursing — 2nd year 2 

9 

Two of these students were in the school less than one week. 

Graduation exercises this year were held in Gardner House on 
June 4, and the address was given by Mrs. Robert McClellan, 
member of the Board of Control of the Department of Nursing at 
Skidmore College. At the end of the calendar year 1940 we find that 
the disposition of these graduates is as follows: 

Married 3 

Institutional work (C. H.) 17 

Institutional work (other hospitals) 12 

Public health 2 

Private duty 5 

39 

There have been a number of changes in head nurses during the 

year, and resignations were received from Miss Kathryn Cheney 
who had served as orthopedic supervisor for nine years and left to 
take a public health course; Miss Esther Read, supervisor of the 
neurological unit for ten years, who accepted a position at the 
Neurological Institute in New York; and Miss Martha Ghen, 
supervisor of the throat operating room, who had been employed 
here for eleven years and also left to take a public health course. 
Miss Dorothy Pratt, formerly a head nurse on the orthopedic service 
and more recently night supervisor, was appointed to the position 
of orthopedic supervisor. Miss Elizabeth Logan, a graduate of the 
Yale School of Nursing, formerly in charge of the orthopedic hut, 
Children's Memorial Hospital, Montreal, and recently a member of 
the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Staff, filled the vacancy on the neu- 
rological and behavior unit. 

The number of students completing affiliations during 1940 

were as follows: 

Students 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital (6 months' experience in adult medical 

and surgical nursing) 34 

Boston Lying-in Hospital (3 months' obstetrical nursing experience) 33 

144 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

N. E. Deaconess Hospital (1 months' experience in their operating 

rooms) 37 

McLean Hospital (3 month's experience in psychiatric nursing). . . 11 

Public health course (8 weeks' experience with Simmons College in 

conjunction with the Community Health Association) 13 

During the year 296 affiliating students, representing sixteen 
schools, completed the course of instruction and practice in the care 
of children. 

In addition to the teaching of our own students and affiliating 
students, the school was responsible for four weeks of instruction 
in orthopedic nursing to five public health nurses as part of the course 
given by Simmons College in conjunction with the Harvard Physio- 
therapy Department and the Community Health Association. The 
school also participates in the teaching of the students in the Har- 
vard Physiotherapy Department and in turn that department teaches 
massage to student nurses. Two students were received from Sim- 
mons College this year for field experience in ward administration, 
and one graduate nurse was given three months' experience in pedia- 
trics to enable her to qualify for registration in Massachusetts. 

The health record of the students is always a matter of concern, 
but we are glad to report that for Children's Hospital students in 
residence we have had less average days of illness per student, 
namely, 9.7 days. This is a decrease of 3.2 days per student from last 
year or 214.5 less infirmary days than in 1939. Unfortunately, we 
cannot report an equal gain in the record for affiliating students, 
which is 1.1 days higher per student than last year. One factor 
must be kept in mind in comparing the infirmary days for affiliating 
students and for Children's Hospital students, namely, that the 
number of different affiliating students is approximately four times 
that of the Children's Hospital students in residence within a year, 
since affiliating students change every three months. The record 
for five years shows : 

C. H. Students Affiliating Students 

Daily Inf. Av. Days Daily Inf. Av. Days 

Residence Days of Illness Residence Days of Illness 

1940 74.5 727 9.7 79.2 840 10.6 

1939 73 941.5 12.9 81 771 9.5 

1938 68.856 710 10.31 78.094 777 9.93 

1937 *70.462 953 13.5 74.218 708 9.53 

1936 71.584 813 11.35 74.903 813 9 

*Beginning in 1937 this figure has vacation taken out. 

145 



*i 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

It is customary in this school to give a physical examination each 
year to students and to take an X-ray of the chest. The School of 
Nursing Committee voted, in accordance with our own policy, that 
all affiliating students be required to have an X-ray of the chest with- 
in one year of the time of their entrance to this school. 

A slight change has been made in the admission requirements 
in the direction of the general trend in educational institutions toward 
allowing more latitude in the subjects required for entrance. The 
minimum admission requirements must conform to the requirements 
of the State Board, and as this school is registered by the New York 
State Board of Regents we must also keep their requirements in 
mind. The geographical distribution of our own students indicates 
that we have students from a variety of states, so that we try to 
make our admission requirements broad enough to cover those of 
the majority of the states. An individual nursing school may add 
other requirements as it wishes. 

Studies in the field of general education have shown that subject 
requirement is less important in judging a student's chance for success 
in college than the standing of the student in his high school class. 
We obtain the rank of the student, and this factor along with the 
results of the scholastic and other tests, health record and personality 
reports are used in selecting applicants for the school. 

In many plans for national defense programs which involve nurses, 
emphasis is being placed on the need for nurses whose basic course 
in nursing includes experience in communicable disease nursing, 
tuberculosis and psychiatry. We have limited facilities for pro- 
viding experience in communicable disease nursing for all of our stud- 
ents; at the present time we are giving experience in psychiatric 
nursing to about one-third of the senior class. The desirability of 
including psychiatric nursing in the progiam of study was discussed 
by the School of Nursing Committee, and it was voted that the affilia- 
tion be extended to all students when, and as, we can. 

For a number of years the counselling and guidance of students 
has been largely in the hands of two or three of the older members 
of the faculty. With their many other responsibilities it was not 
possible to give the time to an effective program for the development 
of all students. This year we have further developed the counselling 
program so that most of the faculty share in it. During the pre- 
clinical course the counselling is done by the instructors who have 
the closest relationship with this group. After the preclinical period 

146 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

the students are assigned to other faculty members. A student 
may change her counsellor on request or the counsellor may also ask 
that a student be transferred. In a great many schools of nursing 
there is. a social director whose sole responsibility is the extra- 
professional program. Lacking that person, the faculty has tried 
to stimulate extracurricular activities- — again not as successfully as it 
would have desired. We hope, however, with the revival of our 
Student Association this year to do more about extracurricular 
activities. 

In order to appraise the accomplishments of any educational 
institution it is necessary to measure them in terms of its stated 
objectives. For many years the School of Nursing prospectus has 
included a statement as to the aims of the school. Such aims need 
to be examined periodically to determine whether they meet present- 
day needs. The School of Nursing Committee this year considered 
the school's aims, and they are now recorded in the following state- 
ments. 

"The aim of the school is to offer a sound program of study to young 
women who wish to prepare themselves for the practice of the profession 
of nursing which includes intelligent and skilled nursing care of the 
sick, the teaching of the principles and practice of health, and parti- 
cipating as a worker in the prevention of disease, both in the hospital 
and in the community. While the school offers a basic nursing course 
which enables its graduates to qualify as registered nurses both for adults 
and children, it places special emphasis on the care of the child. The 
school aims also to help its students to enrich their own life as individuals 
and to develop the social attitudes and habits which are essential to good 
citizenship." 

During the summer the professional library has been catalogued 
and cross indexed by a professional librarian. This is a matter which 
has needed attention for a long time and should prove to be useful 
in helping students to use the library more effectively. Through 
the library fund also it has been possible to have the library open 
three evenings a week with a part-time librarian in charge. An- 
other of the progressive steps we have been able to take this year — 
because an instructor was appointed late in 1939 — has been a change 
in the time of classes for the affiliating students, making it unneces- 
sary for them to get up early in the afternoon for classes when they 
are on night duty. 

In March the school was visited by representatives of the Com- 

147 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

mittee on Accrediting of the National League of Nursing Education 
for study. The acceptability of the school will be voted on in 
January 1941. 

The History of the School of Nursing was completed this year 
and published by the Alumnae Association. The study of the 
records which was involved revealed a number of procedures which 
had come into use without formal action. One of these was the fac- 
ulty organization as at present constituted. Early in the develop- 
ment of the school provision was made for a faculty organization. 
With the passing of the years, although many new positions have 
been created in the School of Nursing, and there are constant refer- 
ences to the faculty, the records did not reveal that there had been 
any formal action — since the original action — as to who should 
constitute the faculty. The School of Nursing Committee has 
recommended to the Board of Managers that they designate who 
shall constitute the faculty. Our next step should be to define 
qualifications and functions. 

We are glad to report that members of the faculty and head nurses 
who are concerned with the teaching of students on the wards are 
making efforts to improve their preparation. While we do not lessen 
their service load, we try to adjust their free time to make such study 
possible. Many of them are taking courses during the winter at 
Boston University or Simmons College, and last summer four had 
leaves of absence to attend summer school. Unfortunately, schools 
of nursing, except in a few instances, have not provided for faculty 
growth by establishing sabbatical leaves. 

Another important gauge of the quality of a faculty is its mem- 
bers' contribution to the profession as a whole, made through their 
associations with professional organizations. Members of this 
faculty have served in the following capacities during the year: 

National League of Nursing Education 
President 
Member of Committee on Nursing Education in the Care of the Child 

Massachusetts State League of Nursing Education 
Secretary 

Chairman of the Committee on the Care of the Child 
Member of the Program Committee 

Massachusetts State Nurses' Association, District No. 5 
Member of the Program Committee 
Member of the Board of Directors 

148 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Children's Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae Association 
President 
Director 
Chairman of Committee on Loan and Relief Fund 

One of the outstanding events at the State Nurses' convention this 
year was a demonstration of the principles of teaching child develop- 
ment in the home and hospital and an exhibit demonstrating types 
of materials used in creative play activities for children of various 
age groups, for which members of our faculty were largely responsible. 

A study was made during the year of the changes which have 
taken place in the last twenty years with reference to the numbers 
of personnel needed and the necessity for more skilled service. 
While the percentage of increase of patients was far below that of 
the personnel, the reasons therefor were evident. The surgical 
patients in general are no longer simple appendectomies, hernias 
and empyemas for the most part, but children who come for special 
operative procedures in which post-operatively skilled nursing care 
plays an important part. The change in the orthopedic service has 
been from the care of children with tubercular spines and hips to 
those with deformities from poliomyelitis, arthritis and muscle 
dystrophy. A good deal of research work is now being done on the 
orthopedic wards. The development of medical science has made it 
necessary for the nurse to have a knowledge not needed twenty 
years ago, and to acquire skill in an ever increasing number of 
technical procedures. It was found that some twenty odd new 
diagnostic tests or treatments had been introduced, besides the 
constant use of treatments which twenty years ago were compara- 
tively rare. 

These treatments are very time-consuming and consequently 
fewer patients may be cared for by one person. It is a very com- 
plicated set-up today in which the young student is placed, and the 
need for more adequate supervision becomes apparent. We still 
do not have a sufficient number of graduate nurses to share in the 
bedside care of patients. Whenever there are not sufficient nurses 
on the wards or when there is inadequate supervision, it may mean 
that patients do not get treatments promptly which may result in 
retarding recovery or increasing hospitalization; orders may not all 
be carried out; research projects may be retarded or errors made; 
and there is tension created which is not desirable in a situation in 
which the student is there as a learner. 

149 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

REPORT OF NURSING SERVICE 

Some of the foregoing report of the School of Nursing is also a report 
of the nursing service, since student nurses constitute a large per- 
centage of the nursing service for bedside nursing. Changes in 
personnel of those holding dual responsibilities for the School of 
Nursing and nursing service have been reported. The position of 
supervisor of the throat service has been abolished, and the throat 
operating room is staffed from the main operating room. This 
change makes all operating rooms under the operating room super- 
visor and provides for flexibility in service needs. The supervision 
of Ward VI (ear, nose and throat) has been assigned to the surgical 
supervisor. The position of supervisor on the private ward has been 
restored. 

Another anesthetist has been added to make house anesthesia 
more available to the private ward, and another scrub nurse was 
added to the operating rooms. No graduate staff nurses for the 
general wards were added this year. More graduate staff nurses to 
stabilize the nursing service and to provide for expanding medical 
service, which involves an increase in special treatments and in 
research, is an ever pressing need. 

The appointment of a clerk for the three units of the surgical 
service, in order to relieve the head nurse of clerical work and make 
it possible for her better to follow up the care of patients and the 
learning of students, was a forward step in the economical adminis- 
tration of these wards which we hope may be extended to other units. 

Stella Goo stray, 
Superintendent of Nurses and Principal, School of Nursing 

C. H. students enrolled, January 1, 1940 112 

Admissions — C. H. students 42 

Re-entered — C. H. student (previously admitted 

in September 1939) 1 43 

155 

Completed course during year 38 

Removed from roll 

Preclinical students 2 

1st year students 3 

2nd year students 4 9 

47 

150 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

C H. students enrolled, December 31, 1940 108 

Affiliating students enrolled, December 31, 1940 77 



C. H. students on affiliation, not in residence. . . 28 

C. H. students in residence but attending Sim- 
mons College 

Preclinical course .-...- 28 

Public health course 4 32 



185 



60 



Total number of students assigned to wards and 

special departments 125 

Children's Hospital 101 

Infants' Hospital 24 

Affiliating students completing course during 
year 296 

Graduate Staff (Permanent), December 31, 1940 

School of Nursing Office 6 

Children's Hospital, including Infirmary 

Night Supervisors 3 

Day Supervisors 3 

Head Nurses 11 

General Duty Nurses 

Days 9 

Nights . 8 17 

34 



Operating Rooms and Anesthesia 12 

Out-Patient Department 5 

Infants' Hospital 7 

Private Ward (3 floors open) 22 



Total 86 



REPORT OF THE WELFARE COMMITTEE 

I have the honor to present a report of the Welfare Committee for 
the year 1940. As everyone knows, the highlight of the year was 
the Yankee Trading Post — share the profits — which was held in 
October. All credit to Mrs. H. Parker Whittington, who suggested 
this stupendous idea. She, with the help of the Welfare Committee, 
aided by their friends, five hundred and seventy- five in all, worked 
long and hard and carried it out so successfully. Five thousand four 

151 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

hundred and forty-six dollars and fifty cents ($5,446.50) was given 
to the William E. Ladd Chair of Surgery. Four hundred and twenty 
dollars ($420) of goods left over were sold for the benefit of the 
Thrift Shop, and a certain amount was realized in the Thrift Shop 
for the benefit of The Children's Hospital. 

The Avery Lectures have run slightly behind in subscribers, but 
the committee believes it is entirely due to extra demands both of 
time and money. The quality of the lectures was never better and 
the enthusiasm of the listeners is as great as ever. In July, the 
Treasurer sent five thousand dollars ($5,000) to the Treasurer of 
the Hospital to be used as recommended by the Welfare Com- 
mittee. 

The exhibit from The Children's Hospital was again taken to 
Swampscott last May to the Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts 
State Federation of Women's Clubs. 

The Occupational Therapy Department progressed this past year 
in a splendid way. Miss Ness, in charge, carries on and inspires all 
the workers with her enthusiasm. The Occupational Therapy in- 
creases in its scope each year. 

The C. H. Clubs were greatly affected by demands for raising 
War Funds during the summer months and several were not able 
to carry on. More gratitude than ever should go to the faithfuls. 
Outstanding among them is the Buzzards Bay C. H. Club under the 
able leadership of Miss Dorothy Rackemann, which, though under 
pressure to switch to war charities, contributed seven hundred and 
eighty-five dollars and thirty-two cents ($785.32). 

The Holiday Committee, under Miss Bartlett, reports that ten 
church Sunday Schools and two organizations of the Temple Ohabei 
Shalom took care of thirteen of the sixteen holidays. The remaining 
days were taken personally be members of the Welfare Committee. 

The membership of the Birthday Club is not quite so large, but 
the committee is now working on reorganizing their activities and 
hope to steadily increase the membership. 

The Thrift Shop figures show a slight increase over 1939, due 
partially to the articles which were left over from the Yankee Trad- 
ing Post. 

The Girl Scout Committee reports many donations of toys and 
material, and a greater supply of scrap books this past year. 

152 



WELFARE COMMITTEE 

The Tea Committee, under Miss Leland, have given seven teas, 
four for the nurses, one for the volunteer workers for the Trading 
Post, one for the Mattapan Women's Club and one for the Junior 
Unit of the Business and Piofessional Women's and Republican Club 
of Massachusetts. The average attendance at the Nurses' Teas is 
one hundred and seventy-five. 

The Pencil Committee have sold a fairly steady stream, though 
there are still plenty left. Total receipts from June, 1939 to Decem- 
ber, 1940 have been five hundred and twenty-four dollars and ten 
cents ($524.10). The Yankee Trading Post netted approximately 
fifty dollars ($50), and. at two Avery Lectures the proceeds were 
thirty-seven dollars and seventy-five cents ($37.75). 

One hundred ahd fifty articles of children's clothing were knitted 
throughout the state for the Knitting Committee. 

The Welfare Committee has asked our new member, Miss Patricia 
Spencer, the head of the Volunteer System, to give a report at the 
monthly meetings this coming year. We hope to come in closer 
contact with this splendid work. 

It has been our policy this year, as in the past, to impose upon the 
good nature of The Children's Hospital Staff, physicians and sur- 
geons, by asking them to speak at some of the Welfare Committee 
Meetings. The committee feels that these first-hand accounts of 
the splendid work of The Children's Hospital doctors are a most 
valuable stimulus, as well as a great privilege. 

After the Annual Meeting last March, the Welfare Committee 
was hostess to groups from other hospitals for the purpose of dis- 
cussion of activities of their Women's Boards. We were asked to 
become a member of the Hospital Council of Boston, and to send a 
representative to all their meetings. 

After six years of splendid service as Office Secretary to the Wel- 
fare Committee, Miss Doris Hudson resigned on account of her 
approaching marriage. We have been most fortunate in securing the 
services of Miss Barbara Frost as our new secretary. 

In 1940, the Welfare Committee has been very active. I am 
most grateful to the two Vice Chairmen, who, during my absence 
gave me such splendid support, to the Chairmen of the Committees 
and to The Board of Managers who always take so much interest in 
our activities. 

Josephine D. Russell, Chairman 
153 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

MEMBERS OF THE WELFARE COMMITTEE 

January, 1940 to January, 1941 

Mrs. William E. Russell, Chairman 

Mrs. Edwin F. Cave, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. Carl H. Ernlund, Vice Chairman 

Mrs. John G. Palfrey, Corresponding Secretary 

Mrs. John E. Lawrence, Treasurer 

Mrs. Gordon Abbott 

Mrs. Gordon Abbott, Jr. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Allen 

Mrs. Joel M. Barnes 

Miss Betty A. Bartlett 

Mrs. William De Ford Beal 

Mrs. C. Stewart Black 

Mrs. J. Lewis Bremer 

Mrs. Theodore E. Brown 

Mrs. F. Wadsworth Busk 

Mrs. George A. Clapp 

Miss Mary Elizabeth Clarke — New March, 1940 

Miss Louise Coburn 

Mrs. Eliot Codman 

Mrs. Lawrence Coolidge 

Mrs. Channing H. Cox 

Mrs. William C. Cox 

Mrs. Ernest B. Dane, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles Devens 

Mrs. Ralph H. Doane 

Miss Catherine Donnelly 

Mrs. Edward C. Donnelly 

Mrs. Hamilton P. Edwards 

Mrs. Samuel Eliot 

Mrs. Donald Falvey 

Mrs. Charles Feehan — Resigned March, 1940 

Mrs. Vincent L. Greene — New March, 1940 

Mrs. John W. Hallowell 

Mrs. Bartlett Harwood 

Mrs. Stephen Heard 

Mrs. Henry W. Hildreth — Resigned May, 1940 

Mrs. Harold D. Hodgkinson 

Mrs. Russell Howell 

Mrs. John H. Johnson 

Mrs. Alfred Kidder, II 

Mrs. Louis Kirstein 

Mrs. William E. Ladd 

Mrs. Thomas H. Lanman 

Miss Constance B. Learned 

154 



WELFARE COMMITTEE 

Miss Elizabeth C. Leland 

Mrs. Francis B. Lothrop 

Mrs. Frederic W. Mattheis 

Miss Mary E. Meehan 

Mrs. George H. Monks 

Mrs. John W. Myers 

Mrs. Harris J. Nelson 

Mrs. William Brace Pratt 

Mrs. William L. Shearer, III 

Miss Ida C. Smith 

Miss Patricia Spencer — New March, 1940 

Mrs. Frank H. Stewart 

Mrs. Philip Stockton 

Miss Virginia Stone — New March, 1940 

Mrs. William Sutton 

Mrs. Robert C. Tepry 

Mrs. Philip H. Theopold 

Mrs. Richard H. Thompson 

Mrs. Samuel D. Warren 

Mrs. Richard P. Waters 

Mrs. Edwin S. Webster 

Mrs. David A. Westcott — New May, 1940 

Mrs. Alexander Wheeler 

Mrs. Nehemiah H Whitman 

Mrs. H. Parker Whittington 

Mrs. Samuel H. Wolcott 

Mrs. Edgar N. Wrightington — New December, 1940 

Honorary Members 
Mrs. Roger W. Cutler 
Mrs. Frederick S. Mead 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF WELFARE COMMITTEE 

Receipts 

Welfare Committee $5,705.22 

Avery Lectures 5,000.00 

Yankee Trading Post 5,446.50 

Campaign proceeds through Welfare Com- 
mittee 737.50 

Gross Receipts $16,889.22 

Deduct Special Donations 

Avery Lectures proceeds for the following 
purposes: (in accordance with the recom- 

155 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 

mendation of the Committee and the ap- 
proval of the Board of Managers) 

Support of Occupational Therapy for 

one year $1,800.00 

For special duty nurses 2,000.00 

Purchase of thirty new beds 1,200.00 

Yankee Trading Post proceeds for the fol- 
lowing purpose: (in accordance with the 
recommendation of the Committee and 
the approval of the Board of Managers) 

William E. Ladd Chair of Surgery 5,446.50 

Holiday Committee . 105.00 

Expenses 1,701.25 

Balance towards current expenses 1,636.47 

$16,889.22 



156 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 

Abbott, F. B 1915 

Adams, John D 1902 43 Bay State Road, Boston, Mass. 

Adams, John E 1941 Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

Adams, Wm. B 1920 20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

Adelman, Maurice 1922 209 Angel St., Providence, R. I. 

Alexander, Eben, Jr 1940 Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

Allen, Fred H., Jr 1941 300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Allison, Nathaniel 1901 950 East 59th St., Chicago, 111. 

Ames, Frederick D 1934 1201 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

Amiral, Hiram H 1916 9 Walnut St., Worcester, Mass. 

Anderson, Arthur. 1923 122 East 76th St., New York, N. Y. 

Anderson, Randolph L. . . .1926 1023 Quarier St., Richmond, Va. 

Anderson, Samuel A., Jr. ..1925 2326 W. Grace St., Richmond, Va. 

♦Andrews, Edward A 1896 

Andrews, Sumner C 1916 1374 Mass. Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 

Atsatt, Rodney F 1927 1421 State St., Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Aufranc, Otto E 1938 264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Austen, George 1937 Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

Ayer, J. B., Jr 1907 319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Bacon, Joshua E. 1927 Dubuque, Iowa 

Bailey, Orville T 1935 Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 

*Bailey, Walter C 1898 

*Baker, Frederick H 1892 

Baker, Horace M 1917 Lumberton, N. C. 

♦Baldwin, Herman T 1895 

Ball, John D 1923 414 Spurgeon Bldg., Santa Ana, Calif. 

Barber, Carol Glenn 1921 606 Hanna Bldg., Cleveland, O. 

Barnes, Frederick W., Jr. . 1937 Columbia Univ. Med. Sch., New York, N.Y. 

Barr, Joseph S 1928 234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Barrett, M. F 1903 231 Main St., Brockton, Mass. 

Bartlett, Daniel E 1905 

Bartlett, Fred A 1908 308 Beale St., Wollaston, Mass. 

Baty, James M 1929 1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

Beekel, W. Fred 1907 7039 Superior Ave., Cleveland, O. 

Bell, Donald 1921 Tryon, N. C. 

Bender, Norman 1921 115 Saranac Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Benjamin, JamesD., U.S.N. 1914 Naval Air Station, San Diego, Calif. 

Bennett, Charles B 1923 1122 University Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 

Berkley, Hugh K 1916 1136 West 6th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Bigelow, Edward B 1907 9 Walnut St., Worcester, Mass. 

Binns, J. Frazier 1929 706 Church St., Nashville, Tenn. 

Biorkman, Gustav 1918 660 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

♦Deceased 



157 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Billig, Harvey F., Jr 1936 

Birdsong, McLemore 1941 

Blair, Montgomery 1929 

Blodgett, James B 1940 

Blodgett, William H 1939 

Bolowtow, Nathan A 1917 

Bost, Frederick C 1929 

Botsford, Thomas W 1937 

Boutwell, Horace K 1905 

*Bowditch, Henry 1 1902 

Boyd, Robert T 1939 

Bressler-Pettis, Chas. W...1917 

Briggs, Maurice T 1917 

Brines, John K 1939 

Bromer, Ralph 1915 

Brooks, Glidden L 1939 

Brostrom, Frank 1929 

Brown, Charles L 1923 

*Brown, David R 1918 

Brown, F. Bert 1938 

Brown, John C, D.M.D...1939 

Brown, John E., Jr 1933 

Brown, Lloyd T 1908 

Brown, Percy 1900 

Browne, Trevor S 1924 

*Bryant, Charles S 1899 

Bryant, Clarence E 1906 

Burpee, Benjamin P 1916 

Byers, Randolph K 1924 

Byrne, Harry V 1929 

Calder, Harold G 1908 

Campbell, Charles M 1940 

Campbell, James B 1937 

Canada, Charles C 1934 

Canaday, John W 1934 

Carey, Benjamin W 1935 

Carpenter, George 1920 

Carson, Paul C 1921 

Carter, Marshall A 1935 

Catterson, L. F 1926 

Cave, Edwin 1927 

Chamberlain, John W 1935 

Chapin, William E 1926 

Chenoweth, Beach M., Jr. . 1941 



226 Union Oil Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. 
University Virginia Medical School, Char- 
lottesville, Va. 
2222 Q St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 
2218 Iroquois Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
126 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 
384 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 



Iowa City, Iowa 

Lynn Shore Drive, Lynn, Mass. 
1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
629 Pembroke Rd., Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
3439 Prytania St., New Orleans, La. 
2401 North Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

612 Drayton St., Savannah, Ga. 

102 Main St., Andover, Mass. 

270 E. Town St., Columbus, Ohio 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Egypt, Mass. 

711 Professional Bldg., Phoenix, Ariz. 

101 Highland St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
814 Elm St., Manchester, N. H. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

301 Essex St., Lawrence, Mass. 

224 Thayer St., Providence, R. I. 

268 Brookline Ave., Boston, Mass. 

New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn. 

2015 N. Kenmore St., Arlington, Va. 

191 Glen St., Glenns Falls, N. Y. 

Wayne Medical School, Detroit, Mich. 

1205 Behnie Dillon Bldg., Nashville, Tenn. 

401 North Emporia, Wichita, Kan. 

Box DD, Carmel, Calif. 

107^ High Ave., W., Oskaloosa, Iowa 

264 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

3103 W. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 



*Deceased 



158 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Churney, Otto 1929 

Clarke, George W 1904 

Clarke, M. Melvin ....... 1927 

Clement, David H 1939 

Clifford, Stewart 1929 

Cochrane, J. Joseph 1925 

Coe, Herbert E ....1907 

Cogswell, William, Jr 1892 

Cole, Walter F 1920 

Connerley, Marion L 1940 

Cook, Robert J 1916 

Coonse, G. Kenneth 1927 

*Corson, Carl C 1936 

Cozen, Lewis 1938 

♦Crandall, Arthur R. . . 1896 

Crane, Chilton 1940 

Cravener, Edward K 1929 

Crawford, Henry B 1930 

*Creesy, Everett L 1900 

Crothers, Bronson 1912 

Cudney, Ethan B 1925 

Cunningham, Allen 1915 

Curnen, Edward C, Jr. . . . 1938 
Cutler, Charles H 1939 

Daniels, George F 1923 

Darrah, Rufus 1887 

Davidson, William D 1933 

David, S. D 1923 

Davis, Arthur G 1922 

Dawson, Clyde W 1938 

Deering, Charles F 1911 

Derby, Joseph C 1924 

Dexter, Smith 1936 

Diamond, Louis K 1929 

Dietrich, Henry F 1936 

Dillon, Victor M 1931 

Dimmler, Charles L., Jr. ..1939 

Dingle, John H 1940 

Dinnerman, M., D.M.D.. . 1941 

Divers, Douglas 1924 

Dodd, J. E 1912 

Domser, Benjamin M 1911 

Doolittle, Leroy 1917 

Dresel, Rudolph L 1919 

Drissen, Edward 1931 



Zamboanga, P. I., Canada 

Defiance, Ohio 

315 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 

135 Linwood Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

15 W. Central St., Natick, Mass. 

830 Medical & Dental Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

Capitol Bldg., Helena, Mont. 

101 N. Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 

U. S. Navy, Quansett Point, R. I. 

85 Whitney Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

370 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 

2007 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 
146 Barrett St., Schenectady, N. Y. 

35 Chestnut St., Rochester, N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
527 W. Iroquois Rd., Pontiac, Mich. 
76 Church St., Winchester, Mass. 
Rockefeller Institute, New York, N. Y. 
2323 Lake St., San Francisco, Calif. 

129 E. 69th St., New York, N. Y. 

810 E. Powell Ave., Evansville, Ind. 

911 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 

1374 Ida Ave., Columbus, Ohio 

38 Elm St., Danvers, Mass. 

20 Maple St., Springfield, Mass. 

36 Follen St., Cambridge, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
9615 Brighton Way, Beverly Hills, Calif. 
490 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 
Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 
73 3rd St., N.W., Pulaski, Va. 
259 Union Ave., Framingham, Mass. 
506 Prospect Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 
908 Medical Arts Bldg., Duluth, Minn. 
490 Post St., San Francisco, Calif. 
Briton, S. D. 



"Deceased 



159 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Dubois, Robert 1923 

*Dunn, C. H 1902 

Dwan, PaulF 1931 

Dye, Paul J 1926 

Duckett, J. Warner 1929 

*Eastman, Alexander 1900 

*Eaton, Percival J 1885 

Eckles, Lucius E 1935 

Edmonds, Henry W 1941 

Eley, R. C 1929 

Ellis, Richard W. B 1929 

*Ely, T. W 1910 

Emerson, George E 1905 

Emerson, Paul 1915 

Emidy, Herman L 1926 

Eveleth, Charles W 1904 

Ewer, Edward G 1937 

Farber, Sidney 1928 

Fay, William E 1887 

Ferguson, Charles F 1937 

Ferguson, Edward V 1941 

Fisher, James T 1895 

Fisher, William H 1929 

Fiske, Eben W 1912 

*Fiske, William B 1885 

Fitch, Ralph R 1904 

Fitts, John B 1916 

Fitz, George W 1890 

*FitzSimmons, H. J 1910 

Flake, Carlyle G 1937 

*Fletcher, A. S 1909 

Fletcher, F. L 1928 

Flint, Carlton P 1898 

Flook, Samuel E 1939 

Floyd, Cleveland 1905 

Fort, F. L 1923 

Fortune, Clayton W 1930 

Foshee, Clyde H 1931 

Foster, Joseph B 1929 

Foster, Thomas 1919 

Fothergill, Leroy 1930 

Fowler, Charles B 1929 

Franke, Winthrop 1 1941 

Frawley, W. T 1910 



122 East 76th St., New York, N. Y. 

4509 Dupont, So., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Sewall Rd., Wolfeboro, N. H. 
4105 Live Oak St., Dallas, Texas 



715 Fillmore St., Topeka, Kan. 

Mass. General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Rearsby, Leicestershire, England 

52 Columbia St., South Weymouth, Mass. 
422 E. 19th St., Cheyenne, Wyo. 
193 Gaskill St., Woonsocket, R. I. 
1 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 
181 Brookside Dr., Berkeley, Calif. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Melrose, Mass. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 

1151 No. Madison Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 

755 Salem St., Maiden, Mass. 

701 Westinghouse Bldg., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

277 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 
917 W. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 
Peconic, L. I., N. Y. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Milford, N. H. 

1129 Grand Ave., Dayton, Ohio 
246 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
1022 Park St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

716 Sassafras St., Erie, Pa. 

Citizens Bank Bldg., Madisonville, Ky. 

1028 Medical Arts Bldg., Houston, Texas 

131 State St., Portland, Me. 

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 

411 30th St., Oakland, Calif. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 

184 North St., Pittsfield, Mass. 



''Deceased 



160 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Frazee, John W 1930 

Freeman, Don W 1938 

*Fregeau, Wheaton 1933 

Freiburg, Joseph A 1927 

Friedman, Eli 1918 

Fuldner, Russell V 1940 

*Gage, Homer 1885 

Gallo, James E 1925 

Gallup, Henry E 1928 

Gamble, James L 1912 

Ganz, Robert N 1927 

Gates, R. E 1908 

(Not in practice) 

Gear, Patrick ....1919 

George, A. W 1904 

Giddings, Paul D 1937 

Gill, MacLean 1935 

Gillespie, Elmer H 1930 

Gillespie, Norman 1917 

Glover, Donald M 1921 

Goeringer, C. Fred 1937 

Goldloom, Alton 1917 

Goldman, Ahbrum 1918 

Goldthwaite, Joel E 1888 

Goodale, Robert L 1924 

Goodwin, Edward S 1928 

Gordon, John K 1921 

Graham, W. T 1910 

Green, Hyman 1916 

Green, William T 1931 

Greene, D. Crosby, Jr 1898 

Griffin, Charles H 1923 

Griffith, Jesse B 1919 

Gross, Harold G 1890 

Gross, Herman W 1896 

Gross, Robert 1932 

Grover, Joseph 1 1913 

Grub, Wilson 1940 

Grulee, Clifford, Jr 1940 

Guest, George M 1926 

Guy, Percy F 1926 

Haig, Ray T 1924 

Haight, Harry W 1911 

*Hall, Herbert J 1894 



311 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
931 West Bond St., Denison, Texas 

707 Race St., Cincinnati, Ohio 

416 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Conn. 



Alvero Bldg., Herkimer, N. Y. 
1101 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
19 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 
144 Walnut St., East Dedham, Mass. 

188 Chestnut St., Holyoke, Mass. 
45 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 
Augusta, Maine 

14 North State St., Concord, N. H. 
101 Bay State Rd., Boston, Mass. 
632 Columbia Rd., Dorchester, Mass. 
10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 
Camp Edwards, Bourne, Mass. 
1543 Crescent St., Montreal, Que. 
121 E. 60th St., New York, N. Y. 
372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
258 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
304 State St., Albany, N. Y. 
1538 Sherbrooke St., W. Montreal, Que. 
116 E. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 
483 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
85 Dudley Rd., Newton Center, Mass. 
404 County St., New Bedford, Mass. 
Willinsburg, Pa. 
Eureka, Cal. 

300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
281 Ashmont St., Dorchester, Mass. 
3706 No. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 
300 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Cincinnati Children's Hosp., Cincinnati, O. 
618 2nd Ave., Seattle, Wash. 

1026 Medico Dental Bldg., Sacramento, Cal. 
Highland Park, N. J. 



*Deceased 



161 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 



Hall, Robert G 1910 

Hand, Delbert W 1935 

Hanflig, Samuel 1931 

Hansell, W. Whitfield 1917 

Harbin, Maxwell 1923 

Harkey, J. Mace 1940 

Harper, Edwin A 1934 

Harris, Albert H 1931 

Harris, Herbert E 1936 

Harris, Jerome S 1936 

Harral, Pinckney 1935 

Hartman, Frederick B.. . .1935 

Harvey, Campbell 1921 

Hass, George 1931 

Hassman, David M 1915 

*Haven, George 1882 

Helmick, Arthur G 1913 

Henry, Myron 1922 

Herrick, Theodore P 1920 

Hertig, A. T 1932 

Heyl, Henry L 1935 

Hibben, F. H 1914 

*Higgins, Frank A 1891 

Hight, Donald ,.1935 

Hightower, Robert A 1936 

Hill, Allen M 1939 

Hill, A. Morgan 1928 

Hill, Lewis W 1915 

Hitchcock, Harold H 1922 

Ho, Wayne Y. H 1941 

Hockwalt, Wm. Richard .. 1929 

Hodgen, John T 1915 

Hodges, Richard G 1938 

*Hogarth, Walter P 1921 

Hoover, Harold R 1940 

Hopkins, Frank Read 1930 

Horner, Albert A 1913 

Hosley, Walter A . 1906 

*Howard, A. A 1910 

Howard, Philip 1927 

Howard, Rutledge W 1939 

Howe, Walter C 1897 

Howell, William W 1899 

Hubbard, Elliot, Jr 1918 

Hubbard, John P 1931 

Huddleston, John 1899 



812 S. W. Washington St., Portland, Ore. 
450 Sutter St., San Francisco, Calif. 
371 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, Mass. 
901 So. Surety Bldg., Des Moines, la. 
10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 
610 Market Ave., North Canton, Ohio 
2205 Link Rd., Lynchburg, Va. 
Loudonville, N. Y. 
219 Waterman St., Providence, R. I. 
270 West End Ave., New York, N. Y. 
5920 Julian Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
241 No. Main St., Liberty, N. Y. 
Orchard Lake, Mich. 

Cornell Medical School, New York, N. Y. 
1738 Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 

78 South Fifth St., Columbus, Ohio 
401 Medical Arts Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 
10515 Carnegie Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 
Boston Lying-in Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
New Canaan, Conn. 



Univ. of Virginia, Charlotteville, Va. 
2651 16th St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass. 
1810 Wealthy St., S.E., Grand Rapids; Mich. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
1624 Franklin St., Oakland, Calif. 
Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 111. 
560 Fidelity Bldg., Dayton, Ohio 
1810 Wealthy St., S.E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Babies Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

Peter Bent Brigham Hosp., Boston, Mass. 
1112 Church St., Lynchburg, Va. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 
46 Waban Ave., Waban, Mass. 

Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 
Putchogue, Long Island, N. Y. 

330 Dartmouth St., Boston, Mass. 
29 Highland St., Cambridge, Mass. 
319 Longwood Ave., Boston, Mass. 



*Deceased 



162 



FORMER HOUSE OFFICERS AND RESIDENTS 



Hudson, Henry W., Jr.. . .1927 

Hugenberger, Paul W 1934 

Hughes, Grey C 1936 

Hughes, Harry C 1937 

Humphreys, Storer P 1936 

Hunt, Fred C 1925 

Hunt, George P 1919 

*Hunting, Nathaniel S 1886 

Huntington, Frederick. . . . 1926 

Hurd, Arthur H 1936 

Huston, Lewis L 1937 

Hyatt, Gilbert T 1933 

Ilfeld, Frederic W 1936 

Jackson, George H 1918 

Jacobus, Lawrence 1928 

Jeans, Philip 1910 

Jenks, Harrison D 1893 

Jennings, Robert E 1934 

Jennings, Percy H., Jr. . . . 1937 

Johann, A. E 1910 

Johnson, Erick St. John... 1904 

Johnson, Harold N 1937 

Johnston, Joseph A 1926 

Jones, FrankS 1932 

Jones, Harold W 1901 

Jones, J. Lawrence 1921 

Joplin, Robert J 1934 

Judy, J. A 1926 

Jump, Ellis B., D.M.D....1938 

Karp, Meier G 1935 

Keane, Clarence 1905 

Keever, Henry F 1909 

Kendrick, James 1 1932 

Kennard, John H 1938 

Key, John A 1920 

Key, William A 1928 

King, Donald 1917 

King, Edward 1917 

King, James M 1926 

*Knowles, W. F 1882 

Koplik, Louis 1931 

Krakower, Cecil A 1936 

Kuhns, John G 1927 

Kyle, Bernard 1921 



1101 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

Shackleford Hospital, Martinsville, Va. 

Axton, Va. 

3801 University St., Montreal, Canada 

784 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

34 Fenn St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

333 Quincy Ave., Scranton, Pa. 
1432 No. Hayworth Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 
117 12th St., N.E., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 
151 Rock St., Fall River, Mass. 

1930 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 

840 Forest Ave., Evanston, 111. 
2940 Summit St., Oakland, Calif. 
Children's Hospital, Iowa City, Iowa 

143 Park St., E. Orange, N. J. 

Cold Spring Harbor, L. I., N. Y. 

685 Harwood Dr., Des Moines, Iowa 

18 Fallen St., Cambridge, Mass. 

106 2nd St., Cloverdale, Montgomery, Ala. 

1937 Boston Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

179 Allyn St., Hartford, Conn. 

7610 17th St., Washington, D. C. 

401 Argyle Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

372 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 

414 Harris Bldg., Dayton, Ohio 

University of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

234 Marlborough St., Boston, Mass. 
Silverton, Ore. 

69 Maple Rd., Auburndale, Mass. 
2020 East 93rd St., Cleveland, Ohio 
52A Eliot St., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Wash. Univ. Med. School, St. Louis, Mo. 
23 2nd Ave., San Mateo, Calif. 
1101 Beacon St.,